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1. Kiratli H, Gümüs K: [Mycosis fungoides of the eyelids. Two case reports]. J Fr Ophtalmol; 2006 Mar;29(3):323-6
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  • [Title] [Mycosis fungoides of the eyelids. Two case reports].
  • [Transliterated title] Mycosis fongoïde des paupières. A propos de deux cas.
  • Mycosis fungoides is a distinct variant of cutaneous T cell lymphoma.
  • We describe two male patients presenting with the third stage of the disease at the age of 56 and 67 years.
  • Multiagent chemotherapy and PUVA treatment were administered with limited successful outcome on their cutaneous lesions.
  • These two cases demonstrate the poor prognosis of the tumor stage because of strong association with widespread systemic involvement and emphasize the need for early diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Eyelid Neoplasms. Mycosis Fungoides. Skin Neoplasms

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  • (PMID = 16557179.001).
  • [ISSN] 1773-0597
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal français d'ophtalmologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Fr Ophtalmol
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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2. Sokołowska-Wojdyło M, Trzeciak M, Roszkiewicz J: 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Dermatol Reports; 2010 Aug 31;2(2):e12

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  • [Title] 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • The primary cutaneous lymphomas are often indolent but difficult to treat.
  • In the early stages psoralen and ultraviolet-A therapy is the standard treatment whereas at the tumor stage chemotherapy (e.g. pegylated doxorubicin) is often used for debulking.
  • The purine analog 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2CdA) acts in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and has been used in our center for the treatment of advanced primary cutaneous T-cell lyphomas (CTCL).

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  • (PMID = 25386249.001).
  • [ISSN] 2036-7392
  • [Journal-full-title] Dermatology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dermatol Reports
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4211472
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2CdA) / Sézary syndrome / cutaneous T-cell lymphoma / mycosis fungoides / side effect. / treatment
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3. Talpur R, Jones DM, Alencar AJ, Apisarnthanarax N, Herne KL, Yang Y, Duvic M: CD25 expression is correlated with histological grade and response to denileukin diftitox in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. J Invest Dermatol; 2006 Mar;126(3):575-83
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  • [Title] CD25 expression is correlated with histological grade and response to denileukin diftitox in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • Denileukin diftitox (Ontak), a recombinant fusion protein of diphtheria toxin and ligand, IL-2, binds to the IL-2 receptor, is internalized, and causes cell death.
  • Denileukin diftitox was approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) with CD25+ expression.
  • We prospectively stained lesional skin biopsy specimens from 113 mycosis fungoides and Sézary Syndrome patients for activation markers CD25 and CD30 to correlate expression with clinical tumor-node metastasis (TNM) stage, histologic grade, and response to denileukin diftitox.
  • Advanced TNM (T3 or T4) was significantly associated with intermediate-grade (P = 0.002) and large-cell transformation histology (P = 0.04).
  • These data suggest that high CD25 expression by IHC is associated with advanced CTCL and with clinical response to denileukin diftitox therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Diphtheria Toxin / therapeutic use. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Receptors, Interleukin-2 / analysis. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antigens, CD30 / analysis. Female. Humans. L-Lactate Dehydrogenase / blood. Male. Middle Aged. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / therapeutic use. Skin / pathology. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 16410787.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-202X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of investigative dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Invest. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16672-22; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K24 CA 86815; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21-CA74117
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD30; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Diphtheria Toxin; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Receptors, Interleukin-2; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; 25E79B5CTM / denileukin diftitox; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene; EC 1.1.1.27 / L-Lactate Dehydrogenase
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4. Buhl T, Bertsch HP, Kaune KM, Mitteldorf C, Schön MP, Kretschmer L: Low-dose gemcitabine efficacious in three patients with tumor-stage mycosis fungoides. Clin Lymphoma Myeloma; 2009 Oct;9(5):E21-4
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  • [Title] Low-dose gemcitabine efficacious in three patients with tumor-stage mycosis fungoides.
  • Mycosis fungoides is the most common subtype of mature T-cell lymphoma that primarily arises in the skin.
  • The tumor manifests as patches, plaques, tumors, or erythroderma and can secondarily involve lymph nodes, peripheral blood, and visceral organs.
  • In advanced tumor stage, chemotherapy is a second-line approach, which is generally not considered curative.
  • Initially, most patients profit from this treatment, but observed remissions usually do not exceed several months.
  • Because of possible immunosuppressive effects in vulnerable patients, the overall benefit of chemotherapy itself is not unequivocal in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • We report 3 patients whose tumor-stage mycosis fungoides was not sufficiently controlled by several preceding systemic therapies, including liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19858049.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-0712
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lymphoma & myeloma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lymphoma Myeloma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine
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5. Russell-Jones R, Child F, Olavarria E, Whittaker S, Spittle M, Apperley J: Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in tumor-stage mycosis fungoides: predictors of disease-free survival. Ann N Y Acad Sci; 2001 Sep;941:147-54
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  • [Title] Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in tumor-stage mycosis fungoides: predictors of disease-free survival.
  • Nine patients with mycosis fungoides (age range 27-67) underwent autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT).
  • All patients had tumor-stage disease, and four had lymph node involvement.
  • Eight patients exhibited a peripheral blood T cell clone using PCR/SSCP analysis of the TCR gamma gene, six prior to harvest and two at the time of harvest.
  • Conditioning prior to reinfusion of stem cells was achieved with various combinations of total skin electron beam (TSEB), total body irradiation (TBI), and chemotherapy, depending upon the patient's prior exposure to radiotherapy.
  • Those with a short DFS were distinguished by rapid tumor onset prior to transplant but not by stage at transplant.
  • Loss of a detectable T cell clone after manipulation of the harvest did not discriminate between the two groups, but rapid relapsers had been subjected to a greater degree of T cell depletion, possibly indicating a compromised cytotoxic response post-PBSCT.
  • The median survival of the cohort is four years from tumor onset, 15 months from PBSCT, and 27 months from the date a peripheral blood clone was first detected in the presence of tumor-stage disease.
  • Our data demonstrate the value of PBSCT for inducing remission in tumor-stage mycosis fungoides.
  • Reinfusion of neoplastic cells could be avoided by harvesting stem cells at an earlier stage in the disease process, preferably before a T cell clone is detectable in the peripheral blood.
  • Alternatively T cell depletion should be restricted to the CD4 subset.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Mycosis Fungoides / mortality. Mycosis Fungoides / therapy. Skin Neoplasms / mortality. Skin Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cohort Studies. Disease-Free Survival. Genes, T-Cell Receptor gamma. Humans. Lymphocyte Depletion. Middle Aged. Remission Induction. Risk Factors. Transplantation Conditioning. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11594568.001).
  • [ISSN] 0077-8923
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Steinhoff M, Beyer M, Roewert-Huber J, Lukowsky A, Assaf C, Sterry W: Complete clinical remission of tumor-stage mycosis fungoides after acute extensive skin necroses, granulomatous reaction, and fever under treatment with bexarotene, vorinostat, and high-dose fenofibrate. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2008 May;58(5 Suppl 1):S88-91
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  • [Title] Complete clinical remission of tumor-stage mycosis fungoides after acute extensive skin necroses, granulomatous reaction, and fever under treatment with bexarotene, vorinostat, and high-dose fenofibrate.
  • Mycosis fungoides and its variants are a distinct entity with a variable, but well-characterized clinical course.
  • We report on a 51-year-old patient with tumor-stage mycosis fungoides who developed several unusual features such as extensive necrosis of lymphoma lesions, granulomatous reaction, and venular thromboses while under treatment with bexarotene, vorinostat, and high-dose fenofibrate.
  • We hypothesize that combination of the high-dose fenofibrate (400 mg) with the retinoid X receptor ligand bexarotene and vorinostat might have induced an increased rate of apoptosis in lymphoma cells in our patient resulting in an extensive release of lymphoma antigens.
  • [MeSH-major] Fenofibrate / administration & dosage. Granuloma / chemically induced. Hydroxamic Acids / administration & dosage. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Anticarcinogenic Agents / administration & dosage. Anticarcinogenic Agents / adverse effects. Biopsy. Drug Eruptions / pathology. Female. Fever / chemically induced. Humans. Hypolipidemic Agents / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Necrosis. Remission Induction. Skin / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18489056.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6787
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Hydroxamic Acids; 0 / Hypolipidemic Agents; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; 58IFB293JI / vorinostat; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene; U202363UOS / Fenofibrate
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7. Amitay-Laish I, David M, Hodak E: Systemic progression following complete cutaneous remission under bexarotene treatment for tumor-stage mycosis fungoides. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2009 Aug;61(2):361-2
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  • [Title] Systemic progression following complete cutaneous remission under bexarotene treatment for tumor-stage mycosis fungoides.
  • [MeSH-major] Mycosis Fungoides / therapy. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / therapy. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy, Needle. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Progression. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Retreatment. Risk Assessment. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentOn] J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005 Jun;52(6):991-6 [15928617.001]
  • (PMID = 19615550.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6787
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Comment; Letter
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene
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8. Zackheim HS, Kashani-Sabet M, McMillan A: Low-dose methotrexate to treat mycosis fungoides: a retrospective study in 69 patients. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2003 Nov;49(5):873-8
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  • [Title] Low-dose methotrexate to treat mycosis fungoides: a retrospective study in 69 patients.
  • BACKGROUND: Although low-dose methotrexate has been used to treat mycosis fungoides for many years, documentation is very limited.
  • OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to review our experience with methotrexate in the treatment of 69 patients with patch/plaque and tumor stage mycosis fungoides observed for up to 201 months.
  • Data are presented in terms of response rates and time to treatment failure.
  • RESULTS: The greatest number of patients (60) had patch/plaque stage T2 disease (>/=10% skin involved).
  • The median time to treatment failure was 15 months.
  • Only 1 of 7 patients with tumor stage disease responded.
  • Side effects caused treatment failure in 6 (9%) of the total cohort of 69 patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Low-dose methotrexate may be of value in the treatment of a subset of patients with patch/plaque mycosis fungoides resistant to other therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 14576667.001).
  • [ISSN] 0190-9622
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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9. Guitart J, Wickless SC, Oyama Y, Kuzel TM, Rosen ST, Traynor A, Burt R: Long-term remission after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Arch Dermatol; 2002 Oct;138(10):1359-65
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  • [Title] Long-term remission after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has proved to be an effective therapeutic option in various hematologic neoplastic disorders.
  • Because patients with advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma have a poor prognosis, with minimal possibilities of sustained remission, we studied the therapeutic potential of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
  • OBSERVATIONS: Three young patients with refractory tumor stage mycosis fungoides underwent allogeneic HLA-matched sibling transplantation with combined marrow and CD34-enriched peripheral blood stem cell transplantation after cytoreductive chemotherapy and total-body irradiation.
  • One patient was in complete remission for 9 months, followed by limited cutaneous recurrence.
  • Mild graft-vs-host disease and graft-vs-tumor effect have contained the recurring disease as a low-grade process.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has the potential for sustained remission and the possibility of cure for young patients with advanced and recalcitrant cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • Even in the absence of complete remission, an allogeneic graft-vs-tumor effect may provide an immune mechanism to control the malignant T-cell process and alter the natural history of disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / pathology. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biopsy, Needle. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Mycosis Fungoides / pathology. Mycosis Fungoides / therapy. Remission Induction. Severity of Illness Index. Sezary Syndrome / pathology. Sezary Syndrome / therapy. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12374543.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-987X
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Dermatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 28
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10. Wollina U, Hohaus K, Schönlebe J, Haroske E, Köstler E: Liposomal daunorubicin in tumor stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: report of three cases. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2003 Jan;129(1):65-9
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  • [Title] Liposomal daunorubicin in tumor stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: report of three cases.
  • PURPOSE: Advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a hard-to-treat condition.
  • The use of liposomal formulation anti-cancer drugs can improve the efficacy and the risk-benefit ratio.
  • Liposomal doxorubicin was shown to be effective as a second-line treatment in CTCL.
  • METHODS: Monotherapy with liposomal-encapsulated daunorubicin (DNX) was given as a monotherapy once a month at 20 mg/m(2) three times to achieve a clinical response.
  • In the case of limited response the drug was given once every 3 weeks and a dose increase was performed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Daunorubicin / administration & dosage. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Liposomes. Male. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12618903.001).
  • [ISSN] 0171-5216
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Liposomes; ZS7284E0ZP / Daunorubicin
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11. Scarisbrick JJ, Child FJ, Clift A, Sabroe R, Whittaker SJ, Spittle M, Russell-Jones R: A trial of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide combination chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced refractory primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Br J Dermatol; 2001 May;144(5):1010-5
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  • [Title] A trial of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide combination chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced refractory primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • BACKGROUND: The combination of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide shows synergistic toxicity in vitro and has been used to treat nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.
  • OBJECTIVES: To test the efficacy of this combination in 12 patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).
  • METHODS: Nine patients with erythrodermic CTCL were identified for the study, eight of whom met the criteria for Sézary syndrome (SS), and three with tumour-stage mycosis fungoides (MF).
  • Six patients had treatment withdrawn, five due to bone marrow suppression and one due to progressive disease.
  • No difference in pretrial parameters were found in those who had treatment withdrawn and those who tolerated at least three courses.
  • As with other multiagent chemotherapy regimens, bone marrow toxicity is a common and severe side-effect.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Vidarabine / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Middle Aged. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Pilot Projects. Sezary Syndrome / drug therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11359390.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0963
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; FA2DM6879K / Vidarabine; P2K93U8740 / fludarabine
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12. Lundin J, Osterborg A: Therapy for mycosis fungoides. Curr Treat Options Oncol; 2004 Jun;5(3):203-14
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  • [Title] Therapy for mycosis fungoides.
  • Treatment of mycosis fungoides (MF) is indicated to reduce symptoms, improve clinical appearance, prevent secondary complications, and prevent progression of disease, all of which may have an impact on survival.
  • Treatment of MF includes topical and systemic therapies, which can be administered alone or in combination.
  • Psoralen and ultraviolet A radiation is effective in early-stage MF, inducing complete remissions in most patients.
  • Psoralen and ultraviolet A radiation may also be combined with low doses of interferon (IFN)-alpha to treat stage I/II disease.
  • However, early aggressive therapy with radiation and chemotherapy does not improve the prognosis.
  • Once the disease becomes refractory to topical therapy, IFN-alpha single-agent or combination chemotherapy may be administered, but the duration of response is often less than 1 year and ultimately all patients will relapse and become refractory.
  • Response rates after combined modality therapy with total skin electron beam irradiation and chemotherapy/IFN-alpha appear similar to response rates of chemotherapy alone.
  • Therefore, there is a great need for the further development of novel emerging treatment modalities, such as retinoids (ie, bexarotene) and immunotherapeutic agents (ie, cytokines, tumor vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies), all of which appear to have significant therapeutic potential in patients with MF.
  • Biologically based therapies may reduce the need for genotoxic therapies, such as cytostatics and radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Mycosis Fungoides / therapy. Skin Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Ficusin / administration & dosage. Humans. Interferon-alpha / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Staging. Photosensitizing Agents / administration & dosage. Ultraviolet Therapy

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  • (PMID = 15115649.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-2729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current treatment options in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Treat Options Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; KTZ7ZCN2EX / Ficusin
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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13. Fukushima T, Horio K, Matsuo E, Imanishi D, Yamasaki R, Tsushima H, Imaizumi Y, Ohshima K, Hata T, Yoshida S, Miyazaki Y, Tomonaga M: Successful cord blood transplantation for mycosis fungoides. Int J Hematol; 2008 Dec;88(5):596-8
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  • [Title] Successful cord blood transplantation for mycosis fungoides.
  • A 26-year-old female diagnosed as mycosis fungoides (MF, clinical stage IV) was treated with single-agent chemotherapy, multi-drug chemotherapy and unrelated bone marrow transplantation with reduced-intensity conditioning (engraftment failure), resulting in failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Graft vs Tumor Effect. Mycosis Fungoides / therapy. Skin Neoplasms / therapy. Transplantation Conditioning

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  • (PMID = 18998050.001).
  • [ISSN] 1865-3774
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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14. Tsatalas C, Martinis G, Margaritis D, Spanoudakis E, Kotsianidis I, Karpouzis A, Bourikas G: Long-term remission of recalcitrant tumour-stage mycosis fungoides following chemotherapy with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol; 2003 Jan;17(1):80-2
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .

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  • [Title] Long-term remission of recalcitrant tumour-stage mycosis fungoides following chemotherapy with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin.
  • Advanced stage mycosis fungoides (MF) generally has a poor prognosis, and currently there is no standard treatment available.
  • Here we report the case of a young woman with recalcitrant tumour-stage MF (T3, stage IIb) whose disease was unresponsive to several therapeutic modalities, but who has showed sustained clinical response to pegylated liposomal doxorubucin.
  • The use of this drug in tumour-stage MF should be investigated further.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 12602979.001).
  • [ISSN] 0926-9959
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Liposomes; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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15. Li N, Kim JH, Glusac EJ: Brainstem involvement by mycosis fungoides in a patient with large-cell transformation: a case report and review of literature. J Cutan Pathol; 2003 May;30(5):326-31
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  • [Title] Brainstem involvement by mycosis fungoides in a patient with large-cell transformation: a case report and review of literature.
  • BACKGROUND: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by mycosis fungoides (MF) is rare.
  • RESULTS: A 71-year-old female with long-standing MF developed lymphomatous CNS involvement 10 years after the diagnosis of tumor stage MF.
  • At this time, the patient presented with a transient episode of garbled speech followed by generalized weakness.
  • Computerized tomography scan (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI scan) of the head revealed a subcortical lesion in the left temporo-frontal lobe.
  • Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed atypical T cells, and brain biopsy confirmed parenchymal involvement by T-cell lymphoma.
  • Meanwhile, a biopsy of a skin lesion showed large-cell transformation.
  • No lymph node or other systemic involvement was noted at this time, and the patient was treated with chemotherapy.
  • Twelve months later, the patient developed recurrent CNS lymphoma with multiple organ involvement and expired soon thereafter.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / pathology. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology. Mycosis Fungoides / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 12753174.001).
  • [ISSN] 0303-6987
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cutaneous pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cutan. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
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16. Akita Y, Watanabe D, Yanagishita T, Kuhara T, Kawamura C, Masuda Y, Kawada M, Nakaseko H, Tamada Y, Matsumoto Y: The effect of psoralen plus ultraviolet A in vitro in HUT-78 enhances by 5-aminolevulinic acid. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed; 2007 Apr-Jun;23(2-3):95-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. 8-METHOXYPSORALEN .

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  • BACKGROUND: Sezary syndrome and mycosis fungoides are forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and in the early stage of these diseases psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) is one of the treatments of choice.
  • Photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-PDT) is an effective, non-invasive, and safe treatment for most superficial skin cancers.
  • In order to obtain greater efficacy of PUVA, we investigated the synergistic anti-tumor effects of ALA-PDT and PUVA using 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and a UVA lamp.
  • METHODS: The in vitro effects of PUVA and ALA-PDT and their combination in HUT-78 cell line from human SS were determined by MTT assay.
  • RESULTS: In our results, cell proliferation compared with controls was inhibited to 53.2% with UVA alone, 52.3% with 1 microM 8-MOP, 43.8% with 100 microM ALA, and 19.2% with combined 8-MOP and ALA.
  • CONCLUSION: Combined use of ALA and PUVA using 8-MOP and UVA lamps, which are widespread in Japan, had a strong anti-tumor effect in vitro.
  • Combined treatment with ALA-PDT and PUVA using a UVA lamp appears to have a strong treatment effect.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminolevulinic Acid / administration & dosage. Methoxsalen / administration & dosage. PUVA Therapy. Photosensitizing Agents / administration & dosage. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor / radiation effects. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Cell Proliferation / radiation effects. Drug Synergism. Humans. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Mycosis Fungoides / pathology. Sezary Syndrome / drug therapy. Sezary Syndrome / pathology. Ultraviolet Rays

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  • (PMID = 17523931.001).
  • [ISSN] 0905-4383
  • [Journal-full-title] Photodermatology, photoimmunology & photomedicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 88755TAZ87 / Aminolevulinic Acid; U4VJ29L7BQ / Methoxsalen
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17. Vang R, Medeiros LJ, Malpica A, Levenback C, Deavers M: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the vulva. Int J Gynecol Pathol; 2000 Jul;19(3):236-42
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  • [Title] Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the vulva.
  • Two patients had neoplasms localized to the vulva, and two patients had a history of NHL that secondarily involved the vulva; in another patient the stage was unknown, and the sixth patient had stage IVA mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome involving the vulva.
  • Each tumor was classified according to the revised European-American classification of lymphoid neoplasms: four were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, one was peripheral T-cell lymphoma, and one was mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome.
  • Two patients were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, one patient received chemotherapy and phototherapy, one patient was treated with chemotherapy, and in two patients the treatment is unknown.
  • One patient with low-stage NHL responded to therapy, but relapsed and died of disease 2 years later.
  • Two patients with generalized NHL that secondarily involved the vulva died of disease 7 months and 5 years, respectively, after the diagnosis of vulvar involvement was established.
  • The patient with mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome is alive with disease at 4 years.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / pathology. Vulvar Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antigens, CD20 / analysis. Antigens, CD3 / analysis. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Lymphoma, B-Cell / pathology. Mycosis Fungoides / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Sezary Syndrome / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Vulva / pathology

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  • (PMID = 10907172.001).
  • [ISSN] 0277-1691
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological pathology : official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Pathologists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD20; 0 / Antigens, CD3
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18. Wollina U, Graefe T, Karte K: Treatment of relapsing or recalcitrant cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2000 Jan;42(1 Pt 1):40-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of relapsing or recalcitrant cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin.
  • BACKGROUND: Pegylated liposomes are stable, long-circulating carriers useful for delivering doxorubicin to tumor sites with a lower toxicity than the free drug.
  • Free doxorubicin is used in several treatment protocols for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Although pegylated liposomal doxorubicin is currently used in the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma, no data are available for tumors, such as primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs).
  • Six patients (1 woman and 5 men) aged 59 to 78 years with relapsing or recalcitrant CTCL of the mycosis fungoides type, stage (Ib/IIb), were treated with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin to induce a clinical response.
  • The drug was administered at a dosage of 20 mg m(-2) once a month.
  • There was no need of additional therapy because of side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Drug Carriers. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Liposomes. Male. Middle Aged. Pilot Projects. Polyethylene Glycols. Prospective Studies. Recurrence

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  • [CommentIn] J Am Acad Dermatol. 2001 Jan;44(1):149-50 [11148501.001]
  • (PMID = 10607318.001).
  • [ISSN] 0190-9622
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Liposomes; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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19. Pangalis GA, Dimopoulou MN, Angelopoulou MK, Tsekouras C, Vassilakopoulos TP, Vaiopoulos G, Siakantaris MP: Campath-1H (anti-CD52) monoclonal antibody therapy in lymphoproliferative disorders. Med Oncol; 2001;18(2):99-107
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

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  • [Title] Campath-1H (anti-CD52) monoclonal antibody therapy in lymphoproliferative disorders.
  • Campath-1H is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeted against the CDw52 membrane antigen of lymphocytes, which causes complement and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.
  • Campath-1H has been used in B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), T-prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL), and low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (LGNHL).
  • Because of the antibody's higher activity on circulating lymphocytes, it has been used for in vivo purging of residual disease in B-CLL, followed by autologous stem-cell transplantation.
  • In heavily pretreated advanced stage LGNHL, response is achieved only in 14% of cases with B-phenotype; a 50% response rate is noted in mycosis fungoides.
  • The main complications of Campath-1H treatment are caused by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 release, usually during the first intravenous infusion, and include fever, rigor, nausea, vomiting, and hypotension responsive to steroids.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Neoplasm / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leukemia, B-Cell / drug therapy. Leukemia, Prolymphocytic / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. Immunosuppression. Infection. Infusions, Intravenous. Interleukin-6 / adverse effects. Interleukin-6 / secretion. Phenotype. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / adverse effects. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / secretion

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  • (PMID = 11778765.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-0560
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical oncology (Northwood, London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antibodies, Neoplasm; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 3A189DH42V / alemtuzumab
  • [Number-of-references] 60
  •  go-up   go-down


20. Ishihara K, Saida T, Otsuka F, Yamazaki N, Prognosis and Statistical Investigation Committee of the Japanese Skin Cancer Society: Statistical profiles of malignant melanoma and other skin cancers in Japan: 2007 update. Int J Clin Oncol; 2008 Feb;13(1):33-41
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  • Because the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) TNM and stage classifications for malignant melanoma were changed substantially in 2002, analyses in the present investigation were performed according to the new classifications.
  • In addition, the numbers of patients with various kinds of skin malignancies, including not only malignant melanoma but also basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, mycosis fungoides, actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease, and Paget's disease, registered at approximately 100 medical institutions in Japan from 1987 to 2001, were also investigated and data were tabulated.
  • RESULTS: The nationwide survey of Japanese patients with malignant skin tumors from 1987 to 2001 showed that the most prevalent skin tumor was basal cell carcinoma, which increased year by year, followed by squamous cell carcinoma, and then by malignant melanoma.
  • The following results were obtained from the data for melanoma patients registered at major institutions from 1987 to 2001. (1) The overall 10-year survival rates for melanoma patients in each chronological group were ranked as: group C > B > A, although only the difference between groups C and A was statistically significant. (2) The male-to-female ratio ranged from 1: 0.97 to 1: 1.14, and the survival rate of female patients was higher than that of male patients (the 140-month survival rate was 70.6% in females and 60% in males). (3) Assessment of the age distribution showed that the number of patients increased rapidly from ages 40-49 years and reached a peak at around 60 years in all three groups. (4) The sole of the foot was the most common site of melanoma in both males and females, while melanomas on the lower limbs were also prevalent in females. (5) Acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM) was the most common type in all three groups, accounting for nearly 50% of the patients in each group.
  • The number of patients with superficial spreading melanoma (SSM) increased steadily over time and exceeded the number of patients with nodular melanoma (NM) in group C.
  • The prognosis of NM was the worst, while that of SSM was the most favorable. (6) The proportion of stage I patients was larger in group C than in groups A and B, but no significant difference among the groups was observed in the proportions of stage II, III, and IV patients.
  • For patients in stage III, the overall survival rate was higher in group C than that in group A or B, while there was no apparent difference in survival between the groups for patients in stage I or II.
  • For patients in stage IV, the survival rate in group C was slightly lower than that in group A or B. (7) In group C, the overall survival rates for substages III A, B, and C were ranked as III A > III B > III C. (8) The overall survival rates for stage IV M1a, M1b, and M1c were ranked as M1a > M1b > M1c.
  • In group C, the overall survival rate of stage IV patients with a normal serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level was higher than that of patients with elevated LDH values. (9) Evaluation of the effects of some therapeutic procedures (prophylactic lymph node dissection and chemotherapy with and without interferon-beta) on the survivals of patients with melanoma was inconclusive and suggested the need for more studies in this area.
  • The prognosis of patients with advanced malignant melanoma remains extremely poor, but that of patients in stage III has shown an improvement.

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  • [Cites] Int J Epidemiol. 1995 Oct;24(5):897-907 [8557445.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Clin Oncol. 2003 Jun;8(3):139-50 [12851837.001]
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  • (PMID = 18307017.001).
  • [ISSN] 1341-9625
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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21. Duvic M, Talpur R, Wen S, Kurzrock R, David CL, Apisarnthanarax N: Phase II evaluation of gemcitabine monotherapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Clin Lymphoma Myeloma; 2006 Jul;7(1):51-8
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  • [Title] Phase II evaluation of gemcitabine monotherapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate safety and efficacy of gemcitabine monotherapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).
  • RESULTS: Two patients with CD30+ anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma and 31 with mycosis fungoides (stage IB [T2, n = 2], stage IIA [T2, n = 1], stage IIB [T3, n = 13], stage IVA [T3 N3, n = 3; T4b2, n = 2; T4b2 N3, n = 2], and stage IVB [T4b2 N1, n = 6; T4 N3b2 M1, n = 1; T3 N3 M1, n = 1]) had received a median of 5 previous therapies (range, 1-13 therapies).
  • Seven of 13 patients with mycosis fungoides (T3) responded, 10 had tumor burden reductions, and 8 of 11 patients with Sezary syndrome responded.
  • Increased hepatic transaminases (n = 4), mucositis (n = 3), lethargy (n = 7), fever (n = 8), cutaneous hyperpigmentation (n = 6), infusion-related maculopapular rash (n = 1), and radiation recall (n = 1) were also seen.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Sezary Syndrome / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Mycosis Fungoides / complications. Receptors, Interleukin-2 / blood. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16879770.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-9190
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lymphoma & myeloma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lymphoma Myeloma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16672-22; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K24 CA 86815
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Receptors, Interleukin-2; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine
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22. Assaf C: Denileukin diftitox therapy for patients with tumour-stage mycosis fungoides. Dermatol Clin; 2008 Jan;26 Suppl 1:21-2
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  • [Title] Denileukin diftitox therapy for patients with tumour-stage mycosis fungoides.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Diphtheria Toxin / therapeutic use. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 18405182.001).
  • [ISSN] 0733-8635
  • [Journal-full-title] Dermatologic clinics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dermatol Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Diphtheria Toxin; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 25E79B5CTM / denileukin diftitox
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23. Markham T, Sheahan K, Collins P: Topical 5-aminolaevulinic acid photodynamic therapy for tumour-stage mycosis fungoides. Br J Dermatol; 2001 Jun;144(6):1262-3
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  • [Title] Topical 5-aminolaevulinic acid photodynamic therapy for tumour-stage mycosis fungoides.
  • [MeSH-major] Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy / methods. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aminolevulinic Acid / therapeutic use. Humans. Male. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11422054.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0963
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 88755TAZ87 / Aminolevulinic Acid
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24. Wobser M, Göppner D, Lang SC, Beckmann G, Flentje M, Ugurel S, Bröcker EB, Becker JC: Durable complete remission of therapy-refractory, tumor-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma under radioimmunotherapy with electron beam irradiation and denileukin diftitox. Arch Dermatol; 2010 Jul;146(7):805-6
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  • [Title] Durable complete remission of therapy-refractory, tumor-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma under radioimmunotherapy with electron beam irradiation and denileukin diftitox.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Diphtheria Toxin / therapeutic use. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / therapy. Remission Induction / methods. Skin Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged, 80 and over. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Follow-Up Studies. Foot. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / administration & dosage. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 20644054.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-3652
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Dermatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Diphtheria Toxin; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 25E79B5CTM / denileukin diftitox
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