[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 27 of about 27
1. Dey BR, McAfee S, Sackstein R, Colby C, Saidman S, Weymouth D, Poliquin C, Vanderklish J, Sachs DH, Sykes M, Spitzer TR: Successful allogeneic stem cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancy following autologous stem cell transplantation. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2001;7(11):604-12
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Successful allogeneic stem cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancy following autologous stem cell transplantation.
  • The use of myeloablative preparative therapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) as salvage therapy for adult patients with relapsed hematologic malignancy after autologous stem cell transplantation (autoSCT) is generally unsuccessful due to very high treatment-related mortality rates.
  • We evaluated the outcome of HLA-matched related donor alloSCT following nonmyeloablative preparative therapy in 13 patients (median age, 38 years) with relapsed hematologic malignancies (Hodgkin's disease, n = 4; Hodgkin's disease and advanced myelodysplastic syndrome, n = 1; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, n = 6; multiple myeloma, n = 2) after initial autoSCT.
  • Median time from autoSCT to alloSCT was 12 months (range, 3-24 months); 6 patients had chemotherapy-refractory disease following autoSCT, 6 were in untreated relapse, and 1 had a partial response from salvage chemotherapy.
  • Preparative therapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, 150-200 mg/kg; peritransplantation anti-thymocyte globulin; thymic irradiation (in patients who had not received previous mediastinal irradiation); and a very short course of cyclosporine as GVHD prophylaxis.
  • The median survival time of the 13 patients is currently 10 months (range, 3-39 months), with an overall survival probability at 2 years of 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19%-73%) and a disease-free survival probability at 2 years of 37.5% (95% CI, 12%-65%).
  • Thus, this novel nonmyeloablative alloSCT strategy followed by prophylactic DLI was well tolerated and can result in durable disease-free survival among patients with advanced hematologic malignancies after a failed autoSCT.
  • Further follow-up and evaluation of additional patients are required to conclusively establish the role of this strategy in the treatment of hematologic malignancies after an autologous transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Immunosuppressive Agents / administration & dosage. Salvage Therapy / methods. Transplantation Conditioning / methods

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11760148.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-8791
  • [Journal-full-title] Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1 RO1 CA79986-O1A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1 RO1 CA79988-O1A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
  •  go-up   go-down


2. Thompson JS, Pomeroy C, Kryscio RJ, Brown SA, Reece D, Kramer R, Howard DS, VanZant G, Humphries S, Phillips G: Use of a T cell-specific monoclonal antibody, T10B9, in a novel allogeneic stem cell transplantation protocol for hematologic malignancy high-risk patients. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2004 Dec;10(12):858-66
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Use of a T cell-specific monoclonal antibody, T10B9, in a novel allogeneic stem cell transplantation protocol for hematologic malignancy high-risk patients.
  • To reduce the toxicity of traditional conditioning regimens for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), we used single-agent chemotherapy conditioning with either busulfan (total cumulative dose, 16 mg/kg) or melphalan (200 to 240 mg/m 2 ), followed by the anti-T cell-specific monoclonal antibody T10B9 (MEDI-500) daily for 3 days.
  • Twenty-six high-risk hematologic malignancy patients were entered onto this study.
  • Deaths occurred in 21 of 26 patients because of infection (n = 7), progression/recurrence of primary disease (n = 6), aGVHD (n = 4), regimen-related toxicity (n = 1), and other causes (n = 3).
  • In conclusion, single-agent chemotherapy conditioning with T10B9 produced durable engraftment and long-term survival in some patients who would not have qualified for a traditional allo-SCT.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Leukemia / therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. T-Lymphocytes / immunology. Transplantation, Homologous / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Graft vs Host Disease / prevention & control. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Leukocyte Transfusion. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Analysis. Treatment Failure. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Leukemia.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15570254.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-8791
  • [Journal-full-title] Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R03 CA 83634
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / alpha-beta T cell receptor antibody T10B9
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Shaughnessy PJ, Ornstein D, Ririe D, Callander N, Anderson JE, Pollack MS, Freytes CO, Cruz J, Rodriquez T, Bachier C, LeMaistre CF: Phase II study of a moderate-intensity preparative regimen with allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for hematologic diseases: the Texas Transplant Consortium experience. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2002;8(8):420-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Blood Disorders.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II study of a moderate-intensity preparative regimen with allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for hematologic diseases: the Texas Transplant Consortium experience.
  • Conventional preparative regimens for allogeneic stem cell transplantation are associated with excessive regimen-related toxicity (RRT) in some patients because of underlying comorbidities, advanced age, or prior treatment.
  • We studied a preparative regimen designed to reduce RRT, yet allow for adequate engraftment and development of a graft-versus-malignancy effect.
  • Transplantation-related mortality was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6%-8%) at 3 months and 28% (95% CI, 23%-34%) at 12 months after transplantation.
  • Non-relapse-related mortality was most often due to infection.
  • Grade II or greater GVHD developed in 56% of evaluable patients, and all patients with disease response developed GVHD.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematologic Diseases / therapy. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Transplantation Conditioning / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Graft Survival. Graft vs Host Disease / drug therapy. Graft vs Host Disease / prevention & control. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Opportunistic Infections / drug therapy. Opportunistic Infections / microbiology. Survival Analysis. Transplantation, Homologous / immunology. Transplantation, Isogeneic

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12234167.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-8791
  • [Journal-full-title] Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. Martino M, Morabito F, Console G, Irrera G, Messina G, Pucci G, Nardi M, Nobile F, Molica S, Cicero G, Palazzo S, Peta A, Musolino C, Iacopino P: Differences in transplant-related complications between hematologic malignancies and solid tumors receiving high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Tumori; 2003 Jul-Aug;89(4):385-90
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Differences in transplant-related complications between hematologic malignancies and solid tumors receiving high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.
  • Multiple factors contribute to transplant-related complications after high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, including conditioning regimens, number of infused stem cells and clinical characteristics of patient at transplant.
  • We compared the transplant-related complications of 141 patients affected with hematological malignancies with those of 109 patients with solid tumors.
  • High-dose chemotherapy mainly consisted of melphalan-, busulphan- or thiotepa-based regimens.
  • Despite the equal number of infused CD34+ cells, patients with a hematological malignancy showed a slower absolute neutrophil count (days to neutrophils > 0.5 x 10(9)/L, 10.6 +/- 3.6 for hematological malignancies versus 9.1 +/- 1.2 for solid tumors, P < 0.0001) and platelet recovery (days to platelets > 20 x 10(9)/L, 16.4 +/- 9.8 for hematological malignancies versus 12.3 +/- 4.1 for solid tumors, P < 0.0001) than patients with a solid tumor.
  • Five graft failures were documented exclusively in patients with a hematological malignancy.
  • Transplant-related mortality was similar between the two groups.
  • In conclusion, patients with a hematological malignancy overall have more complications than those with a solid tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematologic Neoplasms / surgery. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 14606640.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8916
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumori
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumori
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Giralt S: Update on non-myeloablative stem cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies. Int J Hematol; 2002 Aug;76 Suppl 1:176-83
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Update on non-myeloablative stem cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies.
  • Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an established treatment modality for a variety of hematologic malignancies.
  • Unfortunately it carries a high risk of complications and toxicities related to the intensive preparative regimen which is traditionally used for pre-transplant myeloablation and the graft versus host disease, which may be life threatening.
  • Non ablative or reduced intensity preparative regimens for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (NST) have been proposed as a strategy that would allow exploiting the graft versus tumor effect of allogeneic transplantation without the toxicity of myeloablative therapy.
  • After more than five years of cumulative clinical experience, it is now well established that NST is a feasible treatment option for patients with suboptimal performance status and is mostly effective in slow proliferating malignancies, which gives time for a graft versus malignancy effect to take place.
  • Additionally achievement of stable donor cell engraftment with NSTs provides a platform for adoptive immune cell treatments and may allow to extend indications of stem cell transplantation in the future.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Transplantation Conditioning / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / toxicity. Graft vs Leukemia Effect / drug effects. Graft vs Leukemia Effect / immunology. Humans. Immunosuppression / methods. Transplantation, Homologous / methods

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Ann Intern Med. 1988 Jun;108(6):806-14 [3285744.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1993 Oct 15;82(8):2310-8 [8400284.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1960 May;20:425-30 [13806002.001]
  • [Cites] Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 1999;5(4):192-203 [10465099.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1965 Oct;25(9):1525-31 [5323965.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1997 Apr 15;89(8):3048-54 [9108426.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1997 Oct 15;90(8):3204-13 [9376604.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1996 Feb 1;87(3):1196-8 [8562947.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2000 May 15;95(10 ):3262-9 [10807798.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1997 Jun 15;89(12):4531-6 [9192777.001]
  • [Cites] Exp Hematol. 1995 Dec;23(14):1553-62 [8542946.001]
  • [Cites] Br Med J. 1956 Sep 15;2(4993):626-7 [13356034.001]
  • [Cites] Science. 1976 Sep 24;193(4259):1252-4 [785599.001]
  • [Cites] Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1999 Apr 30;872:377-85; discussion 385-6 [10372140.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1993 Oct 15;82(8):2273-7 [8400279.001]
  • [Cites] Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1999 Apr 30;872:372-5; discussion 375-6 [10372139.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1995 Dec 1;86(11):4376-81 [7492799.001]
  • [Cites] Pharmacol Ther. 1991;49(3):239-68 [1675805.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2000 Sep 14;343(11):750-8 [10984562.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Treat Res. 1999;101:97-108 [10800646.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1989 Jul;74(1):19-25 [2473795.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1981 Jun 18;304(25):1529-33 [7015133.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1994 Jun 1;83(11):3377-83 [8193375.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2000 Oct 1;96(7):2419-25 [11001893.001]
  • [Cites] Leuk Lymphoma. 1993 Mar;9(4-5):343-50 [8394169.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1997 Nov 15;90(10):4206-11 [9354693.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2001 Feb 1;97(3):631-7 [11157478.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1994 Mar 24;330(12):827-38 [8114836.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1984 Jul 7;2(8393):28-30 [6145942.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 1993 Jul 7;270(1):57-60 [8510297.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Med. 1996 Mar;100(3):299-307 [8629675.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1993 Jan;11(1):116-24 [8418222.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1990 Dec 15;76(12):2462-5 [2265242.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1998 Feb 1;91(3):756-63 [9446633.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1995 Dec 1;86(11):4337-43 [7492795.001]
  • (PMID = 12430850.001).
  • [ISSN] 0925-5710
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 57
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Gürman G, Arat M, Ilhan O, Konuk N, Beksaç M, Celebi H, Ozcan M, Arslan O, Ustün C, Akan H, Uysal A, Koç H: Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation without myeloablative conditioning for patients with advanced hematologic malignancies. Cytotherapy; 2001;3(4):253-60
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Stem Cells.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation without myeloablative conditioning for patients with advanced hematologic malignancies.
  • BACKGROUND: The effect of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) on hematologic malignancies is based on the graft-versus-malignancy effect.
  • Once mixed chimeric status, and host versus graft with graft versus host tolerance are achieved, further strengthening of chimerism and graft-versus-malignancy effect can be obtained by donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) when needed.
  • Post-transplant GvHD prophylaxis was achieved with CsA alone in 10 patients, and with CsA plus mycophenolate mofetil in the last three patients.
  • Two CML patients in blastic phase (CML-BP), and the primary refractory secondary AML patient did not respond to procedure.
  • In four patients, drug therapy in conventional doses was added to post-transplant DLIs for their relapsed or refractory diseases.
  • A patient with CML-BP achieved CR and full donor chimerism after transplantation, but developed refractory post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in the 19th month.
  • Acute GvHD, Grade II-III, was observed in five patients, and two of them developed secondary progressive chronic GvHD subsequently.
  • Procedure-related severe toxicity was not observed, either in standard-risk patients or stem-cell donors.
  • The second step, which was the result of the graft-versus-malignancy effect, could be seen in most of the patients, but was not sustained in all of them because of the aggressiveness of their malignancy.
  • The role of NMA conditioning, and of the treatment in standard disease indications, remains to be determined in further studies.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft Survival / immunology. Graft vs Tumor Effect / immunology. Hematologic Neoplasms / immunology. Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / immunology. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Transplantation Conditioning / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Bone Marrow Purging / adverse effects. Female. Graft vs Host Disease / immunology. Graft vs Host Disease / physiopathology. Host vs Graft Reaction / immunology. Humans. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / immunology. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / physiopathology. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / therapy. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / immunology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / physiopathology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Myeloablative Agonists / therapeutic use. Postoperative Complications / etiology. Postoperative Complications / physiopathology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / immunology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / physiopathology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy. Remission Induction / methods. Secondary Prevention. Transplantation Chimera / immunology. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Failure

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12171713.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-3249
  • [Journal-full-title] Cytotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cytotherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Myeloablative Agonists
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Krishnan A, Forman SJ: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for AIDS-related malignancies. Curr Opin Oncol; 2010 Sep;22(5):456-60
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for AIDS-related malignancies.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: AIDS-related malignancies are an ongoing cause of mortality in individuals with HIV infection.
  • In the HIV-negative setting, high-dose chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation is an option for patients with hematologic malignancies.
  • Prior to the advent of effective HIV therapy, stem cell transplantation was not feasible for HIV-positive patients.
  • The purpose of this article is to explore the transplant options for HIV-positive patients after widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy.
  • Recently, in less advanced AIDS lymphoma, autologous stem cell transplantation has resulted in low transplant-related mortality and durable remissions.
  • In addition, case-control studies of HIV-positive versus HIV-negative lymphoma patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation have shown similar transplant-related mortality and overall survival.
  • There are challenges of drug interactions between highly active antiretroviral therapy and immunosuppressive agents as well as the potential for higher infection rates.
  • SUMMARY: The potential future applications of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation are the cure of the malignancy as well as the underlying HIV infection by either transplantation of naturally resistant or genetically modified stem cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - AIDS-HIV.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2002 Jul 25;347(4):284-7 [12140307.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2009 Aug 13;114(7):1306-13 [19451551.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2004 Jul 15;101(2):317-24 [15241829.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1989 Apr;73(5):1340-50 [2649174.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1991 Dec 1;68(11):2466-72 [1933784.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 1996 Dec;18(6):1195-7 [8971396.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1998 Mar 26;338(13):853-60 [9516219.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1999 Aug 1;59(15):3561-4 [10446961.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2005 Jan 15;105(2):874-8 [15388574.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2006 Sep 1;24(25):4123-8 [16896005.001]
  • [Cites] Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2008 Jan;14(1):59-66 [18158962.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2008 Oct 15;112(8):3484-7 [18698002.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2009 Feb 12;360(7):692-8 [19213682.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2009 May 1;27(13):2192-8 [19332732.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2009 Jun 4;113(23):6011-4 [19307667.001]
  • [Cites] AIDS. 2003 Jul 4;17(10):1521-9 [12824790.001]
  • (PMID = 20639760.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-703X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA030206; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA033572; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA033572; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA107399
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS427480; NLM/ PMC3537514
  •  go-up   go-down


8. Redei I, Langston AA, Lonial S, Cherry JK, Allen AJ, Hamilton E, Jones M, Bartlett VM, Waller EK: Rapid hematopoietic engraftment following fractionated TBI conditioning and transplantation with CD34(+) enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells from partially mismatched related donors. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2002 Sep;30(6):335-40
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Rapid hematopoietic engraftment following fractionated TBI conditioning and transplantation with CD34(+) enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells from partially mismatched related donors.
  • Nineteen adult patients with poor-risk hematologic malignancy received T cell-depleted (TCD) hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplant from partially mismatched related donors (PMRD).
  • GVHD prophylaxis consisted of TCD by positive/negative selection using the Isolex 300i system and pre-transplant ATG with no post-transplant immunosuppression.
  • Thirteen patients died of the following causes: relapse (n = 6), infections (n = 5), interstitial pneumonia (n = 1), and unknown causes (n = 1) None of the recipients of rabbit ATG required therapy for acute or chronic GVHD.
  • Five patients are alive and disease-free at a median time of 303 days post transplant (range 100-660).
  • Combination of stringent ex vivo TCD and pre-transplant ATG is effective GVHD prophylaxis.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Cause of Death. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Graft vs Host Disease / drug therapy. Graft vs Host Disease / prevention & control. Hematologic Neoplasms / mortality. Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoiesis. Humans. Lymphocyte Depletion. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Analysis. Transplantation, Homologous / immunology

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12235516.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD34
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Picardi A, Fabritiis Pd Pd, Cudillo L, Dentamaro T, Cupelli L, Ballatore G, Venditti A, Caravita T, Cristina Cox M, Catalano G, Amadori S: Possibility of long-term remission in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies after reduced intensity conditioning regimen (RIC) and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hematol J; 2004;5(1):24-31
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOSPORIN A .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Possibility of long-term remission in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies after reduced intensity conditioning regimen (RIC) and allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
  • High-dose chemotherapy and radiation used as a preparative regimen for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) produces a considerable morbidity and mortality.
  • An alternative strategy, developed to reduce transplant-related toxicity and to induce graft versus malignancy effect in the presence of full hematopoietic engraftment, includes the application of RIC that provide sufficient immunosuppression.
  • In all, 22 patients with hematologic malignancies and HLA-identical sibling donors were included in this study.
  • All patients were either refractory to therapy or beyond first complete remission (CR).
  • All the durable responses occurred in patients who developed GVHD.
  • Transplant related mortality (TRM) at 100 days was 27.3%, 67% of that caused by infections, while 6-year cumulative incidence of TRM was 38%.
  • provide durable responses in patients not eligible for conventional SCT exploiting the graft-versus-malignancy effect and (3).

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUDARABINE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VIDARABINE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 14745426.001).
  • [ISSN] 1466-4860
  • [Journal-full-title] The hematology journal : the official journal of the European Haematology Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol. J.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; FA2DM6879K / Vidarabine; P2K93U8740 / fludarabine
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Dorr RT, Briggs A, Kintzel P, Meyers R, Chow HH, List A: Comparative pharmacokinetic study of high-dose etoposide and etoposide phosphate in patients with lymphoid malignancy receiving autologous stem cell transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2003 Apr;31(8):643-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ETOPOSIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparative pharmacokinetic study of high-dose etoposide and etoposide phosphate in patients with lymphoid malignancy receiving autologous stem cell transplantation.
  • The pharmacokinetics of two etoposide (E) formulations were evaluated in patients with refractory hematologic malignancies receiving high-dose conditioning with autologous stem cell transplantation.
  • There was no procedure-related mortality and eight patients remained alive 1 year post-transplant.
  • As none of the differences reached statistical significance, both E formulations appear to be pharmacokinetically equivalent in the high-dose transplant setting.
  • The combination of high-dose EP with melphalan is an active preparative regimen prior to ABMT for hematologic malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Etoposide / analogs & derivatives. Etoposide / pharmacokinetics. Lymphoma / therapy. Organophosphorus Compounds / pharmacokinetics. Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacokinetics. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Area Under Curve. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy. Hodgkin Disease / therapy. Humans. Life Expectancy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Melphalan / pharmacokinetics. Middle Aged. Multiple Myeloma / drug therapy. Multiple Myeloma / therapy. Time Factors. Transplantation, Autologous

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lymphoma.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MELPHALAN .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12692603.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-23074; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA17094; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA23078
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Organophosphorus Compounds; 528XYJ8L1N / etoposide phosphate; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan
  •  go-up   go-down


11. Gore L, Trippett TM: Emerging non-transplant-based strategies in treating pediatric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2010 Oct;5(4):177-84
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Emerging non-transplant-based strategies in treating pediatric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Although intensive multi-agent chemotherapy has made non-Hodgkin's lymphoma one of the most curable malignancies in children and young adults, there is room for improvement in treatment, particularly for those with advanced-stage disease and those who relapse after conventional therapy.
  • New approaches are now attempting to reduce the burden of treatment, to focus on novel and more specific biologic targets, and to improve outcomes for patients with advanced-stage disease while reducing the potential for late effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antibodies, Monoclonal / immunology. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Burkitt Lymphoma / pathology. Burkitt Lymphoma / therapy. Child. Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Humans. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / therapy. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / pathology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase / antagonists & inhibitors. TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand / antagonists & inhibitors

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Surg. 1992 Feb;27(2):230-5 [1564623.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1989 Jan;7(1):92-9 [2642543.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2003 Dec 1;102(12):3871-9 [12933571.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2000 Jan 15;60(2):383-9 [10667591.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Imaging Biol. 2004 Nov-Dec;6(6):411-6 [15564152.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Dev Pathol. 2005 Jan-Feb;8(1):52-60 [15719203.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2000 Jan 15;95(2):416-21 [10627444.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1996 Jan 15;87(2):423-38 [8555463.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1999 Jul 15;94(2):429-33 [10397709.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2000 Jan;11(1):53-8 [10690387.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2005 Apr 25;92(8):1430-41 [15846298.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2005 Jan;32(1):31-8 [15605288.001]
  • [Cites] Med Pediatr Oncol. 1975;1(3):235-63 [1232532.001]
  • [Cites] Med Pediatr Oncol. 1992;20(2):105-13 [1734214.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Surv. 1997;30:59-75 [9547986.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Pathol. 2003 Mar;56(3):188-92 [12610094.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Invest. 2004;22(2):304-11 [15199612.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2002 Sep;29(9):1155-65 [12192560.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Pathol. 2004 Apr;121(4):496-506 [15080301.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1996 May 9;334(19):1238-48 [8606720.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2001 Jun 1;97(11):3370-9 [11369626.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1998;(23):95-100 [9709310.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr. 1994 Dec;125(6 Pt 1):876-85 [7996359.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Med Chem. 2006;13(26):3165-89 [17168705.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Haematol. 2004 May;125(3):414-5 [15086431.001]
  • [Cites] Exp Hematol. 2003 Apr;31(4):309-15 [12691918.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2010 Feb;54(2):307-10 [19856388.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2005 Nov;45(6):753-69 [15929129.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1999 Nov 15;94(10):3294-306 [10552938.001]
  • [Cites] Med Pediatr Oncol. 2000 Jul;35(1):20-7 [10881003.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1998 May;16(5):1729-35 [9586885.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2001 May 1;61(9):3535-40 [11325813.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2000 Nov 15;18(22):3845-53 [11078498.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2005 Nov;41(16):2485-501 [16243519.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2009 Dec;31(12):936-41 [19875969.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Nucl Med. 2002 Jul;16(5):337-45 [12230093.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Invest. 1999 Jul;104(2):155-62 [10411544.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1998 Nov 15;92(10):3591-8 [9808552.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 2000 Jul 12;284(2):205-9 [10889594.001]
  • [Cites] Leuk Lymphoma. 2005 Oct;46(10):1489-96 [16194895.001]
  • [Cites] Leukemia. 2004 Feb;18(2):238-42 [14628072.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Jun 9;106(23):9414-8 [19470474.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2000 Dec 15;96(13):4319-27 [11110708.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Hematol. 2003 Jan;72(1):53-63 [12508269.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2004 May 15;10(10):3371-6 [15161691.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2006 Sep 15;12(18):5329-35 [17000665.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1998 Jul-Aug;20(4):282-96 [9702999.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2008 Jan;50(1):37-45 [17420992.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2002 Jan 24;346(4):235-42 [11807147.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2003 Sep 15;98(6):1283-91 [12973853.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1997 Oct 30;337(18):1259-66 [9345074.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2001 Jan 15;19(2):414-9 [11208833.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2001 Jun 15;97(12):3699-706 [11389005.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Haematol. 2003 Feb;120(4):660-70 [12588354.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2005 Nov 15;104(10):2133-40 [16211546.001]
  • (PMID = 20640605.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors; 0 / Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; EC 2.4.2.1 / Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase
  •  go-up   go-down


12. Slovak ML, Bedell V, Popplewell L, Arber DA, Schoch C, Slater R: 21q22 balanced chromosome aberrations in therapy-related hematopoietic disorders: report from an international workshop. Genes Chromosomes Cancer; 2002 Apr;33(4):379-94
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] 21q22 balanced chromosome aberrations in therapy-related hematopoietic disorders: report from an international workshop.
  • The International Workshop on the relationship between prior therapy and balanced chromosome aberrations in therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes (t-MDS) and therapy-related acute leukemia (t-AL) identified 79 of 511 (15.5%) patients with balanced 21q22 translocations.
  • Patients were treated for their primary disease, including solid tumors (56%), hematologic malignancy (43%), and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (single case), by radiation therapy (5 patients), chemotherapy (36 patients), or combined-modality therapy (38 patients).
  • Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) at presentation was highest in t(8;21) (82%) and lowest in t(3;21) (37.5%) patients.
  • Cumulative drug dose exposure scores for alkylating agents (AAs) and topoisomerase II inhibitors indicated that t(3;21) patients received the most intensive therapy among the five 21q22 subsets, and the median AA score for patients with secondary chromosome 7 aberrations was double the AA score for the entire 21q22 group.
  • All five patients who received only radiation therapy had t(8;21) t-AML.
  • Noticeable differences were observed in median OS between 21q22 patients (n = 7) receiving transplant (BMT) (31 mo) compared to 21q22 patients who received intensive non-BMT therapy (n = 46) (17 mo); however, this was nonsignificant because of the small sample size (log-rank, P = 0.33).
  • In general, patients could be divided into two prognostic risk groups, those with t(8;21) (median OS, 19 mo) and those without t(8;21) (median OS, 7 mo) leukemia (log-rank, P = 0.0007).
  • [MeSH-major] Chromosome Aberrations / chemically induced. Chromosome Aberrations / statistics & numerical data. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21 / drug effects. Hematologic Neoplasms / chemically induced. Hematologic Neoplasms / epidemiology

  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 11921272.001).
  • [ISSN] 1045-2257
  • [Journal-full-title] Genes, chromosomes & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Genes Chromosomes Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA30206; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA33572; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA38926
  • [Publication-type] Congresses; Multicenter Study; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


13. Levine JE, Braun T, Penza SL, Beatty P, Cornetta K, Martino R, Drobyski WR, Barrett AJ, Porter DL, Giralt S, Leis J, Holmes HE, Johnson M, Horowitz M, Collins RH Jr: Prospective trial of chemotherapy and donor leukocyte infusions for relapse of advanced myeloid malignancies after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. J Clin Oncol; 2002 Jan 15;20(2):405-12
ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prospective trial of chemotherapy and donor leukocyte infusions for relapse of advanced myeloid malignancies after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.
  • Long-term survival after chemotherapy alone, second myeloablative transplant, or donor leukocyte infusions (DLIs) alone is unusual.
  • A chemotherapy strategy was used to debulk disease before administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed DLIs.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-five patients experiencing hematologic relapse of myeloid malignancy after HLA-matched sibling BMT were prospectively treated with cytarabine-based chemotherapy, then G-CSF-primed DLIs.
  • Treatment-related mortality was 23%.
  • CONCLUSION: Salvage treatment with chemotherapy before DLI can help some patients with advanced myeloid relapse and is not dependent on GVHD.
  • Patients with short remissions after BMT are unlikely to benefit from this approach, and the approach is associated with significant treatment-related mortality.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow Transplantation. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / pharmacology. Leukemia, Myeloid / therapy. Leukocytes
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Blood Donors. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Graft vs Host Disease. Humans. Infant. Injections, Subcutaneous. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Recurrence. Salvage Therapy. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Marrow Transplantation.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2002 Jun 1;20(11):2756; author reply 2756-7 [12039941.001]
  • (PMID = 11786567.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
  •  go-up   go-down


14. Miller KB, Roberts TF, Chan G, Schenkein DP, Lawrence D, Sprague K, Gorgun G, Relias V, Grodman H, Mahajan A, Foss FM: A novel reduced intensity regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation associated with a reduced incidence of graft-versus-host disease. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2004 May;33(9):881-9
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • SUMMARY: In all, 55 patients at high risk or ineligible for a conventional allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) received a regimen consisting of extracorporeal photopheresis, pentostatin, and reduced dose total body irradiation.
  • Patients who had not received a prior HSCT or had less than three prior chemotherapy regimens had a 71% OS and 67% EFS at 1 year.
  • Greater than grade II aGVHD developed in 9% and chronic GVHD (cGVHD) in 43%, and extensive in 12% and limited in 31%.
  • This novel reduced intensity preparative regimen was well tolerated and associated with a low incidence of transplant-related mortality and serious acute and cGVHD.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft vs Host Disease / prevention & control. Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Transplantation Chimera. Transplantation Conditioning / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cyclosporine / pharmacology. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Methotrexate / pharmacology. Middle Aged. Pentostatin / therapeutic use. Time Factors. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome. Whole-Body Irradiation

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. PENTOSTATIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOSPORIN A .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 14990986.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 395575MZO7 / Pentostatin; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  •  go-up   go-down


15. Benekli M, Hahn T, Williams BT, Cooper M, Roy HN, Wallace P, Stewart C, Bambach B, McCarthy PL Jr: Muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone OKT3), methylprednisolone and cyclosporine for acute graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2006 Sep;38(5):365-70
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We report the results of a prospective non-randomized phase II study of Muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone OKT3), an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, with methylprednisolone (MP) and cyclosporine (CSA) for acute GVHD (aGVHD) prophylaxis in 22 hematologic malignancy patients.
  • Allogeneic BMT donors were HLA-matched siblings (n = 17), single HLA-mismatched-related (n = 1) and HLA-matched unrelated (n = 4).
  • Chronic GVHD developed in 11/12 evaluable patients.
  • Eight patients (36%) developed OKT3 first dose reactions; no cases of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder were observed.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Transplantation / methods. Cyclosporine / therapeutic use. Graft vs Host Disease / prevention & control. Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Methylprednisolone / therapeutic use. Muromonab-CD3 / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antigens, CD3. Child. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. T-Lymphocytes / cytology. Transplantation, Homologous

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Marrow Transplantation.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOSPORIN A .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHYLPREDNISOLONE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16862164.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD3; 0 / Muromonab-CD3; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; X4W7ZR7023 / Methylprednisolone
  •  go-up   go-down


16. di Grazia C, Raiola AM, Van Lint MT, Lamparelli T, Gualandi F, Berisso G, Bregante S, Dominietto A, Mordini N, Bruno B, Frassoni F, Bacigalupo A: Conventional hematopoietic stem cell transplants from identical or alternative donors are feasible in recipients relapsing after an autograft. Haematologica; 2001 Jun;86(6):646-51

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The risk of relapse after autologous bone marrow transplantation (ASCT) is high and is related to the type of malignancy and phase of the disease.
  • The outcome for the patient who relapses after an autologous transplant is poor.
  • Some of these patients achieve a remission with conventional chemotherapy, but it is usually short-lasting.
  • One further therapeutic possibility is an allogeneic transplant which would confer the potential advantage of a graft-versus-leukemia effect in addition to the lack of tumor contamination of the graft and to a high-dose intensity conditioning regimen.
  • DESIGN AND METHODS: We have studied the outcome of 31 patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) after failing an autologous transplant because of relapse (n=29) or persistent aplasia (n=2).
  • Sixteen patients died of transplant-related complications and one of progressive disease.
  • With a median follow-up of 220 days (9-2104) the actuarial 2-year transplant-related mortality (TRM) was 51%, the actuarial relapse risk 37%, the actuarial survival 46%.
  • INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that patients relapsing after an autotransplant should be screened for potential related or unrelated donors: although TRM remains high there is a definite chance of long-term disease-free survival if these patients are allografted.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Blood Donors. Female. Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Humans. Karnofsky Performance Status. Male. Middle Aged. Recurrence. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11418375.001).
  • [ISSN] 0390-6078
  • [Journal-full-title] Haematologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Haematologica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  •  go-up   go-down


17. Ansell SM, Kyle RA, Reeder CB, Fonseca R, Mikhael JR, Morice WG, Bergsagel PL, Buadi FK, Colgan JP, Dingli D, Dispenzieri A, Greipp PR, Habermann TM, Hayman SR, Inwards DJ, Johnston PB, Kumar SK, Lacy MQ, Lust JA, Markovic SN, Micallef IN, Nowakowski GS, Porrata LF, Roy V, Russell SJ, Short KE, Stewart AK, Thompson CA, Witzig TE, Zeldenrust SR, Dalton RJ, Rajkumar SV, Gertz MA: Diagnosis and management of Waldenström macroglobulinemia: Mayo stratification of macroglobulinemia and risk-adapted therapy (mSMART) guidelines. Mayo Clin Proc; 2010 Sep;85(9):824-33
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. RITUXIMAB .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Diagnosis and management of Waldenström macroglobulinemia: Mayo stratification of macroglobulinemia and risk-adapted therapy (mSMART) guidelines.
  • Waldenström macroglobulinemia is a B-cell malignancy with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the bone marrow or lymphatic tissue and a monoclonal immunoglobulin M protein (IgM) in the serum.
  • It is incurable with current therapy, and the decision to treat patients as well as the choice of treatment can be complex.
  • Using a risk-adapted approach, we provide recommendations on timing and choice of therapy.
  • Patients with smoldering or asymptomatic Waldenström macroglobulinemia and preserved hematologic function should be observed without therapy.
  • Symptomatic patients with modest hematologic compromise, IgM-related neuropathy that requires therapy, or hemolytic anemia unresponsive to corticosteroids should receive standard doses of rituximab alone without maintenance therapy.
  • Patients who have severe constitutional symptoms, profound hematologic compromise, symptomatic bulky disease, or hyperviscosity should be treated with the DRC (dexamethasone, rituximab, cyclophosphamide) regimen.
  • For patients who experience relapse after a response to initial therapy of more than 2 years' duration, the original therapy should be repeated.
  • For patients who had an inadequate response to initial therapy or a response of less than 2 years' duration, an alternative agent or combination should be used.
  • Autologous stem cell transplant should be considered in all eligible patients with relapsed disease.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Blood Viscosity. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Plasmapheresis. Prognosis. Recurrence. Risk Factors. Rituximab. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Blood. 2009 Apr 30;113(18):4163-70 [19196866.001]
  • [Cites] Mod Pathol. 2009 Jun;22(6):807-16 [19287458.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2009 Aug 10;27(23):3830-5 [19506160.001]
  • [Cites] Mayo Clin Proc. 2009 Dec;84(12):1095-110 [19955246.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2010 Mar 10;28(8):1422-8 [20142586.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2010 May 1;28(13):2227-32 [20368570.001]
  • [Cites] Leukemia. 2005 Oct;19(10):1831-4 [16121217.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Haematol. 2006 Apr;133(2):158-64 [16611306.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2006 May 1;107(9):3442-6 [16410453.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2006 Jun 1;106(11):2412-20 [16649223.001]
  • [Cites] Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2006 Aug;12(8):845-54 [16864055.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2006 Sep;169(2):150-3 [16938573.001]
  • [Cites] Mayo Clin Proc. 2007 Mar;82(3):323-41 [17352369.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2007 Jun 15;109(12):5096-103 [17303694.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2007 Aug 1;25(22):3344-9 [17577016.001]
  • [Cites] Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2008 Aug;67(2):172-85 [18499469.001]
  • [Cites] Hematology. 2008 Apr;13(2):119-27 [18616880.001]
  • [Cites] Leuk Lymphoma. 2008 Jun;49(6):1104-7 [18452095.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2008 Dec 1;112(12):4683-9 [18216294.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2004 Jan 1;103(1):363-5 [12969985.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Haematol. 1999 Jun;105(4):993-6 [10554812.001]
  • [Cites] Leuk Lymphoma. 1999 Dec;36(1-2):203-6 [10613467.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2000 Jan;18(1):214-26 [10623712.001]
  • [Cites] Hematol Oncol Clin North Am. 1999 Dec;13(6):1351-66 [10626154.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2000 Jan;18(2):317-24 [10637245.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Haematol. 2000 Mar;108(4):737-42 [10792277.001]
  • [Cites] Leukemia. 2000 Jun;14(6):1136-42 [10865980.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2000 Aug 1;96(3):852-8 [10910896.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Haematol. 2000 Jun;109(4):838-41 [10929038.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Hematol. 2000 Oct;79(10):556-9 [11100745.001]
  • [Cites] J Immunother. 2001 May-Jun;24(3):272-9 [11394506.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2001 Jul 1;98(1):41-8 [11418461.001]
  • [Cites] Ther Apher. 2001 Jun;5(3):171-5 [11467752.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2001 Nov 1;98(9):2640-4 [11675332.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Haematol. 2001 Dec;115(3):575-82 [11736938.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2002 May 1;20(9):2327-33 [11981004.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2002 Oct 15;100(8):2996-3001 [12351413.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Metastasis Rev. 2003 Mar;22(1):87-93 [12716040.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 2003 Apr;30(2):110-5 [12720118.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 2003 Apr;30(2):116-20 [12720119.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 2003 Apr;30(2):121-6 [12720120.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 2003 Apr;30(2):206-10 [12720137.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2003 Nov 15;102(10):3759-64 [12881316.001]
  • [Cites] Leuk Lymphoma. 2004 Sep;45(9):1809-13 [15223640.001]
  • [Cites] Leuk Lymphoma. 2004 Oct;45(10):2047-55 [15370249.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Med Scand. 1985;217(1):133-7 [3919530.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Invest. 1991;9(1):1-7 [1901509.001]
  • [Cites] J Intern Med. 1989 Dec;226(6):443-7 [2518735.001]
  • [Cites] Q J Med. 1991 Aug;80(292):651-60 [1754669.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1993 Nov 15;82(10):3148-50 [8219203.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 1994 Mar;5(3):288-9 [7514439.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1998 Mar 15;82(6):1078-81 [9506352.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Feb;17(2):546-53 [10080598.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1999 Mar;79(7-8):1215-9 [10098762.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Haematol. 1999 Jul;63(1):35-41 [10414453.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2004 Dec 1;101(11):2593-8 [15493038.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2005 Jan;16(1):132-8 [15598950.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2005 Feb 1;103(3):582-7 [15611977.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Mar 1;23(7):1564-77 [15735132.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2005 Mar 1;11(5):1786-90 [15756000.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Lymphoma. 2005 Mar;5(4):257-60 [15794860.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 May 20;23(15):3383-9 [15908650.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Jul 20;23(21):4662-8 [16034042.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2009 Jan 1;27(1):120-6 [19047284.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2009 Jan 10;27(2):250-5 [19064987.001]
  • [Cites] Leukemia. 2009 Jan;23(1):3-9 [18971951.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 2009 Apr;43(7):587-8 [18978819.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Lymphoma Myeloma. 2009 Mar;9(1):17-8 [19362962.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Lymphoma Myeloma. 2009 Mar;9(1):50-2 [19362972.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2009 Apr 15;69(8):3579-88 [19351844.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2009 Apr 16;113(16):3673-8 [19015393.001]
  • (PMID = 20702770.001).
  • [ISSN] 1942-5546
  • [Journal-full-title] Mayo Clinic proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mayo Clin. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA083724
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
  • [Number-of-references] 72
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2931618
  •  go-up   go-down


18. Phillips GL, Abboud CN, Bernstein SH, Friedberg JW, Ifthikharuddin JJ, Lancet JE, Liesveld JL, Spreng E, Johnson V, Chapman M, Vesole DH: Phase I study for poor-prognosis lymphoma: augmentation of the "BEAM" regimen with escalating dose melphalan using amifostine cytoprotection and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation--a preliminary report. Semin Oncol; 2004 Dec;31(6 Suppl 18):59-61
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ETOPOSIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We and others have previously shown that the use of amifostine (Ethyol; MedImmune Inc, Gaithersburg, MD) can ameliorate certain regimen-related toxicities of high-dose melphalan (HD-MEL) in the autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant setting.
  • Our recent experience indicated that the maximum tolerated dose of HD-MEL plus autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant could be increased from approximately 200 mg/m2 to at least 280 mg/m2 with amifostine.
  • Nonetheless, it is unlikely that single agent therapy, regardless of dose, will be highly curative in advanced hematologic malignancy.
  • Thus, we used amifostine to permit dose escalation of HD-MEL within the BEAM (BCNU/etoposide/arabinosylcytosine/HD-MEL) combination chemotherapy regimen before autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant in selected patients with lymphoma.
  • Patient entry at the starting dose (ie, HD-MEL 140 mg/m2) has been completed without the development of severe regimen-related toxicities.
  • [MeSH-major] Amifostine / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carmustine / therapeutic use. Cytarabine / therapeutic use. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Lymphoma / therapy. Melphalan / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Cytoprotection. Humans. Middle Aged. Radiation-Protective Agents / adverse effects. Radiation-Protective Agents / therapeutic use. Transplantation, Autologous

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lymphoma.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYTARABINE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MELPHALAN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Carmustine .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. AMIFOSTINE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15726525.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiation-Protective Agents; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; M487QF2F4V / Amifostine; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan; U68WG3173Y / Carmustine; BEAM regimen
  •  go-up   go-down


19. Baden LR, Katz JT, Fishman JA, Koziol C, DelVecchio A, Doran M, Rubin RH: Salvage therapy with voriconazole for invasive fungal infections in patients failing or intolerant to standard antifungal therapy. Transplantation; 2003 Dec 15;76(11):1632-7
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Salvage therapy with voriconazole for invasive fungal infections in patients failing or intolerant to standard antifungal therapy.
  • BACKGROUND: Invasive fungal infections (IFI), particularly those caused by Aspergillus and other angioinvasive molds, are associated with an excessive mortality despite therapy.
  • METHODS: Voriconazole was prescribed on a compassionate basis to patients with IFI who were intolerant to or who had progressed despite standard therapy.
  • RESULTS: Forty-five patients were enrolled in a compassionate release program (29 [64%] because of failure of response to standard therapy), between 1998 and 2002.
  • Underlying illnesses were as follows: 13 (29%) solid-organ transplant (SOT), 11 (24%) BMT, and 7 (13%) hematologic malignancy.
  • The median duration of voriconazole therapy was 79 days with 9 (20%) patients receiving over 1 year of therapy.
  • Nine thousand one hundred twenty-eight days of therapy were given with only four serious adverse events in two cases considered possibly or probably drug related.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this population of severely immunocompromised patients with life-threatening IFI who have failed or were intolerant to standard antifungal therapy, voriconazole demonstrated substantial efficacy and an acceptable level of toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Mycoses / drug therapy. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Salvage Therapy / methods. Triazoles / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aspergillosis / drug therapy. Bone Marrow Transplantation / adverse effects. Child. Drug Resistance, Fungal. Female. Hematologic Neoplasms / complications. Humans. Immunocompromised Host. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / complications. Transplantation / adverse effects. Treatment Failure. Voriconazole

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Fungal Infections.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 14702539.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1337
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplantation
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 0 / Pyrimidines; 0 / Triazoles; JFU09I87TR / Voriconazole
  •  go-up   go-down


20. Tam CS, Khouri I: Nonmyeloablative stem cell transplantation in follicular B-cell lymphoma. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2007 Oct;2(4):225-31
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation carries the promise of long-term disease control by graft-versus-lymphoma (GVL) immunity but is associated with a 30% to 40% risk of transplant-related mortality.
  • Using this regimen, transplant-related mortality is currently 10%, and 85% of patients remain alive without disease at 3 to 4 years.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antibodies, Neoplasm / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Graft vs Tumor Effect. Humans. Immunologic Factors / administration & dosage. Immunotherapy. Lymphocyte Transfusion. Melphalan / administration & dosage. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Multicenter Studies as Topic. Rituximab. Tissue Donors. Vidarabine / administration & dosage. Vidarabine / analogs & derivatives

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Follicular Lymphoma.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MELPHALAN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. RITUXIMAB .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUDARABINE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VIDARABINE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 2005 Aug;36(3):205-13 [15937505.001]
  • [Cites] J Immunother. 2002 Nov-Dec;25(6):455-68 [12439343.001]
  • [Cites] Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2006 Dec;12(12):1326-34 [17162215.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2001 Apr 15;19(8):2153-64 [11304767.001]
  • [Cites] Haematologica. 2007 May;92(5):627-34 [17488686.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 1995 Aug;16(2):289-95 [7581150.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Haematol. 2001 Sep;114(4):800-9 [11564066.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2002 Oct 1;20(19):4022-31 [12351600.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2003 Oct 15;21(20):3744-53 [12963703.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2001 Dec 15;98(13):3595-9 [11739162.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2004 Dec 15;104(13):3865-71 [15304395.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 Jun 15;22(12):2419-23 [15197204.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Mar 20;23(9):1993-2003 [15774790.001]
  • [Cites] Leukemia. 2004 Mar;18(3):484-90 [14749699.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 1997 May;19(10):977-82 [9169641.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Haematol. 2004 Nov;127(3):311-21 [15491292.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2001 Jul 1;61(13):5137-44 [11431352.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2003 Nov 15;102(10):3521-9 [12893748.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2004 Jan 15;103(2):428-34 [12969983.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 1997 Sep 15;90(6):2188-95 [9310469.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2005 Feb 3;352(5):441-9 [15689582.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 Jul 1;22(13):2654-61 [15159414.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2003 May;14(5):737-44 [12702528.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2002 Dec 15;100(13):4310-6 [12393626.001]
  • [Cites] Exp Hematol. 2004 Jan;32(1):28-35 [14725898.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2001 Apr 15;19(8):2165-70 [11304768.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 2003 Apr;31(8):667-78 [12692607.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 1993 Oct;20(5 Suppl 5):75-88 [8211209.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1998 Aug;16(8):2817-24 [9704734.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 2003 Dec;32(12):1159-63 [14647270.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1998 Aug;16(8):2825-33 [9704735.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Biother Radiopharm. 1997 Jun;12(3):177-86 [10851464.001]
  • (PMID = 20425374.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antibodies, Neoplasm; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 3A189DH42V / alemtuzumab; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; FA2DM6879K / Vidarabine; P2K93U8740 / fludarabine; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  • [Number-of-references] 37
  •  go-up   go-down


21. Champlin R, Khouri I, Anderlini P, Gajewski J, Kornblau S, Molldrem J, Shimoni A, Ueno N, Giralt S: Nonmyeloablative preparative regimens for allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2001 May;27 Suppl 2:S13-22
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation is an effective therapy for a range of malignancies.
  • High doses of myelosuppressive chemotherapy or radiation have been used in preparative regimens with the goal of preventing graft rejection and eradicating malignancy.
  • Much of the benefit of transplantation, however, results from graft-versus-malignancy effects, mediated by donor immunocompetent cells.
  • An alternative approach is to utilize less toxic, nonmyeloablative preparative regimens to achieve engraftment and allow graft-versus-malignancy effects to develop.
  • This strategy reduces the risk of treatment-related mortality and allows transplantation for elderly or medically infirm patients not eligible for myeloablative therapy.
  • Nonmyeloablative preparative regimens appear promising in diagnoses sensitive to graft-versus-malignancy effects and provide a platform for further development of cellular immunotherapy.
  • Controlled clinical trials are warranted to define the role of nonmyeloablative allogeneic transplants in a range of hematologic malignancies and selected solid tumors.
  • [MeSH-minor] Graft vs Tumor Effect. Humans. Myeloablative Agonists / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / therapy. Transplantation, Homologous / adverse effects. Transplantation, Homologous / methods

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11436116.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Myeloablative Agonists
  • [Number-of-references] 122
  •  go-up   go-down


22. Phillips GL, Meisenberg B, Reece DE, Adams VR, Badros A, Brunner J, Fenton R, Filicko J, Grosso D, Hale GA, Howard DS, Johnson VP, Kniska A, Marshall KW, Nath R, Reed E, Rapoport AP, Takebe N, Vesole DH, Wagner JL, Flomenberg N: Amifostine and autologous hematopoietic stem cell support of escalating-dose melphalan: a phase I study. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2004 Jul;10(7):473-83
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. AMIFOSTINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Fifty-eight patients with various types of malignancy who were ineligible for higher-priority AHSCT protocols were entered on a phase I study of escalating doses of melphalan beginning at 220 mg/m(2) and advancing by 20 mg/m(2) increments in planned cohorts of 4 to 8 patients until severe regimen-related toxicity (RRT) was encountered.
  • Hematologic depression was profound, although it was rapidly and equally reversible at all melphalan doses.
  • Moreover, 38 patients were evaluable for delayed toxicity related to RRT; none was noted.
  • [MeSH-major] Amifostine / administration & dosage. Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Melphalan / administration & dosage. Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cohort Studies. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Drug Reactions.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MELPHALAN .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15205668.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-8791
  • [Journal-full-title] Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R03CA80666
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] M487QF2F4V / Amifostine; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan
  •  go-up   go-down


23. Yumura-Yagi K, Inoue M, Sakata N, Okamura T, Yasui M, Sawada A, Sato E, Chayama K, Endo C, Sasabe M, Miyamura T, Park YD, Nakano T, Inagaki J, Kishimoto T, Nomura K, Saito I, Hamada S, Nakano T, Hashii Y, Kawa K: Unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation for 100 pediatric patients: a single institute's experience. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2005 Aug;36(4):307-13
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHYLPREDNISOLONE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Of 93 evaluable patients, 73 patients had hematological malignancy, 13 had nonmalignancy and seven had lymphoproliferative disease.
  • In the following analyses of the patients with hematological malignancy, the standard group had significantly better EFS than the high-risk group (61.5+/-7.0 vs 35.6+/-9.7%, P=0.02), and the EFS rate of the tacrolimus (FK-506)+methotrexate (MTX)+/-methylprednisolone prophylactic group for graft-versus-host disease was superior to that of the FK-506 without MTX group (75.7+/-8.0 vs 55.8+/-7.6%, P=0.02).
  • When we compared the EFS rates of the FK506+MTX+/-methylprednisolone (mPSL) group and the HLA-matched related donor BMT group in our institute, these were almost similar (75.7+/-8.1 vs 68.4+/-9.3%).
  • Therefore, UD-BMT using FK-506+MTX+/-mPSL is a safe and useful method for children with hematological malignancy who require allogeneic BMT.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Transplantation / methods. Tissue Donors
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Graft Rejection / etiology. Graft vs Host Disease / chemically induced. Graft vs Host Disease / etiology. Graft vs Host Disease / prevention & control. Hematologic Diseases / complications. Hematologic Diseases / mortality. Hematologic Diseases / therapy. Humans. Infant. Japan. Male. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Methylprednisolone / therapeutic use. Premedication. Retrospective Studies. Tacrolimus / therapeutic use. Tacrolimus / toxicity

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Marrow Transplantation.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Organ Donation.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Bone Marrow Transplantation (2005) 36, 307-313.
  • (PMID = 15968285.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] WM0HAQ4WNM / Tacrolimus; X4W7ZR7023 / Methylprednisolone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  •  go-up   go-down


24. Aguilar-Guisado M, Espigado I, Cordero E, Noguer M, Parody R, Pachón J, Cisneros JM: Empirical antifungal therapy in selected patients with persistent febrile neutropenia. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2010 Jan;45(1):159-64
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Fungal Infections.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Empirical antifungal therapy in selected patients with persistent febrile neutropenia.
  • Universal empirical antifungal therapy (EAT) in patients with unexplained persistent febrile neutropenia (PFN) is the standard of care, but EAT could be applied in selected patients on the basis of clinical criteria and risk factors.
  • A prospective interventional study was carried out to analyse the incidence and related mortality of invasive fungal infection (IFI) in patients with PFN according to whether or not EAT was indicated.
  • (c) individualized clinical decision in patients at high risk.
  • Sixty-six (19%) of 347 episodes of febrile neutropenia fulfilled PFN criteria, 97% with a haematological malignancy.
  • In the group that received EAT, three patients developed IFI (11.5%), in comparison with none in the group that did not receive it (P=0.04, RR 2.7:1.9-3.8).
  • IFI-related mortality was null in the group that did not receive EAT and 8% (two of 26 patients) in the group that received EAT.
  • These data suggest that in patients with PFN, EAT in selected patients may be safe and avoid unnecessary antifungal therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Fever / drug therapy. Mycoses / drug therapy. Neutropenia / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Female. Hematologic Neoplasms / complications. Humans. Male. Prospective Studies. Sepsis / drug therapy. Shock, Septic / drug therapy

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Fever.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19525983.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5365
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Antifungal Agents
  •  go-up   go-down


25. Fox CP, Pacey S, Das-Gupta EP, Russell NH, Byrne JL: Low dose erythropoietin is effective in reducing transfusion requirements following allogeneic HSCT. Transfus Med; 2005 Dec;15(6):475-80
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Because red cell transfusion is not without complications in this setting, we sought to avoid them using recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEpo) therapy.
  • We treated 53 patients following allogeneic transplantation for haematological malignancy, using rhEpo at a dose of 10 000 units subcutaneously twice weekly.
  • The median time of commencement of rhEpo was 61 days post-transplant (range 19-465 days), and the median haemoglobin (Hb) concentration was 9.4 g dL(-1) (range 7.0-10.7 g dL(-1)).
  • Thirty patients responded to rhEpo and required no further transfusion with a median rise in Hb after 2 weeks of therapy of 1.5 g (0.7-4.1 g dL(-1)).
  • Those patients who failed to respond to rhEpo frequently had additional reasons for anaemia including cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and treatment, major ABO incompatibility, disease relapse, graft rejection or other transplant-related complications.
  • We conclude that a short course of rhEpo is an effective treatment for anaemia arising following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, and can avoid the need for transfusion in this setting.
  • [MeSH-minor] Anemia / etiology. Drug Evaluation. Female. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Hemoglobins / analysis. Humans. Male. Recombinant Proteins. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Blood Transfusion and Donation.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16359418.001).
  • [ISSN] 0958-7578
  • [Journal-full-title] Transfusion medicine (Oxford, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transfus Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hemoglobins; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin
  •  go-up   go-down


26. Schmidt-Hieber M, Fietz T, Knauf W, Uharek L, Hopfenmüller W, Thiel E, Blau IW: Efficacy of the interleukin-2 receptor antagonist basiliximab in steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease. Br J Haematol; 2005 Aug;130(4):568-74
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) occurs in up to 80% of patients who undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) and contributes significantly to transplant-related mortality (TRM).
  • The rates of infections, chronic GVHD, malignancy recurrence and 1-year TRM following immunosuppression with basiliximab were comparable with those found with other treatment modalities for aGVHD.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Graft vs Host Disease / drug therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Receptors, Interleukin-2 / antagonists & inhibitors. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Drug Tolerance. Feasibility Studies. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hematologic Neoplasms / surgery. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Steroids / therapeutic use. Transplantation Conditioning. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16098072.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Receptors, Interleukin-2; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 0 / Steroids; 0 / basiliximab
  •  go-up   go-down


27. Walshe LJ, Malak SF, Eagan J, Sepkowitz KA: Complication rates among cancer patients with peripherally inserted central catheters. J Clin Oncol; 2002 Aug 1;20(15):3276-81
ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • PURPOSE: Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are frequently used to deliver outpatient courses of intravenous therapy.
  • Our objective was to determine the incidence and risk factors of PICC-related complications with a 1-year prospective observational study.
  • Patients with hematologic malignancy or bone marrow transplant were more likely to develop a complication, whereas those with metastatic disease were less likely.
  • [MeSH-major] Catheterization, Central Venous / adverse effects. Catheterization, Peripheral / adverse effects. Neoplasms / drug therapy

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer in Children.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12149302.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement