[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 22 of about 22
3. Köbel M, Xu H, Bourne PA, Spaulding BO, Shih IeM, Mao TL, Soslow RA, Ewanowich CA, Kalloger SE, Mehl E, Lee CH, Huntsman D, Gilks CB: IGF2BP3 (IMP3) expression is a marker of unfavorable prognosis in ovarian carcinoma of clear cell subtype. Mod Pathol; 2009 Mar;22(3):469-75
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] IGF2BP3 (IMP3) expression is a marker of unfavorable prognosis in ovarian carcinoma of clear cell subtype.
  • Clear cell carcinoma is an uncommon subtype of ovarian carcinoma, accounting for 10% of cases.
  • Clear cell carcinoma typically presents with stage I or II disease, and in this setting prognostic markers could aid in management decisions, in particular the decision to treat with adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • We tested whether expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3, also known as IMP3) can serve as a new biomarker to predict outcome for patients with clear cell carcinoma and other subtypes of ovarian carcinoma.
  • We conclude that IGF2BP3 is the first biomarker of prognostic significance in ovarian clear cell carcinoma that has been validated in an independent case series.
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Gene Expression. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Middle Aged. Prognosis. RNA, Messenger / analysis. Tissue Array Analysis

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Ovarian Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19136932.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0285
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / IMP3 protein, human; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA-Binding Proteins
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. Blum KA, Johnson JL, Niedzwiecki D, Piro LD, Saven A, Peterson BA, Byrd JC, Cheson BD, Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study 9153: Prolonged follow-up after initial therapy with 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine in patients with indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma: results of Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study 9153. Cancer; 2006 Dec 15;107(12):2817-25
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CLADRIBINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prolonged follow-up after initial therapy with 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine in patients with indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma: results of Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study 9153.
  • BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and toxicity of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA) in patients with untreated, indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
  • METHODS: For this multicenter, single-arm, Phase II study, 44 patients with treatment-naive, stage III or IV, indolent NHL (International Working Formulation subtypes A, B, and C) were enrolled.
  • Patients received 0.14 mg/kg per day of 2-CdA as a 2-hour bolus infusion for 5 consecutive days every 28 days until maximal response or a total of 6 cycles.
  • Four late malignancies (prostate adenocarcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ, and myelodysplasia) and 4 patients with large cell transformation were reported.
  • CONCLUSIONS: 2-CdA is an active, well-tolerated therapy for patients with untreated, indolent NHL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cladribine / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2006 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 17120198.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA02599; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA03927; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA04326; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA04457; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA07968; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA08025; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA11789; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA12046; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16450; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA26806; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA31946; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA31983; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA33601; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA35279; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA41287; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA47555; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA47559; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA47577; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA47642; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA77597; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA77658
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 47M74X9YT5 / Cladribine
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Hatae M, Nakamura T, Ohnishi Y: [Evidenced-based medicine and future direction of Taxol]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2000 Jul;27(8):1279-87
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. TAXOL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Taxol was introduced for the clinical treatment of several solid tumor malignancies in the 1990s.
  • It has been established that primary chemotherapy based on Taxol is the standard for non-small cell lung cancer and epithelial ovarian cancer.
  • After initial chemotherapy containing doxorubicin, sequential administration of Taxol for advanced or metastatic breast cancer is recommended by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States.
  • Taxol-based chemotherapy and/or concurrent chemoradiation for head and neck cancer, esophageal carcinoma, urothelial and prostate cancer are under investigation, but these trials have not produced evidence showing that they are superior to the present standard treatment for these malignancies.
  • Although phase I/II trials of Taxol combined with new agents such as vinorelbine, topotecan, CPT-11 and others may demonstrate efficacy to a certain extent for some solid tumor malignancies, a phase III study will be required in the next stage.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Evidence-Based Medicine. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease-Free Survival. Female. Forecasting. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Signal Transduction

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Breast Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 10945027.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
  • [Number-of-references] 47
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Stephenson AJ, Bosl GJ, Bajorin DF, Stasi J, Motzer RJ, Sheinfeld J: Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection in patients with low stage testicular cancer with embryonal carcinoma predominance and/or lymphovascular invasion. J Urol; 2005 Aug;174(2):557-60; discussion 560
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection in patients with low stage testicular cancer with embryonal carcinoma predominance and/or lymphovascular invasion.
  • PURPOSE: The outcome after primary retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) was analyzed in patients with clinical stage I-IIA nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer with embryonal carcinoma predominance (ECP) or lymphovascular invasion (LVI).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1989 and 2002, 267 patients with clinical stage I-IIA nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer, and ECP and/or LVI underwent RPLND.
  • RESULTS: Overall 42% of patients had pathological stage (PS) II disease, of whom 54% had low volume (PN1) disease and 16% had retroperitoneal teratoma.
  • All patients with relapse were continuously free of disease following standard chemotherapy with or without resection of residual masses and the 10-year actuarial overall survival was 100%.
  • When adjuvant chemotherapy was restricted to patients with PN2 disease, the estimated 5-year relapse rate was 9% and an estimated 72% of patients avoided chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The low risk of systemic relapse in patients with PS I and PN1 after RPLND alone combined with the 16% incidence of retroperitoneal teratoma and the favorable morbidity profile supports RPLND over primary chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with low stage disease with ECP and/or LVI who are not candidates for surveillance.
  • An estimated 72% of patients are spared the potential toxicity of chemotherapy if adjuvant therapy is restricted to patients with PN2.
  • After primary RPLND and selective adjuvant chemotherapy late recurrence is distinctly uncommon and long-term cancer control is anticipated in essentially all patients.
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Disease Progression. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Retroperitoneal Space

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Embryonal Carcinoma.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Testicular cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Testicular Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] Aktuelle Urol. 2007 Jan;38(1):1-2 [17290323.001]
  • (PMID = 16006891.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 32-CA82088
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Fair WR, Betancourt JE: Update on Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center studies of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Mol Urol; 2000;4(3):241-8;discussion 249-50
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Update on Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center studies of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy for prostate cancer.
  • PURPOSE: We report the results of surgery in 520 patients with clinically localized carcinoma of the prostate (CaP) who received preoperative neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) for 3 to 11(+) months.
  • METHODS: The results in the NHT patients were compared with those in 1,413 men having surgery without NHT at our institution during the same time period.
  • RESULTS: The overall disease-free survival (DFS) rate (serum prostate specific antigen [PSA] concentration < or = 0.2 ng/mL) was 75% at 5 years and 50% at 10 years.
  • At a median survival of 35 months (mean 41 months) in 201 men with an initial PSA > or = 10 ng/mL, 70% had an undetectable PSA concentration at 5 years compared with 72% at the same time point in men presenting with PSA <10 ng/mL.
  • Patients presenting with stage T(1) disease had a significantly better DFS than those with either T(2) or T(3) CaP.
  • However, within each stage, the addition of NHT to surgery did not result in a higher DFS rate.
  • The 5- and 10-year DFS rates for stage T(1) were 80% and 64%, for T2 disease 78% and 50%, and for T3 disease 67% and 50%.
  • There was a statistically significant difference (P < or = 0.003) in survival between stage T(1) and stage T(2) disease, but no significant difference in DFS was noted in patients presenting with stage T(2) compared with T3 cancer (P = 0.431).
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy. Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic. Disease-Free Survival. Flutamide / therapeutic use. Follow-Up Studies. Goserelin / therapeutic use. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatectomy. Time Factors

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Prostate cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. GOSERELIN .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11062380.001).
  • [ISSN] 1091-5362
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0F65R8P09N / Goserelin; 76W6J0943E / Flutamide; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
  •  go-up   go-down


8. Stephenson AJ, Sheinfeld J: Management of patients with low-stage nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer. Curr Treat Options Oncol; 2005 Sep;6(5):367-77
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Testicular Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of patients with low-stage nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer.
  • Management options for patients with clinical stage (CS) I nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer (NSGCT) include surveillance, retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), or two cycles of bleomycin-etoposide-cisplatin (BEP x 2) chemotherapy.
  • The optimal management of these patients is controversial, as cure rates of 97% or greater are reported with each of these treatment modalities.
  • Patients without evidence of lymphovascular invasion, a predominant component of embryonal carcinoma, or advanced pathologic (p) T stage (pT 2 or greater) are at low risk for occult metastases and are optimal candidates for surveillance.
  • Compliance with diagnostic testing and imaging is essential for a successful surveillance strategy to detect and treat metastases at an early stage.
  • For patients who are not candidates for surveillance, RPLND offers several advantages over chemotherapy.
  • RPLND alone is curative in 50% to 80% of CS I patients with pathologic stage (PS) II, and an estimated 75% of CS I patients avoid chemotherapy (as adjuvant therapy or for treatment of relapse).
  • Virtually all patients are cured following two cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy for PS II disease, which is reserved for patients with high-volume (PN2-3) retroperitoneal disease.
  • The poor outcome of patients with late retroperitoneal recurrence from unresected, chemorefractory germ cell testicular cancer indicates that RPLND is a vital component to the long-term cure of patients with NSGCT.
  • Approximately 20% to 30% of patients with PS II disease have retroperitoneal teratoma (which is chemoresistant), and an estimated 5% of PS II patients have chemoresistant viable cancer following BEP x 2 as primary therapy.
  • Patients who relapse after RPLND are "chemotherapy-naïve" and cured in virtually all cases with good-risk chemotherapy regimens.
  • When nerve-sparing techniques are employed to preserve ejaculation, RPLND is also associated with a more favorable long-term toxicity profile compared with chemotherapy.
  • In the absence of conclusive evidence from a randomized trial, we believe RPLND is the treatment of choice for patients with CS I NSGCT who are not candidates for surveillance, as it offers the greatest likelihood of long-term cure with considerably less morbidity than primary chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / surgery. Testicular Neoplasms / drug therapy. Testicular Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Laparoscopy. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Testicular cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1988 Jun;139(6):1220-4 [2836633.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2002 Aug;60(2):339-43; discussion 343 [12137839.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2000 Jun;163(6):1793-6 [10799184.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 Feb 1;22(3):464-7 [14752068.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2000 Mar;36(4):472-5 [10717522.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1998 Sep 1;83(5):1002-11 [9731905.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1995 May;13(5):1170-6 [7537800.001]
  • [Cites] Urol Clin North Am. 1990 May;17(2):449-56 [2336749.001]
  • [Cites] Urol Clin North Am. 1998 Aug;25(3):461-8 [9728215.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2004 Mar;63(3):556-61 [15028457.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1982 Aug 1;50(3):548-51 [6284333.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2000 Jun;163(6):1721-4 [10799168.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Apr 20;23(12):2781-8 [15837993.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1994 Aug;152(2 Pt 1):424-7 [8015086.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1988 Dec;140(6):1437-41 [2848138.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1987 Aug 8;2(8554):294-8 [2886764.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1999 Dec;54(6):1064-7 [10604709.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1998 Mar;159(3):855-8 [9474168.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1986 Mar;135(3):497-9 [3944893.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1996 Apr;14(4):1106-13 [8648364.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1993 Jan 6;85(1):60-2 [7677936.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2003 Apr 15;21(8):1513-23 [12697875.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1994 Jul;44(1):2-14 [7518979.001]
  • [Cites] APMIS. 2003 Jan;111(1):76-83; discussion 83-5 [12752240.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1992 Apr;10(4):564-8 [1312585.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1995 May;13(5):1188-94 [7537802.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Surg Oncol. 1999 Dec;17(4):275-81 [10588857.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1991 Jun;145(6):1178-83; discussion 1182-3 [1851890.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2004 Jan;63(1):144-8; discussion 148-9 [14751368.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1994 Oct;44(4):548-52 [7941194.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2003 Apr 15;21(8):1505-12 [12697874.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2003 Jan 1;21(1):113-22 [12506179.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1995 Nov;154(5):1759-63 [7563341.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2000 Apr;18(8):1725-32 [10764433.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1990 Nov;144(5):1160-3 [2172569.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 1995 Sep;31A(10):1599-604 [7488408.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2005 Aug;174(2):557-60; discussion 560 [16006891.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1987 Dec;138(6):1393-6 [2824862.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1998 Sep;160(3 Pt 1):768-71 [9720544.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2004 Mar;63(3):550-5 [15028456.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Surg Oncol. 2003 Mar;10(2):100-1 [12620901.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1993 Apr;11(4):598-606 [8386751.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1982 Oct 15;50(8):1629-35 [6288220.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1982 Aug;128(2):315-20 [7109099.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1992 May;10(5):760-5 [1285740.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1995 Nov;72(5):1303-6 [7577487.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1998 Jan;159(1):133-8 [9400455.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1983 Mar;1(3):171-8 [6668498.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2001 Mar;37(5):576-82 [11290432.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2004 Jan;171(1):172-6 [14665870.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1992 Nov;10(11):1762-8 [1403057.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2003 Aug;62(2):324-7 [12893344.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1993 Feb;149(2):237-43 [8381190.001]
  • [Cites] AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1997 Aug;169(2):521-5 [9242768.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1984 Apr;131(4):677-80 [6200611.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1999 Apr;161(4):1148-52 [10081858.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2003 Oct;170(4 Pt 1):1159-62 [14501715.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1996 Jun;155(6):1943-5 [8618293.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 1992 Apr;19(2):128-42 [1313191.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1987 Dec 3;317(23):1433-8 [2446132.001]
  • [Cites] Urol Clin North Am. 2001 Feb;28(1):107-14 [11277054.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1996 Feb;14(2):441-8 [8636755.001]
  • (PMID = 16107240.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-2729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current treatment options in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Treat Options Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 68
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Dreicer R, Magi-Galluzzi C, Zhou M, Rothaermel J, Reuther A, Ulchaker J, Zippe C, Fergany A, Klein EA: Phase II trial of neoadjuvant docetaxel before radical prostatectomy for locally advanced prostate cancer. Urology; 2004 Jun;63(6):1138-42
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II trial of neoadjuvant docetaxel before radical prostatectomy for locally advanced prostate cancer.
  • OBJECTIVES: To perform a Phase II trial of docetaxel administered on a weekly schedule for 6 weeks before radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer.
  • METHODS: Treatment consisted of six doses of docetaxel 40 mg/m(2) intravenously administered weekly for 6 weeks followed by RP.
  • Eligibility criteria included clinical Stage T2b, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level 15 ng/mL or greater or Gleason sum 8 or greater, and no evidence of metastatic disease.
  • The primary endpoint was feasibility and drug-related and surgical-related toxicities.
  • Secondary endpoints included pre-RP PSA level, local response, pathologic outcomes, and time to PSA failure.
  • RESULTS: Twenty-nine patients were entered; 80% completed all 6 weeks of therapy and 97% underwent RP.
  • The median PSA level was 12 ng/mL (range 2.5 to 43.3), the median Gleason sum was 8 (range 6 to 9), and all had Stage T2b or greater disease.
  • Pathologic analysis demonstrated residual carcinoma in all cases.
  • At a median follow-up of 23 months (range 1.5 to 36), 20 patients were disease free with no additional therapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This trial establishes the baseline effect of short-course high-dose docetaxel alone on locally advanced prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy. Taxoids / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Male. Middle Aged. Premedication. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Prostate cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOCETAXEL .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DEXAMETHASONE .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15183967.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Nagata M, Ueda T, Komiya A, Suzuki H, Akakura K, Ishihara M, Tobe T, Ichikawa T, Igarashi T, Ito H: Treatment and prognosis of patients with paraplegia or quadriplegia because of metastatic spinal cord compression in prostate cancer. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis; 2003;6(2):169-73
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment and prognosis of patients with paraplegia or quadriplegia because of metastatic spinal cord compression in prostate cancer.
  • Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is a serious complication of metastatic prostate cancer (PCa).
  • Characteristics, treatment efficacy, and prognosis of these patients were analyzed.
  • In total, 15 cases became paraplegic despite androgen ablation therapy (Group I).
  • Average time to paraplegia from initial hormonal treatment was 34 months.
  • Out of nine cases who underwent radiation therapy (RT) to spinal lesions with/without chemotherapy, one patient became ambulatory.
  • MSCC was the first indication of PCa in 11 cases (Group II).
  • Two cases underwent laminectomy plus hormone therapy and nine cases underwent hormone therapy alone.
  • Average interval from paraplegia to death was 7.4 months in Group I and 27.1 months in Group II.
  • However, there was no statistical difference in these two groups on disease-specific survival from the start of initial treatment.
  • It is difficult to recover the ability to walk if paraplegia or quadriplegia occurs in PCa patients although decompression surgery plus hormone therapy seemed to impair the prognosis.
  • Stage M1 patients with paraplegia had survival rates as good as stage M1 patients without paralysis.
  • This should encourage an aggressive treatment approach.
  • However, for patients with hormone-independent disease there seems to be no effective treatment and prognosis is poor.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / complications. Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Bone Neoplasms / complications. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / complications. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Paraplegia / etiology. Paraplegia / rehabilitation. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Quadriplegia / etiology. Quadriplegia / rehabilitation. Spinal Cord Compression / complications. Spinal Cord Compression / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Androgen Antagonists / therapeutic use. Decompression, Surgical. Humans. Laminectomy. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Recurrence. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome


11. Pilepich MV, Winter K, Lawton CA, Krisch RE, Wolkov HB, Movsas B, Hug EB, Asbell SO, Grignon D: Androgen suppression adjuvant to definitive radiotherapy in prostate carcinoma--long-term results of phase III RTOG 85-31. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2005 Apr 1;61(5):1285-90
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. GOSERELIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Androgen suppression adjuvant to definitive radiotherapy in prostate carcinoma--long-term results of phase III RTOG 85-31.
  • PURPOSE: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 85-31 was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of adjuvant androgen suppression, using goserelin, in unfavorable prognosis carcinoma of the prostate treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT).
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Eligible patients were those with palpable primary tumor extending beyond the prostate (clinical Stage T3) or those with regional lymphatic involvement.
  • Patients who had undergone prostatectomy were eligible if penetration through the prostatic capsule to the margin of resection and/or seminal vesicle involvement was documented histologically.
  • The patients were randomized to either RT and adjuvant goserelin (Arm I) or RT alone followed by observation and application of goserelin at relapse (Arm II).
  • In Arm I, the drug was to be started during the last week of RT and was to be continued indefinitely or until signs of progression.
  • RESULTS: Between 1987 and 1992, when the study was closed, 977 patients were entered: 488 to Arm I and 489 to Arm II.
  • CONCLUSION: In a population of patients with unfavorable prognosis carcinoma of the prostate, androgen suppression applied as an adjuvant after definitive RT was associated not only with a reduction in disease progression but in a statistically significant improvement in absolute survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Goserelin / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Androgen Antagonists. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Male. Multivariate Analysis. Prostatectomy. Survival Rate

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] Nat Clin Pract Urol. 2005 Nov;2(11):536-7 [16474596.001]
  • (PMID = 15817329.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-21661; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-32115
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgen Antagonists; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0F65R8P09N / Goserelin
  •  go-up   go-down


12. Pedersen MØ, Larsen A, Stoltenberg M, Penkowa M: The role of metallothionein in oncogenesis and cancer prognosis. Prog Histochem Cytochem; 2009;44(1):29-64
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of metallothionein in oncogenesis and cancer prognosis.
  • The antiapoptotic, antioxidant, proliferative, and angiogenic effects of metallothionein (MT)-I+II has resulted in increased focus on their role in oncogenesis, tumor progression, therapy response, and patient prognosis.
  • Studies have reported increased expression of MT-I+II mRNA and protein in various human cancers; such as breast, kidney, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, urinary bladder, cervical, endometrial, skin carcinoma, melanoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and pancreatic cancers, where MT-I+II expression is sometimes correlated to higher tumor grade/stage, chemotherapy/radiation resistance, and poor prognosis.
  • However, MT-I+II are downregulated in other types of tumors (e.g. hepatocellular, gastric, colorectal, central nervous system (CNS), and thyroid cancers) where MT-I+II is either inversely correlated or unrelated to mortality.
  • Large discrepancies exist between different tumor types, and no distinct and reliable association exists between MT-I+II expression in tumor tissues and prognosis and therapy resistance.
  • Furthermore, a parallel has been drawn between MT-I+II expression as a potential marker for prognosis, and MT-I+II's role as oncogenic factors, without any direct evidence supporting such a parallel.
  • This review aims at discussing the role of MT-I+II both as a prognostic marker for survival and therapy response, as well as for the hypothesized role of MT-I+II as causal oncogenes.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19348910.001).
  • [ISSN] 0079-6336
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in histochemistry and cytochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Histochem Cytochem
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 9038-94-2 / Metallothionein
  • [Number-of-references] 203
  •  go-up   go-down


13. Gilks CB, Ionescu DN, Kalloger SE, Köbel M, Irving J, Clarke B, Santos J, Le N, Moravan V, Swenerton K, Cheryl Brown Ovarian Cancer Outcomes Unit of the British Columbia Cancer Agency: Tumor cell type can be reproducibly diagnosed and is of independent prognostic significance in patients with maximally debulked ovarian carcinoma. Hum Pathol; 2008 Aug;39(8):1239-51
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tumor cell type can be reproducibly diagnosed and is of independent prognostic significance in patients with maximally debulked ovarian carcinoma.
  • Ovarian surface epithelial carcinomas are routinely subclassified by pathologists based on tumor cell type and grade.
  • It is controversial whether cell type or grade is superior in predicting patient response to treatment or survival, in patients stratified by stage of disease.
  • The aim of this study was to uniformly apply updated criteria for cell-type and grade assignment to a series of 575 cases of ovarian surface epithelial carcinoma.
  • In 50 cases, 2 additional pathologists reviewed the slides independently to determine interobserver variation in assessment of cell type and grade.
  • The distribution of tumor stage was as follows: stage I--233 cases, stage II--246 cases, stage III--96 cases.
  • The most common cell type encountered was serous carcinoma (229/575, 40%), followed by clear cell (149/575, 26%), endometrioid (139/575, 24%), and mucinous (36/575, 6%).
  • Serous carcinomas were significantly more likely to present with advanced stage disease (76/229 [33.2%] were stage III, and 82% of all stage III tumors were serous), whereas all nonserous cell types were stage I or II at diagnosis in greater than 90% of cases.
  • In multivariate analysis, stage was the most powerful prognostic indicator (P < .0001), followed by tumor cell type (P = .015), but grade was not of independent significance.
  • Interobserver variation in assignment of cell type was very good (kappa = 0.77) with moderate reproducibility in assignment of Silverberg grade (kappa = 0.40) and minimal reproducibility in assignment of FIGO grade (kappa = 0.27).
  • Thus, in this series of cases of ovarian surface epithelial carcinomas with no macroscopic residual disease after primary debulking surgery, assignment of tumor cell type was both more reproducible and provided superior prognostic information compared with assignment of tumor grade.
  • As tumor cell type also correlates with underlying molecular abnormalities and may predict response to chemotherapy, this suggests that tumor cell type could be used to guide treatment decisions for patients with ovarian surface epithelial carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / pathology. Ovarian Neoplasms / pathology

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Ovarian Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18602670.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8392
  • [Journal-full-title] Human pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / WT1 Proteins
  •  go-up   go-down


14. Fusi A, Procopio G, Della Torre S, Ricotta R, Bianchini G, Salvioni R, Ferrari L, Martinetti A, Savelli G, Villa S, Bajetta E: Treatment options in hormone-refractory metastatic prostate carcinoma. Tumori; 2004 Nov-Dec;90(6):535-46
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment options in hormone-refractory metastatic prostate carcinoma.
  • Prostate cancer represents one of the most important health problems in industrialized countries.
  • It is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States.
  • Therapeutic options are different according to the stage of the disease at the diagnosis.
  • Patients with localized disease may be treated with surgery or radiation, whereas the treatment for patients with a metastatic disease is purely palliative.
  • Hormonal treatment represents the standard therapy for stage IV prostate cancer, but patients ultimately become unresponsive to androgen ablation and are classified as hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients.
  • The important thing is that we understand these mechanisms to define potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients.
  • Conventional options for patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer include secondary hormone therapy, radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy.
  • Therefore, there is no standard therapy for these patients, thus we need new approaches which should be studied in clinical trials.
  • The evaluation and incorporation of new agents into current treatment regimens could have a role in the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer, but their efficacy has not yet been demonstrated.
  • [MeSH-major] Androgen Antagonists / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Receptors, Androgen / drug effects. Receptors, Androgen / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Estramustine / therapeutic use. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Male. Mitoxantrone / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Staging. Palliative Care. Survival Analysis. Taxoids / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NOVANTRONE .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15762353.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8916
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumori
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumori
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgen Antagonists; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Receptors, Androgen; 0 / Taxoids; 35LT29625A / Estramustine; BZ114NVM5P / Mitoxantrone
  • [Number-of-references] 120
  •  go-up   go-down


15. Startsev V, Pouline I: Adjuvant therapy in different risk-groups of patients with superficial bladder cancer. Arch Ital Urol Androl; 2005 Jun;77(2):93-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. THIO-TEPA .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adjuvant therapy in different risk-groups of patients with superficial bladder cancer.
  • OBJECTIVES: We assessed and compared the outcomes of two different courses of adjuvant therapy to patients with superficial bladder TCC.
  • METHODS: The study included 142 patients (28 women and 114 men with a median age of 58.5 years) with newly diagnosed bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), who underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) between October 2002 and October 2003.
  • In 26 (18.3%) patients with considerably enlarged prostate and LUTS we simultaneously performed TURBT and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP).
  • Pathological findings showed pTa stage in 20 (14.1%), pT1G1-2 in 99 (69.7%), pT1G3 in 15 (10.6%) and pTis in 3 (2.1%) cases; we additionally examined prostate specimens after TURP.
  • The main criteria for adjuvant treatment were: grade, number and location of the tumor in the bladder The group of patients (group A) with G3 and multicentric lesions, localized at the lower third of the bladder, underwent BCG-therapy according the conventional schedule (60 patients, 42.3%).
  • In group B (82 patients, 57.7%) patients underwent local chemotherapy (Thiotepa 80 mg p/week or Doxorubicin 50 mg p/week), started within 24 hours after operation.
  • A second-look TURBT was performed within 6 weeks of treatment course in both groups.
  • Adjuvant therapy was continued in all patients, except four patients with G3 and two patients with T2 stage who underwent more aggressive treatment (4 cystectomies and 2 external beam radiotherapy).
  • We switched 16 patients in group B with recurrent cancer to BCG treatment.
  • Nobody of TURP-operated patients had recurrence in the distal part of urethra, and toxicity level of TURP-operated patients was not worse than in the whole patients cohort (not more than grade II).
  • CONCLUSION: BCG adjuvant therapy demonstrated good results in the treatment of the recurrence of superficial TCC.
  • However, in patients with low recurrence risk we used chemotherapy successfully.
  • Patients with T1G3 tumors, being at high risk of residual, or even invasive, cancer, could be offered definitive therapy within a 1-year period.
  • Patients who underwent simultaneous TURP for relief of LUTS did not show cancer recurrences in the operated area or an higher toxicity of adjuvant treatment.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Bladder cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16146269.001).
  • [ISSN] 1124-3562
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivio italiano di urologia, andrologia : organo ufficiale [di] Societa italiana di ecografia urologica e nefrologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Ital Urol Androl
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / BCG Vaccine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 905Z5W3GKH / Thiotepa
  •  go-up   go-down


16. Chang SS, Reuter VE, Heston WD, Hutchinson B, Grauer LS, Gaudin PB: Short term neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy does not affect prostate specific membrane antigen expression in prostate tissues. Cancer; 2000 Jan 15;88(2):407-15
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Short term neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy does not affect prostate specific membrane antigen expression in prostate tissues.
  • BACKGROUND: Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a transmembrane glycoprotein highly expressed in benign prostate secretory-acinar epithelium and prostate carcinoma.
  • The results of several studies suggest that PSMA expression is increased in prostate carcinoma cell lines subjected to androgen deprivation and in androgen-independent tumors.
  • The authors studied the effects of short term (3-month) androgen deprivation on PSMA expression in prostate carcinoma specimens using two anti-PSMA monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 7E11 and PM2J004.5.
  • METHODS: The study included patients with clinically localized prostate carcinoma who were prospectively randomized into 1 of 2 treatment groups: 3 months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy followed by radical prostatectomy (ADT/RP), or radical prostatectomy (RP) alone.
  • Representative formalin fixed, paraffin embedded prostate sections were immunostained with the anti-PSMA mAbs 7E11 and PM2J004.5 by the streptavidin-biotin method.
  • The authors recorded the staining intensity and the percentage of positive cells stained in benign epithelium, high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and prostate carcinoma.
  • They compared the results of 7E11 with those of PM2J004.5 in benign epithelium, high grade prostate, and carcinoma and also compared the results between the two treatment groups (ADT/RP vs. RP alone).
  • RESULTS: Both anti-PSMA mAbs stained benign secretory-acinar epithelium, high grade PIN, and prostate carcinoma.
  • In both treatment groups, PM2J004.5 reacted with a significantly greater percentage of cells (P < 0.001) and with significantly greater intensity (P < 0.001) compared with 7E11 in benign epithelium and prostate carcinoma.
  • With both anti-PSMA mAbs, the percentage of cells stained and the intensity of staining in high grade PIN was similar to that in prostate carcinoma.
  • In the group that received RP alone, the percentage of cells stained and the intensity of staining with 7E11 were significantly greater in high grade PIN and prostate carcinoma compared with benign epithelium (P < 0.001), and the intensity of staining with the PM2J004.5 was significantly greater in high grade PIN and prostate carcinoma compared with benign epithelium (P < 0.001).
  • In the ADT/RP group, the percentage of cells stained and the intensity of staining with 7E11 and PM2J004.5 were significantly greater in prostate carcinoma compared with benign epithelium (P < 0.006).
  • PSMA staining did not correlate with either Gleason score (in the group that received RP alone) or pathologic stage (in both the RP-alone and ADT/RP groups) and did not differ between the two treatment groups.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Short term neoadjuvant ADT does not affect PSMA expression in benign prostate secretory-acinar epithelium, high grade PIN, or prostate carcinoma.
  • Prostate carcinoma and high grade PIN express significantly higher levels of PSMA than benign prostate secretory-acinar epithelium.
  • Compared with 7E11, the PM2J004.5 anti-PSMA mAb is a more sensitive immunohistochemical marker of prostate carcinoma in formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Androgen Antagonists / pharmacology. Antigens, Surface. Carboxypeptidases / biosynthesis. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antibodies, Monoclonal. Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Prostatectomy. Sensitivity and Specificity

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 10640975.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK 47650
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgen Antagonists; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, Surface; EC 3.4.- / Carboxypeptidases; EC 3.4.17.21 / Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II; EC 3.4.17.21 / glutamate carboxypeptidase II, human
  •  go-up   go-down


17. Powell IJ, Tangen CM, Miller GJ, Lowe BA, Haas G, Carroll PR, Osswald MB, DeVERE WHITE R, Thompson IM Jr, Crawford ED: Neoadjuvant therapy before radical prostatectomy for clinical T3/T4 carcinoma of the prostate: 5-year followup, Phase II Southwest Oncology Group Study 9109. J Urol; 2002 Nov;168(5):2016-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. GOSERELIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Neoadjuvant therapy before radical prostatectomy for clinical T3/T4 carcinoma of the prostate: 5-year followup, Phase II Southwest Oncology Group Study 9109.
  • PURPOSE: Several investigators have examined the role of hormonal therapy before definitive local therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer to improve outcome.
  • We evaluated the resectability rate and clinical response rate to 16 weeks of total androgen blockage therapy for clinically locally prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy, and progression-free survival in this multi-institutional study.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Southwest Oncology Group 9109 was a phase II feasibility study designed to treat patients with clinical stage C prostate cancer (T3, T4, N0 and M0).
  • Cases were classified by stage T3 versus T4 and bulky (greater than 4 cm.) versus nonbulky (or less 4 cm.) disease.
  • There were 2 protocol deviations and these patients refused to undergo prostatectomy after hormonal therapy.
  • Four patients went off protocol treatment because they were not considered surgical candidates.
  • Clinical stage at diagnosis was T3 in 97% and T4 in 3% of cases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy followed by radical prostatectomy is reasonable and appropriate for clinical stage T3 prostate cancer.
  • A progression-free and overall 5-year survival of 70% and 90%, respectively, compares favorably to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group neoadjuvant trial outcomes for this stage of prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / administration & dosage. Flutamide / administration & dosage. Goserelin / administration & dosage. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Feasibility Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Survival Rate

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12394698.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / 76447; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA04919; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA13612; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA14028; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16385; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA20319; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA22433; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA32102; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA35090; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA35176; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA35178; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA38926; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA42777; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA46113; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA46441; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA58348; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA76132
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0F65R8P09N / Goserelin; 76W6J0943E / Flutamide
  •  go-up   go-down


19. Chen JQ, Litton J, Xiao L, Zhang HZ, Warneke CL, Wu Y, Shen X, Wu S, Sahin A, Katz R, Bondy M, Hortobagyi G, Berinstein NL, Murray JL, Radvanyi L: Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis and prognostic significance of TRPS-1, a new GATA transcription factor family member, in breast cancer. Horm Cancer; 2010 Feb;1(1):21-33
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis and prognostic significance of TRPS-1, a new GATA transcription factor family member, in breast cancer.
  • Previously, using a gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry (IHC) screen, we identified TRPS-1 as a highly prevalent gene in breast cancer (BC), expressed in >90% of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)(+) and ERα(-) BC subtypes.
  • TRPS-1 was also shown to be expressed in prostate cancer where it was shown to play a proapoptotic function during androgen withdrawal possibly through regulating antioxidant metabolism.
  • In this study, we developed a new quantitative IHC (qIHC) method to further study TRPS-1 as a marker and possible prognostic indicator in BC.
  • By using this method, a quantitative parameter for TRPS-1 expression called a quick score (QS) was derived from the measured labeling index and mean optical density after IHC and applied to a set of 152 stage II/III BC patients from 1993 to 2006 who did not receive preoperative chemotherapy.
  • Further analysis of different ductal structures in ten BC cases revealed that TRPS-1 expression was expressed at low levels in the remaining normal ducts and in areas of usual ductal hyperplasia but showed marked increase in expression in ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma lesions in the tissue.
  • An analysis of TRPS-1 expression in association with overall survival in the 152 stage II/III sample set also revealed that TRPS-1 QS (≥4.0) was significantly associated with improved survival (p = 0.0165).
  • Patients with TRPS-1 QS <4 had a hazard ratio of 2 (p = 0.019) after univariate Cox proportional hazards analysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Breast Neoplasms / genetics. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / genetics. DNA-Binding Proteins / analysis. Gene Expression Profiling / methods. Immunohistochemistry / methods. Transcription Factors / analysis

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Breast Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Breast Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 May;17(5):1474-81 [10334533.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Aug 2;102(31):11005-10 [16043716.001]
  • [Cites] J Am Coll Surg. 2005 May;200(5):705-10 [15848360.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Hum Genet. 2001 Jan;68(1):81-91 [11112658.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Pathol. 1982 Dec;78(6):806-16 [7148748.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2007 Jan 1;25(1):118-45 [17159189.001]
  • [Cites] Biochim Biophys Acta. 2007 May;1774(5):575-82 [17467349.001]
  • [Cites] Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2003 Dec 19;312(3):578-84 [14680804.001]
  • [Cites] Hum Pathol. 2009 Apr;40(4):489-95 [19084267.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Cell Biol. 2002 Dec;22(24):8592-600 [12446778.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2004 Mar 8;90(5):1041-6 [14997205.001]
  • [Cites] Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1957 Jul;105(1):97-102 [13442910.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Genet. 2000 Jan;24(1):71-4 [10615131.001]
  • [Cites] Endocr Relat Cancer. 2004 Dec;11(4):815-22 [15613454.001]
  • [Cites] Nature. 2007 Feb 15;445(7129):724-6 [17301782.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Pathol. 2009 Jan;62(1):6-12 [18794199.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1999 Apr 20;84(2):122-8 [10096242.001]
  • [Cites] Apoptosis. 2002 Feb;7(1):13-21 [11773701.001]
  • [Cites] Histopathology. 2008 Sep;53(3):346-7 [18631198.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Cell Biol. 2007 Feb;9(2):201-9 [17187062.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Biochem. 2002 Dec;269(23):5885-92 [12444977.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2001 Jun;7(6):1669-75 [11410505.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Cell Biol. 2007 Feb;9(2):135-6 [17268476.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Hum Genet. 2004 Feb;12(2):121-6 [14560312.001]
  • (PMID = 21761348.001).
  • [ISSN] 1868-8500
  • [Journal-full-title] Hormones & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Horm Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / TRPS1 protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factors
  •  go-up   go-down


20. Dozić J, Bogdanović J: [Current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to invasive bladder cancer]. Med Pregl; 2005 Sep-Oct;58(9-10):465-71
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to invasive bladder cancer].
  • INTRODUCTION: Bladder cancer is the second most common urological cancer (after prostate cancer, and before kidney and testicular tumors).
  • After setting a diagnosis for bladder cancer, transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), 25% of pts have extravesical spread of the disease, and almost 50% dies in the follow-up period and after radical surgical procedures.
  • T2 stage is underestimated in 40-50% of cases, whereas lymph nodes are positive in 10% of cases in T1 stage of the disease.
  • The aim of this study was to present modern diagnostic-therapeutic procedures, which are being used in multimodal treatment of invasive bladder tumors (surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy), indications for their use, and treatment outcome in regard to the stage of the disease.
  • PATHOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS: Pathological diagnosis is a key factor for correct and on-time treatment.
  • TREATMENT OF BLADDER CANCER: Treatment of bladder tumors is multimodal, multidisciplinary and includes surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • In regard to indications and established protocols, surgery is partial, simple or radical cystectomy, followed by different types of urine derivation (wet stoma--Bricker's ileal conduit, dry stoma--Kock pouch, ureterosigmoidostomy--Mainz pouch II, or orthotopic ileal bladder substitution).
  • The use of new operative procedures can be done only during the early stage of the disease.
  • CONCLUSION: Using new diagnostic equipment, up-to date therapeutic procedures, bladder cancer becomes a curable disease (depending on the stage of the disease) with high survival rate and better quality of life.
  • [MeSH-major] Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / diagnosis. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / therapy


21. Santen RJ, Petroni GR, Fisch MJ, Myers CE, Theodorescu D, Cohen RB: Use of the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate carcinoma. Cancer; 2001 Oct 15;92(8):2095-101
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Use of the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Men with prostate carcinoma initially respond to therapies designed to inhibit androgen secretion or block its action.
  • Later, the tumors in these patients become refractory to androgen-related therapies.
  • Reports of androgen receptor mutations and historic clinical observations raised the hypothesis that estrogens might be involved in the proliferation of androgen-refractory prostate carcinoma.
  • METHODS: To explore this hypothesis, 14 men with advanced prostate carcinoma that was refractory to medical or surgical orchiectomy and antiandrogens were entered into a clinical Phase II trial involving suppression of estrogens.
  • Follow-up included serial determinations of prostate specific antigen (PSA), measurements of evaluable lesions, and assessment of intensity of pain.
  • Minimal improvement of bone pain was reported in two patients receiving intensive analgesic medication.
  • CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that the dependence of androgen-insensitive prostate carcinoma on estrogens for proliferation is uncommon and that aromatase inhibitors may not have a place in the treatment of prostate carcinoma at this stage of the disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Aromatase Inhibitors. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Nitriles / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Triazoles / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pain Measurement. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ANASTROZOLE .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 11596025.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Aromatase Inhibitors; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Nitriles; 0 / Triazoles; 2Z07MYW1AZ / anastrozole; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
  •  go-up   go-down


22. Prezioso D, Lotti T, Polito M, Montironi R: Neoadjuvant hormone treatment with leuprolide acetate depot 3.75 mg and cyproterone acetate, before radical prostatectomy: a randomized study. Urol Int; 2004;72(3):189-95
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Neoadjuvant hormone treatment with leuprolide acetate depot 3.75 mg and cyproterone acetate, before radical prostatectomy: a randomized study.
  • OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of neoadjuvant hormone treatment before radical prostatectomy on: tumor/prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and testosterone levels, surgical margin status and tumor stage, and the ease of surgery following treatment.
  • METHODS: Patients with clinically localized prostatic carcinoma were randomized to receive leuprolide acetate depot 3.75 mg once a month for 3 months and cyproterone acetate 300 mg once a week for 3 weeks prior to surgery (group A).
  • In group A, 31% of patients had a reduction in tumor/prostate volume following hormone therapy.
  • There was little difference between the 2 study groups for the other surgical parameters assessed (ease of dissection, duration of surgery, blood loss).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Neoadjuvant hormone therapy before radical prostatectomy has some effects in the treatment of prostate cancer.
  • However, long-term follow-up of patients is needed to assess the impact of this therapy on morbidity and mortality.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / administration & dosage. Cyproterone Acetate / administration & dosage. Leuprolide / administration & dosage. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Delayed-Action Preparations. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Preoperative Care. Prostatectomy

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYPROTERONE ACETATE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LEUPROLIDE .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 15084760.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-1138
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologia internationalis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 4KM2BN5JHF / Cyproterone Acetate; EFY6W0M8TG / Leuprolide
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement