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Items 1 to 36 of about 36
1. Narula MK, Gupta N, Anand R, Kapoor S: Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma / primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the sacral nerve plexus. Indian J Radiol Imaging; 2009 Apr-Jun;19(2):151-4

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma / primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the sacral nerve plexus.
  • We report an unusual case of Ewing's sarcoma / primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of the sacral nerve plexus in a 9-year-old boy who presented with a soft tissue swelling and severe piercing pain in the lower back region.
  • MRI of the lumbosacral spine showed a lobulated soft tissue mass with clubbed finger-like projections along the path of the sacral nerves, which had caused widening of the spinal canal and the sacral foramina (S2-S4 level).
  • Histopathology of the lesion confirmed Ewing's sarcoma / PNET of the sacral spinal nerve plexus.
  • The patient responded favorably to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, showing clinical and radiological improvement.

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  • [Cites] Tohoku J Exp Med. 2006 Aug;209(4):369-77 [16864960.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1991 Aug 1;68(3):648-54 [2065287.001]
  • [Cites] AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2001 Apr;22(4):795-8 [11290502.001]
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  • (PMID = 19881073.001).
  • [ISSN] 1998-3808
  • [Journal-full-title] The Indian journal of radiology & imaging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Radiol Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2765184
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2. Dartnell J, Pilling J, Ferner R, Cane P, Lang-Lazdunski L: Malignant triton tumor of the brachial plexus invading the left thoracic inlet: a rare differential diagnosis of pancoast tumor. J Thorac Oncol; 2009 Jan;4(1):135-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant triton tumor of the brachial plexus invading the left thoracic inlet: a rare differential diagnosis of pancoast tumor.
  • Malignant triton tumor is a divergent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation.
  • We report a case of malignant triton tumor arising in the brachial plexus of a 28-year-old women with neurofibromatosis type 1.
  • Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography before excision demonstrated a tumor with a maximum standard uptake value of 21 at 4 hours postinjection.
  • The patient underwent complete excision of the tumor through median sternotomy and left supraclavicular approach.
  • Adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy were planned but the patient died of metastatic disease within 3 months of surgical resection.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachial Plexus / pathology. Neurilemmoma / diagnosis. Pancoast Syndrome / diagnosis. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / diagnosis. Thoracic Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Diagnosis, Differential. Fatal Outcome. Female. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neurofibromatosis 1 / complications. Positron-Emission Tomography. Radiopharmaceuticals. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 19096322.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-1380
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of thoracic oncology : official publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Thorac Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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3. Chen YM, Hu GC, Cheng SJ: Bilateral neuralgic amyotrophy presenting with left vocal cord and phrenic nerve paralysis. J Formos Med Assoc; 2007 Aug;106(8):680-4
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  • [Title] Bilateral neuralgic amyotrophy presenting with left vocal cord and phrenic nerve paralysis.
  • This article reports the difference between neuralgic amyotrophy and neuropathy caused by chemotherapy and radiation treatment which manifested with severe shoulder pain followed by marked weakness of bilateral upper arms and involvement of cranial nerves.
  • The diagnosis of neuralgic amyotrophy was supported and differentiated from tumor-induced and radiation-induced neuropathy by clinical presentation, electrophysiologic and imaging studies.
  • Unlike previous reports of the onset of neuralgic amyotrophy being associated with initiation of radiation treatment in cancer patients, this report demonstrates that neuralgic amyotrophy can occur at any point of the malignant disease process after radiation and chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 17711804.001).
  • [ISSN] 0929-6646
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Formos. Med. Assoc.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Singapore
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4. Kellie SJ, Koopmans P, Earl J, Nath C, Roebuck D, Uges DR, De Graaf SS: Increasing the dosage of vincristine: a clinical and pharmacokinetic study of continuous-infusion vincristine in children with central nervous system tumors. Cancer; 2004 Jun 15;100(12):2637-43
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Increasing the dosage of vincristine: a clinical and pharmacokinetic study of continuous-infusion vincristine in children with central nervous system tumors.
  • BACKGROUND: Vincristine (VCR) is widely used to treat patients with malignant disease; among the patients treated with VCR are children with brain tumors.
  • The diagnoses included intrinsic pontine glioma (n = 4), ependymoma (n = 5), astrocytoma (n = 3), medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET; n = 2), ganglioglioma (n = 1), and choroid plexus carcinoma (n = 1).
  • Treatment included cyclophosphamide 65 mg/kg administered intravenously over 1 hour on Day 1, a bolus of VCR 1.5 mg/m(2) administered intravenously on Day 2, and VCR 0.5 mg/m(2) per 24 hours administered via continuous intravenous infusion on Days 2-5.
  • Fifteen patients received 2 courses of treatment at 21-28-day intervals, and a total of 31 treatment courses were administered.
  • However, only 1 of 31 courses was associated with Grade III toxicity, and no Grade IV toxicity (e.g., cranial nerve palsy, ileus, inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, seizures, hallucinations, etc.) was noted.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Continuous infusion of VCR after a conventional bolus dose plus cyclophosphamide for children with tumors of the central nervous system did not result in significant neurotoxicity and appeared to be a safe strategy for achieving increased systemic exposure.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Humans. Infant. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 15197807.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
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5. Davis GA, Knight S: Pancoast tumor resection with preservation of brachial plexus and hand function. Neurosurg Focus; 2007;22(6):E15
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pancoast tumor resection with preservation of brachial plexus and hand function.
  • OBJECT: Pancoast tumors are aggressive bronchogenic lesions of the lung apex that are rapidly fatal if untreated.
  • Modern treatment includes induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy prior to resection, but many authors also resect the T-1 nerve root (with or without the C-8 nerve root and the lower trunk of the brachial plexus) as part of the therapy, causing significant loss of hand function in many patients.
  • The current authors determined whether a different approach allowing preservation of the brachial plexus and hand function could be adopted without compromising patient survival.
  • An extensive historical review of Pancoast tumors is presented as a baseline for clinical comparison.
  • METHODS: Five patients harboring Pancoast tumors with brachial plexus involvement underwent surgery performed by both a neurosurgeon and thoracic surgeon.
  • In all cases the tumor was resected from the brachial plexus using neurolysis while preserving the C-8 and T-1 nerve roots and lower trunk of the brachial plexus.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although this patient series is small, the findings are extremely encouraging and suggest that the described treatment paradigm preserves survival as well as hand function in patients with Pancoast tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachial Plexus / physiology. Brachial Plexus / surgery. Hand / physiology. Pancoast Syndrome / surgery. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / surgery. Recovery of Function / physiology

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  • (PMID = 17613206.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgical focus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurg Focus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Schönberger B: [Bladder dysfunction and surgery in the small pelvis. Therapeutic possibilities]. Urologe A; 2003 Dec;42(12):1569-75
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Urine and Urination.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Bladder dysfunction and surgery in the small pelvis. Therapeutic possibilities].
  • The more extensive a surgical procedure in a small pelvis, the higher the risk for the lower urinary tract with its nerve supply and nerve plexus.
  • Restoration of spontaneous micturition can be supported by drug treatment with parasympatholytics and/or alpha-blockers if the measured bladder pressure and residual urine are within tolerable limits.
  • For electrostimulation of micturition, intravesical therapy, although timeconsuming, is best suited because it can easily be done on an outpatient basis.
  • More promising seems bilateral sacral neuromodulation, which, however, is a rather complicated and expensive procedure.
  • Persisting problems with bladder storage capacity as a result of tumor surgery in the small pelvis are frequently secondary to retention of urine (overflow incontinence).
  • Reduced bladder compliance and lowering of the urethral leak pressure point may result in stress and urge incontinence, which, according to the established rules, should be managed by physiotherapy and behaviour therapy as well as drug therapy and only in exceptional cases by surgical measures.
  • Prevention of postoperative bladder dysfunction can be tried by tissue- and nerve-sparing surgical techniques, but is always determined by oncological aspects.
  • [MeSH-major] Pelvis / abnormalities. Pelvis / surgery. Postoperative Complications. Urinary Bladder / injuries. Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic / etiology. Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic / therapy. Urination Disorders / etiology. Urination Disorders / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Treatment Outcome. Urinary Bladder Diseases / diagnosis. Urinary Bladder Diseases / etiology. Urinary Bladder Diseases / therapy

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  • [Cites] Urologe A. 1995 Jan;34(1):46-8 [7879322.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1987 Apr;94(4):351-7 [3580318.001]
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  • (PMID = 14668983.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-2592
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Urologe. Ausg. A
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urologe A
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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9. Beck A, Jonas J, Frenzel H, Bähr R: [Gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumor]. Zentralbl Chir; 2001 Sep;126(9):702-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumor].
  • Gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumors (GAN-tumor) are rare malignant neurogenic stromal tumors of the intestinal tract.
  • The origin is suspected in the autonomic nerve plexus Meissner or Auerbach with the interstitial cells of Cajal as precursors.
  • We report on a 53-year-old patient with a clinical apparent and radiological 5 cm measuring tumor of the jejunum, which was resected and immunohistochemically verified as GAN-tumor.
  • Several trials of adjuvant chemotherapy (adriamycine/ifosamide, taxotere, gemcitabine/xyloda) were ineffective.
  • Since the first description of the GAN-tumor in 1984 87 patients were reported in the literature.
  • No recurrences or metastasis were seen in tumors with a seize less than 5 cm.
  • A tumor seize of more than 10 cm is associated with recurrences in 64% of the cases within 2 years.
  • Since there is no option for medical treatment, surgical resection is the treatment of choice and has to be considered also in the case of recurrence.
  • [MeSH-major] Autonomic Nervous System Diseases / surgery. Ileal Neoplasms / surgery. Ileum / innervation. Jejunal Neoplasms / surgery. Jejunum / innervation. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Autonomic Nervous System / pathology. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 11699287.001).
  • [ISSN] 0044-409X
  • [Journal-full-title] Zentralblatt für Chirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zentralbl Chir
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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10. Hébert-Blouin MN, Bishop AT, Shin AY, Wetmore C, Spinner RJ: Tardy spinal cord tumor following avulsive brachial plexus injury: coincidental or causal? World Neurosurg; 2010 Aug-Sep;74(2-3):368-73
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tardy spinal cord tumor following avulsive brachial plexus injury: coincidental or causal?
  • OBJECTIVE: Late neurologic deterioration after brachial plexus injury (BPI) is uncommon and may be caused by multiple etiologies.
  • RESULTS: Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography myelogram revealed spinal cord herniation at the same level of the previous nerve root avulsions.
  • Despite craniospinal radiotherapy and different regimens of chemotherapy, he died 4 years later from leptomeningeal spread.
  • The probable coincidental versus possible causal interrelationship of these two processes (BPI and spinal cord tumor) is discussed, but no conclusions can be reached.
  • [MeSH-major] Astrocytoma / etiology. Brachial Plexus / injuries. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Dacarbazine / therapeutic use. Fatal Outcome. Horner Syndrome / complications. Humans. Laminectomy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Meningocele / pathology. Muscle Weakness / etiology. Neurosurgical Procedures. Off-Road Motor Vehicles. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures. Spine / pathology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • [CommentIn] World Neurosurg. 2010 Aug-Sep;74(2-3):275-6 [21492559.001]
  • (PMID = 21492572.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-8769
  • [Journal-full-title] World neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 85622-93-1 / temozolomide
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11. Vranken JH, Zuurmond WW, de Lange JJ: Continuous brachial plexus block as treatment for the Pancoast syndrome. Clin J Pain; 2000 Dec;16(4):327-33

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Continuous brachial plexus block as treatment for the Pancoast syndrome.
  • BACKGROUND: Six patients with severe neuropathic pain caused by a Pancoast tumor were treated with the continuous administration of local anesthetics.
  • These patients had not responded to any other treatment, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, dexamethasone, tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, ketamine, and transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation.
  • INTERVENTIONS: An axillary catheter was placed in the brachial plexus using a posterior approach that has not been described previously.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that neuropathic pain may be treated by local anesthetics administered through an axillary catheter placed in the brachial plexus.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachial Plexus. Nerve Block / methods. Neuralgia / drug therapy. Neuralgia / etiology. Pancoast Syndrome / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Anesthetics, Local / administration & dosage. Axilla. Brachial Plexus Neuropathies / etiology. Brachial Plexus Neuropathies / therapy. Catheterization / methods. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pain Measurement. Patient Satisfaction

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  • (PMID = 11153789.001).
  • [ISSN] 0749-8047
  • [Journal-full-title] The Clinical journal of pain
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin J Pain
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local
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12. Peláez R, Pascual G, Aguilar JL, Atanassoff PG: Paravertebral cervical nerve block in a patient suffering from a Pancoast tumor. Pain Med; 2010 Dec;11(12):1799-802
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Paravertebral cervical nerve block in a patient suffering from a Pancoast tumor.
  • In patients with aggressive tumors resistant to conventional pain treatment, regional anaesthesia frequently becomes an alternative therapy.
  • Cervical paravertebral nerve block among several access options to the brachial plexus is barely ever used.
  • We present a case with severe shoulder and upper extremity pain owing to an expanding Pancoast tumor exhibiting compression upon the brachial plexus.
  • Continuous intrathecal morphine infusion and adjuvant treatment was not sufficient to render the patient pain-free.
  • With the addition of paravertebral nerve blockade the patient's pain improved substantially, however without impacting his longevity.
  • [MeSH-major] Morphine / therapeutic use. Nerve Block / methods. Nerve Compression Syndromes. Pain / drug therapy. Pancoast Syndrome / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Analgesics, Opioid / therapeutic use. Brachial Plexus / pathology. Catheters, Indwelling. Cervical Vertebrae. Humans. Male

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  • [Copyright] Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  • (PMID = 21134120.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-4637
  • [Journal-full-title] Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pain Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine
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13. Vranken JH, van der Vegt MH, Zuurmond WW, Pijl AJ, Dzoljic M: Continuous brachial plexus block at the cervical level using a posterior approach in the management of neuropathic cancer pain. Reg Anesth Pain Med; 2001 Nov-Dec;26(6):572-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Continuous brachial plexus block at the cervical level using a posterior approach in the management of neuropathic cancer pain.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Neuropathic cancer pain due to tumor growth near the brachial plexus is often treated with a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and oral or transdermal opioids.
  • We propose placement of a catheter along the brachial plexus using a posterior approach for patients not responding to the above-mentioned treatment.
  • CASE REPORT: We describe 2 patients with neuropathic cancer pain in the arm and shoulder despite treatment with dexamethasone, amitriptyline, gabapentin, opioids, and, in 1 patient, oral ketamine.
  • Continuous administration of local anesthetics via a brachial plexus catheter inserted at the cervical level using a posterior approach resulted in a markedly improved analgesia and decreased opioid requirement.
  • CONCLUSION: Continuous brachial plexus block should be considered in patients with severe neuropathic cancer pain in the arm and shoulder.
  • To achieve sufficient pain relief for prolonged periods of time, a catheter was inserted to block the brachial plexus using a posterior approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachial Plexus. Neoplasms / complications. Nerve Block. Pain / drug therapy. Pain / etiology

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  • (PMID = 11707798.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-7339
  • [Journal-full-title] Regional anesthesia and pain medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Reg Anesth Pain Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; Y8335394RO / Bupivacaine
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14. Malerba M, Garofalo A: [A rare case of nerve-sheath sarcoma with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (malignant triton tumor)]. Tumori; 2003 Jul-Aug;89(4 Suppl):246-50

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [A rare case of nerve-sheath sarcoma with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (malignant triton tumor)].
  • [Transliterated title] Un raro caso di sarcoma delle guaine nervose a differenziazione rabdomioblastica (malignant Triton tumor).
  • Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are spindle-cell sarcomas that appear in a setting of neurofibroma or schwannoma or are associated with peripheral nerves or demonstrate nerve sheath differentiation.
  • Malignant triton tumor (MTT) is a subtype of MPNST that also contain tissue with skeletal muscle differentiation (embryonal, plemorphic and botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma).
  • A xifopubic laparotomy was performed: the tumor appeared to be localized, well-capsulated and strictly associated to the lumbar and sacral nervous radicles (L4, L5, S1) without evidence of invasion.
  • The tumor was completely resected with sparing of the psoas muscle and the lumbar plexus through a subperineural dissection technique.
  • Postoperative pathologic findings showed evidence for a trition tumor.
  • The popliteal mass was resected too and resulted to be a neurofibroma just like the tumors resected 17 months before when diagnosis of von Recklinghausen disease was made.
  • Sarcoma arising in anatomic site other than extremity and superficial trunk are often more difficult to control because of anatomic constraints, delayed disease presentation, proximity to neurovascular and osseous structures and toxicity for normal adjacent tissues that limits the use of adequate radiation doses.
  • Indeed, the anatomic site is an important prognostic factor in STS and the prognosis for retroperitoneal tumors is considerably worse than for extremity tumors.
  • In contrast to the benefit most patients with high grade soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities receive from adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy, these modalities have been of little value for retroperitoneal tumors.
  • Current chemotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcomas is ineffective.
  • Local adjuvant therapy such as intraperitoneal chemotherapy or experimental immunotherapy seems to be attractive in theory, but needs further investigations through prospective randomized multicentric trials.
  • In conclusion, to date aggressive surgical management remains the most effective modality for selected primary and recurrent retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcomas including MPNSTs and the subtype MTT.
  • Patients with incomplete resection and other risk factors such as younger age and high grade tumors may be suitable candidates for investigational adjuvant therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neurilemmoma / pathology. Neurofibromatosis 1 / pathology. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / pathology. Retroperitoneal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Axilla. Cell Differentiation. Humans. Knee. Male. Mediastinal Neoplasms / pathology. Mediastinal Neoplasms / surgery. Muscles / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery. Spinal Nerve Roots / pathology. Spinal Nerve Roots / surgery

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  • (PMID = 12903608.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8916
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumori
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumori
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Jarmundowicz W, Jabłoński P, Załuski R: [Brachial plexus tumors--neurosurgical treatment]. Neurol Neurochir Pol; 2002 Sep-Oct;36(5):925-35

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Brachial plexus tumors--neurosurgical treatment].
  • Tumours of the brachial plexus according to present classification are included to soft tissue tumours.
  • There is also a few number of publications regarding tumours of the brachial plexus.
  • Therefore the aim of the study was to present our experience in the surgical treatment of tumours of the brachial plexus basing on the material of 5 cases treated in the years 1997-2001.
  • In 3 cases tumours of the brachial plexus invaded the spinal canal through the intervertebral foramen and caused spinal cord compression (type A).
  • In 2 cases tumours involved only plexus elements (type B).
  • In 2 cases tumours were associated with neurofibromatosis type II.
  • Five cases of neural sheath tumours included 2 schwannomas, 2 neurofibromas and 1 schwannoma malignum.
  • In case of schwannomas and neurofibromas the surgical removal was radical without impairment of brachial plexus function.
  • In case of a giant schwannoma malignum tumor, which caused flaccid paresis and symptoms of insufficient blood, supply with severe pain in the upper limb radical extirpation was also possible.
  • In type A tumours in the first stage intraspinal part of the tumor was removed.
  • The result of treatment of benign tumours was very good with complete function recovery of the upper limb, pain disappearance and no symptoms of recurrence in the long postoperative period.
  • The patient died 12 months after the operation because of tumor dissemination.
  • Benign tumours of the brachial plexus can be effectively surgically treated using microsurgical techniques and, if necessary, nerve grafting.
  • In case of malignant tumours many authors also recommend surgery with optimal sparing of the brachial plexus function and subsequent radio and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachial Plexus / surgery. Neurilemmoma / surgery. Neurofibroma / surgery. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12523117.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-3843
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurologia i neurochirurgia polska
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurol. Neurochir. Pol.
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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16. Yamaguchi K, Kobayashi K, Ogura Y, Nakamura K, Nakano K, Mizumoto K, Tanaka M: Radiation therapy, bypass operation and celiac plexus block in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Hepatogastroenterology; 2005 Sep-Oct;52(65):1605-12
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  • [Title] Radiation therapy, bypass operation and celiac plexus block in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer.
  • The treatment options for such patients include bypass operation, celiac plexus block, radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy and immunotherapy.
  • RT is divided into intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) and external radiation therapy (ERT).
  • Appropriate palliative treatment remains controversial.
  • METHODOLOGY: Our experience with palliative treatments including bypass operation, celiac plexus block and RT (IORT and ERT) was retrospectively reviewed in 31 Japanese patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer.
  • Gastrojejunostomy was performed in 25 patients and biliary bypass was done in 29 patients for the therapeutic or prophylactic purpose.
  • RESULTS: No patients developed gastroduodenal obstruction or jaundice until death.
  • Imaging findings after the treatment showed a decrease in tumor size in 11 of the 18 patients examined, an increase in four and no change in the other three.
  • No patients developed back pain after the treatment.
  • Of the 12 patients with pain relief, nine had both RT and celiac plexus block, two RT alone and the other neither RT nor celiac block.
  • CONCLUSIONS: RT significantly prolonged survival of patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer and combined palliative treatments including bypass operation, celiac plexus block and RT (ERT or IORT) are recommended for such patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Autonomic Nerve Block. Palliative Care. Pancreatic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Celiac Plexus. Cholangiography. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Gastrostomy. Humans. Intraoperative Period. Jejunostomy. Male. Radiotherapy / methods. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 16201126.001).
  • [ISSN] 0172-6390
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepato-gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatogastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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17. Rykowski JJ, Hilgier M: Efficacy of neurolytic celiac plexus block in varying locations of pancreatic cancer: influence on pain relief. Anesthesiology; 2000 Feb;92(2):347-54
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  • [Title] Efficacy of neurolytic celiac plexus block in varying locations of pancreatic cancer: influence on pain relief.
  • BACKGROUND: Neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) is an effective way of treating severe pain in some patients with pancreatic malignancy.
  • The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of NCPB in pancreatic cancer pain, depending on the location of the pancreatic tumor.
  • The patients were categorized into two different groups depending on tumor localization: group 1: patients with the cancer of the head of the pancreas and group 2: patients with the cancer of the body and tail of the pancreas.
  • The patients underwent prognostic celiac plexus block with bupivacaine, followed by neurolysis during fluoroscopic control within the next 24 h.
  • Those patients were scheduled for repeated retrocrural neurolysis during computed tomography control.
  • Computed tomography showed massive growth of the tumor around the celiac axis with metastases.
  • After repeated neurolysis, pain relief clinically still was not satisfactory, necessitating additional opioid treatment.
  • CONCLUSION: In this study, unilateral transcrural celiac plexus neurolysis has been shown to provide effective pain relief in 74% of patients with pancreatic cancer pain.
  • Neurolysis was more effective in cases with tumor involving the head of the pancreas.
  • In the cases with advanced tumor proliferation, regardless of the technique used, the analgesic effects of NCPB were not satisfactory.
  • [MeSH-major] Celiac Plexus. Nerve Block. Pain, Intractable / drug therapy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Anesthetics, Local. Bupivacaine. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pain Measurement. Prospective Studies. Survival. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 10691219.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-3022
  • [Journal-full-title] Anesthesiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anesthesiology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; Y8335394RO / Bupivacaine
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18. Erdek MA, Halpert DE, González Fernández M, Cohen SP: Assessment of celiac plexus block and neurolysis outcomes and technique in the management of refractory visceral cancer pain. Pain Med; 2010 Jan;11(1):92-100
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  • [Title] Assessment of celiac plexus block and neurolysis outcomes and technique in the management of refractory visceral cancer pain.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess demographic and clinical factors associated with celiac plexus neurolysis outcomes.
  • Interventions. Fifty celiac plexus alcohol neurolytic procedures done for pain control after a positive diagnostic block.
  • OUTCOME MEASURES: A successful treatment was predefined as >50% pain relief sustained for > or =1 month.
  • The following variables were analyzed for their association with treatment outcome: age, gender, duration of pain, origin of tumor, opioid dose, type of radiological guidance used, single- vs double-needle approach, type of block (e.g., antero- vs retrocrural), immediate vs delayed neurolysis, volume of local anesthetic employed for both diagnostic and neurolytic blocks, and use of sedation.
  • Strong trends for a positive association with outcome were found for the use of computed tomography (vs fluoroscopy), and using <20 mL of local anesthetic for the diagnostic block.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Celiac plexus neurolysis may provide intermediate pain relief to a significant percentage of cancer sufferers.
  • [MeSH-major] Autonomic Nerve Block. Celiac Plexus. Neoplasms / complications. Pain, Intractable / etiology. Pain, Intractable / therapy. Sympathectomy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Analgesics, Opioid / administration & dosage. Analgesics, Opioid / therapeutic use. Anesthetics, Local / administration & dosage. Anesthetics, Local / therapeutic use. Drug Resistance. Female. Fluoroscopy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Socioeconomic Factors. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20002595.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-4637
  • [Journal-full-title] Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pain Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 0 / Anesthetics, Local
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19. Gachiani J, Kim D, Nelson A, Kline D: Surgical management of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Neurosurg Focus; 2007;22(6):E13

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  • [Title] Surgical management of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.
  • OBJECT: The aim of this study was to describe the presentation of patients harboring soft tissue sarcomas involving the nerves, most of which were malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), and provide an algorithm for their treatment.
  • METHODS: The authors retrospectively analyzed data on 43 surgically treated soft tissue sarcomas involving the nerves, 34 (79%) of which were MPNSTs.
  • Tumor classifications are presented, together with patient numbers, locations of MPNSTs, surgical techniques, and adjunctive treatments.
  • Most of these lesions (19 MPNSTs [56%]) were located in the brachial plexus, whereas the rest were located on other major nerves.
  • Neurofibromatosis Type 1-associated tumors (12 lesions) represented 35% of the total number of MPNSTs.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are rare.
  • The role of chemotherapy is still being defined.
  • [MeSH-major] Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / diagnosis. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Management. Humans. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 17613204.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgical focus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurg Focus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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20. Vranken JH, Van Der Vegt MH, Ubags LH, Pijl AJ, Dzoljic M: Continuous sacral nerve root block in the management of neuropathic cancer pain. Anesth Analg; 2002 Dec;95(6):1724-5, table of contents
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  • [Title] Continuous sacral nerve root block in the management of neuropathic cancer pain.
  • IMPLICATIONS: Neuropathic cancer pain caused by tumor infiltration in the sacral plexus is primarily treated by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and opioids.
  • In one patient with severe pain despite pharmacotherapy, a catheter for the continuous administration of local anesthetics was inserted along the first sacral root, resulting in markedly improved analgesia.
  • [MeSH-major] Nerve Block / methods. Ovarian Neoplasms / physiopathology. Pain, Intractable / therapy. Spinal Nerve Roots

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  • (PMID = 12456447.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-2999
  • [Journal-full-title] Anesthesia and analgesia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anesth. Analg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Wong GY, Schroeder DR, Carns PE, Wilson JL, Martin DP, Kinney MO, Mantilla CB, Warner DO: Effect of neurolytic celiac plexus block on pain relief, quality of life, and survival in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA; 2004 Mar 3;291(9):1092-9
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  • [Title] Effect of neurolytic celiac plexus block on pain relief, quality of life, and survival in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer: a randomized controlled trial.
  • CONTEXT: Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive tumor associated with high mortality.
  • OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) vs opioids alone improves pain relief, QOL, and survival in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.
  • INTERVENTION: Patients were randomly assigned to receive either NCPB or systemic analgesic therapy alone with a sham injection.
  • All patients could receive additional opioids managed by a clinician blinded to the treatment assignment.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain intensity (0-10 numerical rating scale), QOL, opioid consumption and related adverse effects, and survival time were assessed weekly by a blinded observer.
  • From repeated measures analysis, pain was also lower for NCPB over time (P =.01).
  • CONCLUSION: Although NCPB improves pain relief in patients with pancreatic cancer vs optimized systemic analgesic therapy alone, it does not affect QOL or survival.

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  • (PMID = 14996778.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-3598
  • [Journal-full-title] JAMA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JAMA
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; Y8335394RO / Bupivacaine
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22. Esch AT, Esch A, Knorr JL, Boezaart AP: Long-term ambulatory continuous nerve blocks for terminally ill patients: a case series. Pain Med; 2010 Aug;11(8):1299-302
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  • [Title] Long-term ambulatory continuous nerve blocks for terminally ill patients: a case series.
  • OBJECTIVE: Intolerable side effects and dissatisfactory pain control with traditional analgesics prompted the utilization of long-term, ambulatory, continuous peripheral nerve blocks (CPNBs) in terminally ill patients for palliative care.
  • SETTING: Continuous peripheral nerve catheters were placed in terminally ill patients in an ambulatory setting.
  • All three cases had an unfavorable coagulation status; case 2 had a prior pneumonectomy on the contralateral side and a large tumor on the ipsilateral lung of the continuous brachial plexus block.
  • RESULTS: After infusion and titration of local anesthetic doses, oral opioid medication was significantly reduced, which resulted in an improved quality of life.
  • The nerve blocks did not hasten death in any of the patients despite their coexisting conditions.
  • [MeSH-major] Ambulatory Care. Nerve Block / methods. Pain / drug therapy. Terminally Ill
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Analgesics, Opioid / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pain Measurement

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  • (PMID = 20704678.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-4637
  • [Journal-full-title] Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pain Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid
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23. Jaeckle KA: Neurological manifestations of neoplastic and radiation-induced plexopathies. Semin Neurol; 2004 Dec;24(4):385-93
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  • Metastatic plexopathy is often a disabling accompaniment of advanced systemic cancer and may involve any of the peripheral nerve plexuses.
  • Brachial plexopathy most commonly occurs in carcinoma of the breast and lung; lumbosacral plexopathy is most common with colorectal and gynecologic tumors, sarcomas, and lymphomas.
  • Later, weakness and focal sensory disturbances occur in the distribution of plexus involvement.
  • Treatment of metastatic plexopathy is palliative and includes radiotherapy to the tumor mass, chemotherapy, and symptomatic treatment.
  • In selected cases, subtotal surgical resection of the tumor may be warranted.
  • The response to therapy is modest and generally short-lived.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachial Plexus Neuropathies / etiology. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / secondary. Radiotherapy / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnostic Imaging / methods. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / physiopathology. Lung Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 15637650.001).
  • [ISSN] 0271-8235
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 36
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24. Davis GA, Knight SR: Pancoast tumors. Neurosurg Clin N Am; 2008 Oct;19(4):545-57, v-vi
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  • [Title] Pancoast tumors.
  • Pancoast tumors (superior sulcus tumors or apical lung tumors) typically invade structures at the thoracic outlet, including the inferior elements of the brachial plexus (C8, T1 nerve roots and lower trunk).
  • Historically, these tumors are rapidly fatal, but newer treatment with induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy, followed by surgical resection of the tumor has resulted in improved patient survival.
  • To accomplish oncologic excision, resection of the involved brachial plexus elements is still standard practice in most centers, resulting in loss of hand function and/or development of neuropathic pain.
  • We present a modification of this protocol that incorporates induction chemoradiation, surgical resection of the lung tumor by a thoracic surgeon, and neurolysis and preservation of the brachial plexus by a neurosurgeon.
  • Improved survival outcome, especially in patients demonstrating a pathologic complete response, with preservation of hand function, supports our hypothesis that involved brachial plexus does not need resection in these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Lung Neoplasms / surgery. Pancoast Syndrome / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Brachial Plexus / physiology. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Movement Disorders / epidemiology. Movement Disorders / etiology. Positron-Emission Tomography. Postoperative Complications / physiopathology. Postoperative Complications / psychology. Recovery of Function. Spinal Nerve Roots / physiology. Survival. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19010280.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-1349
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurg. Clin. N. Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Kurahara H, Shinchi H, Maemura K, Mataki Y, Aoki M, Sakoda M, Ueno S, Natsugoe S, Takao S: [A case of curatively resected locally advanced pancreatic cancer after chemoradiation therapy]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 Oct;37(10):1983-6
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  • [Title] [A case of curatively resected locally advanced pancreatic cancer after chemoradiation therapy].
  • A 68-year-old man admitted for pancreatic tumor detected by US was found by computed tomography(CT)to have locally advanced pancreatic cancer invading the portal vein and neural plexus of the superior mesenteric artery without distant metastasis.
  • We conducted preoperative chemoradiation therapy containing S-1 and hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (50 Gy).
  • Reevaluation of CT after chemoradiation therapy showed that the primary tumor reduced 52% without distant metastasis.
  • Extensive fibrosis with a small amount of cancer cells was observed in the marginal area of the tumor.
  • Extrapancreatic nerve plexus invasion and lymph node metastasis were not observed.
  • The postoperative course was uneventful, and adjuvant chemotherapy (S-1) was started.
  • [MeSH-major] Pancreatic Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Combinations. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Oxonic Acid / therapeutic use. Tegafur / therapeutic use. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 20948269.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid
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26. Wasner G, Hilpert F, Schattschneider J, Binder A, Pfisterer J, Baron R: Docetaxel-induced nail changes--a neurogenic mechanism: a case report. J Neurooncol; 2002 Jun;58(2):167-74
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  • Docetaxel is a new taxoid widely used in chemotherapy for advanced breast cancer and other solid malignancies.
  • We report a patient with a complete peripheral palsy of the right arm due to advanced breast cancer with diffuse tumor infiltration of the brachial plexus.
  • Treatment with docetaxel led to onycholysis at all extremities except the paretic hand.
  • Sensory and motoric innervation measured by nerve conduction studies showed a complete loss of large nerve fiber function of the right arm.
  • [MeSH-major] Arm. Breast Neoplasms / complications. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Nail Diseases / chemically induced. Paclitaxel / adverse effects. Paclitaxel / analogs & derivatives. Paralysis / etiology. Taxoids
  • [MeSH-minor] Afferent Pathways / physiopathology. Brachial Plexus / pathology. Efferent Pathways / physiopathology. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Motor Neurons / physiology. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neural Conduction. Neurologic Examination. Neurons, Afferent / physiology. Parasympathetic Nervous System / physiopathology. Sensory Thresholds. Skin / innervation. Sympathetic Nervous System / physiopathology. Vibration

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  • (PMID = 12164689.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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27. Johansson S, Svensson H, Denekamp J: Timescale of evolution of late radiation injury after postoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2000 Oct 1;48(3):745-50
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  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the incidence and prevalence of various signs of late morbidity, their time of appearance and pattern of progression during an observation period up to 34 years in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy after radical mastectomy.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: A group of 71 breast cancer patients received in 1963-1965 aggressive postoperative telecobalt therapy to the parasternal, axillary, and supraclavicular lymph node regions after total mastectomy and axillary clearance.
  • None of the patients received chemotherapy either prior to, or after the irradiation as part of their primary treatment.
  • The prescribed dose to the three lymph node regions was 44 Gy in 11 fractions.
  • Because of the overlap of the supraclavicular and axillary fields, the dose received by the brachial plexus was not the dose that was prescribed.
  • A retrospective dose calculation showed that the total dose to the brachial plexus was 57 Gy, delivered as a complex combination of 1.8 Gy, 3.4 Gy, and 5.2 Gy fractions.
  • This cohort of patients has now been followed to 34 years and the late side effects of the treatment evaluated and scored.
  • Other neurological findings included unilateral vocal cord paralysis among 5% of the patients, who developed the disease after a median time of 19 years.
  • All of them were left-sided, indicating a mediastinal involvement of the recurrent nerve.
  • Local recurrence or the appearance of a new primary tumor infiltrating or causing pressure on the recurrent nerve were vigorously investigated and excluded as possible causes of these symptoms.
  • CONCLUSION: The greatest risk for all cancer patients is the inadequate treatment of their disease, because this is inevitably lethal.
  • The aggressiveness of the therapy and the acceptable risk of complications must therefore be balanced against the risk of recurrence.
  • The neuropathy seems to be closely linked to the development of fibrosis around the nerve trunks.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachial Plexus / radiation effects. Breast Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases / etiology. Radiation Injuries / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Axilla. Clavicle. Cobalt Radioisotopes / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Progression. Female. Fibrosis. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lymph Nodes / radiation effects. Mastectomy, Radical. Middle Aged. Postoperative Period. Radiotherapy Dosage. Sternum. Survival Analysis. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 11020571.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cobalt Radioisotopes
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28. Snady H: Interventional endoscopy, neoadjuvant therapy and the gastroenterologist. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am; 2002 Feb;16(1):53-79
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  • [Title] Interventional endoscopy, neoadjuvant therapy and the gastroenterologist.
  • With current treatment, survival of greater than 1 year should be anticipated for many patients with pancreatic cancer.
  • Relief of biliary obstruction allows improvement in liver function and more time to evaluate tumor stage accurately to determine initial treatment (see Fig. 1).
  • A cost-effective algorithm to determine accurate stage and treatment can start with the size of the mass on initial imaging studies.
  • EUS-guided FNA represents a significant improvement over CT scan-guided FNA to make a tissue diagnosis.
  • Tumors reliably staged as unresectable by nonoperative imaging methods including EUS are treated with chemotherapy with or without concurrent radiotherapy because median survival of these patients is 2 years in some series.
  • Tumors can be resected after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.
  • For chronic pain or gastric outlet obstruction not responding or treatable by chemoradiotherapy, endoscopically guided celiac plexus nerve block and stenting improve the quality of life for patients with pancreatic cancer.
  • Rather than reliance on any single standard, clinical judgment and communication among the team are paramount to providing optimal care for patients with a pancreatic neoplasm.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Endoscopy. Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal. Endosonography. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Ampulla of Vater / surgery. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Autonomic Nerve Block / methods. Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine / therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde. Cholestasis / etiology. Cholestasis / therapy. Combined Modality Therapy. Common Bile Duct Neoplasms / surgery. Diagnostic Imaging / methods. Gastric Outlet Obstruction / surgery. Humans. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Pain Management. Palliative Care. Pancreatic Cyst / therapy. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Stents

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  • (PMID = 12063829.001).
  • [ISSN] 0889-8588
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology/oncology clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol. Oncol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 115
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29. Jaeckle KA: Neurologic manifestations of neoplastic and radiation-induced plexopathies. Semin Neurol; 2010 Jul;30(3):254-62
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  • Metastatic plexopathy is often a disabling accompaniment of advanced systemic cancer, and may involve any of the peripheral nerve plexuses.
  • Brachial plexopathy most commonly occurs in carcinoma of the breast and lung; lumbosacral plexopathy is most common with colorectal and gynecologic tumors, sarcomas, and lymphomas.
  • In previously treated patients, the main differential diagnostic consideration is radiation-induced plexopathy, which can be difficult to distinguish from tumor plexopathy.
  • Treatment of metastatic plexopathy has included surgical resection of tumor in selected cases, radiotherapy to the plexus, systemic chemotherapy, interventional pain management procedures, and symptomatic treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms / complications. Nervous System Diseases / etiology. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases / etiology. Radiation Injuries / complications

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  • [Copyright] Thieme Medical Publishers.
  • (PMID = 20577932.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-9021
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Beger HG, Rau B, Gansauge F, Poch B, Link KH: Treatment of pancreatic cancer: challenge of the facts. World J Surg; 2003 Oct;27(10):1075-84
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of pancreatic cancer: challenge of the facts.
  • In spite of the progress in surgical treatment, resulting in increasing resection rates and a decrease in treatment-related morbidity and mortality, the true figures of cure are even today below 3%.
  • The dissemination of pancreatic cancer behind the local tissue compartments restricts the short-term (< 3 years) and long-term outcome for patients who have undergone resection.
  • By histological evaluation, less than 15% of the patients undergoing R(0) resection have a pN(0) status, more than 60% suffer from lymph angiosis carcinomatosa, and more than 50% suffer extrapancreatic nerve plexus infiltration.
  • Major contributions of surgery to improved treatment results are the reduction of surgical morbidity--e.g., early postoperative local and systemic complications--and a decrease of hospital mortality below 3%-5%.
  • In most recently published prospective trials, R(0) resection has been reported to result in an increase in short-term survival beyond that recorded for patients with residual tumor.
  • In many published R(0) series, standard tissue resection of pancreatic head cancer with the Kausch-Whipple procedure failed to include remote cancer cell-positive tissues in the operative specimen; e.g., N(2)-lymph nodes, nerve plexus, and perivascular extrapancreatic and retropancreatic tissues were not excised.
  • The assessment of clinical benefit from surgical or medical cancer treatment should therefore be based on several end points, not only on actuarial survival.
  • In reporting pancreatic cancer treatment trial results after oncological resections, more convincing primary end points to evaluate treatment efficacy are median survival (in months), actual survival at 1-5 years, and progression-free survival (in months).
  • In series with multimodality treatment, clinical benefit response as well as quality of life measurements using the EORTC Quality of Life index C30 (QLQ-C30) are of importance in evaluating survival data.
  • Adjuvant treatment improves survival after oncological resection; however, the short-term and long-term benefit after adjuvant chemotherapy in R(0) as well as in R(1)-(2) resected patients has not yet been underscored by data from controlled clinical trials.
  • The survival benefit (median survival time) of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy has been demonstrated to be 6-10 months.
  • Therefore, after oncological resection of pancreatic cancer each patient should be offered adjuvant treatment.
  • A neoadjuvant treatment protocol for pancreatic cancer, however, has not been established.
  • [MeSH-major] Pancreatic Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 12925907.001).
  • [ISSN] 0364-2313
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Editorial
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Kumar R: Spinal tuberculosis: with reference to the children of northern India. Childs Nerv Syst; 2005 Jan;21(1):19-26
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  • The central type of vertebral tuberculosis spreads along with Batson's plexus of veins, while paradiscal infection spreads through the arteries.
  • The anterior type of vertebral body tuberculosis results from the extension of the abscess beneath the anterior longitudinal ligament and periosteum.
  • Two types of bone and joint tuberculosis are recognized: the caseous, exudative type with abscess formation, which is more common in children, and the granular type is frequent in adults.
  • Only 7 of the 19 children had an abscess, while 10 manifested mainly granulation tissue.
  • Although spinal tuberculosis is an extradural disease, 2 children had intramedullary granulomas and presented a tumor-like syndrome as rare manifestations.
  • A frank abscess with clumping of nerve roots was encountered in the cauda of another child without vertebral involvement.
  • It detects the marrow changes, exudative and granulation types, extra- and intradural disease, and radiological response to treatment in the early follow-up period around 6-8 weeks.
  • TREATMENT: Opinion varies regarding the operative indication for Pott's spine.
  • Others perform operative decompression only in those patients who do not respond to chemotherapy.
  • Depending on the site of involvement and type of disease the surgical approach was decided in individual cases.
  • Prognosis depends on many factors; the magnitude of cord compression, duration of neural complication, age and general condition of patient.
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Humans. Image Processing, Computer-Assisted. India / epidemiology. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Prognosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 15459785.001).
  • [ISSN] 0256-7040
  • [Journal-full-title] Child's nervous system : ChNS : official journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Childs Nerv Syst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
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32. Murakami Y, Uemura K, Sudo T, Hashimoto Y, Yuasa Y, Sueda T: Prognostic impact of para-aortic lymph node metastasis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. World J Surg; 2010 Aug;34(8):1900-7
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  • RESULTS: Tumor size (p = 0.045), extrapancreatic nerve plexus invasion (p = 0.043), UICC pT factor (p = 0.026), and surgical margin status (p = 0.002) were associated significantly with para-aortic lymph node metastasis.
  • Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy (p < 0.001) and absence of extrapancreatic nerve plexus invasion (p = 0.041) were associated independently with longer survival, but para-aortic lymph node metastasis (p = 0.078) was not associated significantly with survival by multivariate analysis.
  • The 2- and 5-year survival rates and median survival time of patients with and without para-aortic lymph node metastasis were 12, 0%, 12.4 months and 49, 23%, 14.5 months, respectively, and there was a significant difference in survival between the two groups by a log-rank test (p < 0.001).
  • Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved the survival of patients with para-aortic lymph node metastasis (p = 0.025).
  • However, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy may improve survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal / pathology. Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal / surgery. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Pancreatic Neoplasms / pathology. Pancreatic Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Chi-Square Distribution. Female. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 20376442.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2323
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Papanastassiou I, Ioannou M, Magoulas D, Lalos S, Athanassiou AE, Ziras N, Thanopoulou E, Demertzis N: Chemoembolization facilitates limb salvage surgery in stage III soft tissue sarcoma. J BUON; 2009 Jul-Sep;14(3):507-10
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  • [Title] Chemoembolization facilitates limb salvage surgery in stage III soft tissue sarcoma.
  • A 26 year-old male was referred to our unit because of a stage III soft tissue sarcoma in the shoulder girdle-axillary area and reduced forearm-distal arm strength.
  • Imaging studies revealed that the tumor encompassed the axillary artery and brachial plexus.
  • The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy (ifosfamide/mesna, adriamycin, and dacarbazine/MAID) and finally radiation therapy (RT; 6500 cGy total dose).
  • In stage III soft tissue sarcomas, especially in proximity with major nerve/arterial bundles, a multimodality approach is mandatory; chemoembolization is very effective in shrinking the tumor and defining its margins so as to make feasible a LSS.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Embolization, Therapeutic. Limb Salvage. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 19810146.001).
  • [ISSN] 1107-0625
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of B.U.ON. : official journal of the Balkan Union of Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J BUON
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
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34. Klapman JB, Chang KJ: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle injection. Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am; 2005 Jan;15(1):169-77, x
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • With the development of linear array echoendoscopes and the ability to perform endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration, the delivery of therapeutic agents with fine-needle injection (FNI) emerged.
  • This approach is effective in performing celiac plexus neurolysis for pain relief in patients with pancreatic cancer.
  • The involvement of EUS-guided FNI in tumor therapy adds a host of potential new applications that continue to swing the pendulum of EUS from a diagnostic to a therapeutic modality.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Autonomic Nerve Block / instrumentation. Botulinum Toxins / administration & dosage. Catheter Ablation / methods. Celiac Plexus. Cholangiography / methods. Esophageal Achalasia / drug therapy. Esophageal Achalasia / ultrasonography. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage / drug therapy. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage / ultrasonography. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / ultrasonography. Humans. Injections, Intralesional

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  • (PMID = 15555959.001).
  • [ISSN] 1052-5157
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastrointestinal endoscopy clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastrointest. Endosc. Clin. N. Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; EC 3.4.24.69 / Botulinum Toxins
  • [Number-of-references] 33
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35. Turowski B, Zanella FE: Interventional neuroradiology of the head and neck. Neuroimaging Clin N Am; 2003 Aug;13(3):619-45
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  • Vascular interventions are important and helpful for treatment of various pathologies of the head and neck.
  • Interventional neuroradiology of the head and neck includes image-guided biopsies, vessel occlusion, and local chemotherapy.
  • Knowledge of anatomy, functional relationships between intra- and extracranial vessels, and pathology are the basis for therapeutic success.
  • Neuroradiologic imaging, especially CT and MR imaging, and appropriate analysis of angiographic findings help ensure indication for treatment and plan an intervention.
  • Indications for image-guided biopsies are preverterbal fluid-collections, spinal and paraspinal inflammations and abscesses, deep cervical malignancies, vertebral body, and skull base tumors.
  • Special care should be taken to preserve critical structures in this region, including spinal nerve roots, cervical plexus, main peripheral nerves, and vessels.
  • Indications for vessel occlusion are emergency situations to stop bleeding in vascular lesions (traumatic, malformation, or tumors) by reduction of pressure, preoperative reduction of blood flow to minimize the surgical risk, palliative occlusion of feeding vessels to produce tumor necrosis, or potential curative (or presurgical) occlusion of vascular malformations.
  • Examples of these interventions are: a hemangioma of the hard palate, a juvenile angiofibroma, a hemangiopericytoma, a malignant meningioma, a malignant fibrous histiocytoma, and a glomus tumor.
  • Effective treatment of vascular malformations, such as AV fistulas or angiomas, needs exact occlusion of the fistula or the angiomatous nidus, which is demonstrated in the case of an AV angioma of the base of the tongue.
  • Chemotherapy with local intra-arterial cisplatin combined with intravenous administration of sodium thiosulfate as antidote is indicated as an adjuvant modality in a multimodal regimen of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma or as palliative treatment of recurrent and otherwise untreatable malignant tumors of the head and neck.
  • Palliative treatment of a bleeding oropharyngeal cancer is another example of interventional treatment.
  • Selective treatment, either occluding or pharmacologic, may be preoperative, palliative, or curative.
  • The objective is reduction of surgical risk, improvement of quality of life, or curative therapy of a lesion.
  • Thus, the interventional treatment should not be associated with morbidity or mortality.
  • Major complications, such as cerebral stroke, blindness, or cranial nerve palsies, can result from application of inappropriate techniques or poor evaluation of angiographic findings and should be avoided in the majority of cases.
  • These include inflammation, necrosis, and nerve damage.
  • The benefits, risks, and expected damages of neuroradiologic interventions must be balanced during the informed consent procedure with the patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiography. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Neuroradiography. Radiology, Interventional

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  • (PMID = 14631695.001).
  • [ISSN] 1052-5149
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroimaging clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuroimaging Clin. N. Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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36. Murakami Y, Uemura K, Sudo T, Hayashidani Y, Hashimoto Y, Nakashima A, Yuasa Y, Kondo N, Ohge H, Sueda T: Number of metastatic lymph nodes, but not lymph node ratio, is an independent prognostic factor after resection of pancreatic carcinoma. J Am Coll Surg; 2010 Aug;211(2):196-204
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pancreatic Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Univariate analysis revealed that tumor location, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, tumor differentiation, choledochal invasion, portal or splenic vein invasion, extrapancreatic nerve plexus invasion, resection margin status, node status, number of involved nodes, LNR, International Union against Cancer (UICC) pT factor, and UICC stage correlated significantly (p < 0.05) with increased survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal / secondary. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Pancreatectomy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / surgery. SEER Program

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • [CommentIn] J Am Coll Surg. 2011 Jan;212(1):132-4 [21184962.001]
  • (PMID = 20670857.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1190
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American College of Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Coll. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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