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Items 1 to 34 of about 34
1. Akatsuka J, Nemoto K, Hayashi T, Sasaki T, Kimata R, Tsuboi N, Ooaki Y, Kondo Y: [A case of testicular tumor with inferior vena cava thrombus]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2010 May;56(5):281-4
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  • [Title] [A case of testicular tumor with inferior vena cava thrombus].
  • Computed tomographic scanning detected a right testicular tumor, multiple lung nodules, and inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombus.
  • After insertion of an IVC filter, high inguinal orchiectomy was performed after the first combination chemotherapy.
  • Pathological examination demonstrated an embryonal carcinoma with vascular invasion and direct tumoral extension into the right spermatic cord.
  • According to our survey, this is the 14th case of testicular tumor with IVC thrombus in Japan.

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  • (PMID = 20519928.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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2. Breitenstein A, Stämpfli SF, Camici GG, Akhmedov A, Ha HR, Follath F, Bogdanova A, Lüscher TF, Tanner FC: Amiodarone inhibits arterial thrombus formation and tissue factor translation. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol; 2008 Dec;28(12):2231-8
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  • [Title] Amiodarone inhibits arterial thrombus formation and tissue factor translation.
  • Because the latter may be triggered by coronary artery thrombosis as much as ventricular arrhythmias, amiodarone might interfere with tissue factor (TF) expression and thrombus formation.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Clinically relevant plasma concentrations of amiodarone reduced TF activity and impaired carotid artery thrombus formation in a mouse photochemical injury model in vivo.
  • PTT, aPTT, and tail bleeding time were not affected; platelet number was slightly decreased.
  • In human endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, amiodarone inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and thrombin-induced TF expression as well as surface activity.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Amiodarone impairs thrombus formation in vivo; in line with this, it inhibits TF protein expression and surface activity in human vascular cells.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / pharmacology. Carotid Artery Injuries / drug therapy. Carotid Artery Injuries / etiology. Carotid Artery Injuries / genetics. Carotid Artery Injuries / metabolism. Cells, Cultured. Endothelial Cells / drug effects. Endothelial Cells / metabolism. Humans. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Myocytes, Smooth Muscle / drug effects. Myocytes, Smooth Muscle / metabolism. Protein Biosynthesis / drug effects. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18974383.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4636
  • [Journal-full-title] Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / mono-N-desethylamiodarone; 9035-58-9 / Thromboplastin; N3RQ532IUT / Amiodarone
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3. Kinebuchi Y, Ogawa T, Kato H, Igawa Y, Nishizawa O, Miyagawa S: Testicular cancer with tumor thrombus extending to the inferior vena cava successfully removed using veno-venous bypass: a case report. Int J Urol; 2007 May;14(5):458-60
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  • [Title] Testicular cancer with tumor thrombus extending to the inferior vena cava successfully removed using veno-venous bypass: a case report.
  • A 33-year-old man with a left testicular tumor was referred to Shinshu University Hospital for advanced therapy.
  • Radiographic imaging revealed multiple metastases in the retroperitoneal lymph nodes (RPLN) and bilateral lungs, as well as tumor thrombus that extended from the left renal vein to the inferior vena cava (IVC) adjacent to the right atrium.
  • After eight courses of chemotherapy, the patient's tumor markers normalized and the lung metastases disappeared, but the RPLN and tumor thrombus remained.
  • The pathological examination of the thrombus revealed a mature teratoma.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anastomosis, Surgical / methods. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Remission Induction. Renal Artery / surgery. Renal Veins / surgery. Vascular Surgical Procedures / methods

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  • (PMID = 17511736.001).
  • [ISSN] 0919-8172
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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4. Dolmans DE, Kadambi A, Hill JS, Waters CA, Robinson BC, Walker JP, Fukumura D, Jain RK: Vascular accumulation of a novel photosensitizer, MV6401, causes selective thrombosis in tumor vessels after photodynamic therapy. Cancer Res; 2002 Apr 1;62(7):2151-6
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  • [Title] Vascular accumulation of a novel photosensitizer, MV6401, causes selective thrombosis in tumor vessels after photodynamic therapy.
  • The antivascular effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and their mechanisms are not clearly understood.
  • Here, we examined the effects of PDT with a novel photosensitizer MV6401 on the microvasculature in a mammary tumor (MCaIV) grown in a murine dorsal skinfold chamber and in normal tissue controls.
  • The mice were irradiated with light 15 min after i.v. administration of MV6401 when the drug was localized only in the vascular compartment, as shown by fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry.
  • PDT with MV6401 caused a dose-dependent biphasic blood flow stasis and vascular hyperpermeability, as determined by intravital microscopy.
  • This biphasic response was classified into two components: (a) an acute response observed immediately after PDT; and (b) a long-term response observed at times greater than 3 h after PDT.
  • The acute temporal vascular effects were characteristic of vasoconstriction but not of thrombus formation.
  • However, the long-term vascular shutdown was mediated by thrombus formation, as evidenced by histological evaluation and inhibition with heparin.
  • Minimal effects were observed in normal vessels after antivascular doses used against the tumor, but there was no long-term vascular damage.
  • In concert with the stasis, a dose-dependent tumor growth delay was observed.
  • This study provides mechanistic insights into antitumor vascular effects of PDT and suggests novel strategies for tumor treatment with PDT.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Vessels / drug effects. Blood Vessels / metabolism. Capillary Permeability / drug effects. Female. Male. Mice. Regional Blood Flow / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 11929837.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01-CA80124
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / MV6401; 0 / Organometallic Compounds; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents
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5. Harshman LC, Srinivas S, Kamaya A, Chung BI: Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy after shrinkage of a caval tumor thrombus with sunitinib. Nat Rev Urol; 2009 Jun;6(6):338-43
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  • [Title] Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy after shrinkage of a caval tumor thrombus with sunitinib.
  • DIAGNOSIS: Stage IV, T3bN0M1 clear cell renal cell carcinoma, with an associated tumor thrombus extending into the vena cava.
  • MANAGEMENT: The patient was treated with neoadjuvant sunitinib, which resulted in a marked response in the primary tumor and metastatic lesions as well as regression of the tumor thrombus well into the renal vein.
  • She was restarted on sunitinib with resultant disease stabilization, but discontinued the drug owing to toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Indoles / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy. Nephrectomy. Pyrroles / therapeutic use. Thrombosis / therapy. Vascular Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 19498412.001).
  • [ISSN] 1759-4820
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature reviews. Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Rev Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Indoles; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib
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6. Miyaoka R, Oliveira Reis L, Denardi F, Ikari L, Ferreira U: [Surgical management of retroperitoneal metastatic testicular tumor with inferior vena caval thrombus using cardiopulmonary bypass, arrested circulation, and profound hypothermia: a case report]. Actas Urol Esp; 2009 Oct;33(9):1032-5
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  • [Title] [Surgical management of retroperitoneal metastatic testicular tumor with inferior vena caval thrombus using cardiopulmonary bypass, arrested circulation, and profound hypothermia: a case report].
  • [Transliterated title] Tratamiento quirúrgico de un tumor testicular retroperitoneal metastásico con trombo en la vena cava inferior mediante derivación cardiopulmonar, paro circulatorio e hipotermia profunda: un caso clínico.
  • Testicular tumors represent the most common type of solid neoplasia in men aged between 18 and 35 years.
  • In some cases, tumoral vascular invasion can occur and demands surgical resection to stop disease progression and prevent thromboembolic events.
  • That is the only valuable therapeutic choice although it is a high risk procedure.
  • We present a case report of a patient who underwent successful chemotherapy and surgery for a right-sided testicular tumor associated with an inferior vena cava tumor thrombus extending from the renal vein to the right atrium and extensive retroperitoneal lymph node disease.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2008 AEU. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19925767.001).
  • [ISSN] 0210-4806
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas urologicas españolas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Urol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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7. Matsumoto S, Mori H, Takaki H, Ishitobi F, Shuto R, Yokoyama S: Malignant lymphoma with tumor thrombus in the portal venous system. Abdom Imaging; 2004 Jul-Aug;29(4):460-2
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  • [Title] Malignant lymphoma with tumor thrombus in the portal venous system.
  • We report a case of malignant lymphoma presenting with tumor thrombus of the portal venous system.
  • Computed tomography showed a mass in the portal vein and mesenteric lymphadenopathy.
  • This type of the lymphoma is extremely rare, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of portal vein thrombus.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphatic Diseases / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / diagnosis. Portal Vein / radiography. Thrombosis / diagnosis. Vascular Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Angiography, Digital Subtraction. Diagnosis, Differential. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Mesenteric Artery, Superior / pathology. Middle Aged. Portography / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods

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  • (PMID = 15024520.001).
  • [ISSN] 0942-8925
  • [Journal-full-title] Abdominal imaging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Abdom Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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8. Wiesbauer F, Kaun C, Zorn G, Maurer G, Huber K, Wojta J: HMG CoA reductase inhibitors affect the fibrinolytic system of human vascular cells in vitro: a comparative study using different statins. Br J Pharmacol; 2002 Jan;135(1):284-92
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  • [Title] HMG CoA reductase inhibitors affect the fibrinolytic system of human vascular cells in vitro: a comparative study using different statins.
  • 1. The results of several clinical studies investigating the effect of statin therapy on the fibrinolytic system in vivo are inconclusive.
  • We compared the effect of six different statins (atorvastatin, cerivastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, simvastatin) on components of the fibrinolytic system expressed by human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells and by the human hepatoma cell line HepG2.
  • 3. If the effects on the fibrinolytic system of vascular cells in vitro shown in this study are also operative in vivo one could speculate that by increasing t-PA and decreasing PAI-1 at sites of vascular lesions statins might reduce fibrin formation and thrombus development.
  • Such an effect might contribute to the clinically proven benefits of statin therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Fibrinolysis / drug effects. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Muscle, Smooth, Vascular / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cells, Cultured. Cholesterol / metabolism. Coronary Vessels / drug effects. Coronary Vessels / physiology. Cytokines / metabolism. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Gene Expression Regulation / drug effects. Hepatocytes / drug effects. Hepatocytes / physiology. Humans. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 / genetics. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 / metabolism. Tissue Plasminogen Activator / genetics. Tissue Plasminogen Activator / metabolism. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Umbilical Veins / drug effects. Umbilical Veins / physiology

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  • (PMID = 11786505.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1188
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors; 0 / Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1; 97C5T2UQ7J / Cholesterol; EC 3.4.21.68 / Tissue Plasminogen Activator
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1573117
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9. Falanga A, Marchetti M, Vignoli A, Balducci D: Clotting mechanisms and cancer: implications in thrombus formation and tumor progression. Clin Adv Hematol Oncol; 2003 Nov;1(11):673-8
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  • [Title] Clotting mechanisms and cancer: implications in thrombus formation and tumor progression.
  • Notably, fibrin formation is also involved in the process of tumor spread and metastasis.
  • The pathogenesis of the hemostatic disorders in cancer is complex and reflects the interaction of different mechanisms involving the activation of various hemostatic components, such as the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, the vascular endothelium, leukocytes, and platelets.
  • Tumor cells possess the capacity to interact with all of these components.
  • Additional mechanisms of blood clotting activation are started by the initiation of antitumor therapies.
  • In the last 10 years research studies have greatly improved our knowledge of tumor-promoted prothrombotic functions.
  • Further, pharmacological modulation of malignant cell hemostatic properties may not only affect the tumor-associated thrombotic risk but may also leave open the possibility to interfere with the progression of the disease.
  • [MeSH-minor] Anticoagulants / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cell Adhesion Molecules / physiology. Clinical Trials as Topic. Cysteine Endopeptidases / physiology. Cytokines / physiology. Disease Progression. Drug Delivery Systems. Drug Design. Fibrinolysis. Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Neoplasm Metastasis / physiopathology. Neoplasm Proteins / physiology. Platelet Aggregation. Thromboembolism / etiology. Thromboembolism / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 16258469.001).
  • [ISSN] 1543-0790
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical advances in hematology & oncology : H&O
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Adv Hematol Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticoagulants; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; EC 3.4.22.- / Cysteine Endopeptidases; EC 3.4.22.26 / cancer procoagulant
  • [Number-of-references] 82
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10. Ribeiro RC, Schettini ST, Abib Sde C, da Fonseca JH, Cypriano M, da Silva NS: Cavectomy for the treatment of Wilms tumor with vascular extension. J Urol; 2006 Jul;176(1):279-83; discussion 283-4
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  • [Title] Cavectomy for the treatment of Wilms tumor with vascular extension.
  • PURPOSE: Vascular extension to the vena cava occurs in 4% of Wilms tumor cases and can reach the right atrium in up to 1%.
  • When this happens the thrombus is usually not adherent to the vessel wall, and there is blood flow around it.
  • Preoperative chemotherapy can cause thrombus regression and even resolution.
  • If the thrombus persists after chemotherapy, surgery will be a challenge.
  • On the other hand, if the thrombus invades the vessel wall, its removal may not be feasible.
  • We report 3 cases of Wilms tumor with vena caval invasion in which cavectomy was performed, and discuss the principles, indications and operative technique.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 171 patients with Wilms tumor were treated at our institution between 1984 and 2004.
  • Of these patients 6 with intravascular extension of thrombus within the right atrium were treated with extracorporeal circulation, cardiac arrest and profound hypothermia, and 3 were treated with cavectomy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cavectomy is a safe procedure for treating pediatric patients with Wilms tumor when there is extension and invasion of the vena cava wall without blood flow.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Vascular Neoplasms / surgery. Vena Cava, Inferior / surgery. Wilms Tumor / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16753419.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. He C, Agharkar P, Chen B: Intravital microscopic analysis of vascular perfusion and macromolecule extravasation after photodynamic vascular targeting therapy. Pharm Res; 2008 Aug;25(8):1873-80
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  • [Title] Intravital microscopic analysis of vascular perfusion and macromolecule extravasation after photodynamic vascular targeting therapy.
  • PURPOSE: Photodynamic therapy (PDT), involving the combination of a photosensitizer and light, is being evaluated as a vascular disrupting therapy and drug delivery enhancement modality based on its effects on vascular perfusion and barrier function.
  • Since tumor vasculature is the common route for the delivery of both blood and therapeutic agents, it is important to compare the effects of PDT on blood perfusion and substance transport.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Tumor blood cell velocity and the extravasation of high molecular weight dextran molecules were continuously monitored by intravital fluorescence microscopy for up to 60 min after PDT using three doses of verteporfin in the MatLyLu prostate tumor model.
  • RESULTS: PDT induced tumor perfusion disruption via thrombus formation.
  • A lower molecular weight dextran obtained a higher tumor accumulation after PDT than a higher molecular weight dextran.
  • CONCLUSIONS: PDT with verteporfin had different effects on tumor vascular perfusion versus the extravasation of macromolecules.
  • Optimal PDT conditions should be adjusted based on the therapeutic application.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Area Under Curve. Blood Flow Velocity. Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate. Fluorescent Dyes. Male. Microscopy, Fluorescence. Molecular Weight. Perfusion. Photosensitizing Agents / administration & dosage. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Porphyrins / administration & dosage. Porphyrins / pharmacology. Porphyrins / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / blood supply. Rats. Regional Blood Flow / drug effects. Thrombosis / blood. Thrombosis / chemically induced

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  • (PMID = 18446275.001).
  • [ISSN] 0724-8741
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmaceutical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharm. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dextrans; 0 / Fluorescent Dyes; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 0 / Porphyrins; 0X9PA28K43 / verteporfin; I223NX31W9 / Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate
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12. Nery F, Graca L, Ribeiro M, Guimaraes H, Miranda HP: Sorafenib Improves Survival in Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Case Report. World J Oncol; 2010 Oct;1(5):213-217

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Curative treatments and local ones are well validated.
  • HCC is known to be resistant to systemic chemotherapy, and there are no validated therapies improving survival for metastatic disease.
  • Herein, we report a case of a 45 years old woman with chronic hepatitis B infection submitted to a right hepatectomy in May 2001 for an hepatic tumor with more than 10 cm wide, confirmed as a HCC moderately differentiated.
  • In February 2009, the patient started on sorafenib 400 mg twice daily due to an inferior mediastinal metastasis with a vena cava thrombus associated.
  • Computed tomography (CT) scan done 13 months after revealed a consistently mass reduction in more than 50% and a clinically well patient without important collateral effects.
  • HCC is a highly vascularized tumor and sorafenib is known to inhibit both tumor angiogenesis and tumor cell survival.
  • It is already approved for the treatment of advanced and metastatic renal cell cancer.
  • In our case, the combination of two well done surgical procedures and the posterior use of sorafenib when a metastasis was found in an inaccessible surgical place with macroscopic vascular invasion, led to a long survival without important side effects.

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  • (PMID = 29147210.001).
  • [ISSN] 1920-454X
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Hepatocellular carcinoma / Metastatic disease / Sorafenib
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13. Preise D, Oren R, Glinert I, Kalchenko V, Jung S, Scherz A, Salomon Y: Systemic antitumor protection by vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy involves cellular and humoral immunity. Cancer Immunol Immunother; 2009 Jan;58(1):71-84
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Systemic antitumor protection by vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy involves cellular and humoral immunity.
  • Vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP) takes advantage of intravascular excitation of a photosensitizer (PS) to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS).
  • These ROS are potent mediators of vascular damage inducing rapid local thrombus formation, vascular occlusion, and tissue hypoxia.
  • Unlike classical photodynamic therapy (PDT), cancer cells are not the primary target for VTP but instead are destroyed by treatment-induced oxygen deprivation.
  • VTP initiates acute local inflammation inside the illuminated area accompanied by massive tumor tissue death.
  • Consequently, in the present study, we addressed the possibility of immune response induction by the treatment that may be considered as an integral part of the mechanism of VTP-mediated tumor eradication.
  • The effect of VTP on the host immune system was investigated using WST11, which is now in phase II clinical trials for age-related macular degeneration and intended to be evaluated for cancer therapy.
  • The antitumor effect was cross-protective against mismatched tumors, suggesting VTP-mediated production of overlapping tumor antigens, possibly from endothelial origin.
  • Based on our findings we suggest that local VTP might be utilized in combination with other anticancer therapies (e.g., immunotherapy) for the enhancement of host antitumor immunity in the treatment of both local and disseminated disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibody Formation / drug effects. Bacteriochlorophylls / pharmacology. Immunity, Cellular / drug effects. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Vessels / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor. Dendritic Cells / drug effects. Dendritic Cells / immunology. Female. Flow Cytometry. Immunohistochemistry. Interferon-gamma / biosynthesis. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Photosensitizing Agents / pharmacology. T-Lymphocytes / drug effects. T-Lymphocytes / immunology

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  • (PMID = 18488222.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0851
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer immunology, immunotherapy : CII
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Immunol. Immunother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bacteriochlorophylls; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 0 / WST11 compound; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma
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14. Suzuki S, Yasuhara K, Koyano T, Obayashi T: [Tumor thrombectomy for endometrial stromal sarcoma extending into the inferior vena cava and the right atrium from the uterus]. Kyobu Geka; 2008 Feb;61(2):139-42
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Tumor thrombectomy for endometrial stromal sarcoma extending into the inferior vena cava and the right atrium from the uterus].
  • The chest-abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed tumor thrombus invading the inferior vena cava and right atrium with multiple lung metastasis.
  • To prevent sudden death from pulmonary embolism, she underwent surgical removal the tumor thrombus with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.
  • The pathological diagnosis of the tumor thrombus was low-grade ESS originating from the uterus.
  • After thrombectomy, she underwent chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel.
  • Surgical resection and chemotherapy to low-grade ESS achieved favourable prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Endometrial Neoplasms / pathology. Heart Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating. Sarcoma, Endometrial Stromal / surgery. Vascular Neoplasms / surgery. Vena Cava, Inferior
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cardiopulmonary Bypass. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Circulatory Arrest, Deep Hypothermia Induced. Female. Heart Atria. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18268952.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-5252
  • [Journal-full-title] Kyobu geka. The Japanese journal of thoracic surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kyobu Geka
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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15. Tucci S Jr, Martins AC, Suaid HJ, Cologna AJ, Reis RB: The impact of tumor stage on prognosis in children with adrenocortical carcinoma. J Urol; 2005 Dec;174(6):2338-42, discussion 2342
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The impact of tumor stage on prognosis in children with adrenocortical carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: We evaluated treatment outcomes in children with adrenocortical carcinoma.
  • In 27 of 28 patients without intracaval extension complete surgical excision was accomplished, while tumor resection combined with thrombectomy was carried out in 5 of 6 children with vascular invasion.
  • In 2 children with cavoatrial thrombus the thrombectomy required cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest.
  • Children with incomplete excision of the tumor and/or stage IV disease received adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Ultrasonography, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging exhibited specificity of 100% in the diagnosis of vascular invasion, and sensitivity of 50%, 66% and 100%, respectively.
  • Patient age, tumor stage or size and vascular invasion were associated with survival in univariate analysis.
  • Tumor stage was the only independent factor associated with survival in multivariate analysis.
  • The overall 5-year survival rates according to tumor stage were 100% in stage I, 85% in stage II, 40% in stage III and 0% in stage IV.
  • Of 11 children with local recurrence only 2 were alive without disease at 96 and 204 months after reoperation with complete tumor excision.
  • Only 2 of 6 patients with vascular invasion were disease-free at 17 and 50 months.
  • A total of 10 children with stage IV disease treated with chemotherapy died within a median of 6 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Tumor stage was the most relevant prognostic factor for children with adrenocortical carcinoma.
  • Reoperation for local tumor recurrence and thrombectomy for inferior vena caval tumor invasion should be attempted whenever possible.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Cardiopulmonary Bypass. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Multivariate Analysis. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / etiology. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Sensitivity and Specificity. Survival Analysis. Thrombectomy. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16280838.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Arii S: [Perspective of standardization of surgical treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma]. Nihon Geka Gakkai Zasshi; 2003 May;104(5):399-403
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Perspective of standardization of surgical treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma].
  • In recent years, surgical treatment for this disease has made great progress, leading to reduced operative morbidity and mortality.
  • The advances have made it feasible to standardize surgical treatment.
  • Moreover, the public deserves quality treatment ensured by surgical expertise.
  • In these circumstances, the author believes that the following are important issues in the standardization of surgical therapy.
  • 3) A consensus must be reached on pre- and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Interferon administration liver transplantation may be a promising prophylactic therapy against hepatitis C-related HCC recurrence after curative resection.
  • 4) It is necessary to clarify the long-term survival rate of patients with small HCC who undergo radiofrequency ablation in relation to tumor size, associated liver disease, tumor differentiation, tumor vascularity, etc.
  • Appropriate treatment should be based on an analysis of these four factors.
  • In addition, the issues of surgical indications for vascular tumor thrombus, preoperative portal branch embolization, laparascopic hepatectomy, and also liver transplantation should be discussed, along with perioperative management and postoperative follow-up.

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  • (PMID = 12774524.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-4894
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Geka Gakkai zasshi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nihon Geka Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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17. Poon RT, Lau C, Yu WC, Fan ST, Wong J: High serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor predict poor response to transarterial chemoembolization in hepatocellular carcinoma: a prospective study. Oncol Rep; 2004 May;11(5):1077-84

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] High serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor predict poor response to transarterial chemoembolization in hepatocellular carcinoma: a prospective study.
  • Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important mediator of tumor angiogenesis.
  • A high serum VEGF level has been shown to predict poor response to chemotherapy and poor survival in several cancers, but its prognostic value in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown.
  • We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the prognostic significance of pretreatment serum VEGF levels on tumor response to treatment and survival of patients with HCC undergoing transarterial chemoembolization (TACE).
  • Serum VEGF levels were correlated with clinical data, tumor response to TACE and survival results.
  • Serum VEGF levels were positively correlated with the presence of venous tumor thrombus (P=0.011).
  • In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that serum VEGF level may be useful as a novel prognostic predictor of tumor response and survival of patients with inoperable HCC undergoing TACE treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / therapy. Chemoembolization, Therapeutic. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / blood

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  • (PMID = 15069550.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / VEGFA protein, human; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
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18. Donati MB, Falanga A: Pathogenetic mechanisms of thrombosis in malignancy. Acta Haematol; 2001;106(1-2):18-24
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Strong clinical evidence is accumulating on the prothrombotic tendency of cancer patients, which is enhanced by anticancer therapy, such as surgery and chemotherapy.
  • The mechanisms of thrombus promotion in malignancy include some general responses of the host to the tumor (acute phase, inflammation, angiogenesis) and specific interactions of tumor cells with the clotting/fibrinolysis systems and with blood (leukocytes, platelets) or vascular cells.
  • It is at present difficult to rank the relative weight of these multiple interactions on the basis of the well-recognized clinical evidence of enhanced thrombotic episodes in tumor patients.
  • In any case, the mechanisms explored so far offer a sound experimental basis for prevention/treatment of thrombosis in tumor patients and leave open the possibility that some antithrombotic strategies may also affect the processes of tumor growth and dissemination.
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers / blood. Blood Coagulation. Blood Flow Velocity. Endothelium, Vascular / metabolism. Endothelium, Vascular / pathology. Fibrinolysis. Hemostasis. Humans

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 11549773.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-5792
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta haematologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers
  • [Number-of-references] 89
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19. Ferroni P, Formica V, Roselli M, Guadagni F: Thromboembolic events in patients treated with anti-angiogenic drugs. Curr Vasc Pharmacol; 2010 Jan;8(1):102-13

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Thromboembolic events in patients treated with anti-angiogenic drugs.
  • The therapeutic value of inhibiting angiogenesis is an interesting area of research in oncology, with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) being the most suitable anti-angiogenic target.
  • In the last decade a number of anti-VEGF drugs have demonstrated, especially in combination with standard chemotherapy, clinical efficacy in the treatment of different solid tumor types.
  • As data from clinical trials on anti-VEGF drugs are becoming available, it is increasingly recognized that VEGF, in addition to being a permeability, proliferation, and migration factor, is also a maintenance and protection factor for endothelial cells, being capable of regulating multiple biological functions, i.e. the production of vasoactive mediators and the expression of components of the thrombolytic and coagulation pathways.
  • Consequently, the disturbance of vascular homeostasis by blocking VEGF may lead to endothelial dysfunction and adverse vascular effects, such as venous and arterial thromboembolic events.
  • These genes may be regulated in a biphasic manner, and it is possible that anti-VEGF therapy may disrupt a negative feedback loop that leads to potential in situ thrombus formation.
  • Accordingly, combination treatment with bevacizumab and chemotherapy, compared with chemotherapy alone, was recently associated with an increased risk of thromboembolism.
  • The present review considers the biological mechanisms and clinical impact of thromboembolic complications during anti-angiogenic treatments in cancer patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / adverse effects. Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Thromboembolism / chemically induced. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors / antagonists & inhibitors. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal / adverse effects. Antibodies, Monoclonal / contraindications. Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Bevacizumab. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans

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  • (PMID = 19485903.001).
  • [ISSN] 1875-6212
  • [Journal-full-title] Current vascular pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Vasc Pharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United Arab Emirates
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab
  • [Number-of-references] 122
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20. Marcheix B, Dambrin C, Muscari F, Joseph-Hein K, Guimbaud R, Otal P: [Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava]. J Chir (Paris); 2003 Jun;140(3):140-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava is a rare tumor of mesenchymal origin most commonly found in women.
  • Imagery with ultrasound, CT, or MRI may strongly suggest the diagnosis, but it can only be confirmed by histologic examination of tissue obtained pre or intra-operatively.
  • The tumor is slow growing but nonetheless carries a bad prognosis; it may grow to a large size before directly invading adjacent structures.
  • Radical surgical resection is the only treatment which offers any hope for prolonged survival.
  • Standard vascular surgical techniques are usually sufficient.
  • High-lying lesions adjacent to the hepatic veins or with thrombus extending into the proximal vena cava may require extracorporeal circulation with or without profound hypothermic circulatory arrest.
  • The efficacy of chemotherapy, whether pre-operative for inaccessible tumors or post-operative for incompletely resected or recurrent tumor, is poorly defined and very limited.
  • [MeSH-major] Leiomyosarcoma. Vascular Neoplasms. Vena Cava, Inferior
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 12910211.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-7697
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal de chirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Chir (Paris)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 48
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21. Corral DA, Varma DG, Jackson EF, Amato RJ, Donat SM, Pisters LL: Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography before postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. Urology; 2000 Feb;55(2):262-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVES: Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) after primary chemotherapy is an accepted therapeutic approach for metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer.
  • Because of the intense desmoplastic reaction and adherence to venous and arterial walls, accurate imaging of the retroperitoneal vasculature and its relation to residual tumor is essential.
  • We report our experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), including the recently developed technique of bolus-contrast MRA, in patients undergoing postchemotherapy RPLND.
  • RESULTS: MRI and MRA provided detailed information on retroperitoneal vasculature and its relation to tumor, including multiple renal vessels (n = 5), duplex inferior vena cava (n = 1), left retroaortic renal vein (n = 2), and common iliac vein thrombus (n = 1).
  • The potential benefit of avoiding vascular injury during dissection should be prospectively evaluated.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Contrast Media. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Male. Middle Aged. Vascular Diseases / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 10688091.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media
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22. Steffel J, Akhmedov A, Greutert H, Lüscher TF, Tanner FC: Histamine induces tissue factor expression: implications for acute coronary syndromes. Circulation; 2005 Jul 19;112(3):341-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Histamine induces tissue factor expression: implications for acute coronary syndromes.
  • However, the role of histamine in thrombus formation is ill defined.
  • Hence, this study investigates whether histamine induces tissue factor (TF) expression in vascular cells.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Histamine (10(-8) to 10(-5) mol/L) induced TF expression in a concentration-dependent manner in human aortic endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas TF pathway inhibitor expression remained unaffected.
  • Histamine induced a time-dependent, H1 receptor-mediated activation of p38 MAP kinase (p38), p44/42 MAP kinase (ERK), and c-jun terminal NH2 kinase (JNK).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Histamine induces expression of TF, but not TF pathway inhibitor, in vascular cells via activation of the H1, but not H2, receptor.
  • This observation may open novel perspectives in the treatment of variant angina and acute coronary syndromes.
  • [MeSH-major] Coronary Disease / drug therapy. Endothelial Cells / metabolism. Histamine / pharmacology. Muscle, Smooth, Vascular / metabolism. Thromboplastin / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Cells, Cultured. Histamine H1 Antagonists / therapeutic use. Humans. Lipopolysaccharides / pharmacology. Lipoproteins / biosynthesis. MAP Kinase Signaling System / physiology. Receptors, Histamine H1 / physiology. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / pharmacology. rho GTP-Binding Proteins / physiology


23. Watanabe J, Natsume T, Kobayashi M: Antivascular effects of TZT-1027 (Soblidotin) on murine Colon26 adenocarcinoma. Cancer Sci; 2006 Dec;97(12):1410-6
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We investigated the ability of TZT-1027 (Soblidotin), a novel antimicrotubule agent, to induce antivascular effects, because most vascular targeting agents that selectively disrupt tumor vasculature also inhibit tubulin polymerization.
  • Treatment with 10(-7) g/mL TZT-1027 rapidly disrupted the microtubule cytoskeleton in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and significantly enhanced vascular permeability in HUVEC monolayers.
  • In addition, single intravenous administration of 2 mg/kg TZT-1027 to mice bearing Colon26 tumors significantly reduced tumor perfusion and caused extravascular leakage of erythrocytes 1 h after administration.
  • Subsequently, thrombus formation with deposition of fibrin and tumor necrosis was observed 3 and 24 h after administration, respectively.
  • TZT-1027 induced apoptosis not only in HUVEC but also in C26 cancer cells (cell line of Colon26 solid tumor) in vitro, suggesting it exerts direct cytotoxicity against tumor cells in addition to its antivascular effects.
  • Furthermore, TZT-1027 itself less markedly enhanced the permeability of normal vessels, but was additive with vascular endothelial growth factor, indicating the possibility that TZT-1027 selectively exerts its activity on tumor vessels.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Oligopeptides / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / blood supply. Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Animals. Cell Division / drug effects. Cells, Cultured. Endothelium, Vascular / cytology. Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Female. Fluorescent Antibody Technique. Guinea Pigs. Humans. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Microtubules / drug effects. Microtubules / metabolism. Skin / cytology. Skin / drug effects. Umbilical Veins / cytology. Umbilical Veins / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 16999818.001).
  • [ISSN] 1347-9032
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Oligopeptides; DQC51A0WQH / soblidotin
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24. Sood V, Luke C, Miller E, Mitsuya M, Upchurch GR Jr, Wakefield TW, Myers DD, Henke PK: Vein wall remodeling after deep vein thrombosis: differential effects of low molecular weight heparin and doxycycline. Ann Vasc Surg; 2010 Feb;24(2):233-41
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Venous thrombus resolution sets up an early intense inflammatory reaction, from which vein wall damage results.
  • Tissue response to injury includes matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation and extracellular matrix protein turnover.
  • METHODS: Rats received treatment beginning 24 hr after a stasis venous thrombosis by near occlusive ligation and until harvest at day 7.
  • Thrombus size (mg/mm), levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and D-dimer by colorimetric assay, and monocytes counts by immunohistochemistry were assessed.
  • RESULTS: Thrombus sizes were similar at days 2 and 7 for all three groups, while thrombus TNFalpha was increased in 2-day LMWH- and DOXY-treated groups (NaCl = 1.0 +/- 0.8, LWMH = 9 +/- 3, DOXY = 27 +/- 5 pg/mg protein, n = 6-8, p < 0.05) and at 7 days in the DOXY group (NaCl = 3.0 +/- 2.5, DOXY = 23 +/- 4.2 pg/mg protein, n = 5, p < 0.05).
  • Vein wall stiffness at 7 days was less with LMWH treatment, but not with DOXY, compared to controls (NaCl = 0.33 +/- 0.05, LMWH = 0.17 +/- 0.03, DOXY = 0.43 +/- 0.09 N/mm, n = 5-7, p < 0.05).
  • MMP2 zymographic activity, thrombus monocyte cell counts, and D-dimer activity were not significantly different across groups.
  • CONCLUSION: Treatment with LMWH or DOXY did not alter the size of deep vein thrombosis, mildly altered thrombus composition, and differentially affected vein wall injury, despite similar reductions in early MMP9 activity.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20142002.001).
  • [ISSN] 1615-5947
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of vascular surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Vasc Surg
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL083918; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL083918-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL083918
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enoxaparin; 0 / Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products; 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents; 0 / Interleukin-1beta; 0 / Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors; 0 / Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1; 0 / Protease Inhibitors; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 0 / fibrin fragment D; EC 3.4.21.73 / Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator; EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2; EC 3.4.24.24 / Mmp2 protein, rat; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9; N12000U13O / Doxycycline
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS158745; NLM/ PMC2997482
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25. Caine GJ, Stonelake PS, Lip GY, Kehoe ST: The hypercoagulable state of malignancy: pathogenesis and current debate. Neoplasia; 2002 Nov-Dec;4(6):465-73
ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .

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  • A hypercoagulable or prothrombotic state of malignancy occurs due to the ability of tumor cells to activate the coagulation system.
  • Prothrombotic factors in cancer include the ability of tumor cells to produce and secrete procoagulant/fibrinolytic substances and inflammatory cytokines, and the physical interaction between tumor cell and blood (monocytes, platelets, neutrophils) or vascular cells.
  • Other mechanisms of thrombus promotion in malignancy include nonspecific factors such as the generation of acute phase reactants and necrosis (i.e., inflammation), abnormal protein metabolism (i.e., paraproteinemia), and hemodynamic compromise (i.e., stasis).
  • In addition, anticancer therapy (i.e., surgery/chemotherapy/hormone therapy) may significantly increase the risk of thromboembolic events by similar mechanisms, e.g., procoagulant release, endothelial damage, or stimulation of tissue factor production by host cells.
  • It is hoped that a better understanding of these mechanisms will ultimately lead to the development of more targeted treatment to prevent thromboembolic complications in cancer patients.
  • It is also hoped that antithrombotic strategies may also have a positive effect on the process of tumor growth and dissemination.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Blood Coagulation Factors / metabolism. Cell Communication. Cytokines / secretion. Humans

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  • (PMID = 12407439.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8002
  • [Journal-full-title] Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neoplasia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Blood Coagulation Factors; 0 / Cytokines
  • [Number-of-references] 132
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1550339
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26. Carter AJ, Aggarwal M, Kopia GA, Tio F, Tsao PS, Kolata R, Yeung AC, Llanos G, Dooley J, Falotico R: Long-term effects of polymer-based, slow-release, sirolimus-eluting stents in a porcine coronary model. Cardiovasc Res; 2004 Sep 1;63(4):617-24
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chronic vascular response and the expression of cell cycle regulators after SRL-eluting stent implantation in a porcine coronary model.
  • RESULTS: At 3 days, the mean thrombus area was similar for control (0.38+/-0.19 mm(2)) and SRL (0.29+/-0.09 mm(2)) stents.
  • [MeSH-major] Coronary Restenosis / prevention & control. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Sirolimus / therapeutic use. Stents
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biomarkers / analysis. Cell Cycle. Cell Cycle Proteins / analysis. Coronary Stenosis / drug therapy. Coronary Stenosis / pathology. Coronary Stenosis / surgery. Coronary Vessels. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27. Delayed-Action Preparations. Models, Animal. Polymers. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen / analysis. Swine. Swine, Miniature. Time Factors. Treatment Failure. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / analysis. Tunica Intima / chemistry. Tunica Intima / pathology


27. Vogelgesang D, Dahm JB, Grossmann H, Hippe A, Hummel A, Lotze C, Vogelgesang S: Early detection and efficient therapy of cardiac angiosarcoma due to routine transesophageal echocardiography after cerebrovascular stroke. Vasc Health Risk Manag; 2008;4(4):937-41
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  • [Title] Early detection and efficient therapy of cardiac angiosarcoma due to routine transesophageal echocardiography after cerebrovascular stroke.
  • Since there are initially nonspecific or missing symptoms, these tumors are usually diagnosed only in an advanced, often incurable stage, after the large tumor mass elicits hemodynamic obstructive symptoms.
  • A computed tomography (CT) scan showed changes suggestive of stroke.
  • Transesophageal echocardiography revealed an inhomogeneous, medium-echogenic, floating mass at the roof of the left atrium near the mouth of the right upper pulmonary vein, indicative of a thrombus.
  • At surgery, a solitary tumor was completely enucleated.
  • The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and was free of symptoms and recurrence of disease at 14 months follow-up.
  • [MeSH-major] Early Detection of Cancer. Echocardiography, Transesophageal. Heart Neoplasms / ultrasonography. Hemangiosarcoma / ultrasonography. Incidental Findings. Stroke / ultrasonography
  • [MeSH-minor] Cardiac Surgical Procedures. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Heart Atria / ultrasonography. Humans. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19066013.001).
  • [ISSN] 1176-6344
  • [Journal-full-title] Vascular health and risk management
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vasc Health Risk Manag
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2597752
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28. Rosenson RS: Pluripotential mechanisms of cardioprotection with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy. Am J Cardiovasc Drugs; 2001;1(6):411-20
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pluripotential mechanisms of cardioprotection with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy.
  • Treatment with hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors has been accompanied by a reduced risk of cardiovascular events.
  • Furthermore, more rapid onset of clinical benefit with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in patients with acute coronary syndromes or acute myocardial infarction than in those with stable coronary heart disease suggest that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors facilitate repair of ruptured or ulcerated atherosclerotic plaque, facilitate plaque stabilization and/or reduce thrombus formation on ruptured plaques.
  • Treatment with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors improved endothelial dysfunction in patients with hypercholesterolemia and this improvement in endothelial function was not correlated with reduction in total serum cholesterol levels.
  • Treatment with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors can reduce expression, production and circulating levels of chemokines (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and proinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factoralpha, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1beta].
  • In addition, treatment with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor led to decreased cell death within the atheroma.
  • Treatment with these agents also reduced expression of inducible cellular adhesion molecules, decreased secretion of metalloproteinases by macrophages, reduced vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis.
  • Lastly, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors appear to have important effects on the thrombogenesis: reduced expression of tissue factor production and activity; increased production of tissue factor package inhibitor; decreased platelet thrombus formation and improved fibrinolysis as a result of lowered plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels.
  • As the pluripotential cardioprotective mechanisms of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are further elucidated, it is envisaged that treatment with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors will be initiated earlier and more frequently in patients with hypercholesterolemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Coronary Artery Disease / drug therapy. Coronary Artery Disease / prevention & control. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Angina, Unstable / drug therapy. Angina, Unstable / prevention & control. Animals. Cell Adhesion / drug effects. Clinical Trials as Topic. Coronary Thrombosis / prevention & control. Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Endothelium, Vascular / physiopathology. Humans. Hyperlipoproteinemias / drug therapy. Hyperlipoproteinemias / metabolism. Inflammation / complications. Inflammation / immunology. Lipoproteins / blood. Lipoproteins / metabolism. Myocardial Infarction / drug therapy. Myocardial Infarction / prevention & control. Oxidation-Reduction. Oxidative Stress. Recurrence. Tunica Intima / drug effects. Tunica Intima / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 14728000.001).
  • [ISSN] 1175-3277
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of cardiovascular drugs : drugs, devices, and other interventions
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Cardiovasc Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors; 0 / Lipoproteins
  • [Number-of-references] 90
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29. Imura S, Ikemoto T, Morine Y, Fujii M, Miyake H, Tashiro S, Shimada M: Effect of a new adjuvant systemic interferon alpha, 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin on advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with macroscopic portal invasion. Hepatogastroenterology; 2008 Mar-Apr;55(82-83):615-20
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: Despite an adequate hepatic resection, theprognosis of the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that have macroscopic tumor thrombus in the portal vein has still been poor.
  • The prognosis of those patients and was investigated the significance of postoperative adjuvant therapy was discussed in this study.
  • Those patients were retrospectively divided into 2 groups: the systemic interferon alpha, 5-Fluorouracil (FU) and cisplatin group (n = 10, IFN+ chemo group); and the no adjuvant therapy group (n = 15, control group).
  • In the IFN+chemo group, 3 of 6 patients with a recurrence had a single tumor in the remnant liver.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our new adjuvant systemic therapy including interferon alpha, 5FU and cisplatin for advanced HCC with macroscopic portal invasion is promising.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Portal Vein. Vascular Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Disease Progression. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Interferon-alpha / administration & dosage. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 18613419.001).
  • [ISSN] 0172-6390
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepato-gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatogastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon-alpha; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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30. Mori M, Sakata I, Hirano T, Obana A, Nakajima S, Hikida M, Kumagai T: Photodynamic therapy for experimental tumors using ATX-S10(Na), a hydrophilic chlorin photosensitizer, and diode laser. Jpn J Cancer Res; 2000 Jul;91(7):753-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Photodynamic therapy for experimental tumors using ATX-S10(Na), a hydrophilic chlorin photosensitizer, and diode laser.
  • ATX-S10(Na), a hydrophilic chlorin photosensitizer having an absorption maximum at 670 nm, is a candidate second-generation photosensitizer for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer treatment.
  • In-vitro PDT using ATX-S10(Na) and the diode laser showed drug concentration-, laser dose- and drug exposure time-dependent cytotoxicity to various human and mouse tumor cell lines.
  • Against human tumor xenografts in nude mice, the combined use of 5 mg / kg ATX-S10(Na) and 200 J / cm(2) laser irradiation 3 h after ATX-S10(Na) administration showed excellent anti-tumor activity, and its efficacy was almost the same as that of PDT using 20 mg / kg porfimer sodium and a 100 J / cm(2) excimer dye laser 48 h after porfimer sodium injection.
  • Microscopic observation of tumor tissues revealed that PDT using ATX-S10(Na) and the diode laser induced congestion, thrombus and degeneration of endothelial cells in tumor vessels, indicating that a vascular shutdown effect plays an important role in the anti-tumor activity of PDT using ATX-S10(Na) and the diode laser.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Neoplasms, Experimental / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy / methods. Photosensitizing Agents / pharmacology. Porphyrins / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Dihematoporphyrin Ether / pharmacology. HeLa Cells / drug effects. Humans. KB Cells / drug effects. Lasers. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Transplantation. Sarcoma, Experimental / drug therapy. Sarcoma, Experimental / pathology. Transplantation, Heterologous

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  • (PMID = 10920284.001).
  • [ISSN] 0910-5050
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of cancer research : Gann
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ATX-S10; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 0 / Porphyrins; 97067-70-4 / Dihematoporphyrin Ether
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31. Takahashi M, Nagao T, Imazeki Y, Matsuzaki K, Minamitani H: Roles of reactive oxygen species in monocyte activation induced by photochemical reactions during photodynamic therapy. Front Med Biol Eng; 2002;11(4):279-94
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Roles of reactive oxygen species in monocyte activation induced by photochemical reactions during photodynamic therapy.
  • This study attempts to investigate the mechanism of the vascular shut down (VSD) effect during photodynamic therapy (PDT) with zinc coproporphyrin III tetrasodium salt as a photosensitizer.
  • PDT is a treatment based on photochemical reactions and the resultant cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS).
  • Platelet thrombus formation leading to stasis observed in vivo during PDT is called the VSD effect.
  • The dichlorofluorescein fluorescence intensity of monocytes with four types of free radical scavenger was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy.
  • The fluorescence intensity of monocytes that had been incubated with superoxide dismutase and incubated and added with L-histidine was decreased by about 20 and 30%, respectively.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Carcinoma, Small Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Small Cell / metabolism. Carcinoma, Small Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Small Cell / radiotherapy. Cells, Cultured. Free Radical Scavengers / metabolism. Humans. Lasers. Male. Microscopy, Confocal. Photochemistry / methods. Photosensitizing Agents / administration & dosage. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Reference Values. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 12735428.001).
  • [ISSN] 0921-3775
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers of medical and biological engineering : the international journal of the Japan Society of Medical Electronics and Biological Engineering
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front Med Biol Eng
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Coproporphyrins; 0 / Free Radical Scavengers; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 14643-66-4 / coproporphyrin III
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32. Zeni PT Jr, Blank BG, Peeler DW: Use of rheolytic thrombectomy in treatment of acute massive pulmonary embolism. J Vasc Interv Radiol; 2003 Dec;14(12):1511-5
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Use of rheolytic thrombectomy in treatment of acute massive pulmonary embolism.
  • PURPOSE: The 6-F Xpeedior (AngioJet; Possis Medical, Minneapolis, MN) rheolytic thrombectomy catheter (RTC) uses high velocity saline jets for thrombus aspiration, maceration, and evacuation, through the Bernoulli principle.
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of thrombus removal using the RTC in patients with acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventeen patients (mean age, 51.7 + 16.6 years; range, 30-86 years; 9 men, 8 women) with massive PE initially diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) or VQ scan and confirmed by pulmonary angiography were treated with the RTC.
  • Ten of 17 patients had enough residual thrombus to warrant adjuvant catheter directed thrombolytic infusion with reteplase.
  • Six patients had contraindications to thrombolytic therapy.
  • One patient presented with renal cell carcinoma and tumor embolus as suspected cause of PE.
  • Treatment resulted in immediate angiographic improvement and initial relief of PE symptoms (improvement in dyspnea and oxygen saturation) in 16 of 17 patients.
  • One patient developed heart block during the procedure, and further treatment with the RTC was discontinued.
  • After thrombectomy, 10 patients received adjunctive reteplase thrombolysis for treatment of residual thrombus, and 12 received inferior vena cava (IVC) filters.
  • In the patient with renal cell carcinoma, histopathologic analysis of the evacuated material confirmed tumor origin of the embolism.
  • There were two deaths, both within 24 hours of treatment and secondary to PE.
  • One death occurred in a patient who had only minimal thrombus removal after treatment with the RTC and no thrombolysis.
  • Further evaluation in a larger cohort of patients is warranted to assess whether this treatment may offer an alternative or complement to thrombolysis or surgical thrombectomy.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibrinolytic Agents / therapeutic use. Pulmonary Embolism / drug therapy. Pulmonary Embolism / surgery. Thrombectomy
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Catheterization / adverse effects. Catheterization / instrumentation. Catheterization / methods. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2004 Sep;15(9):1024; author reply 1024 [15470786.001]
  • (PMID = 14654484.001).
  • [ISSN] 1051-0443
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of vascular and interventional radiology : JVIR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Vasc Interv Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents
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33. Cambien B, Bergmeier W, Saffaripour S, Mitchell HA, Wagner DD: Antithrombotic activity of TNF-alpha. J Clin Invest; 2003 Nov;112(10):1589-96
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  • Here we addressed the role played by TNF-alpha in thrombus formation and growth in an in vivo mouse model.
  • Using intravital microscopy, we show that systemic administration of TNF-alpha at doses found in sepsis transiently inhibits thrombus formation and delays arterial occlusion upon vascular injury.
  • These results were reflected in a prolonged bleeding time.
  • In contrast, in vitro treatment of platelets with TNF-alpha did not affect their function.
  • Additionally, the inhibitory effect of TNF-alpha was lost either after treatment with NG-monomethyl-l-arginine, an inhibitor of NO production, or in mice deficient for iNOS.
  • These results indicate that under inflammatory conditions, when leukocytes need free passage to transmigrate into tissues, TNF-alpha decreases platelet activation and inhibits thrombi formation.

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  • (PMID = 14617760.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9738
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Invest.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R37-HL-41002; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01-HL-53756; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R37 HL041002; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL053756; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL056949
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents; 0 / P-Selectin; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 27JT06E6GR / omega-N-Methylarginine; EC 1.14.13.39 / NOS2 protein, human; EC 1.14.13.39 / Nitric Oxide Synthase; EC 1.14.13.39 / Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II; EC 1.14.13.39 / Nos2 protein, mouse
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC259133
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34. Yamanome T, Yoshida K, Miura K, Ogawa A: [Superselective fibrinolysis for a middle cerebral artery embolism caused by a left atrial myxoma: case report]. No Shinkei Geka; 2000 Jul;28(7):653-8
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  • A case of successful treatment by local fibrinolysis of a middle cerebral artery embolism caused by a thrombus from a left atrial myxoma is reported.
  • CT and cerebral angiography revealed no abnormal vascular lesions.
  • Local fibrinolysis using a tissue plasminogen activator was performed within 3 hours after the beginning of the episode, and partial recanalization was obtained within one hour after initiation of the fibrinolytic therapy.
  • Considering the possibility of a cardiac source of the embolism, trans-esophageal echocardiography was performed and revealed a left atrial tumor suspected to be a myxoma.
  • Nine months after local fibrinolytic therapy, the patient returned to work.
  • The diagnosis of cerebral embolism caused by cardiac myxoma is difficult to make at the time when the patient is first examined after admission.
  • It is also hard to discover during emergent cerebral angiography with fibrinolytic therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / complications. Intracranial Embolism / drug therapy. Myxoma / complications. Thrombolytic Therapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Fibrinolytic Agents / administration & dosage. Heart Atria. Humans. Middle Aged. Tissue Plasminogen Activator / administration & dosage. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 10920828.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-2603
  • [Journal-full-title] No shinkei geka. Neurological surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] No Shinkei Geka
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents; EC 3.4.21.68 / Tissue Plasminogen Activator
  • [Number-of-references] 23
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