[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 30 of about 30
1. Matsumura K, Sugimura K, Uchida J, Naganuma T, Nakatani T: Advanced ureteral cancer with complete remission achieved by taxan containing systemic chemotherapy. Int J Urol; 2003 Feb;10(2):105-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINBLASTINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Advanced ureteral cancer with complete remission achieved by taxan containing systemic chemotherapy.
  • We report a case of advanced ureteral cancer successfully treated with systemic chemotherapy combined with irradiation.
  • A 47-year-old man was diagnosed as having a right ureteral cancer at the clinical stage of T4, N2 and M1 (liver).
  • A papillary tumor was also found in the bladder and the resected specimen showed a grade 1 transitional cell carcinoma.
  • Although three cycles of methotrexate, vinblastine, pirarubicin and cisplatin (MVAC) gave partial response to the ureteral tumor, new metastases to the lung and pelvic bone were observed.
  • The patient received 50 Gy external irradiation to the pelvis, 11 cycles of paclitaxel (270 mg) and cisplatin (60-80 mg) followed by four cycles of docetaxel (100 mg) and cisplatin.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / radiotherapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / analogs & derivatives. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Ureteral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ureteral Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Vinblastine / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy, Needle. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. TAXOL .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12588609.001).
  • [ISSN] 0919-8172
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; D58G680W0G / pirarubicin; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; M-VAC protocol
  •  go-up   go-down


2. Inoue T, Ohyama C, Horikawa Y, Togashi H, Matsuura S, Tsuchiya N, Satoh S, Sato K, Habuchi T, Saito S, Hoshi S, Arai Y, Kato T: [Active chemotherapy with gemcitabine, carboplatin and docetaxel for three patients with MVAC-resistant liver metastasis of urothelial carcinoma]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2004 Apr;50(4):273-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINBLASTINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Active chemotherapy with gemcitabine, carboplatin and docetaxel for three patients with MVAC-resistant liver metastasis of urothelial carcinoma].
  • We report three cases with methotrexate-vinblastin-adriamycin-cisplatin (MVAC) resistant multiple liver metastases of urothelial carcinoma that responded to combination chemotherapy consisting of gemcitabine plus carboplatin (GC) with additional docetaxel (GCD) as salvage chemotherapy.
  • Case 1: A 55-year-old man underwent left nephroureterectomy for ureteral cancer (TCC, G3, pT3pN1M0).
  • Three courses of GC followed by three courses of GCD were given via intra-hepatic arterial infusion for multiple liver metastases, which appeared after adjuvant high-dose MVAC therapy.
  • Case 2: A 46-year-old man underwent radical cystectomy for locally advanced bladder cancer (TCC G3 + adenocarcinoma. pT3pN0M0).
  • Two courses of GC followed by 2 courses of GCD systemic therapies were performed for multiple liver metastases, which appeared after adjuvant high-dose MVAC therapy.
  • Case 3: A 66-year-old man received three courses of MVAC for multiple metastases of the bladder cancer (TCC, G3, > pT2), which resulted in disease progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Taxoids / administration & dosage. Vinblastine / administration & dosage

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Liver Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOCETAXEL .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CARBOPLATIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15188623.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Taxoids; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; M-VAC protocol
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Tsukamoto T, Yonese J, Ishii N, Maezawa T, Fukui I: [Successful salvage chemotherapy with gemcitabine, etoposide and cisplatin for metastatic ureteral cancer: a case report]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2002 Jul;48(7):427-30
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ETOPOSIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Successful salvage chemotherapy with gemcitabine, etoposide and cisplatin for metastatic ureteral cancer: a case report].
  • A 35-year-old man who had undergone nephroureterectomy and a single cycle of adjuvant MVAC chemotherapy for the left ureteral cancer was referred our clinic for the treatment of paraaortic lymph node metastases.
  • Following histologic confirmation of transitional cell carcinoma by computed tomography (CT) guided biopsy, we treated him with combination chemotherapy consisting of ifosfamide, 5-fluorouracil, etoposide and cisplatin.
  • After 5 cycles of chemotherapy complete remission was obtained.
  • Thus, we treated him with a new combination chemotherapy comprising gemcitabine, etoposide and cisplatin which was approved as a phase I study by the institutional review board.
  • Adjuvant radiotherapy of 40 Gy was given to the metastatic sites.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / therapy. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Salvage Therapy. Ureteral Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Remission Induction. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Metastatic cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12229181.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. Takayama T, Nagata M, Unno T, Mugiya S, Hata M, Suzuki K, Fujita K: [A clinical study of patients undergoing curative surgery for renal pelvic and ureteral cancers]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2000 Mar;46(3):155-9
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [A clinical study of patients undergoing curative surgery for renal pelvic and ureteral cancers].
  • We retrospectively studied 30 patients who underwent curative surgery for renal pelvic and/or ureteral cancer between August 1987 and August 1998.
  • Nine patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy are alive, but 3 patients have relapsed.
  • Chemotherapy did not have a significant effect on the cause-specific survival or disease-free survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Ureteral Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Kidney Pelvis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Survival Rate

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 10806570.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Abe T, Konari S, Ogata M, Komatsu S, Satoh T: [A case of CEA-producing renal pelvic and ureteral cancer]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2003 Feb;49(2):75-9
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [A case of CEA-producing renal pelvic and ureteral cancer].
  • We report a case of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing renal pelvic and ureteral cancer.
  • On ultrasonography and CT scan, right hydronephrosis with the renal pelvis and ureteral tumor were detected, and he was referred to our hospital.
  • Close examination of the gastro-intestinal tract did not detect any sign of digestive tumor.
  • Right nephro-ureterectomy was performed, and the tumor was histologically diagnosed as TCC G2 > G3 pT3, and CEA was positive in the tumor cells immunohistochemically.
  • CA19-9 was also positive both in the tumor cells and normal epithelium of the renal tubules.
  • Postoperatively, multiple lung metastases developed despite chemotherapy and the patient died 4 months after surgery.
  • CEA had transiently decreased postoperatively, but then increased with lung metastases, apparently related to the state of cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Carcinoembryonic Antigen / blood. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / diagnosis. Kidney Pelvis / immunology. Ureteral Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] CA-19-9 Antigen / blood. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12696186.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CA-19-9 Antigen; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen
  • [Number-of-references] 17
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Parisi S, Troiano M, Corsa P, Raguso A, Cossa S, Piazzolla EE, Munafò T, Sanpaolo G, Natuno A, Maiello E: Role of external radiation therapy in urinary cancers. Ann Oncol; 2007 Jun;18 Suppl 6:vi157-61
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Role of external radiation therapy in urinary cancers.
  • Invasive urinary tumors are relatively rare and their treatment may cause important changes in urinary, sexual, and social functions.
  • A systematic review of external radiation therapy studies in urinary cancers has been carried out.
  • There are few controlled clinical trials using adjuvant or radical radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy in kidney, ureter, and urethra cancers; there are several reports of muscle-invasive bladder cancer using multimodality treatment: intravesical surgery and neo-adjuvant chemotherapy to radiotherapy or concomitant radiochemotherapy with organ preservation.
  • The conclusions reached for renal cancer are controversial; urethra and ureter cancers data are few and inconclusive; sufficient data now exist in literature to demonstrate that conservative management with organ preservation, for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, is a valid alternative to radical cystectomy, viewed as the gold standard.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17591812.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 34
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Hong JY, Choi MK, Uhm JE, Park MJ, Lee J, Park SH, Park JO, Kim WS, Kang WK, Lee HM, Choi HY, Lim H: Palliative chemotherapy for non-transitional cell carcinomas of the urothelial tract. Med Oncol; 2009;26(2):186-92
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Palliative Care.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Palliative chemotherapy for non-transitional cell carcinomas of the urothelial tract.
  • Non-transitional cell carcinomas of the urothelial tract comprise 5-10% of urothelial cancers.
  • Clinical information regarding the clinical behavior and chemotherapy outcome of non-transitional cell carcinomas of the urothelial tract are incomplete due to their rarity.
  • The object of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and the efficacy of palliative chemotherapy in advanced non-transitional cell carcinomas of the urothelial tract.
  • We analyzed the clinical records of 21 consecutive patients who received palliative chemotherapy for unresectable or metastatic non-transitional cell carcinomas of the urothelial tract between January 1995 and November 2007.
  • All the 21 patients received first-line chemotherapy with platinum-based regimens which are known to be effective in transitional cell urothelial carcinomas.
  • The primary sites of involvement were the bladder, urethra, urachus, and ureter in 43%, 29%, 19%, and 10% of the patients, respectively.
  • Adenocarcinoma was the most common histological type (67%); squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma comprised 24 and 10% of the histologic types, respectively.
  • With a median duration of follow-up of 32 months (range, 12-71 months), the median overall survival for all 21 patients from the day of first-line chemotherapy was 13 months (95% CI, 6.8-19.2).
  • The median overall survival of patients who received platinum-based palliative chemotherapy for advanced non-transitional cell carcinomas was comparable to previous studies for patients with transitional cell carcinomas.
  • Adenocarcinomas appear to have a favorable prognosis for the survival of the patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced non-transitional cell carcinomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / drug therapy. Palliative Care. Urologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urothelium
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Urology. 2007 Feb;69(2):255-9 [17320659.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2003 Dec;44(6):672-81 [14644119.001]
  • [Cites] Oncology. 2005;69(5):391-8 [16319510.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2004 Apr 15;100(8):1639-45 [15073851.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2006 May;17 Suppl 5:v118-22 [16807438.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1992 Jul;10(7):1066-73 [1607913.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2000 Jan;37(1):85-9 [10671791.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2006 Jan 15;106(2):297-303 [16342065.001]
  • [Cites] Anticancer Res. 2006 Sep-Oct;26(5B):3865-9 [17094415.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2000 May;18(9):1921-7 [10784633.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1990 Jun;8(6):1050-5 [2189954.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2005 Mar 15;103(6):1172-8 [15700264.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2005 Mar;95(4):497-502 [15705067.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Sep;17(9):2876-81 [10561365.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 Jan 15;22(2):220-8 [14665607.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2000 Sep;18(17):3068-77 [11001674.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Jul 20;23(21):4602-8 [16034041.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2004 Jan;93(2):216-20 [14690486.001]
  • (PMID = 18988001.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-0560
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical oncology (Northwood, London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  •  go-up   go-down


8. Yasuda Y, Tatokoro M, Yokoyama M, Koga F, Saito K, Masuda H, Fujii Y, Kawakami S, Kihara K: [Successful long-term management of hepatic and lymph nodes metastases of ureteral cancer by multimodal treatment including radiofrequency ablation]. Nihon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi; 2010 Nov;101(7):758-63
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Successful long-term management of hepatic and lymph nodes metastases of ureteral cancer by multimodal treatment including radiofrequency ablation].
  • Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed right hydronephrosis and a slightly enhanced invasive tumor in the right lower ureter, providing a diagnosis of ureteral cancer stage cT3NOM0.
  • After three courses of combination chemotherapy consisting of gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC), one tumor completely disappeared and another achieved a partial response.
  • The patient underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the residual followed by GC chemotherapy.
  • The patient underwent RFA again followed by GC chemotherapy and then all hepatic metastases have not revealed enlargement.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / therapy. Catheter Ablation. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary. Quality of Life. Ureteral Neoplasms / pathology. Ureteral Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Liver Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 21174743.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-5287
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Hinyōkika Gakkai zasshi. The japanese journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Raman JD, Scherr DS: Management of patients with upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma. Nat Clin Pract Urol; 2007 Aug;4(8):432-43
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Multiple therapeutic options are available for the management of patients with upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC).
  • Radical nephroureterectomy with an ipsilateral bladder cuff is the gold-standard therapy for upper-tract cancers.
  • However, less invasive alternatives have a role in the treatment of this disease.
  • Distal ureterectomy is an option for patients with high-grade, invasive, or bulky tumors of the distal ureter not amenable to endoscopic management.
  • In appropriately selected patients, outcomes following distal ureterectomy are similar to that of radical nephroureterectomy.
  • Bladder cancer is a common occurrence following the management of upper-tract TCC.
  • Extrapolating from data on bladder TCC, both regional lymphadenectomy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens are likely to be beneficial for patients with upper-tract TCC, particularly in the setting of bulky disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / surgery. Urologic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Urologic Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Kidney Pelvis / pathology. Kidney Pelvis / surgery. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / diagnosis. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / surgery

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transitional cell carcinoma.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17673914.001).
  • [ISSN] 1743-4289
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature clinical practice. Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Clin Pract Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 107
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Troiano M, Corsa P, Raguso A, Cossa S, Piombino M, Guglielmi G, Parisi S: Radiation therapy in urinary cancer: state of the art and perspective. Radiol Med; 2009 Feb;114(1):70-82

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Radiation therapy in urinary cancer: state of the art and perspective.
  • Invasive urinary tumours are relatively rare, and their treatment may cause important changes in urinary, sexual and social functions.
  • A systematic review of external radiation therapy studies in urinary cancers was performed.
  • There are few controlled clinical trials using adjuvant or radical radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in cancer of the kidney, ureter and urethra.
  • There are several reports on multimodality treatment in invasive bladder cancer: intravesical surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy to radiotherapy or concomitant radiochemotherapy with organ preservation.
  • The conclusions reached for renal cancer are controversial, and data on cancers of the urethra and ureter are few and inconclusive.
  • Sufficient data now exist in the literature to demonstrate that conservative management with organ preservation is a valuable alternative to radical cystectomy, the traditional gold standard, in invasive bladder cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Brachytherapy. Combined Modality Therapy. Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic. Cystectomy. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Dose Fractionation. Female. Humans. Kidney / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Male. Meta-Analysis as Topic. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Organ Preservation. Prospective Studies. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Time Factors. Ureter / pathology. Ureteral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ureteral Neoplasms / mortality. Ureteral Neoplasms / pathology. Ureteral Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Urethra / pathology. Urethral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urethral Neoplasms / mortality. Urethral Neoplasms / pathology. Urethral Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Urinary Bladder / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / surgery

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 2000 Jul;56(1):29-35 [10869752.001]
  • [Cites] Oncologist. 2000;5(6):471-6 [11110598.001]
  • [Cites] Anticancer Res. 1998 May-Jun;18(3B):1931-4 [9677446.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Oncol. 2003 Dec;26(6):558-62 [14663371.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1998 Jan 1;40(1):121-7 [9422567.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2004 Dec 1;101(11):2540-8 [15481058.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1994 Nov 15;74(10):2819-27 [7954243.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1995 Aug 30;33(1):173-8 [7642415.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 1997 May;43(2):155-7 [9192960.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1992;23(3):511-7 [1612951.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1958 Feb;79(2):196-201 [13514867.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2004 Oct;172(4 Pt 1):1271-5 [15371822.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 1992 May;24(1):41-4 [1620886.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1982 Apr;127(4):671-4 [7069829.001]
  • [Cites] Strahlenther Onkol. 2005 Oct;181(10):632-7 [16220401.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Surg Oncol. 1997 May-Jun;13(3):208-14 [9143060.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 2005 Apr;75(1):34-43 [15878099.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1994 Feb 1;28(3):783 [8113125.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2006 Dec 10;24(35):5536-44 [17158539.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1993 Nov 15;72(10):3044-51 [8221572.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1977 Nov;10(5):414-7 [411207.001]
  • [Cites] Radiology. 1994 Dec;193(3):725-30 [7972814.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2002 Jul 15;20(14):3061-71 [12118019.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1997 Jan 15;37(2):259-67 [9069295.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2002 Jul;60(1):62-7; discussion 67-8 [12100923.001]
  • [Cites] Anticancer Res. 1997 Nov-Dec;17(6D):4771-80 [9494605.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1996 Jun;155(6):1903-6 [8618283.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2003 Jun 7;361(9373):1927-34 [12801735.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2000 Oct 20;90(5):287-94 [11091353.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1990 Sep;19(3):693-9 [2211217.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1993 Apr 2;25(5):783-90 [8478228.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1970 Jan;25(1):26-40 [5410313.001]
  • [Cites] Tumori. 2006 May-Jun;92(3):202-6 [16869236.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1996 Nov;14(11):2901-7 [8918486.001]
  • [Cites] Transplantation. 1986 Jan;41(1):63-6 [3510497.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 1983 Dec;10(4):417-21 [6198728.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1992;24(3):463-8 [1399731.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2003 Nov 1;57(3):665-72 [14529770.001]
  • [Cites] Neoplasma. 1998;45(6):380-3 [10210113.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 2005 Apr;75(1):44-7 [15878100.001]
  • [Cites] Strahlentherapie. 1985 Nov;161(11):673-7 [3907021.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1998 Nov;160(5):1673-7 [9783929.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1997 Mar;157(3):805-7; discussion 807-8 [9072571.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1995 Oct;46(4):499-504; discussion 504-5 [7571218.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1998 May 1;41(2):273-8 [9607341.001]
  • [Cites] J Surg Oncol. 1983 Aug;23(4):263-8 [6876802.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2001 Feb 1;19(3):666-75 [11157016.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1970 Jul;104(1):53-61 [5426710.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1998 Jun 1;41(3):535-41 [9635699.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2006 Mar 15;64(4):1168-73 [16376486.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol). 2006 Feb;18(1):52-9 [16477920.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Oncol. 2006;45(7):870-5 [16982552.001]
  • [Cites] Int Urol Nephrol. 1984;16(1):29-32 [6724827.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1988 Jan 15;61(2):255-62 [3334959.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2003 Jul 1;56(3):726-33 [12788178.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 2005 Oct;77(1):88-95 [15972239.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1993 Nov;11(11):2150-7 [8229129.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Urol. 1982 Apr;54(2):136-51 [7044462.001]
  • [Cites] J Chin Med Assoc. 2005 Nov;68(11):522-30 [16323396.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1991 Jan;145(1):45-50 [1984097.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1995 May 15;32(2):331-40 [7751174.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2003 Dec 1;57(5):1310-6 [14630267.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2001 Apr;165(4):1111-6 [11257649.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2004 Jan;63(1):73-7 [14751352.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1990 May;18(5):1131-7 [2347721.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 1999 Jul;52(1):1-14 [10577680.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1999 Aug 14;354(9178):533-40 [10470696.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1997 Mar;15(3):1022-9 [9060542.001]
  • [Cites] Tumori. 2002 Nov-Dec;88(6):500-2 [12597146.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1998 Nov;16(11):3576-83 [9817278.001]
  • [Cites] Strahlentherapie Sonderb. 1981;76:169-75 [7303093.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2000 May 1;47(2):373-8 [10802362.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1987 May;13(5):665-72 [3553111.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2004 Jun 1;90(11):2106-11 [15150587.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1996 Jan;14(1):119-26 [8558186.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Urol. 1997 Jul;80(1):44-9 [9240179.001]
  • [Cites] Scand J Urol Nephrol. 1977;11(3):277-81 [594674.001]
  • (PMID = 19082788.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-8362
  • [Journal-full-title] La Radiologia medica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiol Med
  • [Language] eng; ita
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Number-of-references] 80
  •  go-up   go-down


13. Stakia P, Lagos P, Gourgiotis S, Tzilalis VD, Aloizos S, Salemis NS: Large mass affecting retroperitoneal great vessels: a rare presentation of a cancer of unknown primary with diagnostic dilemma and challenged surgical intervention. J Gastrointest Cancer; 2009;40(1-2):55-8

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Large mass affecting retroperitoneal great vessels: a rare presentation of a cancer of unknown primary with diagnostic dilemma and challenged surgical intervention.
  • INTRODUCTION: Cancers of unknown primary site (CUPs) consist of a clinical entity which accounts for 3-5% of all solid tumor patients.
  • They are metastatic solid tumors whose fundamental characteristic is the absence of identifiable site of the primary tumor.
  • During the operation, a large mass was identified 2 cm below the left renal artery which was displacing and encompassing the great retroperitoneal vessels and the left ureter.
  • CONCLUSION: It is essential to assess the high incidence of patients with cancer who present with CUP.
  • Early surgical excision of the metastatic lesion followed by adjuvant combination chemotherapy should be considered for patients with only a single site of malignancy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Incidental Findings. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Male. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2003 Sep;39(14):1990-2005 [12957453.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2002 Feb;38(3):409-13 [11818207.001]
  • [Cites] Oncologist. 2007 Apr;12(4):418-25 [17470684.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2001 Apr;12(4):535-40 [11398889.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2004 May 17;90(10):1898-904 [15138469.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2002 Feb 1;94(3):840-6 [11857320.001]
  • [Cites] Oncologist. 1997;2(3):142-152 [10388044.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2003 Aug;89 Suppl 1:S59-66 [12915904.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer J. 2001 May-Jun;7(3):203-12 [11419028.001]
  • [Cites] Med Clin North Am. 1996 Jan;80(1):153-71 [8569295.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2002 Sep;38(13):1810-2 [12175699.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2000 Sep;18(17):3101-7 [10963638.001]
  • (PMID = 19513858.001).
  • [ISSN] 1941-6636
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastrointestinal cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gastrointest Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


14. Ishida K, Yuhara K, Kanimoto Y: [Septic shock following intracavitary Bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy for postcystectomy ureteral cancer]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2004 Sep;50(9):633-6
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Septic shock following intracavitary Bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy for postcystectomy ureteral cancer].
  • A 72-year-old female patient was diagnosed as having a tumor in her bladder at the department of obstetrics and gynecology.
  • Transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed in November, 2002.
  • Chemotherapy consisting of methotrexate, adriamycin and cisplatin and bladder instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) was performed.
  • Re-biopsy revealed transitional cell carcinoma, G2, carcinoma in situ of the bladder and she received radical cystectomy with ureterocutaneostomy in June, 2003.
  • After the cystectomy, the left ureter showed signs of cancer so BCG was administered through the left ureterocutaneostomy.
  • After she was given endotoxin absorption therapy, she regained normal blood pressure and her heart rate, but was still febrile.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15518130.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / BCG Vaccine
  •  go-up   go-down


15. Makino H, Kametaka H, Koyama T, Seike K: [A case of unresectable advanced gallbladder cancer successfully treated by a combined administration of gemcitabine + CDDP]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 Nov;37(12):2714-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [A case of unresectable advanced gallbladder cancer successfully treated by a combined administration of gemcitabine + CDDP].
  • His history included resections of the left kidney and ureter due to a cancer of the left renal pelvis.
  • The diagnosis was gallbladder cancer with infiltration of the liver and mesoduodenal ligament and lymphatic metastasis.
  • But his condition was judged not to be amenable to surgery: the procedure was limited to an exploratory laparotomy.
  • Chemotherapy composed of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 + CDDP 25 mg/m2 (administered for 2 weeks followed by one week of no treatment, repeated for 8 cycles) was initiated on the 16th day of illness.
  • In a phase III trial (the UK ABC-02 trial) conducted by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in 2009, in which gemcitabine + CDDP combination therapy was compared against gemcitabine monotherapy to treat patients with advanced or metastatic biliary tract cancers, the overall duration of survival was significantly prolonged and the mortality risk reduced.
  • After one cycle applied while the patient was in the hospital, no adverse effects of the chemotherapy were found and a subsequent treatment was given on an outpatient basis.
  • No adverse effects attributable to the chemotherapy were noted until 8 cycles were completed.
  • The tumor marker levels were much reduced.
  • The tumor was reduced in size and marked improvement was noted in bile duct stenosis.
  • With a careful observation of the clinical course, the procedure for unresectable gallbladder cancer shown here may be applied on an outpatient basis.
  • It is an effective and safe therapeutic modality, which may become a standard therapeutic procedure.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Gallbladder Neoplasms / drug therapy

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Gallbladder Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 21224689.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  •  go-up   go-down


16. Sagristani M, Caraglia M, Villa MR, Lucania A, Esposito M, Petriccione L, Improta S, Marra M, Iannaci G, Rossiello R, Mastrullo L: Concomitant occurrence of a primary renal NHL and of a papillary urothelial ureter cancer. J Exp Clin Cancer Res; 2007 Jun;26(2):291-2
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Concomitant occurrence of a primary renal NHL and of a papillary urothelial ureter cancer.
  • In this manuscript for the first time we describe the concomitant diagnosis of primary renal non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PRL) and of a papillary urothelial cancer in a patient with megaloblastic anemia.
  • PRL is a rare disease, since the kidney is one of the extranodal organs usually not containing lymphoid tissue.
  • A review of literature indicated that simultaneous diagnosis of PRL and papillary urothelial carcinoma of the urether, makes our case unique.
  • The early diagnosis of both diseases allowed the eradication of the two neoplasms by nephro-ureterecthomy and by performing subsequent systemic chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Papillary / radiography. Kidney Neoplasms / radiography. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / radiography. Ureteral Neoplasms / radiography
  • [MeSH-minor] Early Diagnosis. Female. Humans. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17725112.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-9078
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of experimental & clinical cancer research : CR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Exp. Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  •  go-up   go-down


17. Liu GH, Li HZ, Wang HJ, Mao QZ, Xia M, Xie Y, Xue C, Wang H, Ji ZG: [Occurrence, types, and therapies of malignant tumors in recipients of renal transplantation]. Zhongguo Yi Xue Ke Xue Yuan Xue Bao; 2009 Jun;31(3):288-91
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Transplantation.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Occurrence, types, and therapies of malignant tumors in recipients of renal transplantation].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the types and therapies of malignancies in renal allograft recipients.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the occurrence, types, and therapies of malignancies in 498 renal allograft recipients who had received operations in Peking Union Medical College Hospital from May 1986 to October 2008.
  • RESULTS: Among 498 renal allograft recipients, 18 patients (3.6% ) were diagnosed with malignancies, which included bladder cancer (n = 5), renal pyloric cancer or ureteric cancer (n = 4), leukemia or lymphoma (n = 3), hepatic cancer (n = 2), skin cancer, rectum carcinoma, pulmonary carcinoma and thymoma (n = 1 each).
  • Three patients with bladder cancer and one patient with ureteric cancer experienced recurrences 7 to 15 months after operations; among them one bladder cancer patient died.
  • One non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patient died 11 months after chemotherapy.
  • Five cases with advanced unresectable malignancies died 8 to 17 months after the diagnosis.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - After Surgery.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19621511.001).
  • [ISSN] 1000-503X
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo yi xue ke xue yuan xue bao. Acta Academiae Medicinae Sinicae
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Yi Xue Ke Xue Yuan Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  •  go-up   go-down


18. Yasuda K, Kawa G, Kinoshita H, Matsuda T: [Port-site metastasis of an upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma after laparoscopic nephroureterectomy: a case report]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2009 Mar;55(3):141-4

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We report here a case of ureteral cancer in which port-site metastasis was suspected after a nephroureterectomy.
  • A tumor was found in his left renal pelvis and ureter by a computed tomographic (CT) scan.
  • The patient was diagnosed with a left upper urinary tract cancer with a clinical stage of T2N0M0.
  • The pathological diagnosis was an urothelial carcinoma, grade 2 > 3, INFbeta, pT3, pV1, pN2.
  • He received two courses of MVAC chemotherapy (methotrexate 50 mg, vinblastine 5 mg, adriamycin 50mg, cisplatin 120 mg) postoperatively.
  • Since retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis was observed three months later on a CT scan, the MVAC chemotherapy was repeated for three courses.
  • Nine months later, a tumor was found in the hypodermic beside the port-site, and a needle biopsy confirmed a metastatic urothelial carcinoma.
  • He received two courses of GP chemotherapy (gemcitabine 4,250 mg, paclitaxel 225 mg).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / surgery. Laparoscopy. Neoplasm Seeding. Nephrectomy. Ureter / surgery. Ureteral Neoplasms / pathology. Ureteral Neoplasms / surgery

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19378825.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Number-of-references] 17
  •  go-up   go-down


19. Hisataki T, Miyao N, Masumori N, Takahashi A, Sasai M, Yanase M, Itoh N, Tsukamoto T: Risk factors for the development of bladder cancer after upper tract urothelial cancer. Urology; 2000 May;55(5):663-7
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Risk factors for the development of bladder cancer after upper tract urothelial cancer.
  • OBJECTIVES: To determine the clinical and pathologic risk factors for initial intravesical recurrence in patients with primary renal pelvic and/or ureteral cancer and to examine the progression in the bladder in patients having high risk factors for intravesical recurrence.
  • METHODS: This study included 69 patients with renal pelvic and/or ureteral cancer.
  • We excluded patients with distant metastases, those with a short period of follow-up, and those having a previous history or concomitance of bladder cancer.
  • The exclusion criteria were chosen to avoid contamination by patients with a poor prognosis who might die of the primary cancer before bladder cancer development.
  • Multivariate analysis by Cox's proportional hazards model was used to determine what clinical and pathologic variables significantly affected the initial intravesical recurrence of cancer.
  • We also studied the stage progression of cancer that recurred in the bladder.
  • RESULTS: Initial intravesical recurrence of the cancer was found in 22 patients during a median follow-up period of 53 months (range 12 to 225).
  • The intravesical disease-free rate after upper tract urothelial cancer was 65% (rate of disease recurrence in bladder 35%) at 5 years by the Kaplan-Meier method.
  • The extent (multifocality) of the upper urinary cancer (P = 0.0038) and pathologic stage (P = 0.0409) independently influenced intravesical recurrence.
  • Age, sex, adjuvant chemotherapy, configuration of the primary tumor, primary cancer size, and pathologic grade did not affect recurrence.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The extent and pathologic stage of cancer in the upper urinary tract were significant and independent factors for initial intravesical recurrence of cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / epidemiology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / epidemiology. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Ureteral Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / epidemiology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / secondary

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Bladder cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 10792075.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-4295
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  •  go-up   go-down


20. Corgna E, Betti M, Gatta G, Roila F, De Mulder PH: Renal cancer. Crit Rev Oncol Hematol; 2007 Dec;64(3):247-62
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Renal cancer.
  • In Europe, renal cancer (that is neoplasia of the kidney, renal pelvis or ureter (ICD-9 189 and ICD-10 C64-C66)) ranks as the seventh most common malignancy in men amongst whom there are 29,600 new cases each year (3.5% of all cancers).
  • Metastases are typically found in the lung, soft tissue, bone, liver, cutaneous sites, and central nervous system.
  • The most important staging technique is a computed tomography (CT) scan of the whole abdomen.
  • Radical nephrectomy is the standard intervention for renal cancer.
  • Intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy has long been a hallmark of renal carcinoma.
  • Limited options are available for the systemic therapy, and no chemotherapeutic regimen is accepted as a standard of care.
  • Biologic agents represent the major effective therapies for widespread metastatic renal cancer.
  • An antiangiogenic strategy, the neutralization of VEGF, can slow the growth rate of advanced cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Prevalence. Prognosis

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17662611.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-8428
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical reviews in oncology/hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Rev. Oncol. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Number-of-references] 134
  •  go-up   go-down


21. Mizutani K, Ehara H, Yokoi S, Phuoc NB, Deguchi T, Hirose Y: Treatment-related ureteral cancer following stage II testicular seminoma. Int J Clin Oncol; 2007 Dec;12(6):469-71
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment-related ureteral cancer following stage II testicular seminoma.
  • We report two cases of left ureteral carcinoma that may have been related to prior radiotherapy and anticancer chemotherapy for stage II testicular seminoma.
  • Both patients had undergone radiotherapy (60 Gy) and cisplatin-based chemotherapy, one 17 years before the present presentation and the other 24 years earlier.
  • They underwent retroperitoneoscopy-assisted left nephroureterectomy under a diagnosis of left upper ureteral cancer, established by means of ureteroscopy and brush biopsy.
  • Recently, some investigators have reported that testicular cancer survivors are at significantly increased risk of solid tumors for at least 35 years after treatment.
  • Young patients may have a high risk of cancer when they reach an advanced age.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Neoplasms, Second Primary. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Seminoma. Testicular Neoplasms. Ureteral Neoplasms / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cisplatin / adverse effects. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Seminoma.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Testicular cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Radiation Therapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Testicular Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 Feb 15;22(4):640-7 [14726503.001]
  • [Cites] J Surg Oncol. 1993 Sep;54(1):60-3 [8377508.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1992;24(5):913-9 [1447034.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2006 Nov 1;66(3):669-73 [16887293.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1989 Mar;33(3):185-8 [2919477.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1995 Nov 1;33(4):831-5 [7591890.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2003 Apr 15;21(8):1513-23 [12697875.001]
  • [Cites] Radiat Res. 1988 Oct;116(1):3-55 [3186929.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2005 Jul;174(1):107-10; discussion 110-1 [15947588.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 1999 Feb;50(2):191-7 [10368043.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2003 Jul 1;56(3):746-8 [12788180.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Apr;17(4):1146 [10561173.001]
  • [Cites] Oncology. 2000;58(1):75-82 [10644944.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Sep 21;97(18):1354-65 [16174857.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2003 Mar 15;21(6):1101-6 [12637477.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1993 Mar;11(3):415-24 [8445415.001]
  • [Cites] Oncology (Williston Park). 1998 Aug;12(8):1203-12; discussion 1212-21 [11236311.001]
  • (PMID = 18071867.001).
  • [ISSN] 1341-9625
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  •  go-up   go-down


22. Fujisawa H, Takagane H, Shimosegawa K, Sakuma T: [Primary malignant lymphoma of the ureter: a case report]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2004 Oct;50(10):721-4
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Primary malignant lymphoma.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Primary malignant lymphoma of the ureter: a case report].
  • Computed tomography and retrograde pyelography revealed a soft tissue mass in the middle portion of the right ureter.
  • Urine cytology specimen from the right ureter suggested transitional cell carcinoma.
  • Under the diagnosis of right ureteral cancer, we performed right total nephro-ureterectomy, partial cystectomy.
  • The histopathological examination showed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (large B-cell type) of the ureter.
  • Our diagnosis was Clinical Stage IE of the Ann Arbor Classification.
  • The patient received only the first course of systemic chemotherapy (THP-cop), because he suffered severe thrombocytopenia in the course of the chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, B-Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis. Ureteral Neoplasms / diagnosis

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15575226.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  •  go-up   go-down


23. Ke HL, Wei YC, Yang SF, Li CC, Wu DC, Huang CH, Wu WJ: Overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha predicts an unfavorable outcome in urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract. Int J Urol; 2008 Mar;15(3):200-5
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Overexpression of HIF-1alpha subunit has been reported to be involved in the carcinogenesis, progression and metastasis of many human cancers.
  • METHODS: Ninety-eight cases (mean age = 63.5 +/- 11.7, range = 23-84 years) of renal pelvic or ureter UC were included in the present study.
  • Those who had distant metastasis at diagnosis, other cancer, urolithiasis, incomplete clinical information or had received radiotherapy or chemotherapy before surgery were excluded.
  • Nuclear HIF-1alpha expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry staining on a paraffin-embedded section of the tumor and non-malignant upper urinary tract specimens and scored by two qualified pathologists.
  • RESULTS: Positive HIF-1alpha expression was found in 65 (66.3%) of the cancer specimens.
  • Tumor HIF-1alpha expression score was significantly correlated with tumor T stage (P < 0.001), N stage (P < 0.001) and grade (P = 0.004).
  • Tumor necrosis was associated with high tumor T stage (P < 0.001), N stage (P = 0.002) and grade (P < 0.001).
  • Higher HIF-1alpha score (negative vs 3-5 vs 6-7) was a significant predictor for cancer-specific survival (Cox regression hazard ratio = 2.23, P = 0.004), and tumor recurrence (Cox regression hazard ratio = 1.58, P = 0.036).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / metabolism. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit / biosynthesis. Kidney Neoplasms / metabolism. Ureteral Neoplasms / metabolism

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18304212.001).
  • [ISSN] 1442-2042
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit
  •  go-up   go-down


24. Koukourakis G, Zacharias G, Koukourakis M, Pistevou-Gobaki K, Papaloukas C, Kostakopoulos A, Kouloulias V: Comprehensive management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma. Adv Urol; 2009;:656521

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract represents only 5% of all urothelial cancers.
  • The 5-year cancer-specific survival in the United States is roughly 75% with grade and stage being the most powerful predictors of survival.
  • Nephroureterectomy with excision of the ipsilateral ureteral orifice and bladder cuff en bloc remains the gold standard treatment of the upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, while endoscopic and laparoscopic approaches are rapidly evolving as reasonable alternatives of care depending on grade and stage of disease.
  • Several controversies remain in their management, including a selection of endoscopic versus laparoscopic approaches, management strategies on the distal ureter, the role of lymphadenectomy, and the value of chemotherapy in upper tract disease.
  • Aims of this paper are to critically review the management of such tumors, including endoscopic management, laparoscopic nephroureterectomy and management of the distal ureter, the role of lymphadenectomy, and the emerging role of chemotherapy in their treatment.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1993 Mar;149(3):457-9; discussion 459-60 [8437246.001]
  • [Cites] J Laparoendosc Surg. 1991 Dec;1(6):343-9 [1838941.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1991 Oct;146(4):980-1 [1895455.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1987 Nov;138(5):1144-5 [3669157.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Urol. 1986 Aug;58(4):368-70 [3756402.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1985 Sep;134(3):531-2 [4032555.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1985 Jun;133(6):952-5 [3999218.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1990 Jun;143(6):1220-2 [2342185.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1982 May;19(5):472-7 [7080318.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1981 May;125(5):632-6 [7230332.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1980 Mar;123(3):357-9 [7359638.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1978 May;119(5):594-7 [660726.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 1976;2(3):120-6 [800989.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1974 Oct;112(4):438-42 [4416700.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1974 Jun;33(6):1642-8 [4834158.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1975 Jun;35(6):1626-32 [1148996.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1975 Feb;113(2):158-62 [1113408.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1967 Nov;98(5):566-9 [6065510.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2004 Oct;172(4 Pt 1):1271-5 [15371822.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2004 Jul;172(1):85-9 [15201743.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Opin Urol. 2004 Mar;14(2):61-5 [15075832.001]
  • [Cites] Urol Clin North Am. 2003 Nov;30(4):791-802 [14680315.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2003 Nov;170(5):1738-41 [14532766.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2003 Oct;44(4):442-7 [14499678.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2003 Aug 28;349(9):859-66 [12944571.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2003 Jul 1;98(1):55-60 [12833455.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2003 Mar;61(3):533-8 [12639641.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2003 Mar;169(3):890-4; discussion 894 [12576807.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2002 Dec;60(6):1010-5 [12475659.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2002 Oct;168(4 Pt 1):1381-5 [12352398.001]
  • [Cites] Hinyokika Kiyo. 2002 Jul;48(7):415-8 [12229178.001]
  • [Cites] World J Urol. 2002 Sep;20(4):219-23 [12215849.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2002 Jun;167(6):2387-91 [11992043.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2001 Sep;88(4):343-7 [11564018.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2001 Aug;58(2):174-8 [11489692.001]
  • [Cites] J Endourol. 2001 May;15(4):391-5; discussion 397 [11394451.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2001 Jan;57(1):133-7 [11164158.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2000 Dec;38(6):701-4;discussion 705 [11111187.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2000 Oct;86(6):619-23 [11069365.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2000 Nov;164(5):1513-22 [11025694.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2000 Nov 1;56(5):741-7 [11068291.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2000 Oct;164(4):1173-6 [10992360.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2000 May;85(7):799-801 [10792155.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2000 Apr;163(4):1100-4 [10737474.001]
  • [Cites] J Endourol. 2008 May;22(5):947-52 [18397157.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2008 Apr;53(4):794-802 [18207313.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2007 Nov;52(5):1414-8 [17507148.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2006 May;17 Suppl 5:v118-22 [16807438.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2007 Mar;51(3):709-13; discussion 714 [16911852.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2007 Jan;51(1):186-91; discussion 191-2 [16822607.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2006 Dec;98(6):1176-80 [17125474.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2006 Jul;176(1):36-9 [16753361.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2005 Aug;66(2):283-7 [16098357.001]
  • [Cites] J Endourol. 2005 May;19(4):441-5; discussion 445 [15910252.001]
  • [Cites] Urol Oncol. 2005 Mar-Apr;23(2):114-22 [15869996.001]
  • [Cites] JSLS. 2005 Jan-Mar;9(1):83-6 [15791977.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2004 Nov;64(5):914-8 [15533477.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1999 Oct;54(4):734-8 [10510939.001]
  • [Cites] Tech Urol. 1999 Jun;5(2):77-80 [10458659.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1999 Feb;161(2):430-4 [9915419.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1997 May;157(5):1560-5 [9112476.001]
  • [Cites] J Endourol. 1998 Apr;12(2):139-41 [9607440.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 1999 May;35(5):738-43 [10505034.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1999 Aug;54(2):240-6 [10443718.001]
  • [Cites] J Endourol. 1999 May;13(4):289-94 [10405908.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1999 Mar;161(3):772-5; discussion 775-6 [10022682.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Urol. 1998 Oct;82(4):494-8 [9806176.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1998 Oct;52(4):594-601 [9763077.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1997 May;157(5):1622-4 [9112490.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1998 Jan;159(1):71-5 [9400440.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1997 Sep;50(3):321-9 [9301692.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Urol. 1997 Mar;4(2):130-3 [9179684.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Urol. 1996 May;77(5):676-9 [8689109.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1996 Jun;47(6):819-25 [8677570.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1996 Aug;156(2 Pt 1):377-85 [8683683.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1996 Mar;155(3):868-74 [8583595.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1996 Jan;155(1):115-7 [7490805.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1995 Dec;46(6):796-800 [7502418.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1995 Nov;154(5):1629-35 [7563308.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1995 Sep;154(3):975-9; discussion 979-80 [7637105.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1995 Mar;153(3 Pt 2):1041-2 [7853555.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1995 Mar;45(3):381-6 [7879332.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1994 Jan;151(1):13-5 [8254791.001]
  • [Cites] J Endourol. 1993 Oct;7(5):389-90 [8298620.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1993 May;149(5):992-7 [8483252.001]
  • (PMID = 19096525.001).
  • [ISSN] 1687-6369
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2600411
  •  go-up   go-down


25. Matsushita M, Kawasaki Y, Okada Y: [Carcinomatous meningitis from urothelial carcinoma of bladder and ureter: case report]. Nihon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi; 2004 Nov;95(7):817-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINBLASTINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Carcinomatous meningitis from urothelial carcinoma of bladder and ureter: case report].
  • Carcinomatous meningitis from urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and ureter is rare.
  • A 77-year-old man with invasive bladder cancer and right ureter cancer had been treated with 3 courses M-VAC (methotrexate, vinblastine, epirubicin, cisplatin) chemotherapy.
  • After chemotherapy we performed radical cystectomy and right nephroureterectomy (ileal-neobladder) (TCC, G3, pT3, N0, M0).
  • Patient died 6 days after diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / secondary. Meningeal Neoplasms / secondary. Meningitis / etiology. Ureteral Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Cystectomy. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Nephrectomy. Ureter / surgery. Vinblastine / administration & dosage

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Meningitis.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15624493.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-5287
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Hinyōkika Gakkai zasshi. The japanese journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; M-VAC protocol
  •  go-up   go-down


26. Takagi S, Gohji K, Iwamoto Y, Masuda H, Segawa N, Kiura H, Ueda H, Katsuoka Y: [Ureter cancer of complete double renal pelvis and ureter: a case report]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2002 Dec;48(12):761-4
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Ureter cancer of complete double renal pelvis and ureter: a case report].
  • Intravenous pyelography, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed ureteral tumors of the complete left double renal pelvis and the ureter.
  • An endoscopic examination disclosed a papillary tumor from the left ureteral orifice of the lower pole of the kidney.
  • A transurethral resection of the tumor was done, and the pathological features revealed transitional cell carcinoma (PTa, grade 2).
  • A left nephroureterectomy and a partial cystectomy were also carried out; macroscopic examinations showed a non-papillary tumor on the middle portion of the left ureter originating from the upper pole of the kidney.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy (M-VAC) was administered but discontinued because of severe side effects.
  • Dispite recurrence with retro-peritoneal lymph node metastasis, the patient is alive and again undergoing M-VAC chemotherapy 22 months after the initial surgery.
  • However, the evaluation of the chemotherapy was "no change".
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Kidney Pelvis / abnormalities. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary. Ureter / abnormalities. Ureteral Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / surgery. Urologic Surgical Procedures

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12613013.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Number-of-references] 16
  •  go-up   go-down


27. Siva Prasad G, Chacko KN, Antony D, Lionel G, Kekre NS, Gopalakrishnan G: Bladder-sparing surgery in locally advanced nonurological pelvic malignancy. Urol Int; 2006;77(1):18-21
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Ovarian Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Often a dilemma exists between cystectomy and a bladder-sparing procedure.
  • 10 had locally advanced colorectal malignancy, 3 with soft tissue masses of the lateral pelvic wall, 1 had ovarian malignancy and the other had residual mass following radiotherapy and chemotherapy of cancer cervix.
  • The left ureter was involved in 6 patients, and they required ureteric reimplantation.
  • Palliative transurethral resection was done in 1 patient with tumor infiltration at the bladder neck and prostate.
  • CONCLUSION: Unlike primary bladder cancers these lesions are not multifocal and hence en block conservative bladder-sparing surgery can be offered.
  • Preoperative CT scan or MRI can predict lower urinary tract involvement and help in decision-making by both surgeon and patient.
  • The ultimate decision for bladder sparing is based on intraoperative findings.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Ovarian Neoplasms / surgery. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / surgery

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cervical Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Colorectal Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16825810.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-1138
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologia internationalis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  •  go-up   go-down


28. Wang H, Satoh M, Abe H, Sunamura M, Moriya T, Ishidoya S, Saito S, Hamada H, Arai Y: Oncolytic viral therapy by bladder instillation using an E1A, E1B double-restricted adenovirus in an orthotopic bladder cancer model. Urology; 2006 Sep;68(3):674-81
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Oncolytic viral therapy by bladder instillation using an E1A, E1B double-restricted adenovirus in an orthotopic bladder cancer model.
  • OBJECTIVES: To investigate the therapeutic effect of AxdAdB-3, a double-restricted oncolytic adenovirus harboring a mutant E1A and an E1B-55KD deletion, on human bladder cancer cell lines and the SCID mouse model of orthotopic bladder cancer.
  • METHODS: The cytopathic effects of AxdAdB-3 were evaluated in several cell lines (YTS-1, YTS-3, T24, J82, 5637) derived from human bladder or ureteral cancer and in a normal bladder mucosa-derived cell line (HCV29) with AxCAlacZ (control) or AxE1AdB (E1B-55KD-defective adenovirus) or dl922-947 (E1A-mutated adenovirus).
  • The efficacy of bladder instillation therapy with AxdAdB-3 for orthotopic bladder cancer of SCID mice was investigated.
  • RESULTS: AxdAdB-3 caused the oncolysis of bladder cancer cell lines in vitro, and it was more cytopathic than AxE1AdB or dl922-947 in the cancer cell lines.
  • Direct instillation of AxdAdB-3 into the bladder of the orthotopic model inhibited tumor growth, leading to significantly prolonged survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Oncolytic viral therapy delivered by instillation of AxdAdB-3 is a promising tool for treating bladder cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoviridae / genetics. Oncolytic Virotherapy / methods. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Intravesical. Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Disease Models, Animal. Humans. Mice. Mice, SCID

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Bladder cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16979729.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


29. Kaneko T, Fujita K, Homma Y: Transient anuria requiring nephrostomy after intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin instillations for superficial bladder cancer. Int J Urol; 2006 Mar;13(3):294-5
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Transient anuria requiring nephrostomy after intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin instillations for superficial bladder cancer.
  • A 76-year-old man received intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) instillations for recurrent superficial bladder cancer.
  • He had undergone right nephroureterectomy for right renal pelvic cancer 9 months previously.
  • There was no sign of recurrent bladder cancer or ureteral cancer.
  • Most of the side-effects of intravesical BCG therapy are minor, and major adverse reactions are rare.
  • Life-threatening ureteral obstruction would be a rare complication of BCG immunotherapy.
  • Although BCG intravesical instillation after nephroureterectomy is a common practice, special care should be taken of renal function in patients with unilateral kidney during BCG therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / adverse effects. Anuria / chemically induced. BCG Vaccine / adverse effects. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Nephrostomy, Percutaneous. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Intravesical. Aged. Cystoscopy. Diagnosis, Differential. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Time Factors. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Urography

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Bladder cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16643629.001).
  • [ISSN] 0919-8172
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / BCG Vaccine
  •  go-up   go-down


30. Saito M, Watanabe T, Tabuchi F, Otsubo K, Satoh K, Miyagawa I: Urodynamic effects and safety of modified intravesical oxybutynin chloride in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity: 3 years experience. Int J Urol; 2004 Aug;11(8):592-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. OXYBUTYNIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Intravesical oxybutynin chloride with hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) (modified intravesical oxybutynin) has been reported to be effective for treatment of overactive bladder.
  • METHODS: Modified intravesical oxybutynin (5 mg/10 mL, twice a day) was applied for more than 3 years to six neurogenic overactive detrusor patients (three men and three women, average age 53.3 years) who were not satisfied with oral anticholinergic agents or the other therapy.
  • A cystometogram (CMG) was performed before, 1 week after and 3 years after the start of modified intravesical oxybutynin treatment.
  • We evaluated the patient's satisfaction of this treatment after 4 weeks and again after 3 years.
  • We compared the patients' answers before and after the therapy (excellent, good, fair, unchanged and worse).
  • RESULTS: CMG studies showed that two of six patients no longer exhibited uninhibited contraction 1 week after the treatment and that the cystocapacity of patients before, 1 week after and 3 years after the initial modified intravesical oxybutynin was 129.7 +/- 19.4, 283.5 +/- 40.4 and 286.8 +/- 38.1 mL, respectively.
  • For the evaluation of patients' satisfaction with this treatment, four patients considered the therapy excellent and one patient described it as good after both 4 weeks and after 3 years.
  • Two patients dropped out of the study; one developed left ureteral cancer (2.25 years) and the other developed ileus (1.5 years).
  • CONCLUSION: Modified intravesical oxybutynin is an effective and relatively safe option of therapy for overactive bladder patients.
  • However, this therapy requires careful observation for emergent side-effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Cellulose / administration & dosage. Cellulose / analogs & derivatives. Mandelic Acids / administration & dosage. Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic / drug therapy. Urinary Incontinence / drug therapy. Urodynamics / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Intravesical. Adolescent. Aged. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Patient Satisfaction. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Urinary Incontinence.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15285747.001).
  • [ISSN] 0919-8172
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mandelic Acids; 9004-34-6 / Cellulose; K9P6MC7092 / oxybutynin; RFW2ET671P / hydroxypropylcellulose
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement