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6. Sarin H: Recent progress towards development of effective systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of malignant brain tumors. J Transl Med; 2009;7:77
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Recent progress towards development of effective systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of malignant brain tumors.
  • Systemic chemotherapy has been relatively ineffective in the treatment of malignant brain tumors even though systemic chemotherapy drugs are small molecules that can readily extravasate across the porous blood-brain tumor barrier of malignant brain tumor microvasculature.
  • Small molecule systemic chemotherapy drugs maintain peak blood concentrations for only minutes, and therefore, do not accumulate to therapeutic concentrations within individual brain tumor cells.
  • The physiologic upper limit of pore size in the blood-brain tumor barrier of malignant brain tumor microvasculature is approximately 12 nanometers.
  • Spherical nanoparticles ranging between 7 nm and 10 nm in diameter maintain peak blood concentrations for several hours and are sufficiently smaller than the 12 nm physiologic upper limit of pore size in the blood-brain tumor barrier to accumulate to therapeutic concentrations within individual brain tumor cells.
  • Therefore, nanoparticles bearing chemotherapy that are within the 7 to 10 nm size range can be used to deliver therapeutic concentrations of small molecule chemotherapy drugs across the blood-brain tumor barrier into individual brain tumor cells.
  • The initial therapeutic efficacy of the Gd-G5-doxorubicin dendrimer, an imageable nanoparticle bearing chemotherapy within the 7 to 10 nm size range, has been demonstrated in the orthotopic RG-2 rodent malignant glioma model.
  • Herein I discuss this novel strategy to improve the effectiveness of systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of malignant brain tumors and the therapeutic implications thereof.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms. Drug Therapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood-Brain Barrier / physiology. Dendrimers / chemistry. Drug Carriers / chemistry. Drug Carriers / metabolism. Drug Delivery Systems. Gadolinium / chemistry. Humans. Microvessels. Molecular Structure. Nanoparticles / therapeutic use. Particle Size

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  • (PMID = 19723323.001).
  • [ISSN] 1479-5876
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of translational medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Transl Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Dendrimers; 0 / Drug Carriers; AU0V1LM3JT / Gadolinium
  • [Number-of-references] 137
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2743638
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7. van Swieten EC, Wijnen JA: [Menorrhagia due to cystic degeneration of a uterine leiomyoma]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd; 2008 Mar 22;152(12):697-700
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  • [Title] [Menorrhagia due to cystic degeneration of a uterine leiomyoma].
  • [Transliterated title] Menorragisch bloedverlies door een cysteus gedegenereerd leiomyoom van de uterus.
  • On ultrasound examination a smooth-walled intra-uterine enlargement with multiple clear areas was found.
  • As these cystic changes were reported to be 'most likely blood vessels' the enlargement was expected to be a uterine leiomyoma, and drug therapy was started.
  • Due to unsatisfactory results of this therapy and continuing growth of the mass, it was finally decided to perform a total abdominal hysterectomy.
  • The pathology revealed cystic degeneration of uterine leiomyoma.
  • Degeneration of uterine leiomyoma is common and can easily be confused with other abnormalities of the uterus or even other abdominal organs.
  • Diagnosis can best be made by (transvaginal) ultrasonography, if necessary complemented by CT or MRI.
  • [MeSH-major] Leiomyoma / complications. Uterine Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy / methods. Menorrhagia / etiology. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2008 Mar 22;152(12):663-5 [18438059.001]
  • (PMID = 18438066.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-2162
  • [Journal-full-title] Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd
  • [Language] dut
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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8. Afssaps: [Recommendations of good practice: drug therapy for fibroma of uterus (October 2004)]. Gynecol Obstet Fertil; 2005 Jul-Aug;33(7-8):547-52
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  • [Title] [Recommendations of good practice: drug therapy for fibroma of uterus (October 2004)].
  • [Transliterated title] Recommandations de bonne pratique: les traitements médicamenteux du fibrome utérin (octobre 2004).
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16106573.001).
  • [ISSN] 1297-9589
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynécologie, obstétrique & fertilité
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol Obstet Fertil
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Practice Guideline
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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9. Zhou YF, Yang DZ, Hu LN, Zheng SR: [Clinical trial on the effectiveness and safety of triptorelin in treatment of uterine leiomyoma]. Zhonghua Fu Chan Ke Za Zhi; 2005 Jul;40(7):460-3
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  • [Title] [Clinical trial on the effectiveness and safety of triptorelin in treatment of uterine leiomyoma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of triptorelin in the treatment of uterine leiomyoma.
  • A total of 125 qualified patients with uterine leiomyoma were randomly divided into either triptorelin group (63 cases) treated with 3.75 mg triptorelin injected intramuscularly or leuprorelin group (62 cases) treated with 3.75 mg leuprorelin injected subcutaneously.
  • Both drugs were injected every 28 days for a total of 3 months.
  • The uterine volumes were similar before treatment between the triptorelin group and the leuprorelin group and were decreased significantly after drug therapy (P < 0.01) in both groups, with a median decrease rate of 51% and 49%, respectively, without significant difference between two groups (P > 0.05).
  • The volumes of the largest leiomyoma decreased significantly after drug therapy (P < 0.01) in both groups, with a median decrease rate of 50% and 48% in the triptorelin and leuprorelin groups, respectively, without significant difference between them (P > 0.05).
  • Patients with serum level of 17beta-estradiol < 183 pmol/L accounted for 94% in both groups.
  • The hemoglobin and serum ferrum levels were both significantly increased in the two groups after treatment (P < 0.05).
  • The amenorrhea rates after 3 months of treatment were 97% in the triptorelin group and 95% in the leuprorelin group (P > 0.05).
  • Dysmenorrhea, noncyclic pelvic pain and pressure-like symptoms were relieved quickly and remarkably in both groups after treatment.
  • Nine patients in the triptorelin group and 6 in the leuprorelin group received add-back therapy with tibolone 1.25-2.50 mg/d because of remarkable climacteric-like symptoms.
  • CONCLUSION: Treatment of uterine leiomyoma with triptorelin for 3 months is both effective and safe in Chinese women.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Triptorelin Pamoate / therapeutic use. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Leuprolide / therapeutic use. Prospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16080872.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-567X
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua fu chan ke za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Fu Chan Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 57773-63-4 / Triptorelin Pamoate; EFY6W0M8TG / Leuprolide
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10. Csatlós E, Rigó J Jr, Szabó I, Nagy Z, Joó JG: [Uterine leiomyoma]. Orv Hetil; 2010 Oct 17;151(42):1734-41
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  • [Title] [Uterine leiomyoma].
  • Uterine fibroids, benign tumors of the human uterus, are the most common indication for hysterectomy.
  • Though surgery has been the mainstay of fibroid treatment, various minimally invasive procedures have been developed in addition to hysterectomy and abdominal myomectomy.
  • Formation of new leiomyomas after these conservative therapies remains a substantial problem.
  • Also drug-therapy methods are available, but the possible side-effects limit their long-term use.
  • Authors attempt to give an overview of this common gynecological disease, yielding a new insight into the basic biology and genetics of fibroids, with the hope of new and effective methods of therapy in the future.
  • [MeSH-major] Leiomyoma. Uterine Neoplasms
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Diagnosis, Differential. Estrenes / therapeutic use. Female. Hormone Antagonists / therapeutic use. Humans. Hysterectomy. Incidence. Laparoscopy. Mifepristone / therapeutic use. Oximes / therapeutic use. Ultrasonic Therapy. Uterine Artery

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  • (PMID = 20889441.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6002
  • [Journal-full-title] Orvosi hetilap
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orv Hetil
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Estrenes; 0 / Hormone Antagonists; 0 / Oximes; 320T6RNW1F / Mifepristone; 72W09924WP / asoprisnil
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11. Istre O, Qvigstad E: Current treatment options for abnormal uterine bleeding: an evidence-based approach. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol; 2007 Dec;21(6):905-13
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  • [Title] Current treatment options for abnormal uterine bleeding: an evidence-based approach.
  • Heavy menstrual bleeding is the predominant complaint in women with abnormal uterine bleeding.
  • Treatment options are drug therapy, and first- and second-generation endometrial resection.
  • Uterine fibroids are the most common solid pelvic tumours in women, and although many fibroids seem to cause no symptoms, they can have serious adverse effects and impact on quality of life.
  • As women postpone having children, gynaecologists will have to manage fibroids and polyps in a conservative manner.
  • The past decade has witnessed the development of highly sophisticated diagnostic and therapeutic technology for women suffering from menorrhagia, fibroids and polyps, including minimally invasive uterine therapy.
  • This chapter reviews the evidence-based approach and minimally invasive therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Menorrhagia / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Embolization, Therapeutic / methods. Endometrium / surgery. Evidence-Based Medicine. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy. Hysteroscopy. Leiomyoma / complications. Leiomyoma / therapy. Uterus / blood supply

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  • (PMID = 17499553.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-6934
  • [Journal-full-title] Best practice & research. Clinical obstetrics & gynaecology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 54
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12. Liaw YF: Hepatitis flares and hepatitis B e antigen seroconversion: implication in anti-hepatitis B virus therapy. J Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2003 Mar;18(3):246-52
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  • [Title] Hepatitis flares and hepatitis B e antigen seroconversion: implication in anti-hepatitis B virus therapy.
  • Hepatitis flares or acute exacerbations, defined as an abrupt elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) over fivefold the upper limit of normal (ULN), of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are the results of HLA-I restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated immune response against HBV and its downstream mechanisms.
  • Higher ALT levels reflect a more vigorous immune response and a more extensive hepatolysis that, in the extreme situation, may lead to decompensation and failure.
  • In contrast, higher ALT also reflects a more robust immune clearance of HBV and, therefore, a higher chance of HBV-DNA loss and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion, both in the setting of natural course and drug therapy.
  • Alanine aminotransferase of fivefold the ULN appears to be a significant cut-off level to categorize the patients in terms of endogenous immune response against HBV.
  • Patients with ALT levels less than fivefold the ULN or those with a less vigorous immune response require immunomodulation to induce robust immune response to enhance HBV clearance.
  • In contrast, those with a more vigorous immune response or those with ALT flare over fivefold the ULN should be monitored closely for spontaneous HBV clearance/HBeAg seroconversion or to start direct antiviral therapy in time to prevent the occurrence or deterioration of hepatic decompensation.
  • In conclusion, a better understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms and natural course of hepatitis flares, wiser selection of patients and the timing of drug therapy are crucial to achieve better treatment results.
  • [MeSH-minor] Alanine Transaminase / blood. Antiviral Agents / immunology. Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Hepatitis B Antibodies / immunology. Hepatitis B Antibodies / therapeutic use. Hepatitis B Surface Antigens / blood. Hepatitis B Surface Antigens / immunology. Humans

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  • [CommentIn] J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2003 Mar;18(3):235-6 [12603520.001]
  • (PMID = 12603523.001).
  • [ISSN] 0815-9319
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Hepatitis B Antibodies; 0 / Hepatitis B Surface Antigens; 0 / Hepatitis B e Antigens; EC 2.6.1.2 / Alanine Transaminase
  • [Number-of-references] 53
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13. Piratello AC, Mattioli R: Thioperamide delays vestibular compensation in goldfish. Neurosci Lett; 2007 Mar 26;415(2):146-8
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Unilateral lesion of the vestibular system induces posturo-locomotor deficits that are compensated for with time.
  • Drug therapy is currently used to improve the recovery process and to facilitate vestibular compensation.
  • We investigated the effects of thioperamide on functional recovery after unilateral labyrinthectomy in Carassius auratus.
  • The injections were repeated daily for a total of 15 consecutive days.
  • The substances were administered in a volume of 1.5 ml/kg body weight.
  • Another group, which served as a non-lesion control, did not receive unilateral labyrinthectomy or system injections.
  • Animals treated with saline presented a compensatory decrease in body tilt on the 7th day, while the animals treated with thioperamide presented a decrease in body tilt from the 13th day, suggesting a delay in the functional recovery process.
  • These results suggest that an increase in cerebral histamine levels impairs vestibular compensation in goldfish.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Physiological / drug effects. Histamine Antagonists / pharmacology. Nystagmus, Pathologic / physiopathology. Piperidines / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Analysis of Variance. Animals. Behavior, Animal / drug effects. Functional Laterality. Goldfish. Labyrinth Diseases / drug therapy. Labyrinth Diseases / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 17234345.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-3940
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroscience letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosci. Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Histamine Antagonists; 0 / Piperidines; 106243-16-7 / thioperamide
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1
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4. Segota E, Misbah S, Crowe J, Tubbs R, Casey G, Elson P, Wacker B, Budd GT: Absolute neutrophil count (ANC) pattern with accelerated dose-intensified epirubicin chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim support. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8229

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Absolute neutrophil count (ANC) pattern with accelerated dose-intensified epirubicin chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim support.
  • : 8229 Background: Several randomized studies evaluating pegfilgrastim and filgrastim have shown no difference in ANC patterns in cycle 2 compared to cycle 1 of chemotherapy.
  • Single agent epirubicin is given at 120 mg/m<sup>2</sup> every 14 days for four cycles with pegfilgrastim support (6 mg subcutaneously once per cycle 24 hours following each treatment).
  • Definitive surgery is performed 3-4 weeks after completion of chemotherapy.
  • Postoperative therapy is given at the discretion of the investigator.
  • All 6 have completed chemotherapy, and have undergone surgery.
  • Grade 4 neutropenia (ANC<0.5 k/uL) was noted in all 6 patients following cycle 1 of chemotherapy.
  • During cycles 2-4, no grade 4, and only 1 case of grade 3 neutropenia (ANC<0.5 k/uL) was observed in a total of 18 cycles of therapy given (Table).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Accelerated, dose intensified epirubicin with pegfilgrastim is safe and appears efficacious as neoadjuvant therapy.
  • The finding of grade 4 neutropenia in all patients after the first dose of epirubicin, but decreased myelosuppression with subsequent chemotherapy cycles suggests a "priming" effect of pegfilgrastim and warrants further study.

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  • (PMID = 28016847.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Dwary AD, Sharma A, Mohanti BK, Pal S, Garg P, Raina V, Shukla NK, Deo SV, Thulkar S, Sreenivas V: A randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing best supportive care (BSC), 5-FU plus folinic acid (FUFA) and, gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (Gem-Ox) in management of unresectable gallbladder cancer (GBC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4521

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Surgery is the only curative treatment.
  • Chemotherapy regimens for GBC are not yet standardized.
  • Planned sample size was 81 to have type I & type II error probabilities of 0.05 & 0.2 respectively.
  • Secondary end points were to compare PFS in three arms and toxicity analysis of chemotherapy arms.
  • Inclusion criteria were: proven unresectable GBC, performance state ≤2, adequate bone marrow reserve and normal biochemical profile (bilirubin≤3 mg % & liver enzymes within 5 times of upper limit).
  • Patients in BSC group received symptomatic treatment without anticancer therapy.
  • In FUFA group, weekly bolus doses of 5-FU (425mg/m2) plus Folinic acid (20 mg/m2) were given for a maximum of 30 weeks.
  • Chemotherapy arms were generally well tolerated.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Probably this is the first RCT confirming efficacy of chemotherapy (Gem-Ox) compared to BSC in improving OS and PFS in unresectable GBC.
  • Both chemotherapy arms were well tolerated.

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  • (PMID = 27962726.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Al-Tourah AJ, Connors JM, Gascoyne RD, Hoskins PJ, O'Reilly SE, Shenkier TN, Voss NJ, Klasa RJ: Long-term follow up of limited stage primary testicular lymphoma: Outcome and patterns of relapse after combined-modality treatment. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6588

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term follow up of limited stage primary testicular lymphoma: Outcome and patterns of relapse after combined-modality treatment.
  • : 6588 Background: To assess the outcome and patterns of relapse in patients (pts) with limited stage primary testicular lymphoma treated with chemotherapy and irradiation.
  • Patients who were consecutively treated from 1980-1995 were selected to reflect a change in treatment policy to combined-modality therapy, consisting of brief CHOP type chemotherapy for 3 cycles followed by total scrotal irradiation.
  • Prophylactic intrathecal chemotherapy was not given.
  • All pts had diffuse large B cell lymphoma; 15(38%) pts had Ann Arbor stage IAE and 24(62%) pts had stage IIAE.
  • 6 patients had elevated LDH at presentation, but none above 1.2 x upper limit of normal.
  • 5 pts were not treated, 4 were elderly and frail and 1 pt refused recommended treatment.
  • 34 pts received combined-modality therapy.
  • There were 13(38%) relapses, 10 occurring more than 2 yrs past diagnosis(range 2-10yrs).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with limited stage primary testicular lymphoma who undergo combined-modality treatment are at risk for late relapses at extranodal sites, with particular predilection for skin and brain parenchyma but not leptomeninges.

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  • (PMID = 28016176.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Kilickap S, Barista I, Akgul E, Aytemir K, Aksoyek S, Celik I, Kes SS, Tekuzman G: Increased Troponin-T level is associated with anthracycline-induced diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9722

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Increased Troponin-T level is associated with anthracycline-induced diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle.
  • : 9722 Background: The serum troponin-T (cTnT) level increases with myocardial damage.
  • We sought to assess whether cTnT level could be a useful marker for the early detection of anthracycline cardiotoxicity.
  • METHODS: 41 Patients who had been planned to receive anthracycline containing combination chemotherapy were included into the study.
  • Serum cTnT levels were measured before (baseline) and after first cycle of chemotherapy, and repeated after the last cycle of chemotherapy.
  • In all patients, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), fractional shortening (FS), early peak flow/atrial flow (E/A) velocity ratio, and the isovolemic relaxation time (IRT) were measured echocardiographically, both before and after the study.
  • In 21 patients (49%), the E/A ratio decreased after therapy.
  • The post-therapy IRT was prolonged (94.0±2.0 vs 85.6±10.5 msec).
  • cTnT levels after completion of therapy were elevated in 14 (34%) patients, but it exceeded the upper limit of normal range (>0.01 ng/mL) only in a single case. cTnT levels after completion of therapy were significantly higher, compared to those baseline and after the first cycles of therapy (p<0.05).
  • In the younger age group (≤44 years), there was a 2-fold decrease in the E/A ratio in patients whose cTnT levels increased during the therapy, compared to those whose cTnT levels did not change (21% vs 43%, p<0.05) (Table 1).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Increased serum cTnT levels can be detected in the early stages of anthracycline therapy and it is associated with diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle.
  • Therefore, serum cTnT level could be a useful marker for the early detection of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy.

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  • (PMID = 28014381.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Koontz SE, Mohassel LR, Jaffe N, Pearson M, Herzog C, Ramirez I, Raney RB: Safety and efficacy of pegfilgrastim in pediatric oncology patients: The M.D. Anderson Cancer Center experience. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8272

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Safety and efficacy of pegfilgrastim in pediatric oncology patients: The M.D. Anderson Cancer Center experience.
  • Pegfilgrastim, a pegylated form of G-CSF, has a long half-life and thus only has to be injected once per chemotherapy cycle.
  • All patients had life expectancy > 6 weeks and baseline lab values acceptable to receive chemotherapy.
  • A total of 101 doses (median/patient 5, range 2-9) of pegfilgrastim were administered (98% 24-72 hours post-chemotherapy).
  • We evaluated the efficacy [measured by total white blood cell (WBC) recovery] and safety [measured by adverse drug reactions (ADRs)] of pegfilgrastim in these patients.
  • For the doses involving neutropenia, the average time to achieving an ANC ≥ 1 x 10<sup>9</sup>/L was 10 days.
  • For the 95 evaluable doses, the average time to peak WBC count was 12.5 days, and 25 admissions for febrile neutropenia (grade 3 or 4) occurred prior to WBC recovery.
  • Identifiable ADRs included: 4 episodes of bone/muscular pain, 1 episode of chills, and 28 episodes of leukocytosis (8 cases of WBC > 2 times upper limit of normal for age).

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  • (PMID = 28016681.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Rodriguez Franco C, Aguiar Bujanda D, Saura Grau S, Bohn Sarmiento U, Aguiar Morales J: Male breast cancer retrospective institution review of a 17-year period. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11638

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Male breast cancer retrospective institution review of a 17-year period.
  • RESULTS: There were 22 male patients diagnosed in our institution with a median age of 62.4 years (range 34 to 83 years) during the period.
  • Ductal carcinoma was the predominant histologic subtype with 17 patients (77%).
  • Other types were pleomorfic, mucoid and papilar carcinoma (one each type) and 3 patients with intrapapilar carcinoma with microinfiltration.
  • Surgery was the initial treatment in 18 patients (81%), just 2 of them performing tumorectomy and the other 16 radical mastectomy.
  • 3 patients receive neoadyuvant chemotherapy with 1 complete response and one partial response.
  • 13 patients (59%) received adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) and 17 (77%) adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT) mostly of them with tamoxifen (14/17) and the others 3 patients with aromatase inhibitors.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy was used in 9 (41%) patients with an antracycline regimen.
  • With a median follow-up of 78 months (range 7-125), overall survival was 77 % with 3 patients died with progression disease and two patients died because of intercurrent illness without evidence of cancer progression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: MBC in our area are in the upper limit of occidental countries incidence.
  • Most cases can be treated with radical intention with surgery (mostly radical) and adjuvant treatment with a good survival percentage.

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  • (PMID = 27961210.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Tsai DE, Wang W, Reshef R, Vogl D, Stadtmauer E, Andreadis C, Carlson A, Luger S: Effect of bexarotene on platelet counts in patients undergoing cancer treatment: An analysis of clinical trials in lung cancer and leukemia. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20533

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of bexarotene on platelet counts in patients undergoing cancer treatment: An analysis of clinical trials in lung cancer and leukemia.
  • METHODS: We analyzed platelet count data from 3 Bex clinical trials encompassing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and AML.
  • More patients on Bex than on placebo had an increase in platelet count of at least 50 K/uL (55% vs. 27% for CarP, p<0.0001; 81% vs. 66% for CisV, p<0.0001) over pre-treatment baseline.
  • The median increase in platelet count was higher on Bex than on placebo (69 vs 0 K/uL for CarP, p<0.0001; 168 vs. 95 K/uL for CisV, p<0.0001) and was maintained while on treatment.
  • In both NSCLC trials, the median time to platelet increase >50 K/uL on Bex was 22 days.
  • Similar findings were seen in a phase I monotherapy trial in AML where 5/18 (28%) patients achieved platelet transfusion independence with peak platelet counts of 40-91 K/uL.
  • These data suggest that Bex improves platelet counts in patients with a variety of cancer types, both as monotherapy and with concurrent chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 27960979.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Inoue A, Ishida T, Saijo Y, Maemondo M, Suzuki T, Kimura Y, Ohkouchi S, Nukiwa T, Tohoku Lung Cancer Clinical Study Group: Phase I trial of bi-weekly docetaxel combined with carboplatin for patients with non-small cell lung cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):7241

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I trial of bi-weekly docetaxel combined with carboplatin for patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
  • : 7241 Background: Docetaxel (D) combined with carboplatin (C) is widely used regimen for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • METHODS: Histologically proven chemotherapy-naïve NSCLC patients were entered to this study.
  • Other entry criteria were (1) age equal or less than 75, (2) ECOG PS 0-1, (3) WBC ≥ 4000, Neut ≥ 2000, Plts ≥ 100000, Hb ≥ 9.0, GOT, GPT ≤ 1.5 upper limit, Ccr ≥ 40, PaO2 ≥ 60, (4) life expectancy more than 3 months, and (5) written informed consent.
  • Doses of agents were planned to increase from level 1 (C: AUC 5.0, D: 30 mg/m2) to level 2 (C: AUC 5.0, D: 35 mg/m2) and level 3 (C: AUC 6.0, D: 35 mg/m2).
  • The level where dose limiting toxicities (DLT) such as Grade 4 neutropenia lasting for 4 days, needs for platelet transfusion, Grade 3 or more non-hematological toxicities were observed in 3/3 or 3/6 or more patients was determined as MTD.
  • No patient experienced DLT in each level.
  • Non-hematological toxicities were also mild and no Grade 3/4 non-hematological toxicities were observed.

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  • (PMID = 28013859.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Patel H, Egorin MJ, Remick SC, Mulkerin D, Takimoto CH, Doroshow JH, Potter D, Ivy SP, Murgo AJ, Ramanathan RK: Comparison of Child-Pugh (CP) criteria and NCI organ dysfunction working group (NCI-ODWG) criteria for hepatic dysfunction (HD): Implications for chemotherapy dosing. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6051

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparison of Child-Pugh (CP) criteria and NCI organ dysfunction working group (NCI-ODWG) criteria for hepatic dysfunction (HD): Implications for chemotherapy dosing.
  • : 6051 Background: Patients with HD may require drug dose modification based on the severity of HD.
  • CP criteria, originally developed for patients with end-stage liver disease, has 5 components -total bilirubin (TB), albumin, prothrombin time, ascites & encephalopathy.
  • Patients were stratified into 4 groups as per the NCI-ODWG criteria based on TB & AST: normal [TB & AST ≤ upper limit of normal (ULN)], mild HD (TB > ULN to 1.5 x ULN or AST > ULN), moderate HD (TB >1.5-3 x ULN, any AST) & severe HD (TB >3 - 10 x ULN, any AST).
  • RESULTS: [Figure: see text] Conclusions: When assessed with a composite index of TB & AST (NCI-ODWG criteria), normal-to-mild HD correlated with CP group A (where dose modification of chemotherapeutic agents is usually not necessary).
  • The NCI-ODWG index, using TB & AST, provides a simple & objective way of assessing HD & can be applied in outpatient clinics & clinical trials for dose modification of chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 28015131.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Agnelli G, Verso M, Bertoglio S, Ageno W, Bazzan M, Parise P, Salvagni S, Naglieri E, Santoro A, Lazzaro A: A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized study on the efficacy and safety of enoxaparin for the prevention of upper limb deep vein thrombosis in cancer patients with central vein catheter. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8021

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized study on the efficacy and safety of enoxaparin for the prevention of upper limb deep vein thrombosis in cancer patients with central vein catheter.
  • : 8021 Background: Efficacy of prophylaxis with fixed dose of warfarin or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for upper limb deep vein thrombosis (UL-DVT) related to central vein catheter (CVC) has been claimed after open studies with limited sample size.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the LMWH enoxaparin in the prevention of UL-DVT in cancer patients with CVC.
  • METHODS: Consecutive cancer patients with CVC for chemotherapy were included in a multicenter double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study performed in 11 Italian centers.
  • The primary endpoint of the study was UL-DVT, as detected by venography (CVC limb) performed at 6 weeks and/or clinically overt pulmonary embolism confirmed by objective testing.
  • Enoxaparin reduced the incidence of UL-DVT from 18.1 % (28/155) to 14.2 % (22/155), a relative risk reduction of 21.4 % (95% CI: 0.47 to 1.31, p=0.35).
  • No major bleeding occurred in both treatment groups.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Enoxaparin, at the dose of 40 mg daily, produced a 21% non significant reduction in the incidence of CVC-related DVT in cancer patients.

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  • (PMID = 28015834.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Ruan J, Martin P, Coleman M, Furman R, Glynn P, Joyce M, Cheung K, Shore T, Schuster M, Leonard J: Durable responses with the antiangiogenic metronomic regimen RT-PEPC in elderly patients with recurrent mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8525

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 8525 Background: Targeting tumor microenvironment and angiogenesis is a novel therapeutic strategy in lymphoma.
  • Two putative anti-angiogenic regimens, RT (rituximab with thalidomide) and PEPC oral metronomic chemotherapy (prednisone, etoposide, procarbazine and cyclophosphamide) are clinically active.
  • A maintenance phase (mo 4 until progression) continues with daily thalidomide (100 mg), PEPC dosing titrated to ANC > 1K/ul, and rituximab q 4 months.
  • Translational studies assessed the angiogenic phenotypes of tumor cells, and dynamic levels of circulating endothelial and hematopoietic progenitors in response to treatment.
  • The median number of prior therapies was two (range 1 to 7), and 15 pts (60%) progressed on bortezomib.
  • At a median followup of 30 months, overall response rate was 73% (32% CR/CRu, 41% PR, N=22).
  • QoL was maintained or improved on treatment.
  • Correlative studies demonstrated pre-therapy autocrine angiogenic loop in tumor cells evidenced by expression of VEGFA and VEGFR1.
  • Circulating levels of hematopoietic and endothelial progenitor cells decreased on rx in responders.
  • Novel low-intensity anti-angiogenic approaches warrant further evaluation in MCL and other NHL subtypes, potentially as initial therapy in elderly patients.

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  • (PMID = 27960902.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Drullinsky P, Fornier MN, Sugarman S, D'Andrea G, Troso-Sandoval T, Seidman AD, Yuan J, Patil S, Norton L, Hudis C: Dose-dense (DD) cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) at 14-day intervals: A pilot study of every 14- and 10-11-day dosing intervals for women with early-stage breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):590

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 590 Background: CMF (C 600 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, M 40 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, F 600 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) is an option for adjuvant therapy for patients with low risk early stage breast cancer.
  • DD regimens as predicted by mathematical models of cancer growth and treatment response are superior.
  • METHODS: An initial cohort (A) was treated q 14 d with PEG-filgrastim (Neulasta) support.
  • A second cohort (B) was treated every 10-11 d with filgrastim/Neupogen x 5 d and then, based on feasibility, modified (cohort C) to use 7 d filgrastim.
  • The primary end point was feasibility defined as having ANC > 1.5 x 10<sup>3</sup>/uL on day 1 of planned treatment for all 8 cycles with no grade 3 or higher non-hematologic toxicity.
  • All three cohorts were tested using a Simon's two-stage optimal design with type I and type II errors set at 10%.
  • 6 out of 7 pts could not complete 8 cycles of chemotherapy secondary to neutropenia and 1 secondary to grade 3 ALT elevation.

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  • (PMID = 27960702.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Richman CM, Denardo SJ, O'Donnell RT, Yuan A, Natarajan A, Wun T, Tuscano JM, Chew HL, Lara PN, Denardo GL: Combined modality radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in metastatic prostate (PC) and breast cancer (BC) using paclitaxel (PT) and a MUC-1 monoclonal antibody, m170, linked to yttrium-90 (Y-90): A phase I trial. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):2554

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 2554 Background: While RIT alone is effective in lymphoma, its application to more radioresistant solid tumors will likely require a combined approach similar to the use of radiosensitizing chemotherapy with external beam radiotherapy.
  • Subsequent cohorts received RIT followed by PT (75 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) 48 hours after RIT, a time when most radioactivity is concentrated in tumor and has been eliminated from normal tissues.
  • RESULTS: Bone and soft tissue metastases were targeted by In-111-m170 in 15 of the 16 patients imaged, with no unexpected uptake in normal tissue.
  • With RIT plus PT, 2 of 3 PC patients had neutrophils (ANC)<500/uL.
  • One patient developed + HAMA (6%) in contrast to 71% of patients in a prior trial using m170 without CSA.
  • In combination with PT, toxicity was limited to marrow suppression at the dose levels above.
  • CSA was effective in preventing HAMA, suggesting the possibility of repeated "fractionated" therapy that could enhance antitumor response.

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  • (PMID = 28015259.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Burtness B, Sipples R, Mirto G, Thomas L, Rahman Z, Kloss RA, Murren J, Lacy J: Phase II trial of irinotecan/docetaxel combination for advanced pancreatic cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):4116

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Combination D/I is attractive because of preclinical evidence of synergy and because of non-overlapping toxicities.
  • We have previously demonstrated safety and tolerability of D 35 mg/m2 and I 50 mg/m2 given on days (d) 1, 8, 15, and 21 of a 35 d schedule.
  • METHODS: Pts were eligible who had unresectable or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, bidimensionally measurable disease, ECOG performance status 0-2, ANC > 1500/microl, AST < 5 x upper limit of normal (ULN), alkaline phosphatase < 2.5 x ULN, and normal bilirubin.
  • Tumor assessment was performed with CT, CT angiography or MR every 2 cycles.
  • The pt who attained CR is alive at 34 m and has been off chemotherapy for 11.5 months without evidence of recurrence on MR or PET.
  • CONCLUSIONS: D/I combination given on a weekly schedule is a promising treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer.

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  • (PMID = 28014521.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Hollmig K, Waheed S, Nair B, Haessler J, Petty N, Pineda-Roman M, Alsayed Y, van Rhee F, Crowley J, Barlogie B: MDS-associated cytogenetic abnormalities (MDS-CA) after total therapy (TT) regimens for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM): Apparent surge after introduction of post-transplant consolidation chemotherapy (CONS) in TT2 and TT3. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8595

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] MDS-associated cytogenetic abnormalities (MDS-CA) after total therapy (TT) regimens for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM): Apparent surge after introduction of post-transplant consolidation chemotherapy (CONS) in TT2 and TT3.
  • : 8595 Background: We have previously reported on the variables associated with the development of MDS-CA in the context of autologous transplant-supported high-dose therapy regimens for MM (Barlogie et al, Blood 2008).
  • Multivariate analysis of features associated with transient and persistent MDS-CA revealed TT3 as an adverse feature (HR=2.84, p=0.043), along with incomplete platelet recovery of <165,000/uL 3mo after 1<sup>st</sup> transplant.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Despite reduced induction chemotherapy prior to and CONS after tandem melphalan (200mg/m2)-based autotransplants from 4 in TT2 to 2 in TT3, overall and persistent MDS-CA increased significantly in TT3.

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  • (PMID = 27962291.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Ji SH, Lee SH, Kim JH, Kim K, Kim WS, Park JO, Jung CW, Kang WK, Lee MH, Park K: Dose-intensive CHOP chemotherapy followed by radiation for localized NK/T-cell lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6716

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Dose-intensive CHOP chemotherapy followed by radiation for localized NK/T-cell lymphoma.
  • : 6716 Background: NK/T-cell lymphoma is a specific type of T-cell lymphoma which is prevalent in Eastern Asia and known to have poor prognosis.
  • With the hope of better treatment outcome, we developed new induction regimen using dose-escalated doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide, and higher dose-intensity.
  • We planned to treat them with 2 cycles of dose-intensive CHOP (DI-CHOP), followed by radiation (total 40 Gy with 20 fractions) and 4 cycles of conventional CHOP.
  • The second cycle of DI-CHOP was started as soon as possible when ANC more than 1500/uL and platelet count more than 75,000/uL no less than 14 days since day 1 of the first cycle.
  • Seven patients (58%) completed all planned treatment.
  • One patient experienced septic shock leading to treatment-related mortality.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Dose-intensive induction CHOP preceding radiation was a feasible approach against localized NK/T-cell lymphoma, but short follow-up and small number of accrual limit us to conclude this approach is more effective than conventional CHOP induction.

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  • (PMID = 28014693.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Reni M, Cereda S, Aprile G, Tronconi MC, Milandri C, Passoni P, Rognone A, Balzano G, Di Carlo V, Villa E: A randomized phase II trial of adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin, epirubicin, 5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine (PEFG regimen) or gemcitabine alone after curative resection for pancreatic cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4608

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A randomized phase II trial of adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin, epirubicin, 5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine (PEFG regimen) or gemcitabine alone after curative resection for pancreatic cancer.
  • At time of trial design, both arms were experimental since the role of adjuvant therapy in PA was debated.
  • In both treatment arms chemotherapy was administered for 3 months and followed by radiotherapy (54-60 Gy in 27-30 fractions) with concurrent 5-FU 250 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/day.
  • The treatment arm had to be considered of interest with > 23 patients being DFS1y.
  • One patient in arm A and 2 in arm B refused the assigned treatment.
  • Patients' characteristics were (A/B): median age 61/60, median PS 90/90, stage IIA 19/12%; stage IIB 73/81%; stage III 8/7%; grade 3 30/46; R1 36/30; pre- and post-surgery surgery CA19.9 > upper limit of laboratory normal 68/80% and 29/33%, tumor size > 2.9 cm 41/43%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: With a mature follow-up for 80% of patients, PEFG reached the primary endpoint of the trial and warrants further study while G not yet.

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  • (PMID = 27964177.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Heng DY, Xie W, Regan MM, Cheng T, North S, Knox JJ, Kollmannsberger C, McDermott D, Rini BI, Choueiri TK: Prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted agents: Results from a large multicenter study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5041

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted agents: Results from a large multicenter study.
  • : 5041 Background: Prognostic factors (PF) for OS have yet to be fully defined for patients with metastatic RCC in the era of VEGF-targeted therapy.
  • The median (m) OS was 22 months (95% CI: 20.0-24.8) with a median follow-up of 25 months.
  • Four of the five PFs previously identified by MSKCC were independent predictors of short survival, including hemoglobin below the lower limit of normal (LLN) (p < 0.0001), corrected calcium above the upper limit of normal (ULN) (p = 0.0006), Karnofsky performance status <80% (p < 0.0001) and time from initial diagnosis to initiation of therapy ULN (pULN (p = 0.012) were independent adverse PFs.
  • This model produced a c-index of 0.74 and the bootstrap procedure confirmed good internal validity.
  • The discriminatory ability of the model and its parameter estimates were not affected after adjusting for prior use of immunotherapy or the type of anti-VEGF drug used.
  • This model derived from a large population can be incorporated into patient care and clinical trials of VEGF-targeted agents.

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  • (PMID = 27962941.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Kingsley E, Richards D, Garbo L, Gersh R, Robbins G, Leopold L, Brill J, Di Bella N: An open-label, multicenter, phase II study of AT-101 in combination with rituximab (R) in patients with untreated, grade 1-2, follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (FL). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8582

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An open-label, multicenter, phase II study of AT-101 in combination with rituximab (R) in patients with untreated, grade 1-2, follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (FL).
  • : 8582 Background: Bcl-2 family proteins are overexpressed in the majority of patients with FL and contribute to resistance to therapy.
  • It is active as a single agent and in combination with R in NHL tumor models.
  • METHODS: Patients with untreated FL who did not require immediate chemotherapy were eligible.
  • Treatment consisted of an induction cycle of AT-101 (30mg po daily × 21) and R (375 mg/m<sup>2</sup> weekly × 4) followed by up to 4 maintenance cycles of AT-101 (30mg po daily × 21) and R (375 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) every 8 weeks in nonprogressors.
  • The best ORR is at the upper limit of reported ORR for R alone; therefore a randomized trial is required to definitively determine activity of the combination.

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  • (PMID = 27962265.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Stickney DR, Dowding C, Reading C, Frincke J: HE2100 and HE3204 protect Rhesus Macaques from chemotherapy or radiation induced myelosuppression. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6668

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] HE2100 and HE3204 protect Rhesus Macaques from chemotherapy or radiation induced myelosuppression.
  • Prophylactic and therapeutic HE2100 studies of lethally irradiated rodents demonstrated a significant survival advantage for treated groups (Whitnall et. al., Int. J. Immunopharm.2000).
  • Rodent studies with either HE2100 or HE3204 demonstrated protection against chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression.
  • METHODS: The current study investigated the effects of these compounds in (1) a non-human primate model with induced myelosuppression from chemotherapy or ionizing radiation and (2) on primitive (Long-Term Culture-Initiating Cells-LTC-IC), lineage committed (Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Forming Cells-GM-CFC) and bone marrow mesenchymal progenitor cells.
  • Non-human primates were given carboplatin, 35 mg/kg, 36 hrs. prior to 5 daily sc injections of HE2100 or HE3204 or 2-4 hours after sublethal total body irradiation.
  • RESULTS: HE2100 showed a decrease in the number of days of severe neutropenia (<500cells/uL) in the sub-lethally irradiated macaques from 7 days (vehicle) to 2 days at the highest dose (p=0.019) and reduced the days of severe neutropenia induced by carboplatin from 5.3 (vehicle) to 0.7.
  • HE3204 completely eliminated severe neutropenia from chemotherapy, 5.3 days for vehicle control to 0 (p=0.03).
  • CONCLUSIONS: This class of compounds expands committed and primitive bone marrow progenitor cells and affords significant protection from chemo or radiation induced myelosuppression in non-human primates.

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  • (PMID = 28016363.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Doyen J, Italiano A, Largillier R, Ferrero J, Fontana X, Thyss A: Aromatase inhibition in male breast cancer patients: Biological and clinical implications. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1130

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 1130 Background: Because male breast cancer (MBC) is rare, treatment recommendations are derived from results of trials in female patients (pts).
  • We report here the largest experience about the efficacy of AI in MBC pts with advanced disease and their impact on estradiol (E) levels.
  • METHODS: MBC pts were selected from the breast cancer database of the Centre Antoine-Lacassagne (Nice, France) as follows: Metastatic disease with at least one measurable or assessable non-measurable lesion, estrogen receptor (ER) and/or or progesterone receptor (PR) positive, availability of complete clinical and histological data, evidence of progressive disease at initiation of AI, receipt of at least one month of treatment with non steroidal (anastrozole, letrozole) or steroidal (exemestane) AI.
  • Sex hormone levels were retrospectively assessed on serum samples from our institutional serum bank.
  • 7 pts received previous lines of hormonal therapy (median = 1) and 3 pts a previous line of chemotherapy before the introduction of AI.
  • At the time of analysis, 8 pts (53%) had died and 7 (47%) were still alive.
  • 9 out of 11 pts with available samples had E levels less than the lower limit of the assay during AI treatment.
  • Among the 9 pts with E level decrease, four had OR, one had SD, and four had PD.
  • 1 pt had E levels higher than the upper limit of the assay during AI treatment.
  • Further data on FSH and testosterone levels will be presented at the meeting.
  • This activity is correlated with a significant reduction in E levels.

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  • (PMID = 27962244.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Tolcher AW, Yap TA, Fearen I, Taylor A, Carpenter C, Brunetto AT, Beeram M, Papadopoulos K, Yan L, de Bono J: A phase I study of MK-2206, an oral potent allosteric Akt inhibitor (Akti), in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumor (ST). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3503

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I study of MK-2206, an oral potent allosteric Akt inhibitor (Akti), in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumor (ST).
  • MK-2206, a highly selective non-ATP competitive allosteric Akti, has nM IC<sub>50</sub> and broad preclinical antitumor activity.
  • Main eligibility criteria: ≥18 yo, evaluable advanced ST, ECOG ≤1, HbA1c ≤8% or fasting glucose ≤110% upper limit of normal.
  • Sequential tumor biopsies were performed in a subset of pts.
  • RESULTS: Dose escalation occurred in 19 pts (8 female/11 male; median age 57 yo; ECOG 0/1: 5/14) and 37 cy of therapy with no DLTs at 30 and 60 mg.
  • Common drug-related AEs included skin (47.1%), gastrointestinal (41.2%), and general disorders (29.4%).
  • Evidence of PD activity included decreases in whole blood pAkt at all dose levels, reversible CTCAE G1/2 hyperglycemia and CTCAE G1 insulin c-peptide elevations.
  • RECIST stable disease following 2 cycles of therapy was observed in 1 pt at 30 mg and 5 pts at 60 mg.
  • Observed clinical activity included: central tumor necrosis, decreased ascites and peripheral edema, reduction in index lesions, normalization of LFTs, and decreased CA-125.

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  • (PMID = 27961284.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Tryakin A, Fedyanin M, Bulanov A, Titov D, Allakhverdiyeva G, Mitin A, Sergeev J, Zaharova T, Garin A, Tjulandin S: Prognostic factors in advanced seminoma in the era of etoposide- and cisplatin-based chemotherapy: Importance of pretreatment LDH-level. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16038

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic factors in advanced seminoma in the era of etoposide- and cisplatin-based chemotherapy: Importance of pretreatment LDH-level.
  • : e16038 Background: The commonly used IGCCCG classification probably underestimates other prognostic factors (tumor markers, stage) for advanced seminoma, which was shown later (Fossa S., 1997).
  • METHODS: From 1983 to 2005, 250 chemotherapy (CT)-naïve pts with advanced seminoma received induction platinum-based CT, which was divided as an "older" (76 pts) and "modern" (174 pts) one.
  • 227 (91%) pts had primary testicular tumor, 241 (96%) pts belonged to IGCCCG good prognostic group.
  • Univariate analysis revealed following factors as significant: number of metastatic sites, presence of pulmonary metastases, RPLN size, hCG level, and LDH level.
  • Using cut-off 2 x upper limit of normal for LDH level, "modern CT" group can be divided into favorable (105 [60%] pts) and unfavorable (69 (40%) pts) groups with 5-years DFS 98% vs. 78% (HR 11.1, 95% CI 3.2-33.3) and 5-years OS 99% vs. 80% (HR 11.07, 95% CI 3.09-27.92), respectively.
  • Pre-treatment LDH level is an important independent prognostic factor, which could help stratify pts better into risk groups.

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  • (PMID = 27962946.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Kozer E, Parvez S, Minassian BA, Kobayashi J, Verjee Z, Koren G: How high can we go with phenytoin? Ther Drug Monit; 2002 Jun;24(3):386-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. PHENYTOIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The upper limit for the therapeutic serum concentration of phenytoin is considered to be 80 micromol/L.
  • The authors describe a 9-year-old girl who needed concentrations twice the normal amount to control recurrent episodes of decreased levels of consciousness.
  • This patient highlights the critical principle in therapeutic drug monitoring of individualizing drug therapy.
  • Although some patients receiving phenytoin may achieve seizure control with "subtherapeutic" levels (i.e., <40 micromol/L), others may need supratherapeutic levels, as was the case with this patient.
  • Clinicians should be careful not to treat "numbers" (i.e., serum concentrations), but rather the patient's clinical condition, with a careful balance between therapeutic advantage and adverse effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticonvulsants / administration & dosage. Epilepsy / drug therapy. Phenytoin / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Hospitalized. Drug Monitoring. Female. Glasgow Coma Scale. Humans

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  • (PMID = 12021630.001).
  • [ISSN] 0163-4356
  • [Journal-full-title] Therapeutic drug monitoring
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ther Drug Monit
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticonvulsants; 6158TKW0C5 / Phenytoin
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38. Katz DA, Isaacson JD, Han L, Drajesk JF, Comer GM, Heath-Chiozzi ME: Clinical observation of liver chemistry abnormalities in asthmatics. Curr Drug Saf; 2009 Sep;4(3):173-80
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: We undertook a retrospective analysis of comparator arm data from a long-term safety surveillance study of a leukotriene inhibitor.
  • RESULTS: Several liver chemistry elevations relative to the upper limit of normal were observed.
  • We identified three other types of outliers: liver chemistry elevations relative to screening values, persistent liver chemistry elevations, and unusually variable alanine aminotranferase.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of any common drug therapy, there are considerable within-population differences of liver chemistry profiles including substantial outliers.
  • This ordinary variability should be taken into account in the design of clinical trials and analysis of drug-induced liver injury therein.
  • [MeSH-major] Alanine Transaminase / blood. Anti-Asthmatic Agents / adverse effects. Asthma / drug therapy. Drug-Induced Liver Injury / diagnosis. Liver / chemistry. Liver Function Tests
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Alkaline Phosphatase / blood. Aspartate Aminotransferases / blood. Bilirubin / blood. Biomarkers / blood. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Severity of Illness Index. Time Factors. Young Adult. gamma-Glutamyltransferase / blood

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  • (PMID = 19534645.001).
  • [ISSN] 2212-3911
  • [Journal-full-title] Current drug safety
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Drug Saf
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United Arab Emirates
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Asthmatic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers; EC 2.3.2.2 / gamma-Glutamyltransferase; EC 2.6.1.1 / Aspartate Aminotransferases; EC 2.6.1.2 / Alanine Transaminase; EC 3.1.3.1 / Alkaline Phosphatase; RFM9X3LJ49 / Bilirubin
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39. Polsani VR, Nambi V, Virani SS, Zoch D, Yang EY, Jones PH, Ballantyne CM: Efficacy and tolerability of multidrug therapy for hypertriglyceridemia. J Clin Lipidol; 2009 Oct;3(5):341-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy and tolerability of multidrug therapy for hypertriglyceridemia.
  • BACKGROUND: Although there is clinical evidence for the safety and efficacy of single-drug therapy and some two-drug combinations for the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia, information is limited on the use of more than 2 drugs.
  • METHODS: The study included 40 individuals in an academic lipid referral clinic with mean follow-up of 1.98 years and an average use of 3.5 medications.
  • RESULTS: During the study, mean body mass index decreased significantly (P=.0127), from 29.2kg/m(2) to 28.7kg/m(2), and mean hemoglobin A1C showed a trend towards decreasing (P=.06), from 7.9% to 7.2% in patients with diabetes (n=17).
  • All lipid parameters decreased significantly: total cholesterol level decreased significantly from (mean±SD) 334.3±282.9mg/dL to 183.8±54.8mg/dL (P=.001, mean reduction of 45%), mean (± SD) triglyceride level decreased significantly from 1900.9±4576.8mg/dL to 300.7±372.2mg/dL (P=.02), median (range) triglyceride level decreased from 599 (242-28,550) mg/dL to 301 (40-1960) mg/dL (P < .001, mean reduction of 50%), and mean (± SD) non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased significantly from 189.9±131.6mg/dL to 138.4±49.1mg/dL (P=.014, mean reduction of 27%).
  • There were no serious adverse effects (rhabdomyolysis or increased liver function tests >3 times upper limit of normal).
  • CONCLUSION: In a 2-year follow-up of 40 individuals on multidrug therapy (average of 3.5 drugs) for severe hypertriglyceridemia, combination therapy was efficacious and well tolerated.

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  • (PMID = 21291832.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-2874
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical lipidology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Lipidol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. Narayan R, Perkins RM, Berbano EP, Yuan CM, Neff RT, Sawyers ES, Yeo FE, Vidal-Trecan GM, Abbott KC: Parathyroidectomy versus cinacalcet hydrochloride-based medical therapy in the management of hyperparathyroidism in ESRD: a cost utility analysis. Am J Kidney Dis; 2007 Jun;49(6):801-13
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  • [Title] Parathyroidectomy versus cinacalcet hydrochloride-based medical therapy in the management of hyperparathyroidism in ESRD: a cost utility analysis.
  • BACKGROUND: Previously, patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with uncontrolled hyperparathyroidism had few options other than parathyroidectomy, which was reserved for patients refractory to medical therapy.
  • Newer calcimimetic agents, such as cinacalcet, may be an alternative, but raise the possibility of indefinite medical treatment that also would increase costs.
  • SETTING & POPULATION: Base case consisted of prevalent adult US patients with ESRD refractory to management with standard medical therapy.
  • PERSPECTIVE & TIME FRAME: Medicare and societal costs and quality-adjusted life-years from the date of parathyroidectomy or use of cinacalcet followed up for 2 years, respectively.
  • RESULTS: At base-case surgical and drug costs, surgical and drug success rates, complication rates/costs, and benefit from correction of hyperparathyroidism, parathyroidectomy was found to be both less expensive and more cost-effective at 7.25 +/- 0.25 months.
  • Parathyroidectomy became more cost-effective at 15.28 to 16.32 months at the upper limit of sensitivity analysis, when drug/surgical costs and success/complication rates/costs were maximally weighted to favor cinacalcet-based medical therapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: For patients with ESRD with uncontrolled hyperparathyroidism who are good candidates for either drug therapy or surgery, cinacalcet hydrochloride is the most cost-effective modality if the patient is to remain on dialysis therapy for 7.25 +/- 0.25 months.
  • [MeSH-major] Hyperparathyroidism / economics. Hyperparathyroidism / therapy. Kidney Failure, Chronic / complications. Naphthalenes / economics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cinacalcet Hydrochloride. Cost-Benefit Analysis. Decision Trees. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Parathyroidectomy. Quality-Adjusted Life Years. Time Factors. United States

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  • (PMID = 17533023.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-6838
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Kidney Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Naphthalenes; 1K860WSG25 / Cinacalcet Hydrochloride
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46. Günal AI, Duman S, Ozkahya M, Töz H, Asçi G, Akçiçek F, Basçi A: Strict volume control normalizes hypertension in peritoneal dialysis patients. Am J Kidney Dis; 2001 Mar;37(3):588-93
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  • The aim of this study is to investigate whether normal blood pressure (BP) can be achieved in patients with hypertension on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) therapy by strict volume control without the use of antihypertensive drugs.
  • Of the 78 patients in our center, 47 persons had hypertension and/or were on antihypertensive drug therapy.
  • After discontinuing these drugs, a strong dietary salt restriction was imposed by repeatedly explaining the need for it to patients and families.
  • With salt restriction alone or combined with UF, body weight decreased by a mean of 2.8 +/- 0.5 kg, and BP decreased from a mean of 158.2 +/- 17.0/95.7 +/- 10.3 to 119.7 +/- 16.0/77.9 +/- 9.7 mm Hg in 37 patients, accompanied by a decrease in CTI from 48.0% +/- 5.6% to 42.9% +/- 4.5%.
  • In 7 of the remaining patients who did not respond to the applied treatment, BP decreased from 158.8 +/- 23.2/111.6 +/- 9.8 to 113.5 +/- 14.3/76.4 +/- 6.2 mm Hg after administration of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor.
  • This is accompanied by a decrease in CTI from upper limits into the normal range, but also by a decrease in residual renal function and Kt/V index.
  • [MeSH-major] Diet, Sodium-Restricted. Hypertension / therapy. Peritoneal Dialysis, Continuous Ambulatory / adverse effects. Water-Electrolyte Imbalance / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Captopril / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Enalapril / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Ultrafiltration

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  • (PMID = 11228184.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-6838
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Kidney Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; 69PN84IO1A / Enalapril; 9G64RSX1XD / Captopril
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47. Schwenn O, Yun SH, Troost A, Pfeiffer N: Glaucoma studies from 1996 to 1999 in peer-reviewed journals. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol; 2005 Jul;243(7):629-36
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  • BACKGROUND: Studies on glaucoma therapy were analyzed with regard to study design, diagnostic parameters and success criteria.
  • Thirty-seven studies dealt with drug therapy, 12 with laser therapy, and 52 with surgical therapy.
  • Out of the 70 definitions that gave an absolute value for IOP, 12 definitions (17%) used IOP values between 14 and 16 mmHg as the upper limit, 4 definitions (6%) used IOP values between 17 and 19 mmHg, and 54 definitions (77%) used IOP values between 20 and 22 mmHg.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Examples of prestigious studies show the necessity of observation periods of several years and demonstrate the need for a high number of participants, necessitating the cooperation of many study centers.
  • New diagnostic techniques for improved assessment of the functional and morphologic damage will gain in relevance in the future.
  • The lack of a common definition of success reveals the complexity of the disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Databases, Factual / statistics & numerical data. Glaucoma / diagnosis. Glaucoma / therapy. Peer Review, Research / trends. Periodicals as Topic / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 15702327.001).
  • [ISSN] 0721-832X
  • [Journal-full-title] Graefe's archive for clinical and experimental ophthalmology = Albrecht von Graefes Archiv fur klinische und experimentelle Ophthalmologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Graefes Arch. Clin. Exp. Ophthalmol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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48. Isaacsohn JL, LaSalle J, Chao G, Gonasun L: Comparison of treatment with fluvastatin extended-release 80-mg tablets and immediate-release 40-mg capsules in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia. Clin Ther; 2003 Mar;25(3):904-18
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  • [Title] Comparison of treatment with fluvastatin extended-release 80-mg tablets and immediate-release 40-mg capsules in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia.
  • BACKGROUND: According to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III guidelines, hypercholesterolemic patients with greater risk for cardiovascular heart disease require more aggressive lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels.
  • Numerous studies have demonstrated that despite these guidelines, patients often do not reach their target levels, and that physicians frequently do not titrate the drug beyond the starting dose.
  • For these patients, it may be more suitable to initiate treatment with a higher starting dose of statin.
  • Use of this formulation should bring more patients into compliance with target LDL-C levels.
  • OBJECTIVE: This analysis compared the efficacy and tolerability of fluvastatin ER 80 mg QD and fluvastatin IR 40 mg QD in lowering total cholesterol, LDL-C, triglyceride, and apolipoprotein (apo) B levels and raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apo A-I levels in patients with hypercholesterolemia over a 12-week treatment period.
  • METHODS: This was a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, parallel-group, active-controlled study Patients with primary hypercholesterolemia who qualified for lipid-lowering drug therapy based on NCEP ATP II guidelines were randomized to fluvastatin ER 80 mg QD or fluvastatin IR 40 mg QD, and treated for 12 weeks.
  • RESULTS: A total of 173 patients were randomized to treatment: 86 to the fluvastatin ER 80-mg group and 87 to the fluvastatin IR 40-mg group.
  • For each of the 3 coronary heart disease (CHD) risk groups (defined by the NCEP), as well as for the total population studied, more patients from the fluvastatin ER 80-mg group than the IR 40 group achieved NCEP ATP II target LDL-C levels (79% vs 47%, respectively [P = NS], for patients with < 2 risk factors; 58% vs 15%, respectively [P < 0.001], for patients with > or = 2 risk factors; and 40% vs 14%, respectively [P = 0.012], for patients with CHD).
  • The incidence of elevations in transaminase levels was low and similar for both doses, with 1 patient in each of the treatment groups being discontinued due to repeated elevation of transaminases > 3 x the upper limit of normal (ULN).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with fluvastatin ER 80 mg resulted in greater reductions in LDL-C, total cholesterol, and apo B levels compared with fluvastatin IR 40 mg, with clinically equivalent reduction in triglyceride levels and elevation of HDL-C levels.
  • For patients with higher baseline LDL-C levels, and for patients who require greater LDL-C lowering, it may be appropriate to initiate therapy with fluvastatin ER 80 mg.
  • Use of the higher starting dose likely would bring a greater proportion of high-risk patients into compliance with NCEP ATP II target LDL-C levels and would provide LDL-C lowering that is in the same range that has been proved in clinical trials to be associated with reductions in CHD event rates.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticholesteremic Agents / therapeutic use. Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated / therapeutic use. Hypercholesterolemia / drug therapy. Indoles / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Capsules. Cholesterol / blood. Delayed-Action Preparations. Double-Blind Method. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Tablets. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 12852707.001).
  • [ISSN] 0149-2918
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticholesteremic Agents; 0 / Capsules; 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0 / Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Tablets; 4L066368AS / fluvastatin; 97C5T2UQ7J / Cholesterol
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49. Larsen SS, Krasnik M, Vilmann P, Jacobsen GK, Pedersen JJ, Faurschou P, Folke K: [Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsy of suspected malignancy in the mediastinum has a major impact on the clinical decision process]. Ugeskr Laeger; 2002 Jun 17;164(25):3341-6

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsy of suspected malignancy in the mediastinum has a major impact on the clinical decision process].
  • [Transliterated title] Endoskopisk UL-vejledt biopsi af malignitetssuspekte processer i mediastinum har stor indflydelse på den kliniske beslutningsproces.
  • In all patients computer tomography (CT) had shown a lesion of the mediastinum suspected of malignancy, which was located adjacent to the oesophagus.
  • The direct result of the cytological diagnosis obtained by EUS-FNA was that a final diagnosis of small cell lung cancer was made in eight patients leading to referral for chemotherapy, and specific therapy could be initiated in another three patients with benign disease (sarcoidosis, mediastinal abscess and leiomyoma of the oesophagus).
  • DISCUSSION: EUS-FNA is a safe and sensitive, minimal invasive method in the evaluation of patients with a solid lesion of the mediastinum, suspected by CT.
  • EUS-FNA has a significant impact on patient management; it should be considered for diagnosing the spread of cancer to the mediastinum of patients with lung cancer in whom surgery is contemplated, as well as for the primary diagnosis of solid lesions located in the mediastinum adjacent to the oesophagus.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy, Needle / methods. Decision Making. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / radiography. Lung Neoplasms / therapy. Lung Neoplasms / ultrasonography. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Referral and Consultation. Sensitivity and Specificity. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 12107948.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-5782
  • [Journal-full-title] Ugeskrift for laeger
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ugeskr. Laeg.
  • [Language] dan
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
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50. Lokich J: Same-day pegfilgrastim and chemotherapy. Cancer Invest; 2005;23(7):573-6
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  • [Title] Same-day pegfilgrastim and chemotherapy.
  • Pegylated filgrastim is a new formulation of a neutrophil colony-stimulating factor that has a long circulating half-life, permitting a single dose of filgrastim per cycle of chemotherapy.
  • The pegylated filgrastim is recommended to be administered not less than 24 hours following chemotherapy and not less than 14 days prior to chemotherapy based on the theoretic concern that marrow suppression would be accentuated.
  • This schedule of usage for pegylated filgrastim may compromise its application for weekly chemotherapy schedules.
  • We have treated 80 patients with pegylated filgrastim administered on the same day as chemotherapy; the latter delivered on a weekly schedule.
  • Twenty-four patients had non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and were treated with one of two weekly chemotherapy regimens alternating triplets [AT] taxane, cisplatin, irinotecan alternating with gemcitabine, cisplatin, vinorelbine or alternating doublets [AD] taxane, cisplatin alternating with gemcitabine, vinorelbine; four of these patients also received weekly taxane and carboplatin with concomitant thoracic radiation.
  • A consistent pattern emerged in which leukocytosis was observed at Day 8; median WBC 15,800/uL (range 7,200 to 35,000/uL); at Day 14, the median WBC was 9,300/uL (range 1,100 to 17,400/uL).
  • Pegylated filgrastim can be given safely simultaneously with chemotherapy in weekly chemotherapy schedules.
  • The pegfilgrastim can be administered on an every two week (fortnightly) schedule to maintain a weekly chemotherapy schedule.
  • [MeSH-major] Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Neutropenia / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bridged Compounds / administration & dosage. Camptothecin / administration & dosage. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / radiotherapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Drug Administration Schedule. Filgrastim. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Recombinant Proteins. Taxoids / administration & dosage. Vinblastine / administration & dosage. Vinblastine / analogs & derivatives

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  • (PMID = 16305982.001).
  • [ISSN] 0735-7907
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bridged Compounds; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / Taxoids; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 1605-68-1 / taxane; 3A58010674 / pegfilgrastim; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 7673326042 / irinotecan; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; PVI5M0M1GW / Filgrastim; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; Q6C979R91Y / vinorelbine; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
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51. Dong JF, Cruz MA, Aboulfatova K, Martin C, Choi H, Bergeron AL, Martini SR, Kroll MH, Kent TA: Magnesium maintains endothelial integrity, up-regulates proteolysis of ultra-large von Willebrand factor, and reduces platelet aggregation under flow conditions. Thromb Haemost; 2008 Mar;99(3):586-93
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  • [Title] Magnesium maintains endothelial integrity, up-regulates proteolysis of ultra-large von Willebrand factor, and reduces platelet aggregation under flow conditions.
  • We investigated the roles of MgSO(4) in regulating the release and cleavage of the prothrombotic ultra-large (UL) von Willebrand factor (VWF) and VWF-mediated platelet adhesion and aggregation.
  • Release and cleavage of ULVWF by ADAMTS-13 was measured in the absence or presence of physiological or therapeutic levels of MgSO(4).
  • Maintenance of endothelial integrity required physiological levels of MgSO(4), but exogenous MgSO(4) showed no additional benefits.
  • These results provide a new insight into additional mechanisms involved with magnesium therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] ADAM Proteins / metabolism. Blood Platelets / drug effects. Endothelial Cells / drug effects. Fibrinolytic Agents / pharmacology. Magnesium Sulfate / pharmacology. Platelet Adhesiveness / drug effects. Platelet Aggregation / drug effects. von Willebrand Factor / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Culture Techniques. Cell Shape / drug effects. Cells, Cultured. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Hemorheology. Humans. Magnesium / metabolism. Stress, Mechanical. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 18327408.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-6245
  • [Journal-full-title] Thrombosis and haemostasis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Thromb. Haemost.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD39833; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL71895; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL72886
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents; 0 / von Willebrand Factor; 7487-88-9 / Magnesium Sulfate; EC 3.4.24.- / ADAM Proteins; EC 3.4.24.- / ADAMTS13 protein, human; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium
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52. Rauova L, Poncz M, McKenzie SE, Reilly MP, Arepally G, Weisel JW, Nagaswami C, Cines DB, Sachais BS: Ultralarge complexes of PF4 and heparin are central to the pathogenesis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Blood; 2005 Jan 1;105(1):131-8
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  • [Title] Ultralarge complexes of PF4 and heparin are central to the pathogenesis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.
  • Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (HITT) is a severe complication of heparin therapy caused by antibodies to complexes between unfractionated heparin (UFH) and platelet factor 4 (PF4) that form over a narrow molar range of reactants and initiate antibody-induced platelet activation.
  • We observed that UFH and tetrameric PF4 formed ultralarge (> 670 kDa) complexes (ULCs) only over a narrow molar range with an optimal ratio of PF4 to heparin of approximately 1:1.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid. Humans. Microscopy, Electron, Transmission. Models, Molecular. Mutagenesis, Site-Directed. Platelet Activation / drug effects. Platelet Activation / immunology. Protein Binding. Protein Structure, Tertiary. Swine

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  • (PMID = 15304392.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / 1 K08 HL04245; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL54500; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL68631; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL69471
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 37270-94-3 / Platelet Factor 4; 9005-49-6 / Heparin
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53. Liu JP, Yang H, Xia Y, Cardini F: Herbal preparations for uterine fibroids. Cochrane Database Syst Rev; 2009 Apr 15;(2):CD005292
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Herbal preparations for uterine fibroids.
  • BACKGROUND: Uterine fibroids are the most common non-malignant growths in women of childbearing age.
  • OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and risks of herbal preparations for uterine fibroids.
  • SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials comparing herbal preparations with no intervention, placebo, medical treatment or surgical procedures in women with uterine fibroids.
  • We also included trials of herbal preparations with or without conventional therapy.
  • There were variations in the tested herbal preparations, and the treatment duration was six months.
  • The outcomes available were not the primary outcomes selected for this review, such as symptom relief or the need for surgical treatment; trials mainly reported outcomes in terms of shrinkage of the fibroids.Compared with mifepristone, Huoxue Sanjie decoction showed no significant difference in the disappearance of uterine fibroids, number of patients with shrinking of uterine fibroids or average volume of uterine fibroids, but less effective than mifepristone on reducing average size of uterus (mean difference 23.23 cm(3),95% confidence interval 17.85 to 28.61).
  • There was no significant difference between Nona Roguy herbal product and GnRH agonist in average volume of uterine fibroids or size of uterus.
  • AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Current evidence does not support or refute the use of herbal preparations for treatment of uterine fibroids due to insufficient studies of large sample and high quality.

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  • [UpdateIn] Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;4:CD005292 [23633329.001]
  • (PMID = 19370619.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-493X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Cochrane database of systematic reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cochrane Database Syst Rev
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCCIH NIH HHS / AT / AT001293-07; United States / NCCIH NIH HHS / AT / R24 AT001293; United States / NCCIH NIH HHS / AT / R24 AT001293-07
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal; 0 / Hormone Antagonists; 0 / Plant Preparations; 320T6RNW1F / Mifepristone; 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
  • [Number-of-references] 145
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS307129; NLM/ PMC3155698
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54. Chia CC, Huang SC, Chen SS, Kang JY, Lin JC, Lin YS, Huang KF, Lee HJ, Zheng CC: Ultrasonographic evaluation of the change in uterine fibroids induced by treatment with a GnRH analog. Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol; 2006 Jun;45(2):124-8
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ultrasonographic evaluation of the change in uterine fibroids induced by treatment with a GnRH analog.
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the change in volume of uterine fibroids after GnRH analog (GnRHa) treatment.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients who had a uterine leiomyoma were included in this study.
  • The vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI), vascularization-flow index (VFI), pulsative index (PI), resistance index (RI), vascular patterns (histogram), blood flows, and sizes (volume and largest diameter) of each fibroid were measured with power Doppler by the same technician every month before the operation.
  • In addition, the total blood loss and time required for each operation were also recorded.
  • RESULTS: Results of this study showed that the volume of the uterus and the fibroids, but not the vascularity, including VI, FI, VFI, PI and RI, decreased significantly after two doses of GnRHa treatment.
  • CONCLUSION: We found that the volumes of the uterus and fibroids decreased significantly after treatment with two consecutive doses (given a month apart) of GnRHa.
  • The 3D color Doppler including a histogram and blood flow parameters is another useful tool for fibroid evaluation.
  • [MeSH-major] Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / agonists. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Leiomyoma / ultrasonography. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / ultrasonography
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Blood Vessels / ultrasonography. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Imaging, Three-Dimensional. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Pulse. Regional Blood Flow. Treatment Outcome. Ultrasonography, Doppler. Vascular Resistance


55. Malkin RA, Hoffmeister BK: Hemodynamic collapse, geometry, and the rapidly paced upper limit of ventricular vulnerability to fibrillation by T-wave stimulation. J Electrocardiol; 2000 Jul;33(3):279-86
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hemodynamic collapse, geometry, and the rapidly paced upper limit of ventricular vulnerability to fibrillation by T-wave stimulation.
  • There is an upper limit to the vulnerability (ULV) of the ventricles to fibrillation (VF) induced by T-wave stimuli.
  • Across species, disease states, and pharmacological treatments, the ULV is correlated to the defibrillation threshold (DF50).
  • The T-wave shock strength that induced VF 50% of the time (the ULV50) was measured using a 10-step Bayesian up-down protocol.
  • We measured the geometry of the left ventricle at the moment of T-wave stimulation using linear ultrasound.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Dogs. Electrophysiology. Mathematics. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 10954381.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-0736
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of electrocardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Electrocardiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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56. Fishbane S, Kalantar-Zadeh K, Nissenson AR: Serum ferritin in chronic kidney disease: reconsidering the upper limit for iron treatment. Semin Dial; 2004 Sep-Oct;17(5):336-41
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Serum ferritin in chronic kidney disease: reconsidering the upper limit for iron treatment.
  • Intravenous iron treatment in hemodialysis patients improves the response to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) and facilitates achievement of targets for hemoglobin and hematocrit.
  • Excessive treatment, however, could expose patients to risks related to iron overload and oxidative stress.
  • Therefore international treatment guidelines generally recommend that intravenous iron be discontinued when serum ferritin is greater than 500-1000 ng/ml.
  • In this article we explore the relevant issues that inform the decisions as to what levels of serum ferritin are used as the upper limit for treatment.
  • Clinical judgment is critical to properly weigh the risks and benefits of intravenous iron treatment in the context of the individual patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia, Iron-Deficiency / prevention & control. Erythropoietin / therapeutic use. Ferritins / therapeutic use. Renal Dialysis / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Interactions. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Kidney Failure, Chronic / diagnosis. Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Recombinant Proteins

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  • (PMID = 15461737.001).
  • [ISSN] 0894-0959
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in dialysis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Dial
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Editorial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin; 9007-73-2 / Ferritins
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57. Schuman SI, Lambrou N, Robson K, Glück S, Myriounis N, Pearson JM, Lucci JA 3rd: Pegfilgrastim dosing on same day as myelosuppressive chemotherapy for ovarian or primary peritoneal cancer. J Support Oncol; 2009 Nov-Dec;7(6):225-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pegfilgrastim dosing on same day as myelosuppressive chemotherapy for ovarian or primary peritoneal cancer.
  • According to the prescribing information, pegfilgrastim should not be administered within 14 days prior to, or within 24 hours after, the administration of cytotoxic chemotherapy.
  • A single-institution retrospective review was conducted of all patients with ovarian or primary peritoneal cancer who received prophylactic pegfilgrastim on the same day as myelosuppressive chemotherapy from May 2003 to June 2006.
  • A total of 269 cycles of chemotherapy were administered.
  • All patients received pegfilgrastim within 1 hour of the completion of chemotherapy administration.
  • Grade 1 or 2 neutropenia developed in 10 cycles (3.7%), and the mean absolute neutrophil count was 4926/uL (range, 1,293-24,300).
  • No patients had febrile neutropenic episodes, hospitalizations, or antibiotic use secondary to neutropenia, nor did they have dose reductions or chemotherapy delays due to neutropenia.
  • Administration of pegfilgrastim on the same day as myelosuppressive chemotherapy in patients with ovarian or primary peritoneal cancer may be determined to be a convenient, safe, and effective approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Endometrial Stromal Tumors / drug therapy. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Peritoneal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Filgrastim. Humans. Leukocyte Count. Middle Aged. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Neutropenia / prevention & control. Recombinant Proteins. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20380330.001).
  • [ISSN] 1544-6794
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of supportive oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Support Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 3A58010674 / pegfilgrastim; PVI5M0M1GW / Filgrastim
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58. Numa F, Umayahara K, Ogata H, Nawata S, Sakaguchi Y, Emoto T, Kawasaki K, Hirakawa H, Sase M, Oga A, Kato H: De novo uterine sarcoma with good response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2003 May-Jun;13(3):364-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] De novo uterine sarcoma with good response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • We report here the extremely rare case of a 28-year-old woman with advanced stage uterine sarcoma arising soon after a cesarean section.
  • She underwent an abdominal cesarean section because of a breech presentation.
  • At the time of the procedure, there were no abnormal findings such as leiomyoma of the uterus in the abdominal cavity.
  • One year later, she was referred to our hospital because of a large abdominal tumor.
  • Transabdominal power Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large hypervascular tumor in the abdominal cavity.
  • Her serum levels, for the two tumor markers carbohydrate antigen CA125 and LDH, were elevated, at 219 U/ml (< 35 U/ml) and 862 IU/l (115 U/ml-217 U/ml), respectively.
  • On the basis of a diagnosis of malignant tumor of gynecological origin, exploratory laparotomy was performed, and through biopsy, the tumor was found to be advanced undifferentiated uterine sarcoma.
  • She exhibited a good response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin, epirubicin, and dimethyltriazenoimidazole carboxamide (DTIC) every 28 days, which was successfully followed by a hysterectomy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Hysterectomy / methods. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Treatment Outcome. Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color

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  • (PMID = 12801270.001).
  • [ISSN] 1048-891X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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59. Myers ER, Barber MD, Gustilo-Ashby T, Couchman G, Matchar DB, McCrory DC: Management of uterine leiomyomata: what do we really know? Obstet Gynecol; 2002 Jul;100(1):8-17
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of uterine leiomyomata: what do we really know?
  • OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the literature on the surgical and nonsurgical management of uterine leiomyomata.
  • DATA SOURCES: Published literature in English on the management of uterine leiomyomata published from 1975 through 2000 was identified in MEDLINE, CINAHL, CancerLit, EMBASE, HealthSTAR, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.
  • Search terms included "leiomyomata," "fibroids," "hysterectomy," and "myomectomy."
  • Original research studies or relevant reviews were included if the study population included women with uterine leiomyomata, and data were provided relevant to one or more of nine prespecified research questions.
  • TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS: Inconsistency in reporting of severity of symptoms, uterine anatomy, and response to therapy prevented meaningful comparison of studies in most cases, and prevented performance of meta-analysis in all cases.
  • This was true of both surgical and nonsurgical treatments.
  • CONCLUSION: The available evidence on the management of uterine leiomyomata is of poor quality.
  • Patients, clinicians, and policymakers do not have the data needed to make informed decisions about appropriate treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Leiomyoma / surgery. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy / methods. Laser Therapy / methods. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Risk Assessment. Severity of Illness Index. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12100798.001).
  • [ISSN] 0029-7844
  • [Journal-full-title] Obstetrics and gynecology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Obstet Gynecol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / 290-97-0014
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 83
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60. Chaves AJ, Fernández-Recio JM, de Argila D, Rodríguez-Nevado I, Catalina M: [Zosteriform cutaneous leiomyoma. Satisfactory treatment with oral doxazosin]. Actas Dermosifiliogr; 2007 Sep;98(7):494-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Zosteriform cutaneous leiomyoma. Satisfactory treatment with oral doxazosin].
  • [Transliterated title] Leiomioma cutáneo zosteriforme. Tratamiento satisfactorio con doxazosina oral.
  • We report a 50-year-old man that presented a zosteriform cutaneous leiomyoma in the left facial region, intensely painful, that showed great improvement after the administration of a daily dose of 4 mg of oral doxasozin.
  • The therapy was well tolerated and did not present any associated adverse effect.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists / therapeutic use. Doxazosin / therapeutic use. Facial Neoplasms / drug therapy. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Diagnosis, Differential. Herpes Zoster / diagnosis. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Piloerection / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 17669306.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-7310
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas dermo-sifiliográficas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Dermosifiliogr
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists; NW1291F1W8 / Doxazosin
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61. Ashani Y, Pistinner S: Estimation of the upper limit of human butyrylcholinesterase dose required for protection against organophosphates toxicity: a mathematically based toxicokinetic model. Toxicol Sci; 2004 Feb;77(2):358-67
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Estimation of the upper limit of human butyrylcholinesterase dose required for protection against organophosphates toxicity: a mathematically based toxicokinetic model.
  • Human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) is a drug candidate for protection against organophosphates (OP) intoxication.
  • (1) level and duration of exposure, (2) bimolecular rate constants of inhibition of HuAChE (kA) and HuBChE (kB) by OPs, and (3) time elapsed from enzyme load.
  • The first part of the analysis of the proposed model was focused on acute bolus exposures and suggests that upper limit doses of 134, 115, and 249 mg/70 kg are sufficient to protect RBC AChE above 30% of baseline activity following a challenge with 1 LD(50) VX, soman, and sarin, respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Acetylcholinesterase / blood. Butyrylcholinesterase / blood. Chemical Warfare Agents / pharmacology. Cholinesterase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Erythrocytes / drug effects. Models, Biological. Neuroprotective Agents / blood. Organophosphorus Compounds / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cholinesterase Reactivators / blood. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Esterases / antagonists & inhibitors. Humans. In Vitro Techniques. Inactivation, Metabolic. Nervous System Diseases / drug therapy. Nervous System Diseases / prevention & control. Organothiophosphorus Compounds / pharmacology. Organothiophosphorus Compounds / toxicity. Reproducibility of Results. Sarin / pharmacology. Sarin / toxicity. Soman / pharmacology. Soman / toxicity

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  • [CommentIn] Toxicol Sci. 2004 Feb;77(2):185-7 [14992203.001]
  • (PMID = 14600276.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-6080
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicol. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chemical Warfare Agents; 0 / Cholinesterase Inhibitors; 0 / Cholinesterase Reactivators; 0 / Neuroprotective Agents; 0 / Organophosphorus Compounds; 0 / Organothiophosphorus Compounds; 50782-69-9 / VX; 96-64-0 / Soman; B4XG72QGFM / Sarin; EC 3.1.- / Esterases; EC 3.1.- / serine esterase; EC 3.1.1.- / Butyrylcholinesterase; EC 3.1.1.7 / Acetylcholinesterase
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62. Ke LQ, Yang K, Li J, Li CM: Danazol for uterine fibroids. Cochrane Database Syst Rev; 2009;(3):CD007692
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Danazol for uterine fibroids.
  • BACKGROUND: Uterine fibroids (myomas, fibromyomas, leiomyomas) are the most common benign tumours of the female genital tract.
  • Danazol, a synthetic isoxazole derivative chemically related to 17-ethinyl testosterone, has been used for many years for the treatment of women with uterine fibroids.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of danazol in women with uterine fibroids.
  • SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials of danazol versus placebo or any other medical therapy in women with uterine fibroids confirmed by medical procedures, regardless of the women's symptoms or age.
  • AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is no reliable evidence available from randomised controlled trials regarding the benefits and or harms of the use of danazol for treating uterine fibroids.
  • [MeSH-major] Danazol / therapeutic use. Estrogen Antagonists / therapeutic use. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19588442.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-493X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Cochrane database of systematic reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cochrane Database Syst Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrogen Antagonists; N29QWW3BUO / Danazol
  • [Number-of-references] 33
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63. Kawatani T, Suou T, Tajima F, Ishiga K, Omura H, Endo A, Ohmura H, Ikuta Y, Idobe Y, Kawasaki H: Incidence of hepatitis virus infection and severe liver dysfunction in patients receiving chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Eur J Haematol; 2001 Jul;67(1):45-50
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  • [Title] Incidence of hepatitis virus infection and severe liver dysfunction in patients receiving chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies.
  • Hepatitis virus infection through virus reactivation has a high risk of mortality in patients with hematological malignancies receiving chemotherapy.
  • We examined the incidence of both hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and severe liver dysfunction (alanine aminotransferase >ten times the normal upper limit and total bilirubin >5 mg/dl) during chemotherapy in 268 patients with hematological malignancies.
  • HBV- or HCV-infected patients showed severe liver dysfunction at a significantly higher incidence than non-infected patients (11/31 (35.5%) vs. 0/237 (0%), p<0.0001).
  • Three of eight HBV-infected patients were initially negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by latex agglutination and became positive for HBsAg during chemotherapy.
  • Furthermore, all three patients developed severe liver dysfunction and two developed fatal fulminant hepatitis.
  • From an examination of the original stock of serum samples before chemotherapy, two patients were found to be positive for HBV-DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
  • Since HBV-infected patients develop severe liver dysfunction at a higher incidence than either patients not infected with virus or HCV-infected patients before chemotherapy for hematological malignancies, it is recommended that HBV-DNA should be tested by PCR to detect HBV marker-negative carriers and liver function tests should be carefully monitored.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hepacivirus / drug effects. Hepatitis B / epidemiology. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Hepatitis C / epidemiology. Liver / physiopathology. Virus Activation / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 11553266.001).
  • [ISSN] 0902-4441
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral; 0 / Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
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64. Cook AM, Huddart RA, Jay G, Norman A, Dearnaley DP, Horwich A: The utility of tumour markers in assessing the response to chemotherapy in advanced bladder cancer. Br J Cancer; 2000 Jun;82(12):1952-7
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  • [Title] The utility of tumour markers in assessing the response to chemotherapy in advanced bladder cancer.
  • In patients with advanced bladder cancer receiving chemotherapy, early assessment of response can avoid unnecessary toxicity.
  • Serum levels of one or more of markers beta human chorionic gonadotrophin (betahCG), carcinoembryomic antigen (CEA), CA125 and CA19.9 were measured in 74 patients with advanced bladder cancer receiving chemotherapy from 1992 to 1997.
  • Forty-three of 74 (58%) of patients had at least one raised marker (1.5 times upper limit of normal range).
  • Monitoring of tumour markers in patients with advanced bladder cancer can help predict the response to chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Treatment Outcome. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 10864203.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] SCOTLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CA-125 Antigen; 0 / CA-19-9 Antigen; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen; 0 / Chorionic Gonadotropin, beta Subunit, Human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2363245
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65. Eisinger SH, Meldrum S, Fiscella K, le Roux HD, Guzick DS: Low-dose mifepristone for uterine leiomyomata. Obstet Gynecol; 2003 Feb;101(2):243-50
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  • [Title] Low-dose mifepristone for uterine leiomyomata.
  • OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of 5 and 10 mg of mifepristone on uterine leiomyoma size and symptoms, and to measure side effects.
  • METHODS: Forty premenopausal women with large, symptomatic leiomyomata were randomized to receive either 5 or 10 mg of mifepristone daily for 6 months in an open-label study.
  • Uterine volume was measured at bimonthly intervals by sonography.
  • Serum concentrations of hemoglobin levels, follicle-stimulating hormone, and liver enzymes were obtained, and endometrial samples, symptoms, and menstrual bleeding were also assessed.
  • Mean uterine volume shrank by 48% (P <.001) in the 5-mg group and 49% (P <.001) in the 10-mg group, a nonsignificant difference.
  • Leiomyoma-related symptoms were comparably reduced in both groups.
  • Hemoglobin levels increased by 2.5 g/dL in anemic subjects.
  • CONCLUSION: Mifepristone in doses of 5 mg or 10 mg results in comparable leiomyoma regression, improvement in symptoms, and few side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Hormone Antagonists / administration & dosage. Leiomyoma / diagnosis. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Mifepristone / administration & dosage. Uterine Neoplasms / diagnosis. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biopsy, Needle. Blood Chemical Analysis. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Endosonography. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Reference Values. Statistics, Nonparametric. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12576246.001).
  • [ISSN] 0029-7844
  • [Journal-full-title] Obstetrics and gynecology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Obstet Gynecol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hormone Antagonists; 320T6RNW1F / Mifepristone
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66. Krishna G, AbuTarif M, Xuan F, Martinho M, Angulo D, Cornely OA: Pharmacokinetics of oral posaconazole in neutropenic patients receiving chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Pharmacotherapy; 2008 Oct;28(10):1223-32
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  • [Title] Pharmacokinetics of oral posaconazole in neutropenic patients receiving chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
  • STUDY OBJECTIVE: To analyze the pharmacokinetics of posaconazole administered as prophylaxis for invasive fungal infection (IFI) in neutropenic patients receiving chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).
  • DESIGN: Pharmacokinetic subanalysis of a phase III, prospective, randomized, multicenter, evaluator-blinded trial comparing posaconazole with standard azoles (fluconazole and itraconazole).
  • PATIENTS: One hundred ninety-four patients with AML or MDS who received posaconazole oral suspension 200 mg 3 times/day with meals or a nutritional supplement for a minimum of 7 days to achieve steady state and for a maximum of 12 weeks.
  • INTERVENTION: For the first 20 patients, blood samples were collected before the first dose on day 8 and at 2, 4, 6, and 24 hours after that first dose; for all other patients, blood samples were collected at 1 and 3 hours after the first dose on day 8 and during the first episode of evaluation for a possible IFI.
  • MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The effects of the following covariates on average (Cav) and maximum (Cmax) posaconazole plasma concentrations at steady state were explored: age, sex, and race-ethnicity; proven or probable IFI; baseline body weight and body surface area; and baseline (on or before day 7) increases in liver enzyme levels, mucositis, neutropenia, diarrhea, vomiting, or use of an H2-receptor antagonist or proton pump inhibitor.
  • Diarrhea, proton pump inhibitor use, gamma-glutamyl transferase level of 2 or more times the upper limit of normal, and race-ethnicity reduced Cav.
  • Mean Cav and Cmax values did not appear different in the six patients with IFIs (three with proven IFIs, three with probable IFIs) compared with the entire sample of 194 patients; however, a definitive conclusion cannot be made due to the small sample size of patients with IFI.
  • CONCLUSION: Oral posaconazole 200 mg 3 times/day provided plasma concentrations adequate for preventing IFIs.
  • [MeSH-major] Antifungal Agents / pharmacokinetics. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / drug therapy. Mycoses / prevention & control. Myelodysplastic Syndromes / drug therapy. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Triazoles / pharmacokinetics


67. Kraemer K, Waelti M, de Pee S, Moench-Pfanner R, Hathcock JN, Bloem MW, Semba RD: Are low tolerable upper intake levels for vitamin A undermining effective food fortification efforts? Nutr Rev; 2008 Sep;66(9):517-25
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  • [Title] Are low tolerable upper intake levels for vitamin A undermining effective food fortification efforts?
  • Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is a major health problem, particularly in low-resource countries, putting an estimated 125-130 million preschool-aged children at increased risk of morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases.
  • Concern over increased risk of bone fracture associated with vitamin A intakes below the tolerable upper intake level (UL) among populations in affluent countries conflicts with the need to increase intakes in less developed countries, where populations are at greater risk of VAD and intakes are unlikely to reach the UL as diets include fewer foods containing retinol while vitamin A from carotenoids poses no risk of overdose.
  • With the implementation of recently developed risk management tools, vitamin A can be used safely in food fortification, including point-of-use fortification in the context of supplementation among specific target groups in low-resource countries.
  • [MeSH-major] Food, Fortified. Vitamin A / administration & dosage. Vitamin A Deficiency / drug therapy

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  • [ErratumIn] Nutr Rev. 2008 Oct;66(10):610
  • (PMID = 18752475.001).
  • [ISSN] 1753-4887
  • [Journal-full-title] Nutrition reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nutr. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11103-57-4 / Vitamin A
  • [Number-of-references] 53
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68. Topfer LA, Hailey D: Uterine artery embolization for the treatment of fibroids. Issues Emerg Health Technol; 2002 Aug;(36):1-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Uterine artery embolization for the treatment of fibroids.
  • Uterine artery embolization (UAE), or uterine fibroid embolization, is a non-surgical treatment for uterine fibroids that preserves the uterus and offers women an alternative to surgical procedures such as hysterectomy and myomectomy.
  • Evidence from controlled trials comparing fibroid treatments is not yet available.
  • Case series reports indicate that UAE is a relatively safe and effective treatment for symptomatic fibroids.
  • UAE may reduce health care costs associated with treating fibroids through shorter hospital stays and faster recoveries.
  • [MeSH-major] Embolization, Therapeutic / methods. Leiomyoma / therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Canada. Costs and Cost Analysis. Device Approval. Female. Humans. Patient Satisfaction. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Technology Assessment, Biomedical. United States. United States Food and Drug Administration

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  • (PMID = 12195604.001).
  • [ISSN] 1488-6316
  • [Journal-full-title] Issues in emerging health technologies
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Issues Emerg Health Technol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
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69. Berghmans T, Paesmans M, Lalami Y, Louviaux I, Luce S, Mascaux C, Meert AP, Sculier JP: Activity of chemotherapy and immunotherapy on malignant mesothelioma: a systematic review of the literature with meta-analysis. Lung Cancer; 2002 Nov;38(2):111-21
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  • [Title] Activity of chemotherapy and immunotherapy on malignant mesothelioma: a systematic review of the literature with meta-analysis.
  • The role of chemotherapy for unresectable malignant mesothelioma is unclear.
  • The aims of the present study were to evaluate the methodological quality of published papers relative to chemotherapy or immunotherapy in malignant mesothelioma and to aggregate, for trials having a similar methodology, the response rates in order to identify the most active chemotherapeutic drugs and regimens.
  • A study was considered as potentially positive if the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the response rate was greater than 20% and positive if the lower limit of the 95% CI was > 20%.
  • Eighty-three studies (88 treatment arms) were eligible for the systematic review.
  • Studies were aggregated in four groups according to the presence of cisplatin and/or doxorubicin in the treatment regimen.
  • The combination of these two drugs can be recommended as control arm for future randomised phase III trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Mesothelioma / drug therapy. Mesothelioma / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Clinical Trials as Topic. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Humans. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.
  • (PMID = 12399121.001).
  • [ISSN] 0169-5002
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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70. La Marca A, Giulini S, Vito G, Orvieto R, Volpe A, Jasonni VM: Gestrinone in the treatment of uterine leiomyomata: effects on uterine blood supply. Fertil Steril; 2004 Dec;82(6):1694-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gestrinone in the treatment of uterine leiomyomata: effects on uterine blood supply.
  • Gestrinone has been shown to reduce uterine volume and stop bleeding in women with uterine leiomyomata.
  • In the present study, we demonstrated a reduction in the volume of uterine myomas and in the uterine artery blood perfusion over a 6-month period of gestrinone administration in premenopausal women.
  • [MeSH-major] Estrogen Antagonists / therapeutic use. Gestrinone / therapeutic use. Leiomyomatosis / blood supply. Leiomyomatosis / drug therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / blood supply. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Premenopause. Regional Blood Flow / drug effects. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15589885.001).
  • [ISSN] 0015-0282
  • [Journal-full-title] Fertility and sterility
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fertil. Steril.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrogen Antagonists; 1421533RCM / Gestrinone
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71. Petrache SM, Miftode E, Vâţă A, Petrovici CM, Dorneanu O, Luca V: [Sepsis with Staphylococcus aureus in immunocompromised patients]. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi; 2009 Apr-Jun;113(2):410-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Transliterated title] Sepsis-ul cu Staphylococcus aureus la imunodeprimaţi.
  • The aim of our study was to analyze clinical and biological characteristics of immunocompromised patients with staphylococcal sepsis and to compare with the same data in non-immunocompromised patients.
  • MATERIAL AND METHOD: The diagnosis of sepsis was made based on Bone criteria.
  • RESULTS: Among the 147 patients with Staphylococcus aureus sepsis--66.67% had concomitant immunosuppressive conditions (diabetes mellitus, liver diseases, renal failure, corticotherapy, etc).
  • We have found a significant correlation between the immunosuppressed status and MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) involvement (p = 0.0018) and also, between this group of patients and treatment failure (p = 0.0012).
  • CONCLUSION: Because of the high rate of MRSA involvement in systemic infections in the Eastern region of Romania first intention treatment of patients with staphylococcal infections and conditions of immunosuppression must include antibiotics effective against methicillin-resistant strains.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacteremia / diagnosis. Bacteremia / microbiology. Immunocompromised Host. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus / isolation & purification. Staphylococcal Infections / complications. Staphylococcal Infections / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Immunocompetence. Male. Microbial Sensitivity Tests. Middle Aged. Oxacillin / pharmacology. Oxacillin / therapeutic use. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Romania / epidemiology. Staphylococcus aureus / isolation & purification. Survival Rate. Treatment Failure. Treatment Outcome. Vancomycin / pharmacology. Vancomycin / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 21495345.001).
  • [ISSN] 0048-7848
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista medico-chirurgicală̆ a Societă̆ţ̜ii de Medici ş̧i Naturaliş̧ti din Iaş̧i
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi
  • [Language] rum
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Romania
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 6Q205EH1VU / Vancomycin; UH95VD7V76 / Oxacillin
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72. Varelas FK, Papanicolaou AN, Vavatsi-Christaki N, Makedos GA, Vlassis GD: The effect of anastrazole on symptomatic uterine leiomyomata. Obstet Gynecol; 2007 Sep;110(3):643-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The effect of anastrazole on symptomatic uterine leiomyomata.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of anastrazole on symptomatic uterine leiomyomata.
  • Forty-one premenopausal women eligible for hysterectomy with 45 uterine leiomyomata were enrolled and treated with anastrazole 1 mg daily for three cycles of 28 days each.
  • The effect of treatment was evaluated on leiomyoma and uterine volumes, endometrial thickness, gonadotrophins, estradiol and hematocrit levels, menstrual pattern, severity of leiomyoma-related symptoms, and adverse effects.
  • The effects of leiomyoma location, size, and age of participants on tumor volume changes were evaluated.
  • RESULTS: Thirty-five women with 39 leiomyomata finished the study.
  • Anastrazole resulted in a mean 55.7% reduction of leiomyoma volumes (163 mL to 72 mL, P<.001), a 29.9% reduction in total uterine volumes (278 mL to 195 mL, P<.001), and an 11.3% increase of the hematocrit levels (33.4% to 37.2%, P<.001) at the end of the treatment.
  • Leiomyoma location had no significant effect on volume decrease.
  • Leiomyoma volume decreased in women aged older than 40 years (P=.002), whereas no difference was found in women younger than 40.
  • The size of large (greater than 50 mm) leiomyomata decreased significantly (P=.004).
  • Less difference was observed in small (50 mm or less) leiomyomata (P=.031).
  • Anastrazole improved leiomyoma-related symptomatology and caused no serious adverse effects.
  • CONCLUSION: In premenopausal women, anastrazole reduces the size of uterine leiomyomata, improves symptomatology, and is generally well tolerated.
  • LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Leiomyomatosis / drug therapy. Nitriles / therapeutic use. Triazoles / therapeutic use. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Endometrium / drug effects. Endometrium / pathology. Estradiol / blood. Female. Gonadotropins / blood. Hematocrit. Humans. Middle Aged. Organ Size / drug effects. Prospective Studies. Severity of Illness Index. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17766612.001).
  • [ISSN] 0029-7844
  • [Journal-full-title] Obstetrics and gynecology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Obstet Gynecol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Gonadotropins; 0 / Nitriles; 0 / Triazoles; 2Z07MYW1AZ / anastrozole; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol
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73. Moriyama M, Matsumura H, Aoki H, Shimizu T, Yamagami H, Shioda A, Kaneko M, Goto I, Tanaka N, Arakawa Y: Decreased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis C whose serum alanine aminotransferase levels became less than twice the upper limit of normal following interferon therapy. Liver Int; 2005 Feb;25(1):85-90
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Decreased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis C whose serum alanine aminotransferase levels became less than twice the upper limit of normal following interferon therapy.
  • AIM: The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in C-viral chronic hepatitis (CH) and liver cirrhosis (LC) patients after interferon (IFN) therapy was evaluated according to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels.
  • The efficacy of IFN therapy was evaluated based on virologic response and ALT levels using the following groups: virologic-sustained responders (VSR); biochemical-sustained responders (BSR); partial responders (PR), which consisted of BSR patients whose serum ALT levels later relapsed; non-responders (NR)1, which included patients with serum ALT levels that were usually less than 80 IU/l; and NR2, NR with ALT levels persistently more than 80 IU/l.
  • RESULTS: Of the 269 patients, 22 (8.2%) developed HCC after IFN therapy.
  • The incidence of HCC (%/patient/year) was 0.78%, 0%, 0%, 0.17%, 4.68% in VSR, BR, PR, NR1, NR2, respectively.
  • Multivariate analysis revealed that an increase in ALT levels to more than 80 IU/l is an important risk factor for the occurrence of HCC.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the patients with ALT levels less than twice the upper limit of normal after IFN therapy have a reduced risk of progression to HCC from C-viral chronic liver disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Alanine Transaminase / blood. Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / prevention & control. Hepatitis C, Chronic / drug therapy. Interferons / therapeutic use. Liver Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Japan / epidemiology. Male. Middle Aged. Reference Values. Risk. Risk Assessment. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15698403.001).
  • [ISSN] 1478-3223
  • [Journal-full-title] Liver international : official journal of the International Association for the Study of the Liver
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Liver Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 9008-11-1 / Interferons; EC 2.6.1.2 / Alanine Transaminase
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74. Nakayama M, Mitsuhashi T, Shimizu Y, Ishihara O, Shimizu M: Pathological evaluation of uterine leiomyomas treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) therapy: role of mast cells and a possible mechanism of GnRH-a resistance in leiomyomas. Pathol Int; 2008 May;58(5):268-74
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LEUPROLIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pathological evaluation of uterine leiomyomas treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) therapy: role of mast cells and a possible mechanism of GnRH-a resistance in leiomyomas.
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) therapy is frequently applied to reduce the volume of uterine leiomyomas (UL).
  • In addition, the possible relationship between mast cells (MC) within UL and the development of UL has been suggested, but the role of MC in UL remains to be determined.
  • UL with or without GnRH-a therapy in 121 premenopausal patients were reviewed.
  • The number of MC was evaluated between the two groups, immunohistochemistry was done for insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and the association between the IGF-I immunoreactivity in UL and the GnRH-a therapy was analyzed.
  • The number of MC significantly increased in UL in GnRH-a therapy, while IGF-I immunoreactivity was significantly reduced in smooth muscle cells of these UL.
  • Furthermore, IGF-I immunoreactivity in MC was inversely correlated with the size reduction rate of UL in GnRH-a therapy.
  • Although GnRH-a therapy is considered to reduce the size of UL transiently, the regression of UL was in part hampered by the increased IGF-I secretion from the increased MC after GnRH-a therapy.
  • Therefore, the more the IGF-I secretion from MC in UL increases, the less effective the GnRH-a therapy is on the size reduction of UL.
  • Thus, the present study may provide an explanation of the possible mechanism of GnRH-a resistance in UL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / agonists. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Leuprolide / therapeutic use. Mast Cells / drug effects. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Count. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / drug effects. Female. Humans. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I / metabolism. Premenopause

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  • (PMID = 18429824.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone; 67763-96-6 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor I; EFY6W0M8TG / Leuprolide
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75. Tomandl J, Palyza V, Tallová J, Drbal J: Time course of urinary neopterin in a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patient during chemotherapy and radiotherapy. J Exp Clin Cancer Res; 2004 Mar;23(1):157-61
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINCRISTINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Time course of urinary neopterin in a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patient during chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • The objective of this study was to follow urinary neopterin in a patient affected by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma during the three months treatment from the onset of the disease.
  • In the study a patient affected by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in Stage IV (centrocyto-centroblastic type) was enrolled.
  • He was treated with combined chemotherapy and local radiotherapy.
  • The time course of urinary neopterin levels ranged from 110 to 524 micromol x mol(-1) creatinine (mean 261, SD 67.5 micromol x mol(-1) creatinine).
  • Over 70 % of the received values were higher than the upper limit of normal excretion of healthy subjects.
  • Longitudinal analysis showed a relatively big variance of urinary neopterin with a tendency of decrease during the treatment.
  • The significant decrease of urinary neopterin was observed till after the radiotherapy period which followed the chemotherapy period.
  • In conclusions, the response to the therapy was accompanied by a reversal tendency of neopterin excretion to physiological values.
  • This study confirms neopterin as a suitable additional parameter for the control of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / radiotherapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / urine. Neopterin / urine
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid. Combined Modality Therapy. Creatinine / urine. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Time Factors. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 15149166.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-9078
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of experimental & clinical cancer research : CR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Exp. Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 670-65-5 / Neopterin; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine; VAP-cyclo protocol
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76. Abe T, Kitajima T, Honma K, Kurasaki T, Okazuka K, Shibasaki Y, Momoi A, Kuroha T, Masuko M, Yagisawa K, Furukawa T, Toba K, Aizawa Y: [Effective combination chemotherapy with rituximab for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with bone relapse after bone marrow transplantation]. Rinsho Ketsueki; 2008 Nov;49(11):1556-61
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. RITUXIMAB .

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  • [Title] [Effective combination chemotherapy with rituximab for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with bone relapse after bone marrow transplantation].
  • A 26-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) relapsed three times after HLA-matched related bone marrow transplantation.
  • Then, ALL relapsed as a single bone tumor involving the CNS and pelvis 4 years after transplantation.
  • Flow cytometry analyses detected CD20-positive cells in the bone tumor.
  • Though the initial bone tumor was resistant to hyper CVAD, radiation was effective and this patient achieved complete remission.
  • At that time, the total radiation dose had already reached the upper limit.
  • After the third relapse, bone marrow achieved complete remission with the administration of pirarubicin, vincristine, prednisolone, and L-asparaginase (arranged DVP-L), though this combination chemotherapy itself was not effective in multiple bone tumors.
  • Thereafter, arranged DVP-L plus rituximab was administered, which resulted in significant tumor reduction.
  • Biweekly rituximab administration as maintenance therapy has completely prevented the regrowth of bone tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Bone Marrow Transplantation. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antigens, CD20. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Rituximab. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19047788.001).
  • [ISSN] 0485-1439
  • [Journal-full-title] [Rinshō ketsueki] The Japanese journal of clinical hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rinsho Ketsueki
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antigens, CD20; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
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77. Kaunitz AM: Progestin-releasing intrauterine systems and leiomyoma. Contraception; 2007 Jun;75(6 Suppl):S130-3
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Progestin-releasing intrauterine systems and leiomyoma.
  • Review of the existing published literature suggests that, in women with uterine fibroids, with or without menorrhagia, the high contraceptive efficacy of the levornorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) remains intact.
  • However, use of the LNG-IUS does not appear to reduce overall uterine dimensions or those of uterine fibroids.
  • In women with uterine fibroids and menorrhagia, LNG-IUS expulsion rates may be somewhat higher than in women without fibroids.
  • Although symptomatic relief is not guaranteed, these findings indicate that insertion of a LNG-IUS represents an appropriate therapeutic option for selected women with menstrual symptoms associated with uterine fibroids.
  • Clinicians who candidly inform their patients regarding what we do and do not know regarding the benefits and risks of the LNG-IUS in women with fibroids should selectively make this therapy available prior to resorting to surgical therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Contraceptive Agents, Female / administration & dosage. Intrauterine Devices, Medicated. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Levonorgestrel / administration & dosage. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Menorrhagia / drug therapy. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Receptors, Progesterone / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 17531604.001).
  • [ISSN] 0010-7824
  • [Journal-full-title] Contraception
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Contraception
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contraceptive Agents, Female; 0 / Receptors, Progesterone; 5W7SIA7YZW / Levonorgestrel
  • [Number-of-references] 16
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78. Eisinger SH, Fiscella J, Bonfiglio T, Meldrum S, Fiscella K: Open-label study of ultra low-dose mifepristone for the treatment of uterine leiomyomata. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol; 2009 Oct;146(2):215-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Open-label study of ultra low-dose mifepristone for the treatment of uterine leiomyomata.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of ultra low-dose mifepristone on uterine size, pain, bleeding and quality of life among women with symptomatic leiomyomata.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Open-label cohort study of 2.5mg mifepristone orally among adult women with at least moderately severe symptoms related to leiomyomata and total uterine volume of greater than 160 cm(3), or at least one myoma of greater than 2.5 cm diameter.
  • Assessments of leiomyomata and uterine size (ultrasound), pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire), bleeding (daily log duration), quality of life (Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life) and health status (SF-36) were conducted at baseline, three months and six months.
  • Uterine volume decreased by 11% and anemia, bleeding, pain, health status and fibroid-related quality of life improved during the course of the trial.
  • CONCLUSION: Treatment of women with symptomatic leiomyomata with ultra low-dose mifepristone for six months is associated with modest reduction in uterine size, appreciable improvements in symptoms and quality of life and no evidence of endometrial hyperplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Hormone Antagonists / therapeutic use. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Mifepristone / therapeutic use. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Health Status. Humans. Middle Aged. Pain / prevention & control. Quality of Life. Uterine Hemorrhage / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 19586708.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-7654
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Obstet. Gynecol. Reprod. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hormone Antagonists; 320T6RNW1F / Mifepristone
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79. Steinauer J, Pritts EA, Jackson R, Jacoby AF: Systematic review of mifepristone for the treatment of uterine leiomyomata. Obstet Gynecol; 2004 Jun;103(6):1331-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Systematic review of mifepristone for the treatment of uterine leiomyomata.
  • OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the effect of mifepristone on uterine leiomyoma size and symptoms and to summarize its adverse effects.
  • DATA SOURCES: A computerized search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and Cochrane databases from 1985 to 2002 and hand searches of conference proceedings from 1995 to 2002 were performed with the search terms "mifepristone" and "leiomyomata" and publication type "clinical trial."
  • Inclusion criteria were clinical trials of daily mifepristone for uterine leiomyomata that measured uterine or leiomyoma volume before and after treatment.
  • The search identified 6 before-and-after clinical trials involving a total of 166 women with symptomatic uterine leiomyomata.
  • The subjects received 5 to 50 mg/d of mifepristone for 3 to 6 months.
  • Daily treatment with all doses of mifepristone resulted in reductions in uterine and leiomyoma volumes ranging from 27% to 49% and 26% to 74%, respectively.
  • Mifepristone treatment reduced the prevalence and severity of dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia, and pelvic pressure.
  • CONCLUSION: Published trials of mifepristone showed reduction in leiomyoma size and improvement in symptoms.
  • [MeSH-major] Hormone Antagonists / therapeutic use. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Mifepristone / therapeutic use. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15172874.001).
  • [ISSN] 0029-7844
  • [Journal-full-title] Obstetrics and gynecology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Obstet Gynecol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hormone Antagonists; 320T6RNW1F / Mifepristone
  • [Number-of-references] 29
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80. Ciochină AD, Drug VL: [Biofeedback therapy for constipation and fecal incontinence]. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi; 2001 Jan-Mar;105(1):173-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Constipation.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Biofeedback therapy for constipation and fecal incontinence].
  • [Transliterated title] Biofeedback-ul în tratamentul constipaţiei şi al incontinenţei anale.
  • Over the last decade biofeedback therapy has emerged as a useful adjunct for the treatment of these problems.
  • Biofeedback therapy is a learning process that is based on "operant conditioning" techniques.
  • Biofeedback training aims to restore a degree of continence that enables patients to resume their activities to a satisfactory level with good success rates and prolonged benefits.
  • The technique requires height levels of motivation not only in the patients but also in the instructor who is providing verbal feedback about the adequacy of a patients performance.
  • [MeSH-major] Biofeedback, Psychology / methods. Constipation / therapy. Fecal Incontinence / therapy

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  • (PMID = 12092149.001).
  • [ISSN] 0048-7848
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista medico-chirurgicală̆ a Societă̆ţ̜ii de Medici ş̧i Naturaliş̧ti din Iaş̧i
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi
  • [Language] rum
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Romania
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81. Schwartzberg L, Burkes R, Mirtsching B, Rearden T, Silberstein P, Yee L, Inamoto A, Lillie T: Comparison of darbepoetin alfa dosed weekly (QW) vs. extended dosing schedule (EDS) in the treatment of anemia in patients receiving multicycle chemotherapy in a randomized, phase 2, open-label trial. BMC Cancer; 2010 Oct 25;10:581
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DARBEPOETIN ALFA .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparison of darbepoetin alfa dosed weekly (QW) vs. extended dosing schedule (EDS) in the treatment of anemia in patients receiving multicycle chemotherapy in a randomized, phase 2, open-label trial.
  • BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA) is responsive to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) such as darbepoetin alfa.
  • Administration of ESAs on a synchronous schedule with chemotherapy administration could benefit patients by reducing clinic visits and potentially enhancing on-time chemotherapy delivery.
  • Patients were randomized 1:1 to an extended dosing schedule (EDS: darbepoetin alfa 300 μg Q2W if chemotherapy was QW, Q2W, or Q4W or darbepoetin alfa 500 μg Q3W if chemotherapy was Q3W) or weekly (150 μg QW regardless of chemotherapy schedule).
  • Stratification factors included chemotherapy cycle length, screening hemoglobin (<10 g/dL vs. ≥10 g/dL), and tumor type (lung/gynecological vs. other nonmyeloid malignancies).
  • The upper limit of the 95% confidence interval was less than the prespecified limit of <0.75 g/dL, supporting noninferiority of the EDS dosing schedule.
  • CONCLUSION: Darbepoetin alfa, when administered synchronously with chemotherapy, on an EDS appears to be similarly efficacious to darbepoetin alfa weekly dosing with no unexpected adverse events.
  • This study provides prospective data on how multiple dosing regimens available with darbepoetin alfa can be synchronized with chemotherapy administered across a range of dosing schedules.
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia / chemically induced. Anemia / drug therapy. Erythropoietin / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Activities of Daily Living. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Darbepoetin alfa. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Hematinics / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / complications. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Quality of Life. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20973982.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00144131
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Hematinics; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin; 15UQ94PT4P / Darbepoetin alfa
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2988026
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82. Markman M, Markman J, Webster K, Zanotti K, Kulp B, Peterson G, Belinson J: Duration of response to second-line, platinum-based chemotherapy for ovarian cancer: implications for patient management and clinical trial design. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Aug 1;22(15):3120-5
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Duration of response to second-line, platinum-based chemotherapy for ovarian cancer: implications for patient management and clinical trial design.
  • PURPOSE: Limited information is available regarding the influence of the duration of a prior response on the length of a subsequent response to platinum chemotherapy in recurrent ovarian cancer.
  • Patients were considered to have responded to second-line therapy if they satisfied specific criteria, including favorable effects on both measurable or assessable disease.
  • RESULTS: A total of 211 platinum-based regimens were administered to 176 women with recurrent ovarian cancer during this time period, with a response being observed in 125 treatment episodes (59%).
  • In three of these four cases, the platinum-based regimen used in the second-line approach included a drug that had not been used in that patient's primary chemotherapy program.
  • CONCLUSION: The length of a prior response to platinum-based therapy in ovarian cancer is highly predictive of the upper limit of the duration of response to a subsequent platinum program, assuming the same or similar drugs are used.
  • [MeSH-major] Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Platinum / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Clinical Trials as Topic / methods. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Research Design. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 American Society of Clinical Onocology
  • (PMID = 15284263.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 49DFR088MY / Platinum
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83. Sharma RA, Decatris MP, Santhanam S, Roy R, Osman AE, Clarke CB, Khanna S, O'Byrne KJ: Reversibility of liver failure secondary to metastatic breast cancer by vinorelbine and cisplatin chemotherapy. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2003 Nov;52(5):367-70
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINBLASTINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Reversibility of liver failure secondary to metastatic breast cancer by vinorelbine and cisplatin chemotherapy.
  • PURPOSE: The development of liver metastases from breast cancer is associated with a very poor prognosis, estimated at 4 months median survival.
  • Since treatment with many chemotherapeutic agents is relatively contraindicated, we assessed the safety, tolerability and potential efficacy of combination chemotherapy with vinorelbine and cisplatin (ViP).
  • METHOD: Pilot study in 11 patients with histologically confirmed breast carcinoma, radiological evidence of liver metastases and serum bilirubin greater than 1.5 times the upper limit of normal.
  • Measurement of liver lesions was performed on CT scan every 8 weeks into treatment.
  • Two patients died after one treatment with ViP, one of whom suffered an intracerebral haemorrhage that was possibly treatment-related.
  • Improvement in liver function tests was observed in 10 patients, and mean time to normalization of bilirubin levels was 36 days.
  • CONCLUSION: Normalization of liver function is possible with ViP treatment of metastatic breast cancer, offering the potential to prolong survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Failure / drug therapy. Liver Failure / etiology. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Vinblastine / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Bone Marrow Diseases / chemically induced. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Liver Function Tests. Middle Aged. Pilot Projects. Survival Analysis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


84. Kotasek D, Canon JL, Mateos MV, Hedenus M, Rossi G, Taylor K: A randomized, controlled trial comparing darbepoetin alfa correction/maintenance dosing with weekly dosing for treating chemotherapy-induced anemia. Curr Med Res Opin; 2007 Jun;23(6):1387-401
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DARBEPOETIN ALFA .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A randomized, controlled trial comparing darbepoetin alfa correction/maintenance dosing with weekly dosing for treating chemotherapy-induced anemia.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if a darbepoetin alfa correction/maintenance dosing regimen is non-inferior to a weekly regimen with respect to red blood cell transfusion requirements in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA).
  • Non-inferiority was to be concluded if the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference in transfusion incidence between treatment groups was below 12.5%.
  • The difference (95% CI) in transfusions was 0.4% (-7.0 to 7.8), demonstrating non-inferiority between treatment groups.
  • The median (range) time to hemoglobin response was 10 (1-17) weeks and 12 (2-17) weeks in the weekly and correction/maintenance groups, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A correction/maintenance schedule with its initial two-fold higher weekly dosing and subsequent Q3W dosing yielded outcomes similar to those observed with a weekly schedule.
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia / chemically induced. Anemia / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Erythropoietin / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Algorithms. Darbepoetin alfa. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Double-Blind Method. Drug Administration Routes. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Hematinics / administration & dosage. Hematinics / adverse effects. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Polypharmacy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17559735.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-4877
  • [Journal-full-title] Current medical research and opinion
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Med Res Opin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hematinics; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin; 15UQ94PT4P / Darbepoetin alfa
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85. Canon JL, Vansteenkiste J, Bodoky G, Mateos MV, Bastit L, Ferreira I, Rossi G, Amado RG: Randomized, double-blind, active-controlled trial of every-3-week darbepoetin alfa for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia. J Natl Cancer Inst; 2006 Feb 15;98(4):273-84
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DARBEPOETIN ALFA .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Randomized, double-blind, active-controlled trial of every-3-week darbepoetin alfa for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia.
  • BACKGROUND: In the United States, darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp) is often used to treat patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia using weekly or every-2-week administration schedules.
  • The every-3-week schedule can be synchronized with many chemotherapy regimens, resulting in fewer visits and reducing burden to patients, but the safety and efficacy of this regimen have not been clear.
  • Eligible patients (age > or = 18 years) were anemic (hemoglobin level < 11 g/dL), had a nonmyeloid malignancy, and were to receive at least 12 weeks of chemotherapy.
  • Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to darbepoetin alfa treatment every 3 weeks (500-microg dose) or weekly (2.25-microg/kg) for 15 weeks.
  • We compared red blood cell transfusion incidence among the two arms from week 5 to the end of the treatment phase using a noninferiority study design.
  • Noninferiority was determined if the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the difference in blood transfusions between groups, calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods, did not exceed 12.5%, a margin based on previous placebo-controlled studies.
  • Fewer patients in the every-3-week arm than in the weekly arm received blood transfusions from week 5 to the end of the treatment phase (unadjusted Kaplan-Meier estimates = 23% versus 30%, difference = -6.8%; 95% CI = -13.6 to 0.1).
  • Percentages of patients achieving the target hemoglobin level (> or = 11 g/dL, consistent with evidence-based practice guidelines) were 84% (every 3 weeks) and 77% (weekly).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia can safely and effectively be treated with 500 microg of darbepoetin alfa every 3 weeks.
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia, Hypochromic / chemically induced. Anemia, Hypochromic / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Erythropoiesis / drug effects. Erythropoietin / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Darbepoetin alfa. Double-Blind Method. Drug Administration Schedule. Erythrocyte Transfusion / statistics & numerical data. Europe. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 16478746.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-2105
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the National Cancer Institute
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin; 15UQ94PT4P / Darbepoetin alfa
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86. Xu Q, Qiu L, Zhu L, Luo L, Xu C: Levonorgestrel inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in uterine leiomyoma cells. Contraception; 2010 Sep;82(3):301-8
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  • [Title] Levonorgestrel inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in uterine leiomyoma cells.
  • BACKGROUND: The levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) is a widely recognized intrauterine anti-fertility system, which can alleviate symptoms of uterine leiomyoma.
  • STUDY DESIGN: After treatment with LNG, the growth rate of the cultured primary uterine leiomyoma cells was studied with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay.
  • Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were performed to measure the differential mRNA and protein expression levels.
  • RESULTS: The proliferation rate of uterine leiomyoma cells was suppressed after treatment with LNG at a minimum concentration of 10 mcg/mL.
  • The inhibitive effect was positively correlated with the LNG concentration and with the incubation time.
  • The mRNA levels of IGF-1, Bcl-2 and survivin were down-regulated significantly after treatment with 10 mcg/mL LNG.
  • Western blot analysis confirmed that the expression of Bcl-2 and survivin was decreased significantly, and the p38 phosphorylation level was increased and caspase 3 was activated remarkably 72 h after treatment with 10 and 20 mcg/mL LNG.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that LNG may suppress the proliferation and induce apoptosis of the uterine leiomyoma cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Contraceptive Agents, Female / administration & dosage. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Levonorgestrel / administration & dosage. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Female. Formazans / chemistry. Histocytochemistry. Humans. Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I / biosynthesis. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I / genetics. Microscopy, Electron, Transmission. Microtubule-Associated Proteins / biosynthesis. Microtubule-Associated Proteins / genetics. Middle Aged. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / biosynthesis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / genetics. RNA, Neoplasm / biosynthesis. RNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Tetrazolium Salts / chemistry. Tumor Cells, Cultured


87. Feng C, Meldrum S, Fiscella K: Improved quality of life is partly explained by fewer symptoms after treatment of fibroids with mifepristone. Int J Gynaecol Obstet; 2010 May;109(2):121-4
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MIFEPRISTONE .

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  • [Title] Improved quality of life is partly explained by fewer symptoms after treatment of fibroids with mifepristone.
  • OBJECTIVE: To examine mediators of mifepristone treatment on improvements in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among women with symptomatic fibroids.
  • METHODS: The study sample included women with symptomatic uterine fibroids who were treated with 5mg or 2.5mg of mifepristone or placebo.
  • Assessments of uterine size (ultrasound), pain (McGill pain questionnaire), bleeding (diary), anemia (gm/dL), and HRQOL measured using the uterine fibroid symptom quality of life scale were done at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months.
  • Treatment with mifepristone was associated with significant improvement in HRQOL, which was explained in part by reduction in pain (28%, P<0.001) and bleeding (18%, P<0.001).
  • Reduction in uterine volume was of marginal significance (P=0.05) and was associated with a decrease in HRQOL (7%).
  • Much of the impact of treatment on HRQOL (61%) remained unexplained in this model.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in HRQOL after treatment with mifepristone are partly explained by improvements in pain and bleeding, but not uterine size.
  • [MeSH-major] Hormone Antagonists / therapeutic use. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Mifepristone / therapeutic use. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anemia / drug therapy. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Organ Size / drug effects. Pain / drug therapy. Quality of Life. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Ultrasonography. Uterus / diagnostic imaging. Uterus / drug effects. Uterus / physiopathology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20132932.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-3479
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Gynaecol Obstet
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD042578; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD042578-02; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01-HD042578-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hormone Antagonists; 320T6RNW1F / Mifepristone
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS177500; NLM/ PMC2854311
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88. Miyake A, Takeda T, Isobe A, Wakabayashi A, Nishimoto F, Morishige K, Sakata M, Kimura T: Repressive effect of the phytoestrogen genistein on estradiol-induced uterine leiomyoma cell proliferation. Gynecol Endocrinol; 2009 Jun;25(6):403-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ESTRADIOL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Repressive effect of the phytoestrogen genistein on estradiol-induced uterine leiomyoma cell proliferation.
  • OBJECTIVE: Uterine leiomyomas are the most common gynecological benign tumor and greatly affect reproductive health and well-being.
  • Current epidemiological study reported that soy products intake is inversely associated with diseases leading to hysterectomy.
  • Genistein is a soy-derived phytoestrogen and its inhibitory effect on leiomyoma cell proliferation is reported.
  • In this study, we investigated the siginificant inhibitory effect of genistein on estradiol (E(2))-induced leiomyoma cells proliferation.
  • STUDY DESIGN: The Eker rat-derived uterine leiomyoma cell line ELT-3 cells were used.
  • This inhibitory effect of genistein was attenuated by the treatment of cells with PPARgamma antagonist bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) or GW9662.
  • Genistein may be useful as an alternative therapy for leiomyoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Genistein / therapeutic use. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Phytoestrogens / therapeutic use. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor. Estradiol. Female. Ligands. PPAR gamma / metabolism. Rats. Receptors, Estrogen / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19903033.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-0766
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Endocrinol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Ligands; 0 / PPAR gamma; 0 / Phytoestrogens; 0 / Receptors, Estrogen; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol; DH2M523P0H / Genistein
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89. Kefford RF, Clingan PR, Brady B, Ballmer A, Morganti A, Hersey P: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of high-dose bosentan in patients with stage IV metastatic melanoma receiving first-line dacarbazine chemotherapy. Mol Cancer; 2010 Mar 30;9:69
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DACARBAZINE .

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  • [Title] A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of high-dose bosentan in patients with stage IV metastatic melanoma receiving first-line dacarbazine chemotherapy.
  • We evaluated the effects of bosentan - a dual endothelin receptor antagonist - in patients receiving first-line dacarbazine therapy for stage IV metastatic cutaneous melanoma in a phase 2, proof-of-concept study.
  • RESULTS: Eligible patients had metastatic cutaneous melanoma naïve to chemotherapy or immunotherapy, no central nervous system involvement, and serum lactate dehydrogenase <1.5 x upper limit of normal.
  • Treatment comprised bosentan 500 mg twice daily or matching placebo, in addition to dacarbazine 1000 mg/m2 every three weeks.
  • Eighty patients were randomized (double-blind) and 38 in each group received study treatment.
  • Median time to tumor progression (primary endpoint) was not significantly different between the two groups (placebo, 2.8 months; bosentan, 1.6 months; bosentan/placebo hazard ratio, 1.144; 95% CI, 0.717-1.827; p = 0.5683).
  • Incidences of most adverse events and clinically relevant increases in hepatic transaminases were similar between treatment groups although hemoglobin decrease to >8 and < or = 10 g/dL and < or = 8 g/dL was more common in the bosentan group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients receiving dacarbazine as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic melanoma, the addition of high-dose bosentan had no effect on time to tumor progression or other efficacy parameters.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Melanoma / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sulfonamides / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 20350333.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-4598
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT01009177
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Sulfonamides; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; Q326023R30 / bosentan
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2856553
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90. Palomba S, Orio F Jr, Russo T, Falbo A, Tolino A, Lombardi G, Cimini V, Zullo F: Antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of raloxifene on uterine leiomyomas in postmenopausal women. Fertil Steril; 2005 Jul;84(1):154-61
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  • [Title] Antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of raloxifene on uterine leiomyomas in postmenopausal women.
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the cell effects of raloxifene on uterine and leiomyoma tissue in postmenopausal women.
  • PATIENT(S): Forty postmenopausal women affected by uterine leiomyomas and selected for hysterectomy.
  • INTERVENTION(S): Treatment for three cycles of 28 days with raloxifene at a dose of 180 mg/day orally (raloxifene group) or placebo tablets (3 tablets/day orally) (placebo group).
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Uterine and leiomyoma dimensions were measured in each subject at entry and before surgery.
  • On leiomyomas and homologous myometrium the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells/total cells (PCNA/TC) and the Bcl-2-positive cells/Bax-positive cells (Bcl-2/Bax) ratios (%), as proliferation and apoptotic indexes, respectively, were measured.
  • RESULT(S): After treatment, uterine and leiomyoma sizes were significantly changed in comparison with baseline and the placebo group.
  • PCNA/TC and Bcl-2/Bax ratios were significantly higher in leiomyomas than in homologous myometrium.
  • A significant difference in PCNA/TC and Bcl-2/Bax ratios was detected in leiomyoma tissue between the raloxifene group and controls.
  • CONCLUSION(S): In postmenopausal women, raloxifene administration reduces uterine leiomyomas by exerting a cell antiproliferative and proapoptotic action.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Postmenopause / drug effects. Raloxifene Hydrochloride / therapeutic use. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Double-Blind Method. Female. Growth Inhibitors / pharmacology. Growth Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Humans. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 16009171.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-5653
  • [Journal-full-title] Fertility and sterility
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fertil. Steril.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Growth Inhibitors; 4F86W47BR6 / Raloxifene Hydrochloride
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91. Mason HR, Nowak RA, Morton CC, Castellot JJ Jr: Heparin inhibits the motility and proliferation of human myometrial and leiomyoma smooth muscle cells. Am J Pathol; 2003 Jun;162(6):1895-904
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. HEPARIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Heparin inhibits the motility and proliferation of human myometrial and leiomyoma smooth muscle cells.
  • Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are a major women's health problem.
  • Currently, the standard for treatment remains hysterectomy, because no other treatment modalities can reduce both symptoms and recurrence.
  • As leiomyomas are a hyperproliferation of smooth muscle cells, we sought to understand the regulation of uterine smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by the glycosaminoglycan heparin, which has been extensively studied as an anti-proliferative molecule in vascular smooth muscle cells.
  • Using matched pairs of human myometrial and leiomyoma smooth muscle cells from the same uterus, we demonstrate that the proliferation and motility of both cell types are inhibited by heparin.
  • Furthermore, nonanticoagulant and anticoagulant heparin were equally effective at inhibiting leiomyoma and myometrial smooth muscle cell proliferation.
  • These results warrant further investigation into the possibility that heparin might be useful in the treatment of uterine fibroids.

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  • (PMID = 12759246.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9440
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Pathol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA78895; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL049973; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA078895; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD35148; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL49973
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9005-49-6 / Heparin; EC 3.4.22.- / CASP3 protein, human; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1868134
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92. Adolfsson PI, Haug I, Berg G, Svensson SP: Changes in beta(2)-adrenoceptor expression and in adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase activity in human uterine leiomyomas. Mol Hum Reprod; 2000 Sep;6(9):835-42
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. (L)-Methionine .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Changes in beta(2)-adrenoceptor expression and in adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase activity in human uterine leiomyomas.
  • Uterine leiomyoma is a very common benign tumour with unclear pathophysiology in adult women.
  • In the present study we have investigated the expression level of alpha(2)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptors, and the adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase activity in leiomyoma tissue compared with adjacent myometrium.
  • Our results show that the alpha(2)/beta(2)-adrenoceptor ratio is increased in leiomyoma, due to a significant decrease in beta(2)-adrenoceptor expression.
  • These changes were not due to an increased innervation, as the tumour tissue was completely devoid of nerve fibres.
  • Moreover, the adenylyl cyclase activity of leiomyoma membranes was found to be approximately 50% lower, whereas the phosphodiesterase activity was significantly increased (by approximately 100%).
  • We found that stimulating an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP, by adenylyl cyclase activity through beta(2)-adrenoceptors (isoprenaline), by direct enzyme activation (forskolin), or by inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity (papaverine), potently blocked both protein and DNA synthesis in cultured leiomyoma smooth muscle cells.
  • Our results imply the adrenoceptors might be involved in, or a consequence of, leiomyoma growth.
  • The results also suggest a new interesting approach for leiomyoma pharmacotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenylyl Cyclases / metabolism. Leiomyoma / metabolism. Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases / metabolism. Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 / biosynthesis. Uterine Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 10956556.001).
  • [ISSN] 1360-9947
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular human reproduction
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Hum. Reprod.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2; 0 / Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2; 0 / Sulfur Radioisotopes; 10028-17-8 / Tritium; AE28F7PNPL / Methionine; EC 3.1.4.- / Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases; EC 4.6.1.1 / Adenylyl Cyclases; VC2W18DGKR / Thymidine
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93. Maruo T, Matsuo H, Samoto T, Shimomura Y, Kurachi O, Gao Z, Wang Y, Spitz IM, Johansson E: Effects of progesterone on uterine leiomyoma growth and apoptosis. Steroids; 2000 Oct-Nov;65(10-11):585-92
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effects of progesterone on uterine leiomyoma growth and apoptosis.
  • Uterine leiomyomas appear during the reproductive years and regress after menopause, indicating the ovarian steroid-dependent growth potential.
  • Recently we have found that the use of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (IUS) is effective in the long-term contraception and management of menorrhagic women with uterine myomas because of a striking reduction in menorrhagia.
  • These clinical experiences prompted us to characterize the effects of progestin on the proliferation and apoptosis of leiomyoma cells cultured in vitro.
  • As epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to mediate estrogen action and play a crucial role in regulating leiomyoma growth, we also investigated the effects of sex steroids on EGF and EGF receptor (EGF-R) expression in leiomyoma cells.
  • In cultures of leiomyoma cells, the addition of either E(2) (10 ng/ml) or P(4) (100 ng/ml) resulted in an increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in the cells; whereas in cultures of normal myometrial cells, the addition of E(2) augmented PCNA expression in the cells, but P(4) did not.
  • Immunoblot analysis revealed that leiomyoma cells contained immunoreactive EGF and that P(4) treatment resulted in an increase in EGF expression in the cells.
  • In contrast, E(2) treatment augmented EGF-R expression in cultured leiomyoma cells, but P(4) did not.
  • These results indicate that P(4) up-regulates the expression of PCNA and EGF in leiomyoma cells, whereas E(2) up-regulates the expression of PCNA and EGF-R in those cells.
  • It is, therefore, conceivable that P(4) and E(2) act in combination to stimulate the proliferative potential of leiomyoma cells through the induction of EGF and EGF-R expression.
  • We also found that Bcl-2 protein, an apoptosis-inhibiting gene product, was abundantly expressed in leiomyoma relative to that in normal myometrium, suggesting that the abundant expression of Bcl-2 protein in leiomyoma cells may be one of the molecular bases for the enhanced growth of leiomyoma relative to that of normal myometrium in the uterus.
  • Furthermore, Bcl-2 protein expression in leiomyoma cells was up-regulated by P(4), but down-regulated by E(2).
  • Therefore, it seems likely that P(4) may also participate in leiomyoma growth through the induction of Bcl-2 protein in leiomyoma cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Progesterone / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Division / drug effects. Female. Humans. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 11108863.001).
  • [ISSN] 0039-128X
  • [Journal-full-title] Steroids
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Steroids
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 4G7DS2Q64Y / Progesterone
  • [Number-of-references] 37
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94. Roberts A: Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound for uterine fibroids. Semin Intervent Radiol; 2008 Dec;25(4):394-405
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  • [Title] Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound for uterine fibroids.
  • Uterine fibroids are an important problem for women of reproductive age.
  • Although hysterectomy has been the traditional treatment for fibroids, many women are interested in a less invasive therapy.
  • Food & Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of uterine fibroids.
  • The procedure is completely noninvasive.
  • It is performed as an outpatient procedure and the patient can resume her normal activities the day following the procedure.
  • Techniques of treatment of uterine fibroids are still being refined, but significant progress has been made in understanding some of the challenges for this new technology.
  • Some fibroids are more responsive to the focused ultrasound; some fibroids are more resistant.
  • Not all women are candidates for this procedure.
  • The procedure of MRgFUS is feasible, safe and becoming increasingly popular.

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  • (PMID = 21326581.001).
  • [ISSN] 0739-9529
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in interventional radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Intervent Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3036536
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Focused ultrasound / MR-guided / ablation / fibroids / magnetic resonance imaging / uterine leiomyoma
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95. Chwalisz K, Larsen L, Mattia-Goldberg C, Edmonds A, Elger W, Winkel CA: A randomized, controlled trial of asoprisnil, a novel selective progesterone receptor modulator, in women with uterine leiomyomata. Fertil Steril; 2007 Jun;87(6):1399-412
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A randomized, controlled trial of asoprisnil, a novel selective progesterone receptor modulator, in women with uterine leiomyomata.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine efficacy and safety of asoprisnil in patients with leiomyomata.
  • PATIENT(S): One hundred twenty-nine women with leiomyomata.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Uterine bleeding changes by using daily bleeding diaries, hemoglobin concentrations, dominant leiomyoma and uterus volume measured sonographically, patient-reported symptoms related to bloating and pelvic pressure, endometrial thickness and morphology, hormonal parameters, and standard safety measures.
  • RESULT(S): Asoprisnil suppressed uterine bleeding in 28%, 64%, and 83% of subjects at 5, 10, and 25 mg, respectively, and reduced leiomyoma and uterine volumes.
  • Median percentage decrease from baseline in leiomyoma volume was statistically significant at 25 mg compared with placebo after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment; by week 12, leiomyoma volume was reduced by 36%.
  • CONCLUSION(S): After 12-week treatment, asoprisnil controlled uterine bleeding while reducing leiomyoma volume and the associated pressure symptoms.
  • [MeSH-major] Estrenes / therapeutic use. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Oximes / therapeutic use. Oxytocics / therapeutic use. Receptors, Progesterone / physiology. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Double-Blind Method. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Patient Selection. Placebos. Uterine Hemorrhage / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 17307170.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-5653
  • [Journal-full-title] Fertility and sterility
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fertil. Steril.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00160459
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrenes; 0 / Oximes; 0 / Oxytocics; 0 / Placebos; 0 / Receptors, Progesterone; 72W09924WP / asoprisnil
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96. Liang M, Wang H, Zhang Y, Lu S, Wang Z: Expression and functional analysis of platelet-derived growth factor in uterine leiomyomata. Cancer Biol Ther; 2006 Jan;5(1):28-33
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Expression and functional analysis of platelet-derived growth factor in uterine leiomyomata.
  • OBJECTIVE: To examine the expression of PDGF and its receptors in leiomyoma tissue and to investigate the regulation of PDGF on leiomyoma cell proliferation.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The expression of PDGF and its receptors was examined in 21 pairs of uterine leiomyoma and the adjacent myometrium tissues using an immunostaining method.
  • Paired cultures of leiomyoma and normal myometrium cells were established and treated with PDGF.
  • Total RNA was extracted from leiomyoma and myometrial cells for detection of the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and collagen alpha1 (I, III) by semi-quantitative PCR.
  • RESULT: The expression of PDGF-AA and PDGF-BB in leiomyoma tissue is obviously higher than that in the matched myometrial tissue (P < 0.05).
  • In addition, the expression of PDGF-BB in secretory phase is higher than that in proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle (P = 0.027) in leiomyoma tissue.
  • The expression of PCNA and collagen alpha1 (I) were increased in both leiomyoma and myometrial cells after treatment of PDGF, whereas the expression levels were greater in leiomyoma cells than that in myometrial cells.
  • CONCLUSION: The expression of PDGF and its receptors in leiomyoma and myometrial tissue varied during the menstrual cycle.
  • PDGF may play a role in the pathogenesis of leiomyomas through a mechanism involved in not only the proliferation of leiomyoma cells but also excessive expression of extra cellular molecules.
  • [MeSH-major] Leiomyoma / metabolism. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor / metabolism. Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha / metabolism. Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta / metabolism. Uterine Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Proliferation. Collagen Type I / analysis. Collagen Type I / genetics. Collagen Type I / metabolism. Collagen Type III / analysis. Collagen Type III / genetics. Collagen Type III / metabolism. Female. Humans. Menstrual Cycle / genetics. Menstrual Cycle / metabolism. Myocytes, Smooth Muscle / drug effects. Myocytes, Smooth Muscle / metabolism. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen / analysis. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen / genetics. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen / metabolism. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-sis. RNA, Messenger / analysis. RNA, Messenger / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16294022.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-4047
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer biology & therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Biol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Collagen Type I; 0 / Collagen Type III; 0 / Platelet-Derived Growth Factor; 0 / Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-sis; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / platelet-derived growth factor A; 0 / platelet-derived growth factor BB; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta
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97. Strinić T, Vulić M, Buković D, Masković J, Hauptman D, Jelincić Z: Uterine artery embolization for the treatment of uterine fibroids. Coll Antropol; 2004 Dec;28(2):793-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Uterine artery embolization for the treatment of uterine fibroids.
  • Uterine artery embolization can be regarded as a less invasive procedure for the treatment of fibroids compared with myomectomy, hysterectomy, and laparoscopic myolysis.
  • The aim of this study was the evaluation of safety and efficacy of uterine artery embolization and of womens' opinion about this treatment.
  • After gynecological examination sixty-nine premenopausal women underwent uterine artery embolization.
  • All procedures but four were technically successful; three women underwent unilateral embolization because of vascular malformation and one of them had an allergic reaction to contrast medium.
  • The follow-up examinations after 3, 6 and 12 month showed a significant reduction of uterine and fibroid volume with significant improvement of bleeding.
  • Therefore, according to this report, uterine artery embolization is a successful, minimal invasive treatment of myoma that preserves the uterus and requires shorter hospitalization and recovery times than surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Embolization, Therapeutic. Leiomyoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Contrast Media / adverse effects. Drug Hypersensitivity. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome. Uterine Hemorrhage / etiology. Uterine Hemorrhage / therapy

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  • (PMID = 15666613.001).
  • [ISSN] 0350-6134
  • [Journal-full-title] Collegium antropologicum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Coll Antropol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Croatia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media
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98. Wang H, Jin J: [Effects of mifepristone on estrogen and progestin receptors in human uterine leiomyoma]. Zhonghua Fu Chan Ke Za Zhi; 2000 Feb;35(2):79-81
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Effects of mifepristone on estrogen and progestin receptors in human uterine leiomyoma].
  • OBJECTIVES: To study the effects of mifepristone on estrogen receptors (ER) and progestin receptors (PR) in human uterine leiomyoma and myometrium.
  • METHODS: 20 patients with uterine leiomyoma who had surgical indication received 25 mg of mifepristone daily for 90 days beginning on the first day of menstrual cycle.
  • Ultrasound examination, serum hormonal parameters, liver and renal function, electrolyte, complete blood count were monitored prior to and at the end of treatment.
  • Hysterectomy or myomectomy was performed just when the treatment finished.
  • Leiomyomata and myometrial tissue were obtained for immunohistochemical ER and PR analyses using monoclonal antibody.
  • Control group included 20 patients who had matched age, weight, size and position of leiomyoma, and operated in the follicular phase of the cycle.
  • RESULTS: After 90 days of mifepristone treatment, the leiomyoma volume decreased by (37.3 +/- 19.0)% and the uterine volume decreased (27.4 +/- 21.9)%.
  • Hormonal parameters were within the levels of follicular phase.
  • ER and PR positive rate in leiomyoma but not in myometrium of study group were significantly less than those of control group (P < 0.001).
  • The positive rate of ER and PR of control group and PR of study group in leiomyoma were significantly higher than those in myometrial tissue of both groups (P < 0.05).
  • ER of study group in leiomyoma was similar to myometrial tissue (P > 0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Mifepristone is a safe and effective drug for treating uterine leiomyoma.
  • It can significantly decrease ER and PR in leiomyoma but not in myometrial tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Hormone Antagonists / therapeutic use. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Mifepristone / therapeutic use. Receptors, Estrogen / drug effects. Receptors, Progesterone / drug effects. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 11809103.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-567X
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua fu chan ke za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Fu Chan Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hormone Antagonists; 0 / Receptors, Estrogen; 0 / Receptors, Progesterone; 320T6RNW1F / Mifepristone
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99. Wilkens J, Chwalisz K, Han C, Walker J, Cameron IT, Ingamells S, Lawrence AC, Lumsden MA, Hapangama D, Williams AR, Critchley HO: Effects of the selective progesterone receptor modulator asoprisnil on uterine artery blood flow, ovarian activity, and clinical symptoms in patients with uterine leiomyomata scheduled for hysterectomy. J Clin Endocrinol Metab; 2008 Dec;93(12):4664-71
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effects of the selective progesterone receptor modulator asoprisnil on uterine artery blood flow, ovarian activity, and clinical symptoms in patients with uterine leiomyomata scheduled for hysterectomy.
  • INTRODUCTION: Asoprisnil, a novel orally active selective progesterone receptor modulator, is being studied for the management of symptomatic uterine leiomyomata.
  • The primary objectives of this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study included evaluation of the effect of asoprisnil on uterine artery blood flow.
  • Furthermore, we assessed effects of asoprisnil on leiomyoma symptoms.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-three premenopausal patients scheduled for hysterectomy due to symptomatic uterine leiomyomata were recruited in four centers and treated with 10 or 25 mg asoprisnil or placebo for 12 wk before surgery.
  • At baseline and before hysterectomy, all patients underwent sonographic assessment to measure impedance to uterine artery blood flow, determined by resistance index and pulsatility index, as well as volumes of largest leiomyoma and uterus.
  • Each asoprisnil treatment was compared with placebo.
  • RESULTS: The increased pulsatility index in both asoprisnil groups and the statistically significantly increased resistance index within the 25-mg asoprisnil group suggest a moderately decreased uterine artery blood flow.
  • Asoprisnil treatment was well tolerated when administered daily for a 12-wk period, and no serious adverse events occurred.
  • CONCLUSION: Asoprisnil moderately reduced uterine artery blood flow.
  • [MeSH-major] Estrenes / pharmacology. Hysterectomy. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Leiomyoma / surgery. Ovary / physiology. Oximes / pharmacology. Receptors, Progesterone / drug effects. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / surgery. Uterus / blood supply
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Arteries / drug effects. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Double-Blind Method. Endometrium / pathology. Female. Humans. Menstruation / drug effects. Middle Aged. Myometrium / pathology. Pregnanediol / blood. Quality of Life. Regional Blood Flow / drug effects. Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color. Uterine Hemorrhage / complications. Uterine Hemorrhage / prevention & control. Vascular Resistance / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 18765509.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-972X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrenes; 0 / Oximes; 0 / Receptors, Progesterone; 72W09924WP / asoprisnil; JR3JD1Y22C / Pregnanediol
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100. Hilário SG, Bozzini N, Borsari R, Baracat EC: Action of aromatase inhibitor for treatment of uterine leiomyoma in perimenopausal patients. Fertil Steril; 2009 Jan;91(1):240-3
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Action of aromatase inhibitor for treatment of uterine leiomyoma in perimenopausal patients.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the aromatase inhibitor on patients with leiomyoma in the reproductive stage regarding reduction of uterine volume and control of symptoms.
  • PATIENT(S): Twenty patients, over 35 years of age, with symptomatic uterine leiomyoma.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Measurement of uterine volume, assessment of symptoms related to uterine leiomyoma, serum assay of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and estradiol.
  • RESULTS: Average reduction of uterine volume of 9.32%, attaining up to 32%, and reduction of symptoms of uterine leiomyoma (menstrual volume, duration of menstruation, and dysmenorrhea).
  • No significant change in serum levels of FSH and estradiol during use of the medication were observed.
  • CONCLUSION(S): Anastrozol proved to be effective in reducing the volume of the uterus-leiomyoma structure, leading to the control of symptoms connected with the disorder without changes in serum FSH and estradiol.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Aromatase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Nitriles / therapeutic use. Perimenopause. Triazoles / therapeutic use. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Estradiol / blood. Female. Follicle Stimulating Hormone / blood. Humans. Menstruation / drug effects. Menstruation / physiology. Middle Aged

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Uterine Fibroid.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Uterine Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Uterine Fibroids.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ANASTROZOLE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ESTRADIOL .
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  • (PMID = 18249392.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-5653
  • [Journal-full-title] Fertility and sterility
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fertil. Steril.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Aromatase Inhibitors; 0 / Nitriles; 0 / Triazoles; 2Z07MYW1AZ / anastrozole; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol; 9002-68-0 / Follicle Stimulating Hormone
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