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1. Matsumura K, Sugimura K, Uchida J, Naganuma T, Nakatani T: Advanced ureteral cancer with complete remission achieved by taxan containing systemic chemotherapy. Int J Urol; 2003 Feb;10(2):105-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Advanced ureteral cancer with complete remission achieved by taxan containing systemic chemotherapy.
  • We report a case of advanced ureteral cancer successfully treated with systemic chemotherapy combined with irradiation.
  • A 47-year-old man was diagnosed as having a right ureteral cancer at the clinical stage of T4, N2 and M1 (liver).
  • A papillary tumor was also found in the bladder and the resected specimen showed a grade 1 transitional cell carcinoma.
  • Although three cycles of methotrexate, vinblastine, pirarubicin and cisplatin (MVAC) gave partial response to the ureteral tumor, new metastases to the lung and pelvic bone were observed.
  • The patient received 50 Gy external irradiation to the pelvis, 11 cycles of paclitaxel (270 mg) and cisplatin (60-80 mg) followed by four cycles of docetaxel (100 mg) and cisplatin.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / radiotherapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / analogs & derivatives. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Ureteral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ureteral Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Vinblastine / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy, Needle. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12588609.001).
  • [ISSN] 0919-8172
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; D58G680W0G / pirarubicin; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; M-VAC protocol
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2. Matin SF, Margulis V, Kamat A, Wood CG, Grossman HB, Brown GA, Dinney CP, Millikan R, Siefker-Radtke AO: Incidence of downstaging and complete remission after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for high-risk upper tract transitional cell carcinoma. Cancer; 2010 Jul 1;116(13):3127-34
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence of downstaging and complete remission after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for high-risk upper tract transitional cell carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: The authors evaluated the incidence of pathologic downstaging and complete remission (CR) in patients with high-grade ureteral and renal pelvic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) (upper tract TCC) who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery.
  • METHODS: The study group comprised patients with biopsy-demonstrated, high-grade disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by nephrouterectomy from 2004 to 2008, during which time patients uniformly were considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Multiple clinical and pathologic features were evaluated, and the primary endpoint was pathologic tumor classification.
  • RESULTS: One hundred seven patients in the control group underwent initial surgery, and 43 patients in the study group received neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Baseline demographics were similar between the groups except for a higher rate of sessile tumor architecture in the study group (72.1% vs 49.5%; P = .018).
  • Fourteen percent of patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy had a pathologic CR.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was associated with a 14% CR rate and a significant rate of downstaging.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Neoadjuvant Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Remission Induction. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 20564621.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA091846-08
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Takayama T, Nagata M, Unno T, Mugiya S, Hata M, Suzuki K, Fujita K: [A clinical study of patients undergoing curative surgery for renal pelvic and ureteral cancers]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2000 Mar;46(3):155-9
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  • [Title] [A clinical study of patients undergoing curative surgery for renal pelvic and ureteral cancers].
  • We retrospectively studied 30 patients who underwent curative surgery for renal pelvic and/or ureteral cancer between August 1987 and August 1998.
  • Nine patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy are alive, but 3 patients have relapsed.
  • Chemotherapy did not have a significant effect on the cause-specific survival or disease-free survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Ureteral Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Kidney Pelvis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 10806570.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
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4. Le Bouëdec G, Bailly C, De Lapasse C, Gimbergues P, Dauplat J: [Retained ovarian remnant carcinoma: a case report]. J Gynecol Obstet Biol Reprod (Paris); 2006 Dec;35(8 Pt 1):829-33
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  • [Transliterated title] Le cancer de l'ovaire rémanent: à propos d'une observation.
  • Ovarian remnant syndrome is defined as residual ovarian tissue non intentionally left in place by the surgeon during a bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy.
  • Patients present various symptoms usually including chronic pelvic pain, pelvic mass, bowel obstruction, hydronephrosis due to ureteral compression.
  • It was regarded as stage IIIc according to the FIGO classification because of common iliac lymph node involvement while there was no ascitis, no peritoneal nor omental implant but a unilateral hydronephrosis induced by extrinsec ureteral obstruction.
  • Complete cytoreductive surgery was achieved including partial bladder and lower ureteral resection with colpectomy, omentectomy, pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy.
  • Paclitaxel-Platinum combination chemotherapy was given for nine cycles.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / surgery. Hysterectomy / adverse effects. Ovarian Neoplasms / surgery. Ovariectomy / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Staging. Salpingostomy. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17151542.001).
  • [ISSN] 0368-2315
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal de gynécologie, obstétrique et biologie de la reproduction
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gynecol Obstet Biol Reprod (Paris)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 32
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5. Lee SE, Byun SS, Park YH, Chang IH, Kim YJ, Hong SK: Adjuvant chemotherapy in the management of pT3N0M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the upper urinary tract. Urol Int; 2006;77(1):22-6
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  • [Title] Adjuvant chemotherapy in the management of pT3N0M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the upper urinary tract.
  • INTRODUCTION: We investigate the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced, but lymph node negative, pathologic stage T3 transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the upper urinary tract.
  • Among the 27 patients, 16 also received adjuvant chemotherapy following surgery (adjuvant group), whereas the other 11 patients did not (nonadjuvant group).
  • RESULTS: Adjuvant and nonadjuvant therapy groups were not significantly different with respect to age, sex, performance status, tumor grade, and tumor location.
  • Overall, 5 of the 16 patients (31%) in the adjuvant group and 4 of the 11 patients (36%) in the nonadjuvant group had recurrence of cancer at 40 months of follow-up.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although it would be difficult to draw any definite conclusions from the results of our investigations, our data suggest that adjuvant therapy with traditional conventional chemotherapeutic regimens alone may not be effective as previously anticipated in significantly improving survival rates for locally advanced, but lymph node negative, TCC of the upper urinary tract.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Pelvis. Ureteral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ureteral Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 16825811.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-1138
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologia internationalis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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6. Fukuda H, Mitsumori K, Minagawa S, Kumazawa T, Tadachi K, Iinuma M, Satoh S, Satoh K, Habuchi T, Kato T: [Two cases of urothelial cancer responsive to high-dose-intensity methotrexate vinblastine doxorubicin and cisplatin (M-VAC) therapy]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2005 Feb;51(2):113-6
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  • [Title] [Two cases of urothelial cancer responsive to high-dose-intensity methotrexate vinblastine doxorubicin and cisplatin (M-VAC) therapy].
  • We report two cases of metastatic urothelial cancer treated with high-dose-intensity (HD) methotrexate vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin (MVAC).
  • After HD-MVAC, the size of primary and lymph node tumors decreased by 57-67% as compared with the standard M-VAC therapy.
  • By shortening the dose interval, HD-MVAC may increase the anti-tumor effect without increasing side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Ureteral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Staging. Pulse Therapy, Drug. Treatment Outcome. Vinblastine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 15773365.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; M-VAC protocol
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7. Zigeuner RE, Hutterer G, Chromecki T, Rehak P, Langner C: Bladder tumour development after urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract is related to primary tumour location. BJU Int; 2006 Dec;98(6):1181-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: To better define the predictors of bladder tumour development in patients operated for upper urinary tract urothelial cancer (UT-UC).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Surgical specimens from 191 consecutive patients with no history of bladder cancer and operated for UT-UC were chosen for analysis.
  • RESULTS: Overall, 51 of 191 (27%) patients developed subsequent bladder tumours, including 25 of 123 (20%) with pelvic, 19 of 47 (40%) with ureteric and seven of 21 (33%) with multifocal tumours (P = 0.04 for all subgroups; P = 0.01 for pelvic vs ureteric).
  • The median (mean, range) time to recurrence was 12 (18, 3-64) months.
  • Clinical trials to evaluate a possible reduction of bladder cancer risk by intraoperative ureteric ligation and/or peri-operative topical intravesical chemotherapy instillation are justified.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Ureteral Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Kidney Pelvis / pathology. Kidney Pelvis / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Urothelium / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17125475.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-4096
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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8. Chen WJ, Kuo JY, Chen KK, Lin AT, Chang YH, Chang LS: Primary urothelial carcinoma of the ureter: 11-year experience in Taipei Veterans General Hospital. J Chin Med Assoc; 2005 Nov;68(11):522-30

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Primary urothelial carcinoma of the ureter: 11-year experience in Taipei Veterans General Hospital.
  • Ureteral urothelial carcinoma is even less common than that of the renal pelvis, accounting for about 25% of all upper urinary tract tumors.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical behavior, survival, recurrence and prognostic information of primary ureteral urothelial carcinoma from our 11 years of experience at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 111 patients with ureteral urothelial carcinoma who had been treated in our hospital between January 1993 and December 2003.
  • Tumor staging was according to the 2002 AJCC TNM classification and stage groupings.
  • RESULTS: There were 69 males and 42 females, with a mean age of 70.5 +/- 9.4 years at diagnosis.
  • Nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision was performed in 78 patients, 12 patients received segmental resection of the ureter, 4 received ureteroscopic laser coagulation, and 17 underwent chemotherapy or radiotherapy or both.
  • Disease recurrence in the nephroureterectomy group occurred in 36 patients (46.2%), with 17 (21.8%) at the urinary bladder, 2 (2.6%) at the retroperitoneum, 1 (1.3%) at the contralateral ureter, 6 (7.7%) with distant metastases to the lung, bone, distant lymph nodes or liver, and 10 (12.8%) at multiple sites.
  • The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 100% for pTa/is, 95.2% for pT1, 69.4% for pT2, and 43.8% for pT3.
  • All 3 pT4 cases died of cancer in a median of 12 months.
  • Significant prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival by univariate analysis were pT (p = 0.00001), stage (p = 0.00001), type of treatment (p = 0.00001) and grade (p = 0.0001).
  • On multivariate analysis, only stage (p = 0.0001) and grade (p = 0.014) were significant for cancer-specific and overall survival.
  • Tumor stage and grade are the only significant prognostic factors for both cancer-specific and overall survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Ureteral Neoplasms / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 16323396.001).
  • [ISSN] 1726-4901
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Chinese Medical Association : JCMA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Chin Med Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China (Republic : 1949- )
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9. Lerouge D, Touboul E, Lefranc JP, Uzan S, Jannet D, Moureau-Zabotto L, Genestie C, Antoine M, Jamali M: [Preoperative concurrent radiation therapy and chemotherapy for operable bulky carcinomas of uterine cervix stages IB2, IIA, and IIB with proximal parametrial invasion]. Cancer Radiother; 2004 Jun;8(3):168-77
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  • [Title] [Preoperative concurrent radiation therapy and chemotherapy for operable bulky carcinomas of uterine cervix stages IB2, IIA, and IIB with proximal parametrial invasion].
  • All patients underwent preoperative external beam pelvic radiation therapy (EBPRT) and concomitant chemotherapy during the first and the fourth radiation weeks combining 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin.
  • The pelvic dose was 40.50 Gy over 4.5 weeks.
  • EBPRT was followed by low-dose-rate uterovaginal brachytherapy with a total dose of 20 Gy in 17 pts.
  • Twenty-one of 25 pts who had not received preoperative uterovaginal brachytherapy underwent postoperative low-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy of 20 Gy.
  • Four severe late complications requiring surgical intervention were observed (one small bowel complication, three ureteral complications).
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / radiotherapy. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Brachytherapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Radiation Injuries. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15217584.001).
  • [ISSN] 1278-3218
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer radiothérapie : journal de la Société française de radiothérapie oncologique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Radiother
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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10. Rose PG, Ali S, Whitney CW, Lanciano R, Stehman FB: Impact of hydronephrosis on outcome of stage IIIB cervical cancer patients with disease limited to the pelvis, treated with radiation and concurrent chemotherapy: a Gynecologic Oncology Group study. Gynecol Oncol; 2010 May;117(2):270-5
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  • [Title] Impact of hydronephrosis on outcome of stage IIIB cervical cancer patients with disease limited to the pelvis, treated with radiation and concurrent chemotherapy: a Gynecologic Oncology Group study.
  • OBJECTIVES: To estimate the significance of hydronephrosis and impact of ureteral obstruction relief on outcome in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer treated with radiation and concurrent chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively studied stage IIIB cervical cancer patients treated on GOG trials 56, 85, 120 and 165 evaluating radiation and concurrent chemotherapy.
  • Eligible patient records were reviewed to assess the presence of hydronephrosis and treatment of ureteral obstruction.
  • Patients were classified into three groups; no hydronephrosis, hydronephrosis relieved from ureteral obstruction via stent or percutaneous nephrostomy and hydronephrosis without treatment of ureteral obstruction.
  • Patient age, race, and tumor characteristics (size, histology and grade) were not significantly different between patients with or without hydronephrosis.
  • Patients with hydronephrosis received similar doses of radiation and cisplatin-based chemotherapy.
  • Univariable analysis identified five prognostic factors; pelvic nodal metastasis (p=0.0001), tumor diameter (p=0.0007), cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiation (p=0.0031), hydronephrosis (p=0.0189), and performance status (p=0.0359).
  • Ureteral obstruction relief occurred for 88% of patients and was associated with improved survival.
  • CONCLUSION: In patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer restricted to the pelvis, hydronephrosis at presentation is a significant but not independent prognostic factor associated with poor performance status and poorer survival.
  • Relief of ureteral obstruction is correlated with improved outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Hydronephrosis / physiopathology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Neoplasm Staging. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. Ureteral Obstruction / physiopathology. Ureteral Obstruction / surgery

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • (PMID = 20181381.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-6859
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 27469; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 37517
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. Mizutani K, Ehara H, Yokoi S, Phuoc NB, Deguchi T, Hirose Y: Treatment-related ureteral cancer following stage II testicular seminoma. Int J Clin Oncol; 2007 Dec;12(6):469-71
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  • [Title] Treatment-related ureteral cancer following stage II testicular seminoma.
  • We report two cases of left ureteral carcinoma that may have been related to prior radiotherapy and anticancer chemotherapy for stage II testicular seminoma.
  • Both patients had undergone radiotherapy (60 Gy) and cisplatin-based chemotherapy, one 17 years before the present presentation and the other 24 years earlier.
  • They underwent retroperitoneoscopy-assisted left nephroureterectomy under a diagnosis of left upper ureteral cancer, established by means of ureteroscopy and brush biopsy.
  • Recently, some investigators have reported that testicular cancer survivors are at significantly increased risk of solid tumors for at least 35 years after treatment.
  • Young patients may have a high risk of cancer when they reach an advanced age.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Neoplasms, Second Primary. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Seminoma. Testicular Neoplasms. Ureteral Neoplasms / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cisplatin / adverse effects. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18071867.001).
  • [ISSN] 1341-9625
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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12. Mylonas I, Briese V, Vogt-Weber B, Friese K: Complete bilateral crossed ureteral duplication observed during a radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy for ovarian cancer. A case report. Arch Gynecol Obstet; 2003 Feb;267(4):250-1
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  • [Title] Complete bilateral crossed ureteral duplication observed during a radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy for ovarian cancer. A case report.
  • Complete bilateral ureteral duplication is a rare malformation.
  • We report the case of a patient diagnosed with ovarian cancer, in which complete crossed bilateral ureteral duplication was observed during a planned radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy operation.
  • Although bilateral ureteral duplication is an even rarer malformation than unilateral, it should be always considered as a differential diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Ovarian Neoplasms / diagnosis. Ureter / abnormalities
  • [MeSH-minor] Acetabulum. Bone Neoplasms / diagnosis. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / radiography. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Bone Neoplasms / ultrasonography. Fatal Outcome. Female. Femur. Humans. Hysterectomy. Liver Neoplasms / diagnosis. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / radiography. Liver Neoplasms / surgery. Liver Neoplasms / ultrasonography. Lymph Node Excision. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Pelvis / surgery. Sacrum

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  • (PMID = 12592431.001).
  • [ISSN] 0932-0067
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of gynecology and obstetrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Gynecol. Obstet.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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13. Troiano M, Corsa P, Raguso A, Cossa S, Piombino M, Guglielmi G, Parisi S: Radiation therapy in urinary cancer: state of the art and perspective. Radiol Med; 2009 Feb;114(1):70-82

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  • [Title] Radiation therapy in urinary cancer: state of the art and perspective.
  • Invasive urinary tumours are relatively rare, and their treatment may cause important changes in urinary, sexual and social functions.
  • A systematic review of external radiation therapy studies in urinary cancers was performed.
  • There are few controlled clinical trials using adjuvant or radical radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in cancer of the kidney, ureter and urethra.
  • There are several reports on multimodality treatment in invasive bladder cancer: intravesical surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy to radiotherapy or concomitant radiochemotherapy with organ preservation.
  • The conclusions reached for renal cancer are controversial, and data on cancers of the urethra and ureter are few and inconclusive.
  • Sufficient data now exist in the literature to demonstrate that conservative management with organ preservation is a valuable alternative to radical cystectomy, the traditional gold standard, in invasive bladder cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Brachytherapy. Combined Modality Therapy. Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic. Cystectomy. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Dose Fractionation. Female. Humans. Kidney / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Male. Meta-Analysis as Topic. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Organ Preservation. Prospective Studies. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Time Factors. Ureter / pathology. Ureteral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ureteral Neoplasms / mortality. Ureteral Neoplasms / pathology. Ureteral Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Urethra / pathology. Urethral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urethral Neoplasms / mortality. Urethral Neoplasms / pathology. Urethral Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Urinary Bladder / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 19082788.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-8362
  • [Journal-full-title] La Radiologia medica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiol Med
  • [Language] eng; ita
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Number-of-references] 80
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14. Mathis KL, Nelson H, Pemberton JH, Haddock MG, Gunderson LL: Unresectable colorectal cancer can be cured with multimodality therapy. Ann Surg; 2008 Oct;248(4):592-8
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  • [Title] Unresectable colorectal cancer can be cured with multimodality therapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine in what manner aggressive external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), chemotherapy, surgical resection, and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) impact relapse and survival in patients with locally unresectable primary colorectal cancer.
  • SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Patients with colorectal cancer fixed to critical structures (eg, IVC and pelvic sidewall) are considered locally "unresectable" for cure and treated with palliative therapy.
  • METHODS: One hundred forty-six patients (65% males) with locally unresectable colon (40) and rectal (106) cancer were treated with EBRT, chemotherapy, surgical resection, and IORT.
  • Median overall survival (years) favored patients with age <58 (7.6 vs. 3.6; P = 0.0012), those receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (9.4 versus 3.9; P = 0.0019), and those with negative or microscopic margins (6.3 vs. 1.9; P = 0.0006).
  • One hundred nineteen long-term complications occurred in 77 patients (53%), most commonly peripheral neuropathy (19%), bowel obstruction (14%), and ureteral obstruction (12%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Aggressive multimodality therapy for locally unresectable primary colorectal cancer results in excellent local disease control and a 5-year disease-free and overall survival rate of 43% and 52% respectively with no operative mortality and acceptable perioperative morbidities.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Colorectal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Colectomy / contraindications. Colonoscopy. Disease-Free Survival. Endosonography. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Retrospective Studies. Severity of Illness Index. Survival Rate. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. United States / epidemiology

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  • [CommentIn] Nat Rev Clin Oncol. 2009 Jun;6(6):305-6 [19483732.001]
  • (PMID = 18936572.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1140
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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15. Savino L, Borruto F, Comparetto C, Massi GB: Radical vaginal hysterectomy with extraperitoneal pelvic lymphadenectomy in cervical cancer. Eur J Gynaecol Oncol; 2001;22(1):31-5
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  • [Title] Radical vaginal hysterectomy with extraperitoneal pelvic lymphadenectomy in cervical cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to examine three types of radical vaginal hysterectomy with different degrees of radicality, performed in order to reduce surgical complications and sequelae in different indications, and to test the feasibility of a new simple and quick technique for extraperitoneal pelvic lymphadenectomy to be used in combination with radical vaginal hysterectomy for treatment of cervical cancer.
  • In this way the advantages of vaginal surgery (e.g.: unnecessary general anaesthesia, reduced surgical trauma, applicability to obese and poor surgical risk patients, fast time-saving procedure) can be preserved.
  • METHODS: We compared retrospectively the long-term results of radical vaginal and radical abdominal operations in a large series of stage IB-IIA cervical cancer patients treated at our institution in Florence from 1968 to 1983.
  • Furthermore, we analysed the results of our experience from 1995 to 1998, when we performed extraperitoneal pelvic lymphadenectomy, followed by radical vaginal hysterectomy, on 48 patients affected by cervical cancer.
  • Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was given in 12 cases and preoperative irradiation was given in ten.
  • As for the more recent experience, median operative time for extraperitoneal pelvic lymphadenectomy was 20 minutes for each side (range 15-36).
  • Median operative time for radical vaginal hysterectomy was 40 minutes (range 30-65).
  • Radical vaginal hysterectomy complications included: ureteral stenosis, one (2%) and uretero-vaginal fistula, one (2%).
  • All complications occurred in patients who received radiotherapy or chemotherapy preoperatively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results of our work demonstrate that our technique for extraperitoneal pelvic lymphadenectomy shows a good applicability to cervical cancer patients submitted to radical vaginal hysterectomy, which has a high rate of cure for stage IB and IIA as shown by our past experience.
  • The procedure of extraperitoneal pelvic lymphadenectomy was quick, easy, and safe, and its realization was not detrimental to the advantages of radical vaginal hysterectomy.
  • Our experience supports the continued use of this combined extraperitoneal and vaginal approach in the treatment of cervical cancer.
  • Moreover, the three classes of radical vaginal hysterectomy allow tailoring the type of the operation to the clinical and physical characteristics of the patients.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Pelvis / pathology. Pelvis / surgery. Peritoneal Cavity. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome


16. Roscigno M, Shariat SF, Margulis V, Karakiewicz P, Remzi M, Kikuchi E, Langner C, Lotan Y, Weizer A, Bensalah K, Raman JD, Bolenz C, Guo CC, Wood CG, Zigeuner R, Wheat J, Kabbani W, Koppie TM, Ng CK, Suardi N, Bertini R, Fernández MI, Mikami S, Isida M, Michel MS, Montorsi F: Impact of lymph node dissection on cancer specific survival in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma treated with radical nephroureterectomy. J Urol; 2009 Jun;181(6):2482-9
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  • [Title] Impact of lymph node dissection on cancer specific survival in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma treated with radical nephroureterectomy.
  • PURPOSE: We examined the impact of lymphadenectomy on the clinical outcomes of patients with upper tract urothelial cancer treated with radical nephroureterectomy.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were collected on 1,130 consecutive patients with pT1-4 upper tract urothelial cancer treated with radical nephroureterectomy at 13 centers worldwide.
  • Univariable and multivariable Cox regression models measured the association of nodal status (pN0 vs pNx vs pN+) with cancer specific survival.
  • The 5-year cancer specific survival estimate was lower in patients with pN+ compared to those with pNx disease (35% vs 69%, p <0.001), which in turn was lower than that in those with pN0 disease (69% vs 77%, p = 0.024).
  • In the subgroup of patients with pT1 disease (345) cancer specific survival rates were not different in those with pN0 and pNx.
  • In pT2-4 cases (813) cancer specific survival estimates were lowest in pN+, intermediate in pNx and highest in pN0 (33% vs 58% vs 70%, p = 0.017).
  • When adjusted for the effects of standard clinicopathological features pN+ was an independent predictor of cancer specific survival (p <0.001).
  • pNx was significantly associated with worse prognosis than pN0 in pT2-4 upper tract urothelial cancer only.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Nodal status is a significant predictor of cancer specific survival in upper tract urothelial cancer. pNx is significantly associated with a worse prognosis than pN0 in pT2-4 tumors.
  • Patients expected to have pT2-4 disease should undergo lymphadenectomy to improve staging and thereby help guide decision making regarding adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Lymph Node Excision. Nephrectomy. Ureter / surgery. Ureteral Neoplasms / mortality. Ureteral Neoplasms / surgery

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  • [CommentIn] J Urol. 2009 Jun;181(6):2412-3 [19371898.001]
  • (PMID = 19371878.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3792
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Wu K, Zhang WH, Zhang R, Li H, Bai P, Li XG: [Analysis of postoperative complications of radical hysterectomy for 219 cervical cancer patients]. Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi; 2006 Apr;28(4):316-9
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  • [Title] [Analysis of postoperative complications of radical hysterectomy for 219 cervical cancer patients].
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyze the causes and therapeutic approaches for the complications of radical hysterectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy in cervical cancer patients.
  • RESULTS: a total of 49 patients (22.4%) developed postoperative complications.
  • The major complications included: bladder dysfunction (10.0%); formation of lymphocysts (7.8%); wound infection (6.8%); hydronephrosis (1.4%) and formation of ureteral fistulas (0.5%).
  • The postoperative complication incidence in the patients who had preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy through intra-arterial catheter or radical radiotherapy in the other hospitals were 50.0% (2/4) and 100.0% (1/1), which were higher than that of the patients treated primarily in our hospital (21.3%, 25.3%) though without statistically significant difference among the groups.
  • Of 52 patients who had previous abdominal surgery history, 13 developed posoperative complications, there was no significant difference between the patients with or without previous abdominal surgery history.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Brachytherapy / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Lymphocele / etiology. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Postoperative Complications. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects


18. Cetina L, Rivera L, Candelaria M, de la Garza J, Dueñas-González A: Chemoradiation with gemcitabine for cervical cancer in patients with renal failure. Anticancer Drugs; 2004 Sep;15(8):761-6
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  • [Title] Chemoradiation with gemcitabine for cervical cancer in patients with renal failure.
  • The prognosis of cervical cancer patients with renal failure secondary to obstructive uropathy is poor.
  • Our objective was to analyze our experience in the management with chemoradiation of untreated cervical cancer patients complicated by obstructive nephropathy and kidney dysfunction.
  • Untreated patients with cervical cancer and renal failure as manifested by raised serum creatinine were treated with pelvic radiotherapy concurrently with weekly gemcitabine at 300 mg/m2.
  • Response, toxicity and renal function pre- and post-therapy were evaluated.
  • Pre-treatment serum creatinine ranged from 1.6 to 18.5 mg/100 ml (median 3.3, mean 6.8) and creatinine clearance varied from 4 to 57 mg/ml/min (median 17, mean 22.1).
  • All patients had improvement in creatinine clearance (pre-therapy 22.78, post-therapy 54.3 mg/ml/min) (p=0.0058) and all but one normalized serum creatinine.
  • Ureteral obstruction causing any degree of renal insufficiency should not be a contraindication to receive chemoradiation to attempt cure.
  • In this setting where cisplatin-based therapy is contraindicated, the use of gemcitabine may be considered.
  • [MeSH-major] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Deoxycytidine / therapeutic use. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Renal Insufficiency / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Brachytherapy / methods. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / complications. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Creatinine / blood. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Evaluation / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Injections, Intravenous. Kidney Function Tests / methods. Mexico. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / administration & dosage. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / adverse effects. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Urethral Obstruction / complications

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  • (PMID = 15494637.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-4973
  • [Journal-full-title] Anti-cancer drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine
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19. Alvarez EA, Wolfson AH, Pearson JM, Crisp MP, Mendez LE, Lambrou NC, Lucci JA 3rd: A phase I study of docetaxel as a radio-sensitizer for locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer. Gynecol Oncol; 2009 May;113(2):195-9
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  • [Title] A phase I study of docetaxel as a radio-sensitizer for locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer.
  • OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of weekly docetaxel with concurrent radiotherapy (RT) for the primary treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix.
  • METHODS: Eligible patients included those with locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer without para-aortic lymph node involvement.
  • RESULTS: Fifteen patients completed 4-6 cycles of chemotherapy.
  • One of three patients experienced 2 delayed grade 3 severe adverse events (SAE) at the 20 mg/m(2) dose level consisting of colonic and ureteral obstruction.
  • At the 30 mg/m(2) dose level, 1/4 patients had a probable treatment-related celiotomy due to obstipation and a necrotic tumor.
  • Of the 8 patients treated at the 40 mg/m(2) dose level, 1 experienced grade 3 pneumonitis, likely treatment related.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / adverse effects. Taxoids / adverse effects. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging


20. Rassweiler JJ, Frede T, Lenz E, Seemann O, Alken P: Long-term experience with laparoscopic retroperitoneal lymph node dissection in the management of low-stage testis cancer. Eur Urol; 2000 Mar;37(3):251-60
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  • [Title] Long-term experience with laparoscopic retroperitoneal lymph node dissection in the management of low-stage testis cancer.
  • All patients had clinical stage-I disease with no clinical evidence (CT scan, ultrasound, tumor markers) of metastases.
  • RESULTS: The procedure could be completed successfully in 30 of 34 patients with stage-I disease.
  • In these cases the mean duration of the procedure was 248 min.
  • One patient developed a delayed ureteral stenosis which required operative repair.
  • Three patients required temporary insertion of an indwelling ureteral stent, and another patient had a pulmonary embolism with an uneventful outcome.
  • One patient with a LRLA on the right side later developed retrograde ejaculation.
  • After a median follow-up of 40 months no regional relapse occurred, but 2 patients developed pulmonary metastases which were treated successfully by three cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Retroperitoneal Space. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 10720848.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-2838
  • [Journal-full-title] European urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] SWITZERLAND
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21. Robnett TJ, Whittington R, Malkowicz SB, Brereton HD, Van Arsdalen K, Drach G, Wein AJ: Long-term use of combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy in the management of stage D1 prostate cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2002 Aug 1;53(5):1146-51
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  • [Title] Long-term use of combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy in the management of stage D1 prostate cancer.
  • PURPOSE: To determine tumor response, patterns of relapse, and prognostic indicators in patients followed long-term after combined hormonal radiation therapy of adenocarcinoma of the prostate in men with tumor metastatic to pelvic lymph nodes.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Seventy-nine patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate with pathologically confirmed pelvic lymph node metastases were treated with combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy.
  • Of these, 55 patients (70%) had T3 disease, with the remainder having earlier-stage disease; 45 (57%) patients had N2 disease (Whitmore-Jewett staging).
  • No distant metastases were detected at initial staging, and no patient had radiographic or pathologic involvement of the para-aortic nodes.
  • Pelvic lymph nodes were irradiated to a dose 45-54 Gy, and the prostate was irradiated to a dose 65-71.8 Gy.
  • Hormonal therapy began up to 2 months before radiation and continued indefinitely.
  • Patients were allowed to select their hormonal therapy and could choose diethylstilbestrol (DES) (2 patients), orchiectomy (21 patients), luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (12 patients), or combined androgen blockade (44 patients).
  • There were 25 recurrences among the 79 patients, including 7 biochemical recurrences without clinical evidence of disease, three local recurrences in the prostate, and distant metastases in 14 patients; 2 patients were deceased, with cause of death listed as prostate cancer, though the location of recurrence was unknown.
  • A single long-term toxic event, recto-ureteral fistula, was observed.
  • CONCLUSION: Combined hormonal and radiation therapy continues to represent an effective treatment option for patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate with metastasis confined to pelvic lymph nodes.
  • All patient groups seem to have a better disease-free survival than that reported previously in single-modality hormone or radiation treatment series.
  • Combined modality therapy may also extend disease-free survival and allow patients to maintain independent function.
  • [MeSH-major] Hormones / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Recurrence. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome


22. Roscigno M, Cozzarini C, Bertini R, Scattoni V, Freschi M, Da Pozzo LF, Briganti A, Gallina A, Capitanio U, Colombo R, Giorgio G, Montorsi F, Rigatti P: Prognostic value of lymph node dissection in patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the upper urinary tract. Eur Urol; 2008 Apr;53(4):794-802
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  • Univariable and multivariable Cox regression models determined the effect of age, pT, grade, nodal status (pN), number of LNs removed, year of surgery, and postoperative chemotherapy on disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) in the overall population and in patients who underwent LND.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Lymph Node Excision. Ureteral Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Analysis of Variance. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Survival Rate

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  • [CommentIn] Eur Urol. 2008 Oct;54(4):953-4 [18508191.001]
  • (PMID = 18207313.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-2838
  • [Journal-full-title] European urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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23. Kim DS, Lee YH, Cho KS, Cho NH, Chung BH, Hong SJ: Lymphovascular invasion and pT stage are prognostic factors in patients treated with radical nephroureterectomy for localized upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma. Urology; 2010 Feb;75(2):328-32
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  • LVI was related to higher pT stage, high tumor grade, sessile architecture, and squamous differentiation.
  • On univariate analysis, tumor architecture, squamous differentiation, LVI, tumor grade, and pT stage influenced disease-specific survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: LVI and pT stage are significant prognostic factors for recurrence-free and cancer-specific survivals in patients with localized UUT-TCC.
  • LVI and pT stage would be helpful for selecting patients who are appropriate for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Kidney Pelvis. Nephrectomy. Ureter / surgery. Ureteral Neoplasms / pathology. Ureteral Neoplasms / surgery. Vascular Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Survival Rate

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  • [Copyright] 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • [CommentIn] Urology. 2010 Feb;75(2):332-3 [20152482.001]
  • [CommentIn] Urology. 2010 Feb;75(2):333 [20152483.001]
  • (PMID = 20018349.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Raman JD, Ng CK, Scherr DS, Margulis V, Lotan Y, Bensalah K, Patard JJ, Kikuchi E, Montorsi F, Zigeuner R, Weizer A, Bolenz C, Koppie TM, Isbarn H, Jeldres C, Kabbani W, Remzi M, Waldert M, Wood CG, Roscigno M, Oya M, Langner C, Wolf JS, Ströbel P, Fernández M, Karakiewcz P, Shariat SF: Impact of tumor location on prognosis for patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma managed by radical nephroureterectomy. Eur Urol; 2010 Jun;57(6):1072-9
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  • [Title] Impact of tumor location on prognosis for patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma managed by radical nephroureterectomy.
  • BACKGROUND: There is a lack of consensus regarding the prognostic significance of ureteral versus renal pelvic upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC).
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of tumor location on outcomes for UTUC in an international cohort of patients managed by radical nephroureterectomy (RNU).
  • MEASUREMENTS: Data accrued included age, gender, race, surgical approach (open vs laparoscopic), tumor pathology (stage, grade, lymph node status), tumor location, use of perioperative chemotherapy, prior endoscopic therapy, urothelial carcinoma recurrence, and mortality from urothelial carcinoma.
  • Tumor location was divided into two groups (renal pelvis and ureter) based on the location of the dominant tumor.
  • RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: The 5-yr recurrence-free and cancer-specific survival estimates for this cohort were 75% and 78%, respectively.
  • On multivariate analysis, only pathologic tumor (pT) classification (p<0.001), grade (p<0.02), and lymph node status (p<0.001) were associated with disease recurrence and cancer-specific survival.
  • When adjusting for these variables, there was no difference in the probability of disease recurrence (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.22; p=0.133) or cancer death (HR: 1.23; p=0.25) between ureteral and renal pelvic tumors.
  • Adding tumor location to a base prognostic model for disease recurrence and cancer death that included pT stage, tumor grade, and lymph node status only improved the predictive accuracy of this model by 0.1%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is no difference in outcomes between patients with renal pelvic tumors and with ureteral tumors following nephroureterectomy.
  • These data support the current TNM staging system, whereby renal pelvic and ureteral carcinomas are classified as one integral group of tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Pelvis / pathology. Ureter / pathology. Urethral Neoplasms / pathology. Urothelium / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. Multicenter Studies as Topic. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Recurrence. Retrospective Studies

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2009 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19619934.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-7560
  • [Journal-full-title] European urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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25. Brown GA, Matin SF, Busby JE, Dinney CP, Grossman HB, Pettaway CA, Munsell MF, Kamat AM: Ability of clinical grade to predict final pathologic stage in upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma: implications for therapy. Urology; 2007 Aug;70(2):252-6
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  • [Title] Ability of clinical grade to predict final pathologic stage in upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma: implications for therapy.
  • This information can be used to counsel patients before surgery and to identify patients for whom neoadjuvant chemotherapy would be most beneficial.

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  • [Cites] Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2003 Aug;47(2):155-69 [12900009.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2003 Aug 28;349(9):859-66 [12944571.001]
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  • (PMID = 17826484.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA079449-06; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA091846; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672-31; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA016672-31; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA91846; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA079449
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS30001; NLM/ PMC2034451
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26. Garcia del Muro X, Condom E, Vigués F, Castellsagué X, Figueras A, Muñoz J, Solá J, Soler T, Capellà G, Germà JR: p53 and p21 Expression levels predict organ preservation and survival in invasive bladder carcinoma treated with a combined-modality approach. Cancer; 2004 May 1;100(9):1859-67
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  • METHODS: Tumor samples from 82 consecutive patients with localized invasive bladder carcinoma treated on 3 different bladder-sparing studies were examined for p53, p21, and pRB expression by immunohistochemical methods.
  • Treatment consisted of transurethral resection, platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and, according to response, either radiotherapy or radical cystectomy.
  • Positive p53 immunoreactivity and positive p21 immunoreactivity were independent predictors of decreased survival with bladder preservation (P = 0.02 and P = 0.02, respectively) and disease-free survival (DFS; P = 0.005 and P = 0.009, respectively) in a multivariate analysis adjusting for clinical stage, ureteral obstruction, and age.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Expression levels of p53 and p21, especially when simultaneously assessed, exhibit independent predictive value for long-term bladder preservation and survival in patients with bladder carcinoma treated with combined-modality therapy.
  • These determinations could be useful in the selection of candidates for bladder-preserving treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / genetics. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / mortality. Cyclins / genetics. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / genetics. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / genetics. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy, Needle. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Predictive Value of Tests. Probability. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Transurethral Resection of Prostate / methods. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 15112266.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CDKN1A protein, human; 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21; 0 / Cyclins; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
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27. Rincón Mayans A, Rosell Costa D, Zudaire Bergera JJ, Rioja Zuazu J, Barba Abad J, Tolosa Eizaguirre E, Romero Vargas L, Pascual Piedrola I: [Response and progression-free survival in T2 to T4 bladder tumors treated with trimodality therapy with bladder preservation]. Actas Urol Esp; 2010 Oct;34(9):775-80
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  • [Title] [Response and progression-free survival in T2 to T4 bladder tumors treated with trimodality therapy with bladder preservation].
  • [Transliterated title] Respuesta y supervivencia libre de progresión en tumores vesicales en estadios T2-T4 tratados con tratamiento trimodal de conservación vesical.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the response and the free-survival progression in patients diagnosed of invasive bladder cancer who have been treated with transurethral resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • This multimodal treatment is compared with a not random serie of patients treated by radical cistectomy.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 43 cases of invasive bladder cancer treated with two schemes of bladder preservation between 1994-2007.
  • They are compared with 145 cases treated with radical cistectomy in the same period of time.
  • Pronostic variables included in the study are clinical stage, grade of differentiation, presence of ureteral obstruction, chemotherapy modality, radiotherapy doses and p53 and ki-67 expression.
  • RESULTS: Mean and median time are 51 and 39 months in patients with multimodal treatment.
  • Ureteral obstruction is a prognostic factor (OR: 7,3;p:0,02).
  • Radiotherapy doses greater than 60Gy (OR: 6,1; p<0,001) and the absence of ureteral obstruction (OR: 7,5; p<0,002) were pronostic variables.
  • At the end of the study, 53,5% of patients had a intact bladder and free-disease.In the same period of time, 145 radical cistectomies were performed due to muscle invasive bladder cancer.
  • Mean and median time in this group were 29 and 18 months respectively.
  • Stadistical analysis reveals a worse clinical stage in the group of patients treated with multimodal treatment (p:0.01).
  • Radiotherapy doses greater than 60Gy and absence of ureteral obstruction were free-survival prognostic variables.
  • [MeSH-major] Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Cystectomy / methods. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20843454.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-7980
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas urologicas españolas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Urol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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28. Brown GA, Busby JE, Wood CG, Pisters LL, Dinney CP, Swanson DA, Grossman HB, Pettaway CA, Munsell MF, Kamat AM, Matin SF: Nephroureterectomy for treating upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma: Time to change the treatment paradigm? BJU Int; 2006 Dec;98(6):1176-80
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  • [Title] Nephroureterectomy for treating upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma: Time to change the treatment paradigm?
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: The records of patients who had a nephroureterectomy for UUT-TCC at our institution from 1986 to 2004 were reviewed for clinical, pathological and treatment period data.
  • The evaluation of treatment outcome during three periods of the study showed no significant effect on DSS.
  • Patients with high-stage and high-grade disease continue to fare poorly, suggesting a need for changing the treatment protocol.
  • Judiciously applying a multimodal approach to the management of high-risk patients by incorporating neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgical resection might provide, for the first time, the opportunity to improve patient outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Nephrectomy / methods. Ureteral Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cohort Studies. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy / methods. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome. Ureter / surgery

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  • [CommentIn] Eur Urol. 2007 Apr;51(4):1141-2 [17415912.001]
  • (PMID = 17125474.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-4096
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA91846; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA079449-06
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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29. Yazigi R, Aliste G, Torres R, Ciudad AM, Cuevas M, Garrido J, Prado S, Solá A, Castillo R, Cerda B, Cumsille MA, González M, Navarro C, Reyes JM: Phase III randomized pilot study comparing interferon alpha-2b in combination with radiation therapy versus radiation therapy alone in patients with stage III-B carcinoma of the cervix. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2003 Mar-Apr;13(2):164-9
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  • [Title] Phase III randomized pilot study comparing interferon alpha-2b in combination with radiation therapy versus radiation therapy alone in patients with stage III-B carcinoma of the cervix.
  • This randomized pilot study was designed to determine whether the addition of interferon alpha-2b to standard radiation therapy offered an advantage in loco-regional control and survival over radiation therapy alone in a homogeneous group of patients with stage IIIB carcinoma of the cervix.
  • Thirty-six patients were treated with a combination of interferon alpha-2b plus radiation therapy, and 38 patients were treated with radiation therapy alone.
  • Patients with evidence of ureteral obstruction were excluded from the study.
  • Survival time was measured from initiation of treatment to date of death or last follow-up.
  • The objective complete response rate was 67% in the combined therapy group and 55% in the radiation alone group (P = 0.454).
  • We conclude that the addition of interferon alpha-2b to standard radiation therapy did not significantly improve loco-regional response or survival, although such a trend was noted.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chile. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / mortality. Neoplasm Staging. Pilot Projects. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Recombinant Proteins. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12657118.001).
  • [ISSN] 1048-891X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 99210-65-8 / interferon alfa-2b
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30. Thalmann GN, Markwalder R, Walter B, Studer UE: Long-term experience with bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy of upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma in patients not eligible for surgery. J Urol; 2002 Oct;168(4 Pt 1):1381-5
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  • [Title] Long-term experience with bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy of upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma in patients not eligible for surgery.
  • Perfusions with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) have been reported beneficial, however, only long-term results will determine the validity of this treatment.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the results of BCG therapy for upper urinary tract disease in 37 patients.
  • All 37 patients had undergone previous surgical treatment for urothelial cancer, had a positive cytology or biopsy for upper urinary tract cancer and were ineligible for radical nephroureterectomy with a bladder cuff.
  • In 1 patient BCG inflammation and in 2 others severe septicemia developed after the first perfusion.
  • There was no tumor seeding along the nephrostomy tract in any patient.
  • BCG perfusion therapy did not alter renal function.
  • Of the 37 patients 14 (38%) died of urothelial cancer, 11 of other causes (29%) and 12 (33%) are alive.
  • CONCLUSIONS: BCG perfusion therapy of the upper urinary tract for papillary tumors or carcinoma in situ is a valid treatment option with acceptable side effects for patients not amenable to conventional radical surgical therapy.
  • BCG therapy of upper urinary tract urothelial tumors may prevent patients from requiring dialysis and provides cure in those with carcinoma in situ of the upper urinary tract.
  • In this negatively selected patient population BCG buys time for some but does not provide cure except for carcinoma in situ.
  • [MeSH-major] BCG Vaccine / therapeutic use. Carcinoma in Situ / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Nephrostomy, Percutaneous. Perfusion. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Ureter / pathology. Ureter / surgery. Ureteral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ureteral Neoplasms / mortality. Ureteral Neoplasms / pathology. Ureteral Neoplasms / surgery. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / mortality. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / surgery. Urinary Diversion

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  • (PMID = 12352398.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / BCG Vaccine
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31. Bernard A, Touboul E, Lefranc JP, Deniaud-Alexandre E, Genestie C, Uzan S, Blondon J: [Epidermoid carcinoma of the uterine cervix at operable bulky stages IB and II treated with combined primary radiation therapy and surgery]. Cancer Radiother; 2002 Apr;6(2):85-98
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  • [Title] [Epidermoid carcinoma of the uterine cervix at operable bulky stages IB and II treated with combined primary radiation therapy and surgery].
  • [Transliterated title] Carcinomes épidermoïdes du col utérin opérables de stades IB et II de gros volume traités par irradiation première et chirurgie.
  • PURPOSE: To identify prognostic factors and treatment toxicity in a series of operable bulky stages I and II cervical carcinomas treated with a therapeutic modality combining primary irradiation and surgery.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between July 1982 and May 1996, 66 patients with bulky squamous-cell cervical carcinomas (stage IB2, IIA, and IIB with 1/3 proximal parametrial invasion) underwent primary external beam pelvic radiation therapy (37.40 Gy to 40 Gy over 4.5 weeks) and low-dose-rate uterovaginal brachytherapy (20 Gy) followed, 5 to 6 weeks later, by class II modified radical hysterectomy with bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy.
  • The four last patients received concomitant chemotherapy during the first and the fourth radiation week combining 5-FU and cisplatin.
  • The clinical median tumor size was 5 cm in diameter (range: 4.5-8 cm).
  • RESULTS: Pathologic complete tumor response in specimen of hysterectomy were observed in 46 patients.
  • The 10-year probability for pelvic recurrence was significantly influenced by the pathologic tumor response: 26% in the residual group vs 5% in the complete tumor response group, P = 0.024).
  • Five late severe complications requiring surgical intervention were observed: 2 bowel obstructions, 1 ureteral stenosis, 1 vesicovaginal fistula, and 1 radiation induced unilateral femoral necrosis.
  • CONCLUSION: A good local control is obtained after combined primary radiation therapy and surgery for bulky stages I and II cervical carcinomas.
  • In our more recent practice, the treatment combines primary concomitant chemoradiation followed by surgery including pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy Dosage. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 12035486.001).
  • [ISSN] 1278-3218
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer radiothérapie : journal de la Société française de radiothérapie oncologique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Radiother
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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32. Jabbour ME, Smith AD: Primary percutaneous approach to upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma. Urol Clin North Am; 2000 Nov;27(4):739-50
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  • Nephroureterectomy does not reduce the need for a long-term cystoscopic follow-up because of the high rate of bladder tumor recurrence that may happen years later after nephroureterectomy.
  • Relying solely on radiography and cytology, lacking sensitivity and specificity, to recommend a nephroureterectomy is against the principles of oncologic surgery, especially now that preoperative histologic proof is easy to obtain endoscopically without compromising cancer control.
  • Biopsy specimens taken with ureteroscopy may be sufficient for grading but less adequate for staging of the tumor.
  • The authors reserve ureteroscopy for ureteral tumors and small (< 1.5 cm) single tumors of the renal pelvis.
  • They approach large or multiple tumors of the renal pelvis percutaneously, in which a full histologic assessment is possible along with a complete resection of the tumor.
  • The decision on the therapeutic approach is made only after the final pathologic report is reviewed.
  • The indications for endourologic treatment in these cases can be extended safely beyond a solitary kidney or a high surgical risk to include any healthy individual with a normal contralateral kidney who is willing to commit to a rigorous lifelong follow-up.
  • When criteria of good prognosis are found, such as absence of carcinoma in situ, presence of diploidy, low p53 expression and a single-tumor, endoscopic management can be offered [table: see text] with a closer follow-up and resorting always to immediate nephroureterectomy at the first evidence of upstaging.
  • Although the tissue removed may include deep layers, deep resection is precluded by the thin renal pelvic wall and the associated risk for perforation.
  • Patients with more extensive disease (T3, T4) have a bad prognosis regardless of the form of therapy.
  • Achieving local control percutaneously while preserving as many nephrons as possible for the future chemotherapy can be a reasonable option.
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Ureteroscopy

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  • (PMID = 11098771.001).
  • [ISSN] 0094-0143
  • [Journal-full-title] The Urologic clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Number-of-references] 93
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33. Szabo Z, Xia J, Mathews WB, Brown PR: Future direction of renal positron emission tomography. Semin Nucl Med; 2006 Jan;36(1):36-50
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  • [Title] Future direction of renal positron emission tomography.
  • Positron emission tomography (PET) is perfectly suited for quantitative imaging of the kidneys, and the recent improvements in detector technology, computer hardware, and image processing software add to its appeal.
  • The clinical use of functional renal PET studies (blood flow, glomerular filtration rate) has been slow, in part because of the success of concurrent technologies, including single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and planar gamma camera imaging.
  • Measurements of renal blood flow with PET have potential applications in renovascular disease, in transplant rejection or acute tubular necrosis, in drug-induced nephropathies, ureteral obstruction, before and after revascularization, and before and after the placement of ureteral stents.
  • Because many nephrological and urological disorders are initiated at the molecular and organelle levels and may remain localized at their origin for an extended period of time, new disease-specific molecular probes for PET studies of the kidneys need to be developed.
  • Future applications of molecular renal imaging are likely to involve studies of tissue hypoxia and apoptosis in renovascular renal disease, renal cancer, and obstructive nephropathy, monitoring the molecular signatures of atherosclerotic plaques, measuring endothelial dysfunction and response to balloon revascularization and restenosis, molecular assessment of the nephrotoxic effects of cyclosporine, anticancer drugs, and radiation therapy.
  • New radioligands will enhance the staging and follow-up of renal and prostate cancer.
  • Methods will be developed for investigation of the kinetics of drug-delivery systems and delivery and deposition of prodrugs, reporter gene technology, delivery of gene therapy (nuclear and mitochondrial), assessment of the delivery of cellular, viral, and nonviral vectors (liposomes, polycations, fusion proteins, electroporation, hematopoietic stems cells).
  • Of particular importance will be investigations of stem cell kinetics, including local presence, bloodborne migration, activation, seeding, and its role in renal remodeling (psychological, pathological, and therapy induced).
  • Methods also could be established for investigating the role of receptors and oncoproteins in cellular proliferation, apoptosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis; monitoring ras gene targeting in kidney diseases, assessing cell therapy devices (bioartificial filters, renal tubule assist devices, and bioarticial kidneys), and targeting of signal transduction moleculas with growth factors and cytokines.

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  • (PMID = 16356795.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-2998
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in nuclear medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Nucl Med
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK050183; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK-50183
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radioisotopes; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS7972; NLM/ PMC1479802
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