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1. Gill MB, May JS, Colaco S, Stevenson PG: Important role for the murid herpesvirus 4 ribonucleotide reductase large subunit in host colonization via the respiratory tract. J Virol; 2010 Oct;84(20):10937-42

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Important role for the murid herpesvirus 4 ribonucleotide reductase large subunit in host colonization via the respiratory tract.
  • Mutant viruses showed delayed in vitro lytic replication, failed to establish infection via the upper respiratory tract, and replicated to only a very limited extent in the lower respiratory tract without reaching lymphoid tissue.
  • RNR could therefore provide a good target for gammaherpesvirus chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Base Sequence. Cell Line. Cricetinae. DNA, Viral / genetics. Genes, Viral. Herpesviridae Infections / virology. Humans. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Mutagenesis, Insertional. Respiratory System / virology. Tumor Virus Infections / virology. Virulence / genetics. Virulence / physiology. Virus Replication / genetics. Virus Replication / physiology

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  • (PMID = 20668075.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-5514
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Virol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G9800943; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0701185; United Kingdom / Wellcome Trust / / GR076956MA; United Kingdom / Wellcome Trust / / WT089111MA
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Viral; EC 1.17.4.- / Ribonucleotide Reductases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2950598
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2. Sen HN, Sangave A, Hammel K, Levy-Clarke G, Nussenblatt RB: Infliximab for the treatment of active scleritis. Can J Ophthalmol; 2009 Jun;44(3):e9-e12
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Infliximab for the treatment of active scleritis.
  • METHODS: This single-centre, pilot study of infliximab for the treatment of active anterior scleritis was conducted at the National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, between 2003 and 2007.
  • However, after 14 weeks 1 patient developed new-onset intraocular inflammation that did not respond to reinduction and was terminated from the study.
  • Side effects attributable to infliximab included ear infection with transient decreased hearing, urinary tract infection, lower respiratory tract infection, and facial rash in 1 patient and urinary tract infection, diarrhea, upper respiratory tract infection, nasal congestion and headache, mouth sores, head tremor, and occasional numbness and tingling in extremities in another patient, all of which resolved spontaneously or with appropriate treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Infliximab may be considered as a viable option in treating patients with active scleritis; however, patients should be monitored closely for potentially serious side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Scleritis / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infliximab. Injections. Male. Middle Aged. Pilot Projects. Prospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / metabolism. Vitreous Body. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19506593.001).
  • [ISSN] 1715-3360
  • [Journal-full-title] Canadian journal of ophthalmology. Journal canadien d'ophtalmologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can. J. Ophthalmol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z99 EY999999
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; B72HH48FLU / Infliximab
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS147432; NLM/ PMC2771118
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3. Ríos AM, Mejías A, Chávez-Bueno S, Fonseca-Aten M, Katz K, Hatfield J, Gómez AM, Jafri HS, McCracken GH Jr, Ramilo O, Hardy RD: Impact of cethromycin (ABT-773) therapy on microbiological, histologic, immunologic, and respiratory indices in a murine model of Mycoplasma pneumoniae lower respiratory infection. Antimicrob Agents Chemother; 2004 Aug;48(8):2897-904
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Impact of cethromycin (ABT-773) therapy on microbiological, histologic, immunologic, and respiratory indices in a murine model of Mycoplasma pneumoniae lower respiratory infection.
  • Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a major etiologic agent of acute lower respiratory infections.
  • We evaluated the antimicrobial and immunologic effects of cethromycin (ABT-773), a ketolide antibiotic, for the treatment of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in a mouse model.
  • Eight-week-old BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally once with 10(6) CFU of M. pneumoniae on day 0.
  • Treatment was started 24 h after inoculation.
  • Outcome variables included bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for M. pneumoniae quantitative culture and cytokine and chemokine concentration determinations by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha], gamma interferon [IFN-gamma], interleukin-1beta [IL-1beta], IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha [MIP-1alpha]), histopathologic score of the lungs (HPS), and pulmonary function tests (PFT) using whole-body, unrestrained plethysmography at the baseline and post-methacholine exposure as indicators of airway obstruction (AO) and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), respectively.
  • In this mouse model, treatment with cethromycin significantly reduced M. pneumoniae culture titers in BAL samples, cytokine and chemokine concentrations in BAL samples, histologic inflammation in the lungs, and disease severity as defined by AO and AHR.
  • [MeSH-major] Cephalosporins / therapeutic use. Erythromycin / therapeutic use. Ketolides. Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Pneumonia, Mycoplasma / drug therapy. Respiratory Mechanics / physiology. Respiratory Tract Infections / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15273098.001).
  • [ISSN] 0066-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cephalosporins; 0 / Chemokines; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Ketolides; 0 / cethromycin; 63937KV33D / Erythromycin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC478543
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4. Jenks KA, Stamp LK, O'Donnell JL, Savage RL, Chapman PT: Leflunomide-associated infections in rheumatoid arthritis. J Rheumatol; 2007 Nov;34(11):2201-3
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LEFLUNOMIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Combination disease modifying antirheumatic drug therapy was common, with 82/171 (48.0%) taking methotrexate (MTX), 15/171 (8.8%) hydroxy-chloroquine, 11/171 (6.4%) sulfasalazine, and 8/171 (4.7%) anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy.
  • Eleven patients developed infection requiring hospitalization while taking leflunomide including: lower respiratory tract infections (3), cellulitis (2), disseminated herpes zoster (2), probable TB liver (1), abdominal sepsis (1), mycotic aneurysm (1) and gastroenteritis (1).
  • [MeSH-major] Antirheumatic Agents / adverse effects. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Infection / etiology. Isoxazoles / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 17937473.001).
  • [ISSN] 0315-162X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of rheumatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Rheumatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antirheumatic Agents; 0 / Isoxazoles; G162GK9U4W / leflunomide
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5. Yano M, Shiozaki H, Tsujinaka T, Inoue M, Doki Y, Fujiwara Y, Monden M: Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus infiltrating the respiratory tract is less sensitive to preoperative concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. J Am Coll Surg; 2000 Dec;191(6):626-34
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

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  • [Title] Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus infiltrating the respiratory tract is less sensitive to preoperative concurrent radiation and chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: The prognosis of upper thoracic esophageal cancer is poor when compared with middle and lower thoracic esophageal cancer because the tumor easily infiltrates the respiratory tract and surgical en-bloc resection is difficult.
  • Recently, preoperative chemoradiation therapy has been shown to lead to down-staging of the disease and improve prognosis.
  • But the benefit of this therapy for tumors infiltrating the respiratory tract remains unknown.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Fifty-six patients with thoracic esophageal cancer infiltrating neighboring organs, but with no hematogeneous metastasis, were given preoperative concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) and radiation (40 Gy) therapy.
  • RESULTS: The prognosis was significantly poorer for patients with tumors infiltrating the respiratory tract (T) or aorta plus respiratory tract (A + T) than for patients with tumors infiltrating the aorta alone (A) or other organs (Oth) (p < 0.05 for Oth versus T; p < 0.05 for Oth versus A + T; p < 0.0001 for A versus T; p < 0.0001 for A versus A + T by log-rank test).
  • Patients positive for respiratory tract invasion (T, T + A), compared with those negative for respiratory tract invasion (A, Oth), showed a poorer clinical response to chemoradiation (3.0%, 45.5%, 39.4%, and 9.1% versus 4.3%, 82.6%, 4.3%, and 8.7% in complete response (CR), partial response (PR), nonresponse (NC) and progressive disease (PD), respectively, p = 0.0156) and surgical resectability (36.4% vs. 87.0%, p = 0.0003).
  • Histologic effectiveness (8.3%, 50.0%, and 41.7% versus 25.0%, 70.0%, and 5.0% in grade 3, grade 2, and grade 1, respectively, for patients with respiratory tract invasion versus those without it, p = 0.0189) and histologic stages (8.3%, 8.3%, 8.3%, 8.3%, 25.0%, and 41.7% versus 20.0%, 0%, 15.0%, 25.0%, 40.0%, and 0% in pathologic CR, stage I, stage IIA, stage IIB, stage III, and stage IV, respectively, for patients with respiratory tract invasion versus those without it, p = 0.0496) were significantly better in patients negative for respiratory tract invasion; the percentages of patients with lymph node metastasis did not differ significantly between the two groups.
  • Comparison of the recurrence patterns showed that local failure was most common in patients with respiratory tract invasion, and distant failure was the leading cause of recurrence in patients without it.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Because the prognosis of patients with thoracic esophageal cancer infiltrating the respiratory tract is extremely poor, partially because of the low local effectiveness of preoperative concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy, caution is needed when deciding on salvage surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Drug Tolerance. Esophageal Neoplasms / pathology. Esophagectomy. Preoperative Care / methods. Radiation Tolerance. Respiratory Tract Neoplasms / secondary. Respiratory Tract Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11129811.001).
  • [ISSN] 1072-7515
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American College of Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Coll. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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6. Lai SH, Stein DA, Guerrero-Plata A, Liao SL, Ivanciuc T, Hong C, Iversen PL, Casola A, Garofalo RP: Inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus infections with morpholino oligomers in cell cultures and in mice. Mol Ther; 2008 Jun;16(6):1120-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections.

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  • [Title] Inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus infections with morpholino oligomers in cell cultures and in mice.
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, young children, and high-risk adults.
  • Currently, there is no vaccine to prevent RSV infection, and the available therapeutic agents are of limited utility.
  • Intranasal (i.n.) treatment of BALB/c mice with AUG-2 PPMO before the RSV inoculation produced a reduction in viral titer of 1.2 log(10) in lung tissue at day 5 postinfection (p.i.
  • These data show that the AUG-2 PPMO possesses potent anti-RSV activity and is worthy of further investigation as a candidate for potential therapeutic application.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Transfer Techniques. Genetic Therapy / methods. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Base Sequence. Cell Line, Tumor. Cells, Cultured. Codon. Female. Humans. Lung / metabolism. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Molecular Sequence Data. RNA, Complementary / metabolism. RNA, Messenger / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18443602.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P01 AI062885; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P01 AI062885-019001; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P01 AI062885-059001; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P01 AI062885-020002; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P01 AI062885-050002; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P01 AI062885-029001; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P01 AI062885-010002; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / N01 AI030039; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P01 AI062885-039001; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P01 AI062885-030002; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P01 AI062885-040002; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P01 AI062885-049001
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Codon; 0 / RNA, Complementary; 0 / RNA, Messenger
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS155858; NLM/ PMC2782410
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7. Keyaerts E, Li S, Vijgen L, Rysman E, Verbeeck J, Van Ranst M, Maes P: Antiviral activity of chloroquine against human coronavirus OC43 infection in newborn mice. Antimicrob Agents Chemother; 2009 Aug;53(8):3416-21
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  • Until recently, human coronaviruses (HCoVs), such as HCoV strain OC43 (HCoV-OC43), were mainly known to cause 15 to 30% of mild upper respiratory tract infections.
  • In recent years, the identification of new HCoVs, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, revealed that HCoVs can be highly pathogenic and can cause more severe upper and lower respiratory tract infections, including bronchiolitis and pneumonia.
  • To date, no specific antiviral drugs to prevent or treat HCoV infections are available.
  • We demonstrate that chloroquine, a widely used drug with well-known antimalarial effects, inhibits HCoV-OC43 replication in HRT-18 cells, with a 50% effective concentration (+/- standard deviation) of 0.306 +/- 0.0091 microM and a 50% cytotoxic concentration (+/- standard deviation) of 419 +/- 192.5 microM, resulting in a selectivity index of 1,369.
  • The highest survival rate (98.6%) of the pups was found when mother mice were treated daily with a concentration of 15 mg of chloroquine per kg of body weight.
  • Our results show that chloroquine can be highly effective against HCoV-OC43 infection in newborn mice and may be considered as a future drug against HCovs.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Chloroquine / pharmacology. Coronavirus OC43, Human / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Animals, Newborn. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival / drug effects. Coronavirus Infections / drug therapy. Coronavirus Infections / mortality. Female. Humans. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Milk / metabolism. Placenta / metabolism. Pregnancy. Respiratory Tract Infections / drug therapy. Respiratory Tract Infections / mortality. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Virus Replication / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 19506054.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-6596
  • [Journal-full-title] Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 886U3H6UFF / Chloroquine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2715625
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8. Deffrasnes C, Hamelin ME, Prince GA, Boivin G: Identification and evaluation of a highly effective fusion inhibitor for human metapneumovirus. Antimicrob Agents Chemother; 2008 Jan;52(1):279-87
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  • [Title] Identification and evaluation of a highly effective fusion inhibitor for human metapneumovirus.
  • Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) can cause acute upper and lower respiratory tract infections that are particularly severe in young children, elderly subjects, and immunocompromised patients.
  • To date, no treatments or vaccines are available for hMPV infections.
  • It was also moderately active against human respiratory syncytial virus (strain A2) but displayed no activity against human parainfluenza virus type 3.
  • On day 5 postinfection, HRA2-treated mice had undetectable lung viral loads which were significantly less than those of untreated mice (3 x 10(4) 50% tissue culture infective doses/lung).
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Membrane Fusion / drug effects. Metapneumovirus / drug effects. Paramyxoviridae Infections / drug therapy. Peptides / pharmacology. Viral Fusion Proteins / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Animals. Cell Line. Cell Line, Tumor. Female. Humans. Inhibitory Concentration 50. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Molecular Sequence Data

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  • (PMID = 17967906.001).
  • [ISSN] 0066-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Peptides; 0 / Viral Fusion Proteins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2223880
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9. Favalli EG, Desiati F, Atzeni F, Sarzi-Puttini P, Caporali R, Pallavicini FB, Gorla R, Filippini M, Marchesoni A: Serious infections during anti-TNFalpha treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Autoimmun Rev; 2009 Jan;8(3):266-73
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  • [Title] Serious infections during anti-TNFalpha treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients.
  • Seventy-three patients (6.9%) experienced a total of 74 serious infections, an incidence rate for all treatment courses of 35.9 per 1000 patient-years (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 27.66-44.13).
  • Most were lower respiratory tract (34.2%) or skin and soft tissue infections (20.5%).
  • Of the 1064 patients, the 790 treated with anti-TNFalpha after March 2002 underwent screening tests for LTBI; five patients developed active tuberculosis.
  • The type of anti-TNFalpha agent did not seem to affect the incidence or site of the infections.
  • Both univariate and multivariate analyses identified age at the start of anti-TNFalpha treatment (p=0.008), baseline erythrocyte sedimentation rate ([ESR] p=0.014), and the concomitant use of corticosteroids (p=0.029) as significant predictors of infections.
  • [MeSH-major] Arthritis, Rheumatoid / therapy. Opportunistic Infections / epidemiology. Shock, Septic / epidemiology. Tuberculosis / epidemiology. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adalimumab. Adrenal Cortex Hormones / administration & dosage. Age Factors. Aged. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Drug Therapy, Combination. Etanercept. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunoglobulin G / administration & dosage. Immunosuppression. Incidence. Infliximab. Italy. Male. Middle Aged. Radiography, Thoracic. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / administration & dosage. Risk Factors. Skin Tests

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  • (PMID = 19022409.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-0183
  • [Journal-full-title] Autoimmunity reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Autoimmun Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Immunoglobulin G; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; B72HH48FLU / Infliximab; FYS6T7F842 / Adalimumab; OP401G7OJC / Etanercept
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10. Kieback DG, Einzmann T, Labinsky E, Fischer DC, Niebergall H, Hasenburg A: Aggressive management of recurrent ovarian cancer--the challenge of individualizing cancer therapy illustrated by a case report. Onkologie; 2004 Aug;27(4):393-7
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  • [Title] Aggressive management of recurrent ovarian cancer--the challenge of individualizing cancer therapy illustrated by a case report.
  • BACKGROUND: In clinical practice, treatment recommendations and the patient's wishes often diverge, facing the physician with difficult choices.
  • CASE REPORT: The clinical course of a 36-year-old patient with 'platinum-refractory' ovarian cancer is reported.
  • The patient experienced a symptomatic relapse 7 months after debulking surgery and completion of platinum-based first-line chemotherapy.
  • Her husband supported her, and both asked for maximal therapy, including intensive care treatment for recurrent respiratory tract infections and total parenteral nutrition (TPN).
  • Problems related to TPN and progression of disease affected her individual perception of quality of life to a much lower extent than expected and perceived by her caretakers.
  • All professional health care providers were more than once very reluctant to continue treatment and only after extensive counseling gave in to the demand of the patient for further treatment, considering the effort futile - only to be surprised by treatment response and recovery.
  • After 3 years of palliation, the tumor was resistant to all cytotoxic regimens and the patient died 2 months after withdrawal of chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSION: This case report illustrates that also in the age of evidence-based medicine individualized treatment beyond proven strategies can offer patient benefit.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Papillary / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Palliative Care / methods. Patient Participation. Puerperal Disorders / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Critical Care / psychology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Medical Futility. Motivation. Parenteral Nutrition, Total / psychology. Quality of Life / psychology

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  • (PMID = 15347897.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-584X
  • [Journal-full-title] Onkologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Onkologie
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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11. Yatsunami J, Hayashi S: Fourteen-membered ring macrolides as anti-angiogenic compounds. Anticancer Res; 2001 Nov-Dec;21(6B):4253-8
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  • First, erythromycin has prokinetic effects on the gastrointestinal tract as a motilin receptor agonist.
  • Recently, we found roxithromycin and clarithromycin suppressed angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo.
  • Both these drugs are administered per os with insignificant side-effects.
  • Their safety has been established through the experience of long-term treatment for chronic lower respiratory infectious diseases such as diffuse panbronchiolitis.
  • Although the precise mechanisms have not yet been clarified, 14-membered ring macrolides and their derivatives are promising in therapeutic applications for solid tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology. Neoplasms / blood supply. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 11908678.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Macrolides
  • [Number-of-references] 82
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12. Toussirot E, Pertuiset E, Sordet C, Augé B, Wendling D, Pallot-Pradès B, Collet P, Lohse A, Balblanc JC: Safety of rituximab in rheumatoid arthritis patients with a history of severe or recurrent bacterial infection: observational study of 30 cases in everyday practice. Joint Bone Spine; 2010 Mar;77(2):142-5
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  • [Title] Safety of rituximab in rheumatoid arthritis patients with a history of severe or recurrent bacterial infection: observational study of 30 cases in everyday practice.
  • OBJECTIVES: To report our experience with rituximab therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and a history of severe or recurrent bacterial infections.
  • Patients were included if they had RA and a history of severe or recurrent bacterial infection (requiring admission and/or intravenous antimicrobial therapy) that contraindicated the introduction or continuation of TNFalpha antagonist therapy.
  • RESULTS: Of 161 RA patients given rituximab in the five study centers, 30 met the inclusion criteria, 23 females and seven males with a mean age of 58.4+/-11.8 years and a mean disease duration of 11.4+/-13.9 years.
  • Among them, 22 had rheumatoid factors and 21 had received TNFalpha antagonist therapy (one agent in 15 patients, two in five patients and three in one patient).
  • Prior infections were as follows: septicemia, n=2; lower respiratory tract infection or lung abscess, n=12; prosthesis infection, n=3; septic arthritis, n=3; endocarditis, n=1; pyelonephritis, n=2; osteitis, n=4; and various skin infections (erysipelas, cellulitis or skin abscess), n=6.
  • Of these 33 infections, 21 occurred during TNFalpha antagonist therapy.
  • During rituximab therapy, all patients received concomitant glucocorticoid therapy (mean dosage, 12+/-7.9 mg/day).
  • Mean time from the single or last serious infection and the first rituximab infusion was 20.1+/-18.7 months.
  • Immunoglobulin levels after rituximab therapy were within the normal range.
  • CONCLUSION: Rituximab therapy was well tolerated in 24 (80%) of 30 patients with RA and a history of severe or recurrent bacterial infection.
  • In everyday practice, rituximab therapy seems safe with regard to the recurrence of infectious episodes.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal / adverse effects. Antirheumatic Agents / administration & dosage. Antirheumatic Agents / adverse effects. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Bacterial Infections / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunocompromised Host. Immunoglobulin G / blood. Immunoglobulin M / blood. Male. Middle Aged. Recurrence. Retrospective Studies. Rituximab. Severity of Illness Index. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20171921.001).
  • [ISSN] 1778-7254
  • [Journal-full-title] Joint, bone, spine : revue du rhumatisme
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Joint Bone Spine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antirheumatic Agents; 0 / Immunoglobulin G; 0 / Immunoglobulin M; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
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13. Urasaki Y, Nori M, Iwata S, Sasaki T, Hosono O, Kawasaki H, Tanaka H, Dang NH, Ikeda E, Morimoto C: Roxithromycin specifically inhibits development of collagen induced arthritis and production of proinflammatory cytokines by human T cells and macrophages. J Rheumatol; 2005 Sep;32(9):1765-74
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: Roxithromycin (RXM) is a macrolide antibiotic that is effective in treatment of chronic lower respiratory tract diseases including diffuse panbronchiolitis and bronchial asthma.
  • METHODS: T cell proliferation, cytokine production by T cells stimulated through CD28, CD26, or PMA with or without anti-CD3 Mab, cytokine production by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, and transendothelial migration of T cells were analyzed in the presence or absence of various concentrations of RXM.
  • We evaluated the effect of RXM treatment in collagen induced arthritis in mice.
  • RESULTS: RXM did not affect the production of Th1-type and Th2-type cytokines, whereas it specifically inhibited production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-a and interleukin 6 (IL-6) by T cells and macrophages.
  • We found that RXM treatment of mice with CIA reduced the severity of arthritis and serum level of IL-6, as well as leukocyte migration into the affected joints and destruction of bones and cartilage.
  • CONCLUSION: Our findings strongly suggest that RXM may be useful for the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis as well as other inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Arthritis, Experimental / drug therapy. Cytokines / biosynthesis. Macrophages / drug effects. Roxithromycin / pharmacology. T-Lymphocytes / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biopsy, Needle. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Cells, Cultured. Collagen. Disease Models, Animal. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Immunohistochemistry. Interleukin-6 / biosynthesis. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred DBA. Probability. Sensitivity and Specificity. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / biosynthesis. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 16142877.001).
  • [ISSN] 0315-162X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of rheumatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Rheumatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 21KOF230FA / Roxithromycin; 9007-34-5 / Collagen
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14. Wildiers H, Menten J: Death rattle: prevalence, prevention and treatment. J Pain Symptom Manage; 2002 Apr;23(4):310-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. SCOPOLAMINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Death rattle: prevalence, prevention and treatment.
  • A retrospective analysis was performed to study the occurrence and treatment of death rattle (DR) in 107 consecutive dying patients on the palliative care unit of the University Hospital Leuven.
  • The incidence of DR (23%) is lower than reported in literature, possibly due to low hydration.
  • We found 2 types of rattle: "Real DR" responds generally very well to anticholinergic therapy, and is probably caused by non-expectorated secretions.
  • "Pseudo DR" is poorly responsive to therapy and is probably caused by bronchial secretions due to pulmonary pathology, such as infection, tumor, fluid retention, or aspiration.
  • Administration of subcutaneous hyoscine hydrobromide, as a bolus or continuous infusion, is effective therapy for real DR and is comfortable for the patient and caregivers.
  • [MeSH-major] Muscarinic Agonists / therapeutic use. Respiratory Sounds / physiology. Respiratory Tract Diseases / drug therapy. Respiratory Tract Diseases / physiopathology. Scopolamine Hydrobromide / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11997200.001).
  • [ISSN] 0885-3924
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pain and symptom management
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pain Symptom Manage
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Muscarinic Agonists; 451IFR0GXB / Scopolamine Hydrobromide
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15. Bonville CA, Mehta PA, Krilov LR, Rosenberg HF, Domachowske JB: Epithelial cells infected with respiratory syncytial virus are resistant to the anti-inflammatory effects of hydrocortisone. Cell Immunol; 2001 Nov 1;213(2):134-40
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. HYDROCORTISONE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Epithelial cells infected with respiratory syncytial virus are resistant to the anti-inflammatory effects of hydrocortisone.
  • In this work we continue our study of the biochemical responses of respiratory epithelial cells to infection with human paramyxovirus pathogens.
  • In our earlier studies, we detected elevated concentrations of the proinflammatory chemokines MIP-1alpha and IL-8 in upper and lower respiratory tract secretions from patients infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).
  • As repression of chemokine production by epithelial cells is likely to result in diminished recruitment of proinflammatory leukocytes, these results may explain in part why glucocorticoid therapy reduces the symptoms associated with acute PIV infection, but have little to no effect in the overall outcome in the case of RSV.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents / pharmacology. Hydrocortisone / pharmacology. Respiratory Syncytial Viruses / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cells, Cultured. Chemokine CCL3. Chemokine CCL4. Child, Preschool. Culture Media. Drug Resistance. Epithelial Cells / cytology. Epithelial Cells / drug effects. Epithelial Cells / immunology. Epithelial Cells / virology. Female. Gene Expression. Humans. Infant. Interleukin-8 / analysis. Interleukin-8 / genetics. Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins / analysis. Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins / genetics. Male. Nasal Lavage Fluid / virology. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections / pathology. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections / virology. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Virus Replication

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  • (PMID = 11831875.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-8749
  • [Journal-full-title] Cellular immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell. Immunol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Chemokine CCL3; 0 / Chemokine CCL4; 0 / Culture Media; 0 / Interleukin-8; 0 / Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
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16. Vidal M, Ferrer A, Serrano S, Tobeña M, Pajares I, Lopez D, Millastre E, Ruiz-Echarri M, Lambea J, Tres A: Fever in cancer patients as a cause of attendance in emergency room. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20706

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Fever in cancer patients as a cause of attendance in emergency room.
  • : e20706 Background: Normal human body temperature displays a circadian rhythm, ranging from 36.1 C or lower in predawn hours to 37.4 C or higher in the afternoon.
  • Abnormal elevation of temperature occurs as a result of hyperthermia or fever.
  • Cancer tumor type, 35 had lung cancer (35.7%), 14 had breast cancer (14.3%), 9 had colorectal cancer (9.2%), 9 had urothelial cancer (9.2%), 5 had head neck cancer (5.1%), 5 had pancreatic cancer (5.1%), 3 had esophageal cancer (3%), 2 had prostate cancer (2%), and 14,3% had other neoplasm.
  • 18 patients (18.36%) had been received chemotherapy treatment in a period of 10 days before. they were attended in emergency room.
  • 30 were diagnosed of respiratory tract infection (30,6%), 12 were diagnosed of urinary infection (12.24%).
  • Considering all the patients who presented with fever: 45 patients were sent home with new treatment (45,9%), 6 patients were observed for 24 hours in the emergency room (6.2%) and 47 patients required admission to the hospital (47.9%).

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  • (PMID = 27961987.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Hitzman CJ, Wattenberg LW, Wiedmann TS: Pharmacokinetics of 5-fluorouracil in the hamster following inhalation delivery of lipid-coated nanoparticles. J Pharm Sci; 2006 Jun;95(6):1196-211
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

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  • The inhalation delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in lipid-coated nanoparticles (LNPs) to hamsters was evaluated to determine the feasibility for use in lung cancer chemotherapy.
  • The concentration of FITC-dextran and total 5-FU (released and LNP-associated) was determined as a function of time in the lung, trachea, larynx, esophagus, and serum.
  • Concentrations of 5-FU and FITC-dextran were initially high in the trachea, larynx, and esophagus, and lower in the lung.
  • Within 24 h, greater than 99% of the LNPs were cleared from the respiratory tract and total 5-FU concentrations mirrored the LNP concentration.
  • An eight-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to describe the observed trends in concentrations of LNPs and total 5-FU and to estimate the released 5-FU concentration in the above tissues.
  • From this analysis, effective local targeting as well as sustained efficacious concentrations of 5-FU in the expected tumor sites were demonstrated.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Inhalation. Aerosols. Animals. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Cricetinae. Delayed-Action Preparations. Dextrans / chemistry. Feasibility Studies. Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate. Fluorescent Dyes. Lipids / chemistry. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Mesocricetus. Particle Size. Tissue Distribution

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association
  • (PMID = 16639722.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3549
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pharmaceutical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pharm Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aerosols; 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0 / Fluorescent Dyes; 0 / Lipids; I223NX31W9 / Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate; K3R6ZDH4DU / Dextrans; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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18. Birchall JC, Kellaway IW, Gumbleton M: Physical stability and in-vitro gene expression efficiency of nebulised lipid-peptide-DNA complexes. Int J Pharm; 2000 Mar 20;197(1-2):221-31
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The lower respiratory tract provides a number of disease targets for gene therapy.
  • In this study we investigate the role of a condensing polycationic peptide on the stability and efficiency of nebulised lipid-DNA complexes.
  • Samples from the nebuliser reservoir (pre- and post-nebulisation) and from the aerosol mist were collected and investigated for changes, including: particle diameter, retention of in-vitro transfection activity and the relative concentration and nature of the complexed pDNA remaining after the nebulisation procedure.
  • The physical stability and biological activity of nebulised lipid:pDNA complexes can be improved by inclusion of a condensing polycationic peptide such as protamine.
  • The incorporation of the peptide precludes the use of potentially toxic excesses of lipid and charge and may act as a platform for the covalent attachment of peptide signals mediating sub-cellular targetting.
  • [MeSH-major] DNA / genetics. Gene Expression. Genetic Therapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Carriers. Drug Stability. Electrophoresis. Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated. Fluorescent Dyes. Genetic Vectors. Humans. Lipids. Liposomes. Microscopy, Electron. Nebulizers and Vaporizers. Particle Size. Peptides. Protamines / chemistry. Quaternary Ammonium Compounds. Transfection. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 10704809.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-5173
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of pharmaceutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Pharm
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated; 0 / Fluorescent Dyes; 0 / Lipids; 0 / Liposomes; 0 / Peptides; 0 / Protamines; 0 / Quaternary Ammonium Compounds; 113669-21-9 / 1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-(trimethylammonium)propane; 9007-49-2 / DNA
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19. Erelel M, Toker SA, Yakar F, Yakar AA, Yildiz R, Kaya ZB: Multifocal endobronchial carcinoid tumors: a rare case. J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol; 2010 Apr;17(2):158-61

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We present a case of multifocal endobronchial carcinoid tumor and review the literature on multifocal endobronchial carcinoid tumors.
  • Our patient was admitted with complaints of paroxysmal cough and recurrent lower respiratory tract infections.
  • Computed tomography of the chest showed tubular densities in the bilateral lower lobes and a 15-mm soft-tissue mass in the right lower lobe without any enlargement in the mediastinal lymph nodes.
  • On positron emission tomography scan, there was no fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in any of these lesions.
  • The pathologic examination of biopsies showed neuroendocrine neoplasm and typical bronchial carcinoid tumor.
  • Although the only effective treatment for a bronchial carcinoid is complete surgical excision of the tumor, surgical resection was not performed in our patient because of multiple, bilateral, biopsy-proven endobronchial tumors.
  • Radiation and chemotherapy are generally reserved for symptomatic and metastatic disease, which was the treatment of choice for our patient.

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  • (PMID = 23168735.001).
  • [ISSN] 1944-6586
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of bronchology & interventional pulmonology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Hashimoto K, Mori S, Hashimoto Y, Kaneko H, Ishibashi K, Ishioka K, Kawasaki Y, Peebles RS Jr, Munakata M, Hosoya M, Suzutani T: DSCG reduces RSV-induced illness in RSV-infected mice. J Med Virol; 2009 Feb;81(2):354-61
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the pathogens generally associated with the common cold, lower respiratory infection, and exacerbation of asthma.
  • Disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) is a safe and widely used drug for the prevention of bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis attacks.
  • The effect of DSCG on acute upper respiratory tract viral infections remains controversial.
  • Using a well-characterized murine model of RSV infection, the effect of DSCG on RSV-induced illness was evaluated by body weight, respiratory function, viral replication, level of IFN-gamma in lungs, serology, and histopathology.
  • [MeSH-major] Cromolyn Sodium / therapeutic use. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections / drug therapy. Respiratory Syncytial Viruses / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Viral / blood. Cell Line, Tumor. Female. Humans. Interferon-gamma / analysis. Lung / immunology. Lung / metabolism. Lung / pathology. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Pneumonia / pathology. Respiration / drug effects. Viral Load. Virus Replication / drug effects

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 19107959.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-9071
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medical virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Med. Virol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Viral; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma; Q2WXR1I0PK / Cromolyn Sodium
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21. Baughman RP, Lower EE: Novel therapies for sarcoidosis. Semin Respir Crit Care Med; 2007 Feb;28(1):128-33
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Novel therapies for sarcoidosis.
  • The treatment of sarcoidosis remains controversial.
  • Corticosteroids remain the cornerstone of therapy, but immunosuppressive, cytotoxic, and immunomodulatory agents have emerged as viable therapeutic options for patients failing or experiencing adverse effects from corticosteroids.
  • Published data are most extensive with methotrexate, but favorable responses have been noted with leflunomide, azathioprine, antimalarial and antimicrobial agents, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors.
  • This review focuses on these novel therapies for sarcoidosis, including indications for use, efficacy, toxicity, and monitoring.
  • [MeSH-major] Granuloma, Respiratory Tract / drug therapy. Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / therapeutic use. Anti-Infective Agents / therapeutic use. Cytotoxins / therapeutic use. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Macrophages, Alveolar / metabolism. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Pulmonary Medicine / trends. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 17330197.001).
  • [ISSN] 1069-3424
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in respiratory and critical care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Respir Crit Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Anti-Infective Agents; 0 / Cytotoxins; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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22. Anderson K, Lawson KA, Simmons-Menchaca M, Sun L, Sanders BG, Kline K: Alpha-TEA plus cisplatin reduces human cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell tumor burden and metastasis. Exp Biol Med (Maywood); 2004 Dec;229(11):1169-76
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Alpha-TEA plus cisplatin reduces human cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell tumor burden and metastasis.
  • A novel nonhydrolyzable ether-linked acetic acid analog of vitamin E, 2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2R-(4R,8R,12-trimethyltridecyl)-chroman-6-yloxyacetic acid (alpha-TEA) in combination with cisplatin, reduces tumor burden of A2780/cp70 (cp70) cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells xenografted into immune compromised nude mice.
  • For studies 1 and 2, alpha-TEA was formulated in liposomes and delivered by aerosol such that approximately 36 microg and 72 microg of alpha-TEA were deposited in the respiratory tract of each mouse each day, respectively.
  • Cisplatin at 5 mg/kg was administered by intraperitoneal injections once weekly for the first 3 weeks in Study 1 and on the third and 10th days following treatment initiation in Study 2.
  • The combination alpha-TEA + cisplatin treatment reduced tumor burden and metastasis of cp70-GFP cells in comparison to control mice or mice treated with alpha-TEA or cisplatin singly.
  • Analyses of tumor sections showed the alpha-TEA + cisplatin treatment group, in comparison to control, to have a significantly lower level of cell proliferation (Ki-67 staining; P < 0.0001) and a significantly higher level of apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling [TUNEL]; P < 0.0001).
  • In summary, combinations of alpha-TEA + cisplatin significantly reduced tumor burden and metastases in a xenograft model of cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells.
  • These data show promise for combination alpha-TEA + cisplatin chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Drug Resistance / physiology. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tumor Burden / drug effects. Vitamin E / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Inhalation. Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis / physiology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Disease Models, Animal. Female. Humans. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Liposomes. Mice. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Transplantation. Tocopherols

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  • [CommentIn] Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2005 May;230(5):291 [15855295.001]
  • (PMID = 15564444.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-3702
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental biology and medicine (Maywood, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Biol. Med. (Maywood)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA59739; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA75253; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES07784; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / T32 ES07247
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2R-(4R,8R,12-trimethyltridecyl)chroman-6-yloxy acetic acid; 0 / Liposomes; 1406-18-4 / Vitamin E; 1406-66-2 / Tocopherols; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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23. Veras E, Srodon M, Neijstrom ES, Ronnett BM: Metastatic HPV-related cervical adenocarcinomas presenting with thromboembolic events (Trousseau Syndrome): clinicopathologic characteristics of 2 cases. Int J Gynecol Pathol; 2009 Mar;28(2):134-9
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cervical Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The first patient, age 36, presented with bilateral lower extremity deep vein thromboses, pulmonary embolism, and supraclavicular and cervical lymphadenopathy.
  • Acute renal and respiratory failure developed and the patient expired shortly after initiation of chemotherapy, 7 weeks after presentation.
  • Autopsy examination revealed widespread metastatic adenocarcinoma with a 2 cm cervical adenocarcinoma.
  • She developed progressive venous thrombosis despite anticoagulation.
  • Progressive thromboembolic disease with acute renal failure and multiple cerebral infarcts developed and the patient expired shortly after initiation of chemotherapy, 2 months after presentation.
  • HPV DNA was detected by in situ hybridization in the lymph node metastasis in the first case and in the cervical and ovarian tumor specimens in the second case.
  • These features more commonly suggest metastatic adenocarcinoma of upper gastrointestinal tract origin but the presence of HPV DNA within the tumors establishes them as cervical in origin.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / complications. Papillomavirus Infections / complications. Thromboembolism / etiology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / complications

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  • (PMID = 19188822.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7151
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological pathology : official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Pathologists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Li CC, Hu XG, Zhang WX, Xie LW, Zhang HY, Dong L, Cai XH, Wu RX, Zhang ZX, He QS: [Eosinophils apoptosis, fas mRNA and bcl-2 mRNA expressions in asthma model of young rat and effects of achyranthes bidentata polysaccharides]. Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi; 2003 Sep;41(9):657-60
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: Asthma is a chronic respiratory tract disorder characterized by airway hyperreaction (AHR), persistent airway inflammation, high serum IgE, overproduction of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 by allergen-specific Th2 cells.
  • The morbidity and mortality of asthma have continued to increase despite the use of currently available therapeutic agents.
  • The reputed effects of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have led to increasing use of TCMs for treatment of asthma throughout the world.
  • The aims of this study were to investigate in asthma model of young rat the mRNA expressions of apoptotic gene fas and bcl-2, eosinophils (EOS) apoptosis in airway, and effects of achyranthes bidentata polysaccharides (ABPS), a group of polysaccharides extracted from TCM Achyranthes bidentata blume, on treatment of asthma.
  • The expression of the bcl-2 mRNA in ABPS treated T1 and T3 groups was significantly lowered [(57.7 +/- 12.7)%, (57.3 +/- 6.8)%, P < 0.05], but not in T2 group [(72.4 +/- 6.7)%]. (2) In group A, the EOS presenting in the airway increased significantly, but there were few apoptotic EOS; the percentage of apoptotic eosinophil was distinctly lower in group A than that in group C [(5.3 +/- 2.2)% vs. (15.9 +/- 2.4)%, P < 0.01].
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Asthma / drug therapy. Eosinophils / metabolism. Genes, bcl-2 / genetics. Neuropeptides / genetics. Polysaccharides / therapeutic use. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor
  • [MeSH-minor] Achyranthes / chemistry. Animals. Antigens, CD95. Disease Models, Animal. In Situ Hybridization. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Lung / drug effects. Lung / metabolism. Lung / pathology. Male. Ovalbumin / administration & dosage. Phytotherapy. Plant Extracts / chemistry. Plant Extracts / therapeutic use. RNA, Messenger / drug effects. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Random Allocation. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Asthma.
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  • (PMID = 14733803.001).
  • [ISSN] 0578-1310
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD95; 0 / Neuropeptides; 0 / Plant Extracts; 0 / Polysaccharides; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; 0 / Tnfrsf6 protein, rat; 9006-59-1 / Ovalbumin
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25. Willis B, Benghuzzi H, White N, Tucci M, Cameron J: HEp-2 cells exposed to glucocorticoids and LPS undergo organelle damage and apoptosis. Biomed Sci Instrum; 2003;39:383-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MALONALDEHYDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Analysis of programmed cell death by apoptosis staining for Annexin V revealed that cortisol and cortisol + LPS treated cells had lower positive response.
  • This information is important for managing patients who are immuno-suppressed with s respiratory tract infections.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Apoptosis / drug effects. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / physiopathology. Organelles / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Annexin A5 / metabolism. Cell Count. Cell Division / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Glucocorticoids / administration & dosage. Humans. Hydrocortisone / administration & dosage. Lipopolysaccharides / administration & dosage. Malondialdehyde / metabolism. Proteins / metabolism. Reference Values. Sensitivity and Specificity. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Cells, Cultured

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. HYDROCORTISONE .
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  • (PMID = 12724924.001).
  • [ISSN] 0067-8856
  • [Journal-full-title] Biomedical sciences instrumentation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biomed Sci Instrum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM50117
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Annexin A5; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 0 / Lipopolysaccharides; 0 / Proteins; 4Y8F71G49Q / Malondialdehyde; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
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