[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 22 of about 22
1. Gottenberg JE, Merle-Vincent F, Bentaberry F, Allanore Y, Berenbaum F, Fautrel B, Combe B, Durbach A, Sibilia J, Dougados M, Mariette X: Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy in fifteen patients with AA amyloidosis secondary to inflammatory arthritides: a followup report of tolerability and efficacy. Arthritis Rheum; 2003 Jul;48(7):2019-24
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Etanercept .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy in fifteen patients with AA amyloidosis secondary to inflammatory arthritides: a followup report of tolerability and efficacy.
  • OBJECTIVE: Because anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF) has emerged as a highly effective treatment for numerous inflammatory arthritides, which are a common cause of AA amyloidosis, we retrospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of anti-TNF in a nationwide study.
  • Ten patients received infliximab, 4 received etanercept, and 1 received both types of treatment.
  • No severe adverse events were recorded; one episode of herpes zoster in the first branch of the trigeminal nerve occurred after one infusion of infliximab.
  • [MeSH-major] Amyloidosis / drug therapy. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antirheumatic Agents / administration & dosage. Arthritis / drug therapy. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Apolipoproteins / immunology. Etanercept. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunoglobulin G / administration & dosage. Immunoglobulin G / adverse effects. Infliximab. Male. Middle Aged. Proteinuria / drug therapy. Proteinuria / etiology. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / administration & dosage. Retrospective Studies. Serum Amyloid A Protein / immunology. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Amyloidosis.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Amyloidosis AA.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Amyloidosis.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Arthritis.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Infliximab .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12847696.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-3591
  • [Journal-full-title] Arthritis and rheumatism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arthritis Rheum.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antirheumatic Agents; 0 / Apolipoproteins; 0 / Immunoglobulin G; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; 0 / Serum Amyloid A Protein; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; B72HH48FLU / Infliximab; OP401G7OJC / Etanercept
  •  go-up   go-down


2. Dalessio DJ: Relief of cluster headache and cranial neuralgias. Promising prophylactic and symptomatic treatments. Postgrad Med; 2001 Jan;109(1):69-72, 75-8
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Cluster headache.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Relief of cluster headache and cranial neuralgias. Promising prophylactic and symptomatic treatments.
  • When a patient presents with persistently unilateral head or face pain, cluster headache and trigeminal neuralgia should be considered.
  • Diagnosis is based on the patient's history; anatomical studies are performed only to rule out problems other than tumor or stroke.
  • Treatment with carbamazepine is indicated; if the patient does not respond to this drug, the diagnosis is doubtful.
  • Several effective treatments are available for these conditions.
  • Oxygen, drug therapy, or surgery may be indicated depending on the course of the disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Cluster Headache / therapy. Glossopharyngeal Nerve. Neuralgia / therapy. Trigeminal Nerve
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Anticonvulsants / therapeutic use. Humans. Neurosurgical Procedures. Oxygen Inhalation Therapy

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11198259.001).
  • [ISSN] 0032-5481
  • [Journal-full-title] Postgraduate medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Postgrad Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Anticonvulsants
  • [Number-of-references] 17
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Liang YC, Huang CC, Hsu KS: Therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in trigeminal neuralgia. Curr Drug Targets CNS Neurol Disord; 2004 Dec;3(6):507-14
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in trigeminal neuralgia.
  • Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of paroxysmal and severely disabling facial pain and continues to be a real therapeutic challenge to the clinicians.
  • While the exact cause and pathology of this disorder is uncertain, it is thought that trigeminal neuralgia caused by irritation of the trigeminal nerve.
  • This irritation results from damage due to the change in the blood vessels, the presence of a tumor or other lesions that cause the compression of the trigeminal root.
  • The pain of trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by unilateral pain attacks that start abruptly and last for varying periods of time from minutes to hours.
  • Although antiepileptic drug therapy may be beneficial in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, up to one-half of the patients become refractory or intolerant to these medications.
  • At present there are few other effective drugs.
  • In cases of lacking effect after pharmacotherapy, surgical options may be considered.
  • Considering the pronounced antinociceptive effects produced by cannabinoids, they may be a promising therapeutic approach for the clinical management of trigeminal neuralgia.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics / pharmacology. Cannabinoids / pharmacology. Nociceptors / drug effects. Trigeminal Neuralgia / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Afferent Pathways / drug effects. Afferent Pathways / physiopathology. Animals. Anticonvulsants / pharmacology. Anticonvulsants / therapeutic use. Humans. Neurons, Afferent / drug effects. Neurons, Afferent / physiology. Trigeminal Nerve / drug effects. Trigeminal Nerve / physiopathology

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Trigeminal neuralgia.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Trigeminal Neuralgia.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15578967.001).
  • [ISSN] 1568-007X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current drug targets. CNS and neurological disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Drug Targets CNS Neurol Disord
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics; 0 / Anticonvulsants; 0 / Cannabinoids
  • [Number-of-references] 109
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. Kinoshita M, Izumoto S, Oshino S, Nonaka M, Moriuchi S, Maruno M, Yoshimine T: Primary malignant lymphoma of the trigeminal region treated with rapid infusion of high-dose MTX and radiation: case report and review of the literature. Surg Neurol; 2003 Oct;60(4):343-8; discussion 348
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Primary malignant lymphoma of the trigeminal region treated with rapid infusion of high-dose MTX and radiation: case report and review of the literature.
  • Though the tumor responds well to radiation and chemotherapy, the prognosis of primary CNS lymphoma remains poor.
  • We report a case of primary lymphoma of Meckel's cave mimicking a trigeminal schwannoma radiographically, which achieved complete remission through use of rapid high-dose MTX therapy and radiation therapy.
  • CASE DESCRIPTION: The patient, a 55-year-old Japanese male, presented left trigeminal neuralgia.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass lesion in the left side of Meckel's cave, with extension into the cerebellopontine angle and the infratemporal fossa through the foramen ovale, suggesting trigeminal schwannoma.
  • However, the patient suffered radiologically inexplicable progressive cranial nerve palsy, which suggested malignant disease.
  • MRI and CSF disclosed malignant tumor dissemination; biopsy revealed malignant lymphoma.
  • The treatment, composed of the rapid infusion of high-dose MTX and whole brain and spine radiation, resulted in complete remission.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This case, which included atypical presentation of malignant lymphoma, illustrates the importance of including malignant lymphoma in the differential diagnosis of CP-angle and Meckel's cave tumor.
  • The results also confirmed the usefulness of combined rapid high-dose MTX therapy and radiation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Lymphoma / drug therapy. Lymphoma / radiotherapy. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / drug therapy. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / radiotherapy. Trigeminal Neuralgia / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cranial Irradiation. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Spine / radiation effects. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Primary malignant lymphoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lymphoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Trigeminal Neuralgia.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 14505860.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-3019
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  • [Number-of-references] 18
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Baussart B, Lepeintre JF, Condette-Auliac S, Dupuy M, Gaillard S: [Primitive intracranial trigeminal nerve germinoma. Case report]. Neurochirurgie; 2007 Feb;53(1):43-6
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Germinoma.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Primitive intracranial trigeminal nerve germinoma. Case report].
  • A 22-year-old man presented headache, asthenia, body weight loss and trigeminal hypoesthesia worsening quickly.
  • Radiological analysis showed an enhanced lesion that originated from the cavernous sinus and extended into the Meckel cave, owing to the fifth cranial nerve's course.
  • On the basis of histological analysis and negativity of tumor marker levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (alpha-fetoprotein alpha, human beta-chorionic gonadotropin), a primitive non-secreting intracranial germinoma was diagnosed.
  • Under combined chemotherapy (carboplatine, ifosfamide, etoposide) followed by focal fractionated radiotherapy delivering 40 Gy to the initial tumor volume, the outcome was excellent.
  • Primitive intracranial germinomas are rare malignant tumors involving mainly pineal and hypothalamic regions.
  • We report a case of intracranial trigeminal nerve germinoma.
  • Aspects of diagnosis and treatment are discussed in the light of previous publishing data.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / therapy. Germinoma / therapy. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cavernous Sinus / pathology. Combined Modality Therapy. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neurologic Examination. Paresthesia / etiology

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17337016.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-3770
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-Chirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurochirurgie
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Hashemi M, Stark A, Hugo H, Mehdorn M: Intracranial trigeminal nerve metastasis of a desmoplastic neurotropic melanoma: case report. Cent Eur Neurosurg; 2009 May;70(2):91-4
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intracranial trigeminal nerve metastasis of a desmoplastic neurotropic melanoma: case report.
  • CASE DESCRIPTION: A 69-year-old man presented to our clinic with trigeminal neuralgia.
  • 4 years previously he underwent tumor removal with an initial diagnosis of amelanotic malignant cutaneous melanoma; 1 year later, because of tumor recurrence, the patient underwent neck dissection, chemotherapy and radiation.
  • Magnet resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed an enhancement of the Gasserian ganglion and tumor extension along the mandibular and maxillar nerves of the intracranial part of the trigeminal nerve suggestive of tumor.
  • The intraoperative macroscopic appearance of the tumor was compatible with a neurinoma.
  • Histopathological studies proved the tumor to be a desmoplastic neurotropic melanoma (DNM) that was related to the previously treated malignant melanoma.
  • CONCLUSION: A metastatic tumor arising solely in a trigeminal nerve from a cutaneous malignant melanoma is quite rare; to our knowledge this may be the first report of such a case in the literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / secondary. Melanoma / secondary. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Trigeminal Nerve. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / pathology

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Melanoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Skin Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.
  • (PMID = 19711263.001).
  • [ISSN] 1868-4904
  • [Journal-full-title] Central European neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cent Eur Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Beschorner R, Mittelbronn M, Koerbel A, Ernemann U, Thal DR, Scheel-Walter HG, Meyermann R, Tatagiba M: Atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor spreading along the trigeminal nerve. Pediatr Neurosurg; 2006;42(4):258-63
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor spreading along the trigeminal nerve.
  • We here describe the case of a boy with an atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) of the 4th ventricle at 1 year of age and a local tumor recurrence at 19 months of age.
  • Due to brainstem infiltration, only incomplete tumor resection was possible each time.
  • High-dose chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation and irradiation resulted in complete tumor remission on a control MRI.
  • At 8 years of age, another tumor appeared extending from the cerebellopontine angle along the right trigeminal nerve through Meckel's cave into the cavernous sinus.
  • The trigeminal tumor was not in continuity with the primary ATRT but was located within the field of prior irradiation, neuroradiologically mimicking a schwannoma or a meningioma.
  • The origin of the trigeminal tumor as a late metastasis of the former ATRT or as a less likely irradiation-induced secondary ATRT and the operative approach are discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / diagnosis. Rhabdoid Tumor / diagnosis. Teratoma / diagnosis. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Fourth Ventricle / pathology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Rhabdoid tumor.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 16714870.001).
  • [ISSN] 1016-2291
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  •  go-up   go-down


8. Gronseth G, Cruccu G, Alksne J, Argoff C, Brainin M, Burchiel K, Nurmikko T, Zakrzewska JM: Practice parameter: the diagnostic evaluation and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the European Federation of Neurological Societies. Neurology; 2008 Oct 7;71(15):1183-90
ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Practice parameter: the diagnostic evaluation and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the European Federation of Neurological Societies.
  • BACKGROUND: Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a common cause of facial pain.
  • 2) Which features identify patients at increased risk for symptomatic TN (STN; i.e., a structural cause such as a tumor)?
  • 4) Which drugs effectively treat classic and symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia?
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN), routine head imaging identifies structural causes in up to 15% of patients and may be considered useful (Level C).
  • Trigeminal sensory deficits, bilateral involvement of the trigeminal nerve, and abnormal trigeminal reflexes are associated with an increased risk of symptomatic TN (STN) and should be considered useful in distinguishing STN from classic trigeminal neuralgia (Level B).
  • There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the usefulness of MRI to identify neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve (Level U).
  • For patients with TN refractory to medical therapy, Gasserian ganglion percutaneous techniques, gamma knife, and microvascular decompression may be considered (Level C).
  • The role of surgery vs pharmacotherapy in the management of TN in patients with MS remains uncertain.
  • [MeSH-major] Evidence-Based Medicine. Neurology / standards. Trigeminal Neuralgia / diagnosis. Trigeminal Neuralgia / therapy

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Trigeminal neuralgia.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Trigeminal Neuralgia.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18716236.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-632X
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Practice Guideline; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 40
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Horinaka N, Ito Y, Miyajima M, Hishii M, Suzuki K, Saito M, Arai H: Intracranial peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor manifesting as abducens nerve palsy. Childs Nerv Syst; 2005 Apr;21(4):327-30
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intracranial peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor manifesting as abducens nerve palsy.
  • INTRODUCTION: Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) occurring as an extra-axial lesion within the intracranial space and extending to the subarachnoid space is extremely rare.
  • CASE REPORT: An 18-month-old girl presented with an intracranial peripheral PNET manifesting as abducens nerve palsy.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging on admission revealed a lesion affecting the trigeminal and abducens nerves.
  • The tumor was partially removed via the subtemporal approach.
  • Histological examination showed a high-grade, undifferentiated neoplasm of small cell type with positive immunostaining for MIC2.
  • The histological diagnosis was peripheral PNET.
  • OUTCOME: Craniospinal radiotherapy reduced the tumor size, but adjuvant chemotherapy designed for Ewing's sarcomas and PNETs was not effective.
  • She died 1 month after the last chemotherapy, despite whole craniospinal irradiation (total dose 53.2 Gy) and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Abducens Nerve Diseases / etiology. Brain Neoplasms / complications. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Abducens Nerve / pathology. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry / methods. Infant. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Protozoan Proteins / metabolism

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Hum Pathol. 1994 Mar;25(3):304-7 [8150461.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Opin Oncol. 1992 Aug;4(4):696-703 [1511026.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1998 Jan-Feb;20(1):55-61 [9482414.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2003 Feb 20;348(8):694-701 [12594313.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1991 Nov 15;68(10):2251-9 [1655208.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Pathol Lab Med. 1986 Nov;110(11):997-1005 [3535732.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1991 Jan 1;67(1):163-71 [1985713.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1999 Jan;90(1):141-4 [10413168.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2001 Jan;51(1):51-6 [11349881.001]
  • [Cites] AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 1992 Sep-Oct;13(5):1353-64 [1414828.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 2002 Nov;51(5):1286-9; discussion 1289 [12383375.001]
  • [Cites] No Shinkei Geka. 1999 Mar;27(3):243-8 [10190159.001]
  • [Cites] Intern Med. 1997 Jun;36(6):424-9 [9213191.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 1991 Aug;139(2):317-25 [1867320.001]
  • [Cites] J Laryngol Otol. 2001 Oct;115(10 ):848-52 [11668007.001]
  • [Cites] Neuroradiology. 1991;33(3):260-3 [1652705.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1991 Apr 1;67(7):1886-93 [1848471.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1988 Jan 15;61(2):349-57 [3334970.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1973 Oct;32(4):890-7 [4751919.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1991 Apr 1;67(7):1825-9 [1848468.001]
  • (PMID = 15657787.001).
  • [ISSN] 0256-7040
  • [Journal-full-title] Child's nervous system : ChNS : official journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Childs Nerv Syst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protozoan Proteins; 120300-02-9 / thrombospondin-related adhesive protein, protozoan
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Pamuk ON, Harmandar F, Cakir N: The development of trigeminal neuralgia related to auricular chondritis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis-relapsing polychondritis and its treatment with etanercept. Description of the first case. Clin Exp Rheumatol; 2009 Jan-Feb;27(1):128-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Etanercept .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The development of trigeminal neuralgia related to auricular chondritis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis-relapsing polychondritis and its treatment with etanercept. Description of the first case.
  • Cranial neuropathy is an uncommon manifestation of relapsing polychondritis (RPC).
  • Optic neuropathy is the most common type of cranial nerve involvement in RPC.
  • Until now, trigeminal neuralgia (TN) has been reported with different rheumatic diseases, however, there is no reported case of TN associated with RPC.
  • Cranial MRI and MRI angiography of the brain did not show any pathology.
  • The patient partially responded to RA therapy; and carbamazepine and etanercept were administered.
  • We presume that the TN was caused by compression of the trigeminal nerve from inflammation or ischemia secondary to vasculitis.
  • [MeSH-major] Arthritis, Rheumatoid / complications. Immunoglobulin G / therapeutic use. Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Polychondritis, Relapsing / drug therapy. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / therapeutic use. Trigeminal Neuralgia / drug therapy


11. Esposito F, Kelly DF, Vinters HV, DeSalles AA, Sercarz J, Gorgulhos AA: Primary sphenoid sinus neoplasms: a report of four cases with common clinical presentation treated with transsphenoidal surgery and adjuvant therapies. J Neurooncol; 2006 Feb;76(3):299-306
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Primary sphenoid sinus neoplasms: a report of four cases with common clinical presentation treated with transsphenoidal surgery and adjuvant therapies.
  • BACKGROUND: Primary neoplasms of the sphenoid sinus are a rare occurrence, accounting for approximately 1-2% of all paranasal sinus tumors.
  • METHODS: Four patients with sphenoid sinus neoplasms were identified (1%), all treated during the year 2003.
  • Two patients presented with unilateral abducens cranial nerve (CN) palsies; one had trigeminal facial numbness and dizziness; another had headache, epistaxis, and partial third and fourth CN palsies.
  • Cavernous sinus invasion was present in all four cases, including one patient with tumor in the ethmoid sinus and intra-tumoral hemorrhage.
  • All patients underwent subtotal tumor removal via an endonasal transsphenoidal route.
  • Tumor histology included neuroendocrine carcinoma, sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and giant cell tumor.
  • Metastatic work-ups were negative in all patients, and all received fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy; three received chemotherapy.
  • One patient required a second endonasal tumor debulking 15 months after the first for new visual loss that then resolved.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Intra-sphenoidal tumors are locally invasive tumors that include a wide pathological spectrum.
  • Recognizing their distinctive clinical presentation and MRI features is helpful in differentiating them from primary sellar tumors.
  • Their aggressive nature warrants a multimodality treatment plan including surgical debulking, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in some cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Neurosurgical Procedures. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / pathology. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / therapy. Sphenoid Sinus / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Carcinoma / metabolism. Carcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma / therapy. Carcinoma, Giant Cell / metabolism. Carcinoma, Giant Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Giant Cell / therapy. Carcinoma, Mucoepidermoid / metabolism. Carcinoma, Mucoepidermoid / pathology. Carcinoma, Mucoepidermoid / therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 2002 Sep;51(3):699-705; discussion 705-7 [12188948.001]
  • [Cites] Head Neck Surg. 1984 Jan-Feb;6(3):761-76 [6319335.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Surg Pathol. 2002 Mar;26(3):371-6 [11859210.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 1989 Jul;99(7 Pt 1):716-20 [2747395.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 1963 May;73:537-46 [14011951.001]
  • [Cites] Cephalalgia. 1988 Dec;8(4):229-36 [3219724.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 1997 Dec;107(12 Pt 1):1590-5 [9396670.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1988 Jan;14 (1):11-22 [3335447.001]
  • [Cites] Yonsei Med J. 1988;29(3):209-18 [3057747.001]
  • [Cites] Head Neck. 1996 Mar-Apr;18(2):160-5; discussion 166 [8647682.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 1993 Oct;33(4):602-8; discussion 608-9 [8232799.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1981 Aug;55(2):187-93 [7252541.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2003 Sep 15;98(6):1179-87 [12973841.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 1973 Aug;83(8):1252-65 [4758128.001]
  • [Cites] Pituitary. 2002;5(4):261-5 [14558675.001]
  • [Cites] World J Surg. 2003 Jul;27(7):849-55 [14509518.001]
  • [Cites] Minim Invasive Neurosurg. 1998 Jun;41(2):66-73 [9651913.001]
  • [Cites] J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2002 Aug;61(8):663-72 [12152781.001]
  • [Cites] AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1992 Sep;159(3):581-9 [1503031.001]
  • [Cites] J Otolaryngol. 1978 Oct;7(5):379-88 [105151.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Otolaryngol. 1978 Oct;104(10):585-7 [697636.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1996 Jul;122(7):765-8 [8663951.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 2000 May;46(5):1084-91; discussion 1091-2 [10807240.001]
  • [Cites] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1990 Jun;102(6):709-16 [2115658.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Pediatr. 1996 Aug;155(8):717-9 [8839732.001]
  • [Cites] J Otolaryngol. 1990 Apr;19(2):122-9 [2348505.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2001 Dec 15;92(12):3012-29 [11753979.001]
  • [Cites] Head Neck. 1991 May-Jun;13(3):208-12 [2037472.001]
  • [Cites] Med J Aust. 2000 Nov 20;173(10):548-9 [11194741.001]
  • [Cites] Neuroradiology. 1998 Oct;40(10 ):651-5 [9833894.001]
  • [Cites] Brain. 1984 Sep;107 ( Pt 3):855-70 [6478180.001]
  • [Cites] J Craniofac Surg. 1995 Jan;6(1):15-23 [8601000.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg Sci. 1999 Mar;43(1):25-36 [10494663.001]
  • [Cites] Head Neck. 2002 Sep;24(9):821-9 [12211046.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Neurosurg. 1994;8(1):51-5 [8011194.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2002 May;259(5):266-8 [12107531.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Otolaryngol. 1995 Mar-Apr;16(2):109-14 [7793504.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 2003 Feb;98(2):350-8 [12593622.001]
  • [Cites] Pathology (Phila). 1996;3(2):513-34 [8795833.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1994 Jan;120(1):19-25 [8274251.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Emerg Med. 2001 Jan;19(1):88-90 [11146033.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 1998 Apr;42(4):913-5; discussion 915-6 [9574657.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2003 Mar;14(3):367-72 [12598339.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 2003 Nov;53(5):1126-35; discussion 1135-7 [14580279.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1977 Dec;40(6):3038-41 [412586.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 2002 Nov;112(11):1964-9 [12439163.001]
  • [Cites] J Laryngol Otol. 1995 Oct;109(10):951-5 [7499947.001]
  • (PMID = 16163447.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


12. Benoliel R, Epstein J, Eliav E, Jurevic R, Elad S: Orofacial pain in cancer: part I--mechanisms. J Dent Res; 2007 Jun;86(6):491-505
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The mechanisms involved, and possible treatment targets, in orofacial pain due to cancer are poorly understood.
  • However, there is a lack of relevant research in the trigeminal region, and we have therefore applied data accumulated from experiments on cancer pain mechanisms in rodent spinal models.
  • In the second part, we review the clinical presentation of cancer-associated orofacial pain at various stages: initial diagnosis, during therapy (chemo-, radiotherapy, surgery), and in the post-therapy period.
  • In the present article, we provide a brief outline of trigeminal functional neuro-anatomy and pain-modulatory pathways.
  • Tissue destruction by invasive tumors (or metastases) induces inflammation and nerve damage, with attendant acute pain.
  • Distant, painful effects of tumors include paraneoplastic neuropathic syndromes and effects secondary to the release of factors by the tumor (growth factors, cytokines, and enzymes).
  • Additionally, pain is frequent in cancer management protocols (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy).
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Pain / etiology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Chronic Disease. Disease Models, Animal. Humans. Pain, Referred / etiology. Pain, Referred / physiopathology. Paraneoplastic Syndromes / etiology. Paraneoplastic Syndromes / physiopathology. Trigeminal Nerve / physiopathology. Trigeminal Neuralgia / etiology. Trigeminal Neuralgia / physiopathology

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17525348.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-0345
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of dental research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Dent. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 242
  •  go-up   go-down


13. Yamaguchi S, Terasaka S, Ando S, Shinohara T, Iwasaki Y: Neoadjuvant therapy in a patient with clival plasmacytoma associated with multiple myeloma: a case report. Surg Neurol; 2008 Oct;70(4):403-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINCRISTINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Neoadjuvant therapy in a patient with clival plasmacytoma associated with multiple myeloma: a case report.
  • CASE DESCRIPTION: We report a 65-year-old woman who presented with a large clival plasmacytoma causing right trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies and was diagnosed with MM after transsphenoidal biopsy.
  • She underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by radical resection of the residual tumor.
  • CONCLUSION: We presented our treatment strategy including neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by radical resection of the lesion.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Multiple Myeloma / drug therapy. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Plasmacytoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Cranial Fossa, Posterior / pathology. Dexamethasone / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neurosurgical Procedures. Salvage Therapy. Vincristine / therapeutic use

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Multiple myeloma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Multiple Myeloma.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DEXAMETHASONE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18291467.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-3019
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; VAD I protocol
  •  go-up   go-down


14. Leach BC, Kulbersh JS, Day TA, Cook J: Cranial neuropathy as a presenting sign of recurrent aggressive skin cancer. Dermatol Surg; 2008 Apr;34(4):483-97
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Skin Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cranial neuropathy as a presenting sign of recurrent aggressive skin cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize recurrent skin cancers of the head and neck presenting with cranial neuropathies and to review the presentation and the management for this rare subset of cutaneous neoplasms.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review was performed for all patients with previous related cutaneous neoplasms presenting with cranial neuropathies referred to a single academic tertiary-care head and neck tumor program from 1999 to 2007.
  • Six cases of head and neck carcinoma with demonstrable cranial neuropathy were identified and analyzed by clinical history, radiographic and surgical findings, and treatment and survival data.
  • RESULTS: Cranial neuropathy was the presenting symptom of recurrent disease in all six patients.
  • Four presented with multiple cranial neuropathies.
  • All exhibited neuropathy of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V).
  • The tumors involved were squamous cell carcinoma (4) and melanoma (2).
  • Symptoms were present for an average of 7 months prior to diagnosis of perineural recurrence.
  • Cranial nerve involvement was confirmed in all patients by magnetic resonance imaging, and five patients manifested histologic evidence of perineural tumor infiltration.
  • Treatment consisted of various combinations of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy for five patients, and one patient declined any intervention.
  • CONCLUSION: Cranial neuropathy is a rare presentation of recurrent cutaneous neoplasms of the head and neck.
  • Given this infrequent occurrence and shared features of presentation, these highly morbid tumors are often mistakenly diagnosed as Bell's palsy or trigeminal neuralgia.
  • Our findings corroborate previous reports of diagnostic delay, increased tumor burden, and worsened morbidity and mortality associated with such cutaneous malignancies.
  • The critical utility of radiologic imaging for staging and tumor delineation are also supported by our institutional data.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Cranial Nerve Diseases / etiology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Melanoma / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cohort Studies. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Melanoma.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18248467.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4725
  • [Journal-full-title] Dermatologic surgery : official publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et al.]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dermatol Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


15. Sade B, Prayson RA, Lee JH: Gliosarcoma with infratemporal fossa extension. Case report. J Neurosurg; 2006 Dec;105(6):904-7
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Gliosarcoma.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Gliosarcomas are bimorphic intraaxial tumors.
  • The tumor consisted of intraaxial, intracranial as well as extradural, and extracranial components with extension to the posterolateral wall of the sphenoid sinus.
  • The postoperative course was uneventful except for hypesthesia in the distribution of the maxillary division of the right trigeminal nerve.
  • The histopathological diagnosis was consistent with gliosarcoma.
  • Radiotherapy and chemotherapy consisting of temozolomide were administered subsequently, and the patient was recurrence free 12 months after his initial diagnosis.
  • The effect of skull base involvement to the overall treatment and outcome of patients with gliosarcomas would be difficult to determine given the rare occurrence of these lesions in such locations.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Fossa, Middle / surgery. Gliosarcoma / surgery. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / surgery. Skull Base Neoplasms / surgery. Sphenoid Sinus / surgery. Temporal Lobe / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Craniotomy / methods. Follow-Up Studies. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein / analysis. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neurologic Examination. Postoperative Complications / diagnosis. S100 Proteins / analysis

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17405263.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein; 0 / S100 Proteins
  •  go-up   go-down


16. Varma AK, Muller PJ: Cranial neuropathies after intracranial Photofrin-photodynamic therapy for malignant supratentorial gliomas-a report on 3 cases. Surg Neurol; 2008 Aug;70(2):190-3
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Peripheral Nerve Disorders.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cranial neuropathies after intracranial Photofrin-photodynamic therapy for malignant supratentorial gliomas-a report on 3 cases.
  • BACKGROUND: In an RCT of PDT in the treatment of malignant gliomas, 3 patients developed cranial neuropathies after photoillumination.
  • We are aware of no previous reports on cranial neuropathy after intracranial PDT.
  • METHODS: In a cohort of 80 patients, there were 41 men and 39 women; 47 were newly diagnosed and 33 had recurrent tumors.
  • All patients underwent surgical tumor extirpation.
  • There were 77 malignant gliomas, 2 meningiomas, and 1 metastatic tumor.
  • The tumor locations were as follows: 39 frontal, 25 temporal, 12 parietal, and 4 occipital.
  • Of the 25 patients with temporal lobe tumors, 18 received PDT.
  • RESULTS: Three of the 18 patients with temporal lobe tumors developed cranial neuropathies after PDT.
  • This complication was not seen in any other patient with tumors in the frontal, parietal, or occipital regions, or patients with temporal lobe tumors who did not receive PDT.
  • The first patient developed seventh nerve paresis and hypoesthesia in fifth nerve distribution, which resolved only partially.
  • The second patient developed a seventh nerve paresis that resolved completely.
  • The third patient developed transient neuralgic pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cranial neuropathies could be the result of photoillumination of fifth and seventh cranial nerves during PDT of the temporal fossa.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Diseases / chemically induced. Dihematoporphyrin Ether / adverse effects. Glioma / drug therapy. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases / chemically induced. Photochemotherapy / adverse effects. Supratentorial Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Cranial Fossa, Middle / pathology. Facial Nerve / anatomy & histology. Facial Nerve / drug effects. Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Facial Nerve Diseases / chemically induced. Facial Nerve Diseases / metabolism. Facial Nerve Diseases / physiopathology. Female. Humans. Light / adverse effects. Male. Middle Aged. Photic Stimulation / adverse effects. Preoperative Care / standards. Temporal Lobe / pathology. Temporal Lobe / physiopathology. Trigeminal Nerve / anatomy & histology. Trigeminal Nerve / drug effects. Trigeminal Nerve / physiopathology. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / chemically induced. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / metabolism. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / physiopathology

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17976702.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-3019
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 97067-70-4 / Dihematoporphyrin Ether
  •  go-up   go-down


17. Chung WY, Liu KD, Shiau CY, Wu HM, Wang LW, Guo WY, Ho DM, Pan DH: Gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma: 10-year experience of 195 cases. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102 Suppl:87-96
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Acoustic Neuroma.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECT: The authors conducted a study to determine the optimal radiation dose for vestibular schwannoma (VS) and to examine the histopathology in cases of treatment failure for better understanding of the effects of irradiation.
  • Seventy-two patients (37%) had undergone partial or total excision of their tumor prior to gamma knife surgery (GKS).
  • The mean tumor volume was 4.1 cm3 (range 0.04-23.1 cm3).
  • Multiisocenter dose planning placed a prescription dose of 11 to 18.2 Gy on the 50 to 94% isodose located at the tumor margin.
  • At the latest MR imaging assessment decreased or stable tumor volume was demonstrated in 93.6% of the patients.
  • Uncontrolled tumor swelling was noted in five patients at 3.5, 17, 24, 33, and 62 months after GKS, respectively.
  • Two patients developed a new trigeminal neuralgia.
  • There was no treatment-related death.
  • Histopathological examination of specimens in three cases (one at 62 months after GKS) revealed a long-lasting radiation effect on vessels inside the tumor.
  • A margin 12-Gy dose with homogeneous distribution is effective in preventing tumor progression, while posing no serious threat to normal cranial nerve function.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Anti-Inflammatory Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Facial Paralysis / diagnosis. Facial Paralysis / drug therapy. Facial Paralysis / etiology. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hearing Disorders / diagnosis. Hearing Disorders / etiology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Radiation Dosage. Severity of Illness Index. Tinnitus / etiology. Trigeminal Neuralgia / epidemiology. Trigeminal Neuralgia / etiology. Trigeminal Neuralgia / physiopathology

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Schwannoma.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15662787.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents
  •  go-up   go-down


18. Chmielewska B, Leszek KamiƄski M: Progression of preexisting trigeminalgia to Tolose-Hunt-like syndrome. The importance of neuroimaging for early differential diagnosis. Neurol Sci; 2003 Nov;24(4):281-5
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Progression of preexisting trigeminalgia to Tolose-Hunt-like syndrome. The importance of neuroimaging for early differential diagnosis.
  • Recurrent unbearable, paroxysmal, unilateral facial pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve often provoked by sensory stimuli is typical for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia.
  • The less frequent localization in the area of ophthalmic branch (5%) is particularly controversial and should be distinguished from pathological lesions in the brainstem and middle and posterior cranial fossa and from diseases of the orbit and eye.
  • After 1 year of pharmacological treatment no improvement was achieved and the pain became neuropathic and paresis of 3rd, 4th and 6th nerves developed, as observed in Tolose-Hunt syndrome.
  • However, treatment with steroids was completely ineffective.
  • Surgical resection of the tumor (leiomyosarcoma) only partially reversed oculomotor palsy and diminished aching.
  • In differential diagnosis of idiopathic and symptomatic trigeminalgia, early MR and MRA imaging is the most essential and sometimes may be the best single test to evaluate lesions even in distant areas of the nervous system branches.
  • [MeSH-major] Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome / etiology. Trigeminal Neuralgia / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Blinking / physiology. Cranial Nerves / physiopathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Progression. Facial Pain / etiology. Facial Pain / physiopathology. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Masseter Muscle / physiopathology. Meningeal Neoplasms. Neurologic Examination. Physical Stimulation. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Trigeminal Neuralgia.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 14658050.001).
  • [ISSN] 1590-1874
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurol. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  •  go-up   go-down


19. Modarressi Ghavami SA, Lombardi T, Becker M, Richter M: [Chondroblastic osteosarcoma of the mandible: a case report with 14 years follow-up]. Rev Stomatol Chir Maxillofac; 2006 Nov;107(5):380-5
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • INTRODUCTION: Osteosarcoma, the second most frequent primary malignant bone tumor, is usually found in long bones: femur, tibia or humerus with only 6 to 7% of cases occurring in the jaws.
  • Patients with osteosarcoma of the mandible usually complain of a swelling, which can be painful or not, accompanied by paresthesia of one of the trigeminal nerve branches in about 20% of cases.
  • OBSERVATION: We report a case of chondroblastic osteosarcoma of the mandible affecting a 33-year-old woman with 14 years follow-up illustrating the difficulties of a rapid diagnosis.
  • DISCUSSION: The prognosis of osteosarcoma of the mandible relies on its histological grade and the amount of time elapsing from diagnosis to treatment onset.
  • The treatment of choice is radical surgery providing a 5-year survival rate up to 80%.
  • The definitive surgical treatment is usually performed only after several interventions because operative-room pathology cannot be obtained due to the necessity of decalcification.
  • In order to avoid multiple resections, an interim bridging with a reconstructive plate with a condylar head can be proposed before definitive graft reconstruction.
  • Chemotherapy or radiotherapy, which are very efficient for osteosarcoma in general, do not change the prognosis of osteosarcoma of the mandible.
  • [MeSH-major] Mandibular Neoplasms / diagnosis. Osteosarcoma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Bone Transplantation. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Myxoma / diagnosis. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Prognosis. Radiography, Panoramic. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Osteosarcoma.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17128192.001).
  • [ISSN] 0035-1768
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue de stomatologie et de chirurgie maxillo-faciale
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Stomatol Chir Maxillofac
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  •  go-up   go-down


20. Demez P, Goffart Y, Daele J: Facial pain from visceral origin. Acta Otorhinolaryngol Belg; 2004;58(4):141-2
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lung Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • INTRODUCTION: Unilateral facial pain in the trigeminal area is known to be caused by a cancer in the superior lobe of the lung.
  • Thanks to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the patient's pain was improved.
  • CONCLUSION: Referred facial pain is rare and can be explained by the invasion of the tenth nerve by an upper lobe lung tumor.
  • The diagnosis can be delayed from 1 month to 4 years after the onset of the pain.
  • Referred facial pain is improved by the treatment of the causal lung cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Earache / etiology. Facial Pain / etiology. Lung Neoplasms / complications

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15679196.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6497
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oto-rhino-laryngologica Belgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otorhinolaryngol Belg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Belgium
  •  go-up   go-down


21. Kano H, Niranjan A, Novotny J Jr, Bhatnagar J, Flickinger JC, Lunsford LD: Radiosurgery for desmoplastic melanoma of the head and neck using the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion technology: a case report. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg; 2009;87(1):61-5
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • A 44-year-old male developed chronic cancer pain caused by a progressive desmoplastic melanoma involving the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve.
  • The patient had failed local resection, conformal radiation therapy and chemotherapy, but was eligible for stereotactic radiosurgery using a new technology.
  • Intraoperative stereotactic magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging were fused to define the tumor volume and to create a conformal radiosurgery dose plan.
  • A marginal dose of 17 Gy at the 50% isodose was prescribed.
  • The entire procedure was performed on an outpatient basis.
  • The Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion technology increases the spectrum of treatable pathologies located in the cranial base and head and neck regions.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / surgery. Melanoma / surgery. Radiosurgery / methods

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Melanoma.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19174622.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0372
  • [Journal-full-title] Stereotactic and functional neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stereotact Funct Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  •  go-up   go-down


22. Hamilton JF, Bartkowski HB, Rock JP: Management of CNS mucormycosis in the pediatric patient. Pediatr Neurosurg; 2003 Apr;38(4):212-5

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Rhinocerebral mucormycosis (RM) is a rare, rapidly progressive disorder caused by fungi from the Mucoraceae family.
  • Mucormycosis normally presents in poorly controlled diabetics, intravenous drug abusers and immunocompromised patients.
  • We present a case of mucormycosis involving the paranasal sinuses and cranial base in a pediatric patient who experienced long-term survival with a more limited resection.
  • Additionally, there was involvement of the sphenoid sinus and right cavernous sinus with extension into the posterior fossa along the course of the trigeminal nerve and encasement with narrowing of the right carotid artery.
  • The patient underwent sinus endoscopy with debridement of necrotic fungal tissue and bone.
  • The patient continued to receive intrathecal and intravenous antibiotics as well as hyperbaric oxygen therapy.
  • The patient was clinically and radiographically free of disease 1 year after diagnosis.
  • While invasive RM is generally a fatal disease, this rare disorder can be treated successfully without radical resection, particularly if multimodality treatment options are implemented.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 12646741.001).
  • [ISSN] 1016-2291
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement