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1. Somlo G, Doroshow JH, Synold T, Longmate J, Reardon D, Chow W, Forman SJ, Leong LA, Margolin KA, Morgan RJ Jr, Raschko JW, Shibata SI, Tetef ML, Yen Y, Kogut N, Schriber J, Alvarnas J: High-dose paclitaxel in combination with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and peripheral blood progenitor cell rescue in patients with high-risk primary and responding metastatic breast carcinoma: toxicity profile, relationship to paclitaxel pharmacokinetics and short-term outcome. Br J Cancer; 2001 Jun 15;84(12):1591-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .

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  • [Title] High-dose paclitaxel in combination with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and peripheral blood progenitor cell rescue in patients with high-risk primary and responding metastatic breast carcinoma: toxicity profile, relationship to paclitaxel pharmacokinetics and short-term outcome.
  • Between October 1995 and June 1998, 63 patients with high-risk primary [stage II with >or= 10 axillary nodes involved, stage IIIA or stage IIIB inflammatory carcinoma (n = 53)] or with stage IV responsive breast cancer (n = 10) received paclitaxel 150-775 mg/m(2)infused over 24 hours, doxorubicin 165 mg/m(2)as a continuous infusion over 96 hours, and cyclophosphamide 100 mg kg(-1).
  • There were no treatment-related deaths.
  • Kaplan-Meier estimates of 30-month event-free and overall survival for patients with primary breast carcinoma are 65% (95% CI; 51-83%) and 77% (95% CI; 64-93%).

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 Cancer Research Campaign.
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  • (PMID = 11401310.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA33572; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA62505
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2363687
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2. Dietz DW, Dehdashti F, Grigsby PW, Malyapa RS, Myerson RJ, Picus J, Ritter J, Lewis JS, Welch MJ, Siegel BA: Tumor hypoxia detected by positron emission tomography with 60Cu-ATSM as a predictor of response and survival in patients undergoing Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal carcinoma: a pilot study. Dis Colon Rectum; 2008 Nov;51(11):1641-8
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  • [Title] Tumor hypoxia detected by positron emission tomography with 60Cu-ATSM as a predictor of response and survival in patients undergoing Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal carcinoma: a pilot study.
  • Tumor hypoxia reduces the effectiveness of both radiation therapy and chemotherapy and is a well-known risk factor for tumor radioresistence.
  • METHODS: Patients with locally invasive (T2-4) primary or node-positive rectal cancer located <12 cm from the anal verge were recruited for this pilot study.
  • Pretreatment tumor size and stage were determined by endorectal ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonance imaging.
  • Eleven patients also underwent clinical positron emission tomography with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose at the discretion of the treating clinician.
  • The primary tumor was imaged by positron emission tomography with (60)Cu-ATSM, and accumulation of the tracer was measured semiquantitatively by determining the tumor-to-muscle activity ratio.
  • Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was then administered (within 2 weeks of (60)Cu-ATSM-positron emission tomography) and consisted of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions to the pelvis with continuous intravenous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (225 mg/m(2)/day).
  • The median tumor-to-muscle activity ratio of 2.6 discriminated those with worse prognosis from those with better prognosis.
  • In addition, 2 of the 3 tumors with no change in size had tumor-to-muscle activity ratios >2.6 (positive predictive value 66 percent), whereas 6 of 14 with decreased size had tumor-to-muscle activity ratios >2.6 (negative predictive value 57 percent).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results of this small pilot study suggest that (60)Cu-ATSM-PET may be predictive of survival and, possibly, tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.
  • A larger Phase II study is warranted to validate these results.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / diagnosis. Carcinoma / therapy. Organometallic Compounds. Positron-Emission Tomography. Rectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Rectal Neoplasms / therapy. Thiosemicarbazones
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cell Hypoxia. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Pilot Projects. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 18682881.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R24 CA086307
  • [Publication-type] Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organometallic Compounds; 0 / Thiosemicarbazones; 0 / copper (II) diacetyl-di(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS802312; NLM/ PMC4962601
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3. Attia S, Traynor AM, Kim K, Merchant JJ, Hoang T, Ahuja HG, Beatty PA, Hansen RM, Masters GA, Oettel KR, Shapiro GR, Larson MM, Larson ML, Schiller JH: Phase I/II study of vinorelbine and exisulind as first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer in patients at least 70 years old: a wisconsin oncology network study. J Thorac Oncol; 2008 Sep;3(9):1018-25
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINBLASTINE .

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  • [Title] Phase I/II study of vinorelbine and exisulind as first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer in patients at least 70 years old: a wisconsin oncology network study.
  • INTRODUCTION: Exisulind is an apoptotic agent with preclinical activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • We assessed these agents together as palliative treatment for older patients with advanced NSCLC.
  • METHODS: Chemotherapy-naive patients >/=70-years-old with stage IIIB-IV NSCLC and a performance status (PS) </=2 were eligible.
  • Primary endpoints were the maximum tolerated dose (phase I) and time-to-progression (phase II) of oral exisulind with 25 mg/m/wk of intravenous vinorelbine on a 28-day cycle.
  • Thirty phase II patients (median PS 1; median age 78 years) were enrolled.
  • Phase II median time-to-progression was 4.7 months (95% CI: 3.1-9.3 months) and median OS was 9.6 months (95% CI: 6.6-19.1 months).

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  • (PMID = 18758305.001).
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  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of thoracic oncology : official publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Thorac Oncol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520-33; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009614-18; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA062491-14; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA014520-34S2; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009614-14; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009614-11; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009614-10; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA009614-15; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009614-15; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA087718-08; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA009614-16A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA014520-31S1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520-33S1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520-32; None / None / / P30 CA014520-33; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009614-16A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520-32S1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K12 CA087718-07; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520-34; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062491-11; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520; None / None / / P30 CA014520-32; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA014520-34S1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062491-10; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA062491-11; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA062491-13; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520-33S2; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA009614-14; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520-31; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062491; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K12 CA087718; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA009614-12; None / None / / P30 CA014520-30; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA014520-33S2; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062491-13; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA009614-17; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520-31S1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA014520-32S1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA14520; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009614; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA009614-11; None / None / / P30 CA014520-34; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520-30; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009614-13; None / None / / P30 CA014520-31; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA009614-18; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA062491-12; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520-34S1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA009614-13; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009614-17; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062491-12; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009614-12; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062491-14; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA014520-34S2; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K12 CA087718-08; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA009614-10; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA014520-33S1
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 184SNS8VUH / Sulindac; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; K619IIG2R9 / sulindac sulfone; Q6C979R91Y / vinorelbine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS52764; NLM/ PMC2562273
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4. Joshi-Barve S, Amancherla K, Patil M, Bhatnagar A, Mathews S, Gobejishvili L, Cave M, McClain C, Barve S: Acrolein, a ubiquitous pollutant and lipid hydroperoxide product, inhibits antiviral activity of interferon-alpha: relevance to hepatitis C. Free Radic Biol Med; 2009 Jul 1;47(1):47-54
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  • Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease and can lead to hepatocellular carcinoma and end-stage liver disease.
  • The current FDA-approved treatment for HCV (pegylated interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) with ribavirin) is effective in only about 50% of patients.
  • Epidemiological evidence suggests that obesity, alcohol, smoking, and environmental pollutants may contribute to resistance to IFNalpha therapy in HCV.
  • This study examines the effects of acrolein on (i) IFNalpha-mediated signaling and antiviral gene expression in cultured and primary human hepatocytes and (ii) HCV replication in an HCV-replicon system.
  • This study defines mechanisms involved in resistance to IFNalpha and identifies the pathogenic role of acrolein, and potentially other environmental pollutants, in suppressing IFNalpha antiviral activity and establishes their adverse impact on HCV therapy.

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  • (PMID = 19345260.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4596
  • [Journal-full-title] Free radical biology & medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Free Radic. Biol. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / K01 ES017105; United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / R01 AA014371; United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / R01 AA014371-05; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / T32 ES011564
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Air Pollutants; 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / STAT1 Transcription Factor; 0 / STAT1 protein, human; 0 / STAT2 Transcription Factor; 0 / STAT2 protein, human; 0 / peginterferon alfa-2a; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a; 7864XYD3JJ / Acrolein
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS123380; NLM/ PMC3947765
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5. Fallai C, Cerrotta A, Valvo F, Badii D, Olmi P: Anal carcinoma of the elderly treated with radiotherapy alone or with concomitant radio-chemotherapy. Crit Rev Oncol Hematol; 2007 Mar;61(3):261-8
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  • [Title] Anal carcinoma of the elderly treated with radiotherapy alone or with concomitant radio-chemotherapy.
  • PURPOSE: To analyse the results achieved with radio-chemotherapy (RTCT) or radiotherapy alone (RT) in elderly patients (pts) affected with squamous cell anal cancer.
  • There were 9 stage I, 29 stage II, 11 stage IIIa and 13 stage IIIb.
  • RESULTS: Stage II fared significantly better than stage III in terms of locoregional control (LRC) but not overall survival (OS).
  • No G3 acute toxicity was observed in the RT group; in the RTCT group 15 pts (31%) developed a G3+ acute toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / drug therapy. Anus Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy / adverse effects. Dose Fractionation. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Frail Elderly. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17085056.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-8428
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical reviews in oncology/hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Rev. Oncol. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
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6. Mitchell SE, Mendenhall WM, Zlotecki RA, Carroll RR: Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2001 Mar 15;49(4):1007-13
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  • [Title] Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.
  • PURPOSE: To report the results of primary radiotherapy for treatment of anal canal carcinoma from the University of Florida series and review issues related to treatment of this disease.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Forty-nine patients were treated with primary radiation therapy (RT) for cure.
  • After 1990, patients with lesions of at least 3 cm also received chemotherapy with fluorouracil (1000 mg/m(2)) plus cisplatin (100 mg/m(2)) or mitomycin (10-15 mg/m(2)) if medically fit (n = 26).
  • RT was delivered with a 4-field box technique to deliver 45 Gy in 25 fractions.
  • The inguinal nodes were treated daily using electrons to supplement the dose in that region to a total dose of 45 Gy if clinically negative or about 60 Gy if involved.
  • A 10- to 15-Gy boost was delivered using interstitial iridium 192 implant (n = 32), en face (60)Co field (n = 5), or external-beam photon fields (n = 11).
  • Cause-specific survival rates at 5 years were 100% for Stage I, 88% for Stage II, 100% for Stage IIIA, and 70% for Stage IIIB.
  • Sphincter preservation rates were 83%, 79%, 75%, and 100% by stage and 81% overall.
  • There was an improvement in local control with the addition of chemotherapy in more advanced disease, but it was not significant.
  • There was an increase in acute toxicity with the addition of chemotherapy (12% > or = Grade 4) but not long-term toxicity.
  • Late toxicity requiring colostomy occurred in 6% of patients and consisted of soft tissue necrosis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The majority of patients with anal canal carcinoma can be treated with curative intent using a sphincter-sparing approach of radiation with or without chemotherapy even with advanced disease.
  • With the addition of chemotherapy to radiation, there is an increased risk of acute toxicity and about 1-2% incidence of toxic death.
  • Smaller tumors (T1 and early T2) probably do not require the addition of chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Anus Neoplasms / drug therapy. Anus Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Anal Canal / physiology. Analysis of Variance. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Middle Aged. Mitomycin / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy Dosage. Salvage Therapy. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11240241.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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7. Blazy A, Hennequin C, Gornet JM, Furco A, Gérard L, Lémann M, Maylin C: Anal carcinomas in HIV-positive patients: high-dose chemoradiotherapy is feasible in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Dis Colon Rectum; 2005 Jun;48(6):1176-81
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  • [Title] Anal carcinomas in HIV-positive patients: high-dose chemoradiotherapy is feasible in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.
  • BACKGROUND: Anal carcinoma, a common disease in HIV-positive patients, is usually treated with chemoradiotherapy.
  • Generally tolerance was poor before the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapies.
  • We report our experience of treating anal carcinoma in the era of new antiviral drugs.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 1997 and 2001, nine men on highly active antiretroviral therapies with good immune status before chemoradiotherapy received concomitant chemoradiotherapy consisting of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatinum, and high-dose radiotherapy (60-70 Gy) for anal carcinoma.
  • Six cancers were Stage I, two were Stage II, and one was Stage III.
  • RESULTS: All patients received the planned dose of radiation (> or = 60 Gy).
  • The chemotherapy dose was reduced 25 percent in six patients.
  • Overall treatment time was 58 days.
  • None of the patients developed opportunistic infections during follow-up.
  • Among them, four had no or minor anal function impairment at the last follow-up visit.
  • One patient with T4N2 disease relapsed locally one year after treatment and underwent salvage abdominoperineal excision.
  • CONCLUSION: High-dose chemoradiotherapy for anal carcinomas is feasible with low toxicity in HIV-positive patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Anus Neoplasms / therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. HIV Infections / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anti-Retroviral Agents / administration & dosage. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Feasibility Studies. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15906137.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-3706
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Retroviral Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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8. Oehler-Jänne C, Seifert B, Lütolf UM, Studer G, Glanzmann C, Ciernik IF: Clinical outcome after treatment with a brachytherapy boost versus external beam boost for anal carcinoma. Brachytherapy; 2007 Jul-Sep;6(3):218-26
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  • [Title] Clinical outcome after treatment with a brachytherapy boost versus external beam boost for anal carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the outcome after definitive whole pelvis external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by brachytherapy (BT) boost after treatment break vs. external beam boost without break in the treatment of anal carcinoma.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Eighty-one consecutive patients with invasive anal carcinoma were analyzed retrospectively.
  • Concomitant chemotherapy (CT) with mitomycin C was applied during whole pelvis EBRT depending on tumor stage.
  • Pattern of care, local disease control (LC), cancer-specific survival (CSS), overall survival (OS), toxicity, and quality of life (QOL) were assessed.
  • In early stage tumors, (192)Ir-HDR BT boost with CT resulted in a 5-year LC and CSS of 100%.
  • In all patients, BT boost did not result in improved LC, OS, and CSS compared with EBRT boost, despite stage and treatment bias favoring small tumors to be treated with BT.
  • Subgroup analysis of Stages I and II disease revealed no significant improvement after BT boost compared with EBRT boost.
  • BT boost is most beneficial in early stage tumors but the advantage of BT seems to be limited due to its invasiveness, doctor dependence, and logistic circumstances.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Brachytherapy / instrumentation. Carcinoma / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease-Free Survival. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Equipment Design. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17681244.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-4721
  • [Journal-full-title] Brachytherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brachytherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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9. Piperkova E, Raphael B, Altinyay M, Castellon I, Libes R, Sandella N, Abdel-Dayem H: Impact of PET/CT on initial staging, restaging and treatment management of anal cancer: a clinical case with literature review. J BUON; 2006 Oct-Dec;11(4):523-7
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  • [Title] Impact of PET/CT on initial staging, restaging and treatment management of anal cancer: a clinical case with literature review.
  • Distant extrapelvic metastases appear in approximately in 10% of the patients with squamous cell anal cancer (SCAC) and survival depends on the treatment strategy.
  • Exact staging leads to optimal planning of multimodality therapy and the adequate evaluation of treatment response can improve the prognosis of the disease.
  • Diagnosis and staging of SCAC are commonly performed using contrast-enhanced computerized tomography(CT) and interpretation of the findings for tumor biological behavior.
  • F18-fluoro-2 deoxy-D glucose positron emission tomography((18)F-FDG PET) reveals aspects of tumor function and allows metabolic measurements.
  • We present a patient with SCAC in whom, according to PET/CT findings, the initial stage was changed from II (T2N0M0) to III A (T2N2M0).
  • Radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy achieved a good therapeutic response but early follow up revealed new paraaortic lymph node (LN) metastases, as well as an uncommon left supraclavicular LN metastasis from the same primary carcinoma.
  • The disease was restaged as stage IV (T2N2M1) and radiation therapy was substituted by chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / radiography. Anus Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiography. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radionuclide imaging. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Positron-Emission Tomography. Radiopharmaceuticals. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Patient Care Management. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 17309188.001).
  • [ISSN] 1107-0625
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of B.U.ON. : official journal of the Balkan Union of Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J BUON
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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10. Ferrigno R, Nakamura RA, Dos Santos Novaes PE, Pellizzon AC, Maia MA, Fogarolli RC, Salvajoli JV, Filho WJ, Lopes A: Radiochemotherapy in the conservative treatment of anal canal carcinoma: retrospective analysis of results and radiation dose effectiveness. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2005 Mar 15;61(4):1136-42
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  • [Title] Radiochemotherapy in the conservative treatment of anal canal carcinoma: retrospective analysis of results and radiation dose effectiveness.
  • PURPOSE: This retrospective analysis reports the results on patients with anal canal carcinoma treated by combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between March 1993 and December 2001, 43 patients with anal canal carcinoma were treated with radiochemotherapy at the Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo.
  • Stage distribution was as follows: I, 3 (7%); II, 23 (53.5%); IIIA, 8 (18.6%); and IIIB, 9 (21%).
  • The median dose of RT at the whole pelvis and at the primary tumor was 45 Gy and 55 Gy, respectively.
  • Chemotherapy was carried out during the first and last 4 days of RT with continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (1000 mg/m(2)) and bolus mitomycin C (10 mg/m(2)).
  • Median overall treatment time was 51 days (range, 30-129 days).
  • Patient's age, tumor stage, overall treatment time, and RT dose at primary tumor were variables analyzed for survival and local control.
  • RESULTS: Median follow-up time was 42 months (range, 4-116 months).
  • Overall survival according to clinical stage was as follows: I, 100%; II, 82%; IIIA, 73%; and IIIB, 18% (p = 0.0049).
  • According to the RT dose, local control was higher among patients who received more than 50 Gy at primary tumor (86.5% vs. 34%, p = 0.012).
  • Temporary interruption of the treatment as a result of acute toxicity was necessary in 12 patients (28%).
  • Four patients developed mild chronic complications.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This analysis suggests that the treatment scheme employed was effective for anal sphincter preservation and local control; however, the incidence of distant metastases was relatively high.
  • The clinical stage was the main prognostic factor for overall survival.
  • Local control was higher in patients treated with doses of more than 50 Gy at primary tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Anus Neoplasms / drug therapy. Anus Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mitomycin / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Radiotherapy Dosage. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15752894.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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11. Widder J, Kastenberger R, Fercher E, Schmid R, Langendijk JA, Dobrowsky W, Pötter R: Radiation dose associated with local control in advanced anal cancer: retrospective analysis of 129 patients. Radiother Oncol; 2008 Jun;87(3):367-75
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  • [Title] Radiation dose associated with local control in advanced anal cancer: retrospective analysis of 129 patients.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To retrospectively analyse a large consecutive cohort of patients with anal cancer for treatment-related factors influencing local control and survival.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients referred for primary radiotherapy at Medical University of Vienna in 1990-2002 with anal canal carcinoma without distant metastases were analysed.
  • Treatment consisted of external radiotherapy with or without brachytherapy and with or without chemotherapy.
  • Patient-, tumour-, and treatment-factors were tested for influence on survival and local control using Cox multivariate analysis.
  • RESULTS: Median age was 67 years (n=129), the UICC stage distribution was 15%, 58%, and 27% for stages I, II, and III, respectively.
  • Stage and age were significant factors for overall and colostomy-free-survival, N-stage for disease-free-survival.
  • Shorter overall treatment time favoured local control in stage T1-2 (p=.015), higher total radiation dose and female gender were associated with improved local control in T3-4 tumours (p=.021).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results support potential improvement of anal cancer treatment by studying advanced technology such as IMRT, making it possible to tailor high-dose regions.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Radiotherapy Dosage. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 18501453.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-8140
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiotherapy and oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiother Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
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12. Roohipour R, Patil S, Goodman KA, Minsky BD, Wong WD, Guillem JG, Paty PB, Weiser MR, Neuman HB, Shia J, Schrag D, Temple LK: Squamous-cell carcinoma of the anal canal: predictors of treatment outcome. Dis Colon Rectum; 2008 Feb;51(2):147-53
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  • [Title] Squamous-cell carcinoma of the anal canal: predictors of treatment outcome.
  • PURPOSE: The incidence of anal canal squamous-cell carcinoma is increasing.
  • Limited data exist on predictors of treatment failure.
  • This study was designed to identify predictors for relapse/persistence after first-line therapy.
  • METHODS: Using one database, we identified 131 Stages I-III patients treated for primary anal canal squamous-cell carcinoma at our institution from December 1986 to August 2006, with minimum six-month follow-up.
  • Demographic, pathologic, treatment, and outcome data were extracted.
  • Treatment failure was defined as biopsy-proven persistence or relapse (local and/or distant).
  • RESULTS: Of 131 patients (median age, 58.3 years; median follow-up, 2.9 (range, 0.6-11.2) years), 66 percent were females, 43.5 percent were Stage II, and 11 (8 percent) were HIV-positive.
  • Although 114 (93.4 percent) completed radiotherapy, most required treatment breaks, making total duration of radiotherapy longer than planned.
  • Almost all patients undergoing radiotherapy (96.7 percent, 118/122) also had chemotherapy: 118 (100 percent, Stages I-III) had concurrent chemotherapy: (98 (83.8 percent) mitomycin/5-fluorouracil, 12 (10.2 percent) cisplatin/5-fluorouracil, 8 (6.8 percent) 5-fluorouracil alone); 35 of 46 (76 percent) Stage III patients received induction chemotherapy (34 (97.1 percent) cisplatin/5-fluorouracil, 1 (2.8 percent) 5-fluorouracil alone).
  • Many (44 percent Stages I/II, 48.9 percent Stage III) required dose adjustments.
  • Thirty-seven patients (28.2 percent) failed first-line therapy.
  • Bivariate analyses demonstrated that T stage (P=0.0019), completion of radiotherapy, and total radiotherapy dose (P=0.03) were all significantly associated with treatment failure.
  • On multivariate analyses, disease stage (P=0.05) and completion of radiotherapy (P=0.01) remained significant predictors of relapse-free survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Tolerance of chemoradiation seems to be an important predictor of treatment success.
  • Effective therapies with less acute toxicity must be identified.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Disease-Free Survival. Endosonography. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Neoplasm Staging. New York / epidemiology. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Time Factors. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • [ErratumIn] Dis Colon Rectum. 2008 May;51(5):620
  • (PMID = 18180997.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-3706
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Nguyen WD, Mitchell KM, Beck DE: Risk factors associated with requiring a stoma for the management of anal cancer. Dis Colon Rectum; 2004 Jun;47(6):843-6
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  • [Title] Risk factors associated with requiring a stoma for the management of anal cancer.
  • PURPOSE: Combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy has become the standard of care for epidermoid carcinoma of the anus.
  • This treatment modality has allowed for preservation of the anus in most patients, sparing them the morbidity of a stoma.
  • METHODS: Data on all patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal who were treated with chemoradiation with curative intent at Ochsner Clinic Foundation were entered into a prospective registry.
  • We excluded four patients who were lost to follow-up and one patient who died during chemoradiation therapy.
  • Six patients had Stage I disease, 33 patients had Stage II disease, and 12 patients had Stage III disease (N+ disease).
  • The average radiation dose was 57 +/- 17 Gy.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Colostomy / methods. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Colectomy. Combined Modality Therapy. Digestive System Diseases / etiology. Digestive System Diseases / surgery. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasm, Residual. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Risk Factors. Surgical Stomas. Wounds and Injuries / etiology. Wounds and Injuries / surgery

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  • (PMID = 15054683.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-3706
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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14. Winburn GB: Anal carcinoma or "just hemorrhoids"? Am Surg; 2001 Nov;67(11):1048-58
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  • [Title] Anal carcinoma or "just hemorrhoids"?
  • Cancers of the anal margin and anal canal are extremely rare and often misdiagnosed.
  • From January 1985 through July 2000, 50 patients were diagnosed with anal cancer at two institutions.
  • This retrospective review includes all available cases of anal cancer including all histologies.
  • Patient charts were analyzed for diagnosis, staging, treatment, survival, and recurrence rate.
  • The pathologic diagnosis included 44 (88%) with squamous cell carcinoma, three (6%) with melanoma, two (4%) with adenocarcinoma, and one (2%) with Paget's disease.
  • At presentation nine (18%) were classified as stage 0, five (10%) stage I, 21 (42%) stage II, eight (16%) stage III, and seven (14%) stage IV.
  • Chemoradiotherapy was the primary treatment modality in 25 patients (50%).
  • Three patients (6%) received an APR as primary treatment, three (6%) in combination with chemoradiation, and four (8%) for salvage therapy.
  • Fourteen patients (28%) underwent wide local excision (WLE) as the primary treatment.
  • Two patients (4%) underwent WLE plus chemoradiation therapy.
  • One patient (2%) underwent WLE and chemotherapy.
  • Thirteen patients (26%) died of anal cancer; the average time to death from diagnosis was 13.2 months.
  • Three of these deaths were in patients with melanoma who presented with stage IV disease.
  • Thirty-two patients (64%) are alive, and 30 (60%) of these patients are free of disease (mean time since diagnosis 32.5 months, range 2-151 months).
  • Six patients (12%) had recurrence after treatment (mean time to recurrence 12.6 months; range 3-26 months).
  • Anal cancers continue to present at an advanced stage, with a high mortality rate.
  • Anal melanoma in particular is an aggressive and highly fatal cancer.
  • APR remains the recommended salvage therapy for advanced anal carcinomas that fail primary treatment.
  • Early recognition and detection of primary and recurrent disease is necessary for improved outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 11730221.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-1348
  • [Journal-full-title] The American surgeon
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Larbaoui B: Preoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy with capecitabine in locally advanced rectal carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15134

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  • [Title] Preoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy with capecitabine in locally advanced rectal carcinoma.
  • : e15134 Background: Preoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy has shown to improve local control and sphincter preservation with decreased acute toxicity compared with postoperative treatment in locally advanced rectal carcinoma.
  • The primary endpoint of this phase II trial was pathologic tumor response.
  • METHODS: Inclusion criteria: rectal adenocarcinoma <12 cms from anal verge, clinical stage T3-4, adequate renal, hematological and liver function.
  • Treatment schedule: Pelvic radiotherapy (45 Gy : 2 Gy /day ) and chemotherapy: Capecitabine 850 mg/m<sup>2</sup> b.i.d p.o: day 1 to 14 (2weeks of treatment followed by 1 week rest period (cycle repeated every 3 weeks).
  • Surgery with TME was performed after the end of the second cycle of chemotherapy.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy with 5FULV2 was administered after surgery Results: 15 patients have been recruited between January and October 2007: 12 males/3 females.
  • Clinical stage (determined by CT or RMI): T3: 70% and T4: 30%.
  • Tumor location (from anal verge): < 6 cm in 8pts, >6 cm in 7pts.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary results show that preoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy with Capecitabine is an effective regimen with an acceptable safety profile for locally advanced rectal cancer, leading to a high probability of tumor downstaging.

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  • (PMID = 27960909.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Eng C, Chang GJ, Das P, Rodriguez-Bigas M, Skibber JM, Qiao W, Rosner GL, Ukegbu LT, Wolff RA, Crane CH: Phase II study of capecitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiation therapy (XELOX-XRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4116

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II study of capecitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiation therapy (XELOX-XRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.
  • : 4116 Background: Definitive therapy for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anal canal consists of external beam radiotherapy with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C or cisplatin.
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of XELOX-XRT as definitive treatment for anal cancer.
  • Primary objectives were time to treatment failure and occurrence of treatment-related toxicity.
  • METHODS: Patients with histologically proven SCC of the anal canal, AJCC Stage II-IIIB (T<sub>2-4</sub> or N+M<sub>0</sub>), ECOG PS 0-1, HIV<sup>-</sup>, and no prior therapy were eligible for XELOX-based chemoradiotherapy.
  • Chemotherapy initially consisted of capecitabine (825 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) BID, M-F and weekly oxaliplatin (50 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) (Group 1) with subsequent modification to omission of chemotherapy during weeks 3 and 6 (Group 2).
  • Radiation therapy was provided in the following manner: T<sub>1</sub> (45 Gy in 25 fractions), T<sub>2</sub> (55 Gy in 30 fractions), and T<sub>3-4</sub> (59 Gy in 32 fractions).
  • Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was allowed.
  • Interim safety analysis was conducted 3 months after the 10<sup>th</sup> pt.
  • Five of 11 (45%) patients developed grade 3 treatment-related diarrhea (Group 1).
  • Therefore, the chemotherapy schedule was modified and only 1 of 9 patients in Group 2 developed grade 3 diarrhea.
  • One patient in Group 1 developed distant failure.
  • After a median follow-up of 19 months, no patient has developed local recurrence or required salvage resection with colostomy for a colostomy-free rate of 100%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The combination of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy (XELOX-XRT) is effective for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

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  • (PMID = 27961220.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Swampillai A, Williams M, Osborne M, Mawdsley S, Hughes R, Harrison M, Glynne-Jones R: A single-center study of the utility of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCAg) levels in epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal and margin (ECACM) treated with chemoradiation (CRT). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4117

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A single-center study of the utility of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCAg) levels in epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal and margin (ECACM) treated with chemoradiation (CRT).
  • All 195 were treated with CRT- (50.4Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + mitomycin (MMC).
  • Radiotherapy comprised the schedule of the UK Anal cancer Trial (ACT II).
  • 30 had neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by CRT and 3 pts had planned surgery followed by CRT.
  • Clinical stage at diagnosis- Tx (6) T1 (28), T2 (80), T3 (65), T4 (16), N0 (126), N+ (66) Nx (3).
  • RESULTS: Mean baseline SCCAg by cT and cN stage were: T1 93 (ng/dl), T2 300, T3 607, T4 882, N0 376, N+ 529 (correlation coeff: T: 0.47, N: 0.33, both p< 0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is a correlation between T and N stage and baseline SCC.

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  • (PMID = 27961219.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Djellali L, Larbaoui B, Boukerche A, Ghazi S, Chaiba I, Meziane N, Yekrou D, Youcef DF: Preoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy with oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil in locally advanced rectal carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15108

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy with oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil in locally advanced rectal carcinoma.
  • : e15108 Background: Preoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy has shown to improve local control and sphincter preservation with decreased acute toxicity compared with postoperative treatment in locally advanced rectal carcinoma.
  • The primary endpoint of this phase II trial was pathologic tumor response.
  • Secondary endpoint was sphincter preservation and toxicity Methods: Inclusion criteria: rectal adenocarcinoma <12 cms from anal verge, clinical stage T3-4, adequate renal, hematological and liver function.
  • Treatment schedule: Pelvic radiotherapy (25 Gy/ 5 fractions: 5 Gy on day 1 to day 5) and chemotherapy: Oxaliplatin 85 mg/m<sup>2</sup> on 2 hours, day 1 and 15, folinic acid 20 mg/m<sup>2</sup> and 5 fluoro-uracil bolus 500 mg/m<sup>2</sup> on day 1, 8 and 15 (cycle repeated every 4 weeks).
  • Surgery with TME was performed after the end of the second cycle of chemotherapy.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy with 5FULV2 was administered after surgery Results: 15 patients have been recruited between January and October 2006: 10 males/5 females.
  • Clinical stage (determined by CT or RMI): T3: 66.6% and T4: 33.3%.
  • Tumor location (from anal verge): < 6 cm in 10pts, >6 cm in 5pts.
  • Main adverse effects (NCI-CTC): diarrhea G3-4: 14.2%, sensitive peripheral neurotoxicity G1: 26.6%, nausea/vomiting G3-4: 11%, Anemia G3-4: 7.1%, neutropenia G3-4: 14.2% Conclusions: Preliminary results show that preoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy with oxaliplatin and 5FU-folinic acid is an effective regimen with an acceptable safety profile for locally advanced rectal cancer, leading to a high probability of tumor downstaging.

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  • (PMID = 27964340.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Alonso V, Salud A, Escudero P, Valencia J, Mira M, Ruiz de Lobera A, Lambea J, Grandez R, Tres A, Anton A: Preoperative chemoradiation with oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil in locally advanced rectal carcinoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):3607

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preoperative chemoradiation with oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil in locally advanced rectal carcinoma.
  • : 3607 Background: The aim of this phase II trial was to assess the impact of preoperative external radiation therapy combined with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin (LOHP) on pathologic tumor response, sphincter preservation and tumor control in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma.
  • METHODS: Fifty-three patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma (T3/T4 or N+) received radiotherapy (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) and chemotherapy with continuous infusion of 5-FU 200 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/day on days 1-5 + LOHP 60 mg/m<sup>2</sup> on day 1 every week (weeks 1-6).
  • Surgery was performed between 5-7 weeks after the end of the treatment.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-FU + Folinic Acid (NCCTG) x 4 cycles was administered after surgery.
  • Clinical stage (determined by EUS+CT or RMI): cT3 43p, cT4 10p, cN+ 32p.
  • Tumor location (from anal verge): ≤ 5 cm in 26p, >5 cm in 27p.
  • 36% of patients with tumors in distal rectum had sphincter-saving surgery.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with 5FU+LOHP is a feasible and well tolerated treatment.
  • Our results are comparable to the best series of preoperative treatment.

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  • (PMID = 28014345.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Staib L, Gottwald T, Lehnert T, Ruf G, Sturm J, Becker HD, Farthmann E, Herfarth C, Post S, Trede M, Beger HG: Sphincter-saving treatment in epidermoid anal cancer: cooperative analysis of 142 patients in five German university surgical centers. Int J Colorectal Dis; 2000 Nov;15(5-6):282-90
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  • [Title] Sphincter-saving treatment in epidermoid anal cancer: cooperative analysis of 142 patients in five German university surgical centers.
  • Five southern German university centers cooperated in comparing the effect of surgical vs. nonsurgical therapy strategies on survival and sphincter preservation in the treatment of anal cancer.
  • A standardized questionnaire was used to evaluate retrospectively (mean follow-up 30 months) treatment strategy and outcome (survival, colostomy rate, colostomy-free survival) in patients treated between 1987 and 1996.
  • Of the 142 patients 65% had squamous cell, 20% basaloid, 6% adeno-, and 1% undifferentiated carcinoma (8% histology not recorded); 9% were classified in UICC stage I, 37% in stage II, 25% in stage III, and 4% in stage IV (25% not recorded).
  • Primary treatment consisted of local excision (10%), excision plus radio- and/or chemotherapy (17%), radiotherapy (20%), radiochemotherapy (28%), or colostomy with or without resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy (23%).
  • We observed no difference between these treatment groups in overall (P = 0.43) or colostomy-free survival (P = 0.14, log-rank).
  • Mean overall survival (in months) was 42 in stage I, 38 in stage II, and 25 in stage III (P = 0.0013); mean colostomy-free survival was 36 in stage I, 26 in stage II, and 16 in stage III (P = 0.0021, log-rank).
  • Outcome was not significantly related to therapeutic strategy (surgery or radio-chemotherapy.
  • Primary surgical and nonsurgical strategies in treating anal cancer thus produced similar results, although radiochemotherapy is usually recommended for sphincter-endangering anal cancer.
  • Challenges to be met in the future include the prevention of metastasis and long-term preservation of anal sphincter function.
  • [MeSH-major] Anal Canal / surgery. Anus Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / mortality. Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma / mortality. Carcinoma / surgery. Carcinoma / therapy. Clinical Trials as Topic. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Multicenter Studies as Topic. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11151431.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-1958
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of colorectal disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Colorectal Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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21. Rabbani AN, Zlotecki RA, Kirwan J, George TJ Jr, Morris CG, Rout WR, Mendenhall WM: Definitive radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Am J Clin Oncol; 2010 Feb;33(1):47-51
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Definitive radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.
  • PURPOSE: To review the outcomes of definitive radiotherapy (RT) alone or combined with chemotherapy (CT) in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.
  • Distribution according to T stage was: T1, 11 (16%); T2, 29 (42%); T3, 21 (30%); and T4, 8 (12%).
  • Distribution according to N stage was: N0, 53 (77%); N1, 3 (4%); N2, 7 (10%); and N3, 6 (9%).
  • The 5-year cause-specific and overall survival rates were: stage I, 100% and 64%; stage II, 86% and 70%; stage III, 80% and 76%; and overall, 87% and 71%, respectively.
  • Seven patients (10%) developed Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3 late complications and 4 additional patients (6%) experienced grade 4 late complications.
  • The acute toxicity of treatment is significant; the major risk is neutropenia and sepsis.
  • [MeSH-major] Anal Canal / radiation effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Anus Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19704368.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-453X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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22. Takashima A, Shimada Y, Hamaguchi T, Ito Y, Masaki T, Yamaguchi S, Kondo Y, Saito N, Kato T, Ohue M, Higashino M, Moriya Y, Colorectal Cancer Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group: Current therapeutic strategies for anal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan. Int J Clin Oncol; 2009 Oct;14(5):416-20
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  • [Title] Current therapeutic strategies for anal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan.
  • BACKGROUND: In Western countries, chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is well established as the standard therapy for stages II/III anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC).
  • In Japan, the therapeutic modalities for and outcomes of this disease have not been clarified because ASCC is quite rare.
  • The Colorectal Cancer Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG-CCSG) conducted a survey to determine the current therapeutic strategies for ASCC in Japan.
  • METHODS: In July 2006, a questionnaire was sent to 49 institutions affiliated with the JCOG-CCSG to gather information on numbers of cases, therapeutic modalities, and outcomes.
  • The target subjects were patients with stages II/III ASCC, diagnosed from January 2000 to December 2004, who were 20-80 years of age with normal major organ function and no severe complications.
  • Detailed information was obtained for 55 subjects; 25 (45%) had stage II ASCC and 30 (55%) had stage III ASCC.
  • CRT was performed in 25 patients (45%); surgery in 17 (31%); surgery combined with radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy, or CRT in 8 (15%); and RT in 5 (9%).
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / therapy. Asian Continental Ancestry Group. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Digestive System Surgical Procedures
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Health Care Surveys. Humans. Japan / epidemiology. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Surveys and Questionnaires. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19856049.001).
  • [ISSN] 1437-7772
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Investigator] Kondo Y; Ohtsuka K; Shiiba K; Sato T; Yoshimi F; Kotake K; Sawada T; Mochizuki H; Konishi F; Saito N; Moriya Y; Masaki T; Aoki T; Takahashi K; Hasegawa H; Kenichi S; Sumiyama Y; Sato T; Akaike M; Kudo S; Yamada T; Munakata Y; Shigeski Y; Kato T; Maeda K; Koizumi K; Monden M; Ohue M; Higashino M; Tanigawa M; Fukunaga M; Kato T; Okamura S; Kimura H; Okajima M; Takakura N; Tanada M; Shirouzu K; Kitano S
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23. Bilimoria KY, Bentrem DJ, Ko CY, Stewart AK, Winchester DP, Talamonti MS, Halverson AL: Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal: utilization and outcomes of recommended treatment in the United States. Ann Surg Oncol; 2008 Jul;15(7):1948-58
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  • [Title] Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal: utilization and outcomes of recommended treatment in the United States.
  • BACKGROUND: Over the past two decades, recommended treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal has shifted from surgery to primary chemoradiation.
  • Our objectives were (1) to evaluate treatment trends over the past 20 years, (2) to assess contemporary treatment utilization, and (3) to examine the impact of recommended vs nonguideline treatment on survival.
  • METHODS: From the National Cancer Data Base (1985-2005), 38,882 patients with anal canal cancer were identified.
  • Regression models were used to assess factors associated with use of nonguideline treatment (vs chemoradiation +/-surgery).
  • Univariate and multivariate methods were used to assess the impact of treatment on survival.
  • RESULTS: From 1985 to 2005, the use of chemoradiation increased significantly with a concomitant decrease in treatment with surgery alone (P < .0001).
  • However, only 74.9% (5014 of 6696) of patients underwent primary chemoradiation therapy in 2003-2005.
  • Overall, 22.7% (1523 of 6696) of patients received treatment that was not concordant with established guidelines: primary surgery (13.0%) and primary chemotherapy or radiation (9.7%).
  • Patients were significantly less likely to receive guideline treatment if male, older, black or Hispanic, more severe comorbidities, or Stage I (vs Stage II or III).
  • Patients undergoing chemoradiation ( +/- surgery) had higher 5-year survival rates than patients who received nonguideline treatment (64% vs 58%; hazard ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.77-0.87; P < .0001).
  • CONCLUSION: Primary chemoradiation therapy has supplanted surgical treatment and is associated with better outcomes; however, nearly a quarter of patients are still receiving treatment that is not concordant with established guidelines.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Guideline Adherence. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. United States

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  • (PMID = 18414951.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-4681
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Nakagawa S, Amano M, Yamashita S, Nishikawa Y, Higaki N, Hayashida H, Niinobu T, Yoshioka Y, Sakon M: [A case of effective chemoradiation therapy against anal fistula carcinoma recurred 10 years after surgery]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2006 Nov;33(12):1977-9
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  • [Title] [A case of effective chemoradiation therapy against anal fistula carcinoma recurred 10 years after surgery].
  • A male in his eighties underwent abdominoperineal resection under the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma associated with anal fistula (P0, H0, n (-), A1, stage II, ly0, v0).
  • Radiotherapy was performed in the pelvic region at a total dose of 50 Gy (2 Gy/day).
  • After one month, the chemotherapy with UFT (UFT 300 mg/day) was started.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Anus Neoplasms / therapy. Rectal Fistula / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Humans. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Male. Quality of Life. Tegafur / therapeutic use. Time Factors. Uracil / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 17212165.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 56HH86ZVCT / Uracil; 1-UFT protocol
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25. Engstrom PF, Benson AB 3rd, Saltz L, National Comprehensive Cancer Network: Colon cancer. Clinical practice guidelines in oncology. J Natl Compr Canc Netw; 2003 Jan;1(1):40-53
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  • [Title] Colon cancer. Clinical practice guidelines in oncology.
  • The NCCN Colon/Rectal/Anal Cancers Guidelines panel believes that a multidisciplinary approach is necessary for managing colorectal cancer.
  • The panel endorses the concept that treating patients in a clinical trial has priority over standard or accepted therapy.
  • The recommended surgical procedure for resectable colon cancer is an en bloc resection.
  • For patients with stage III disease, 5-FU-based adjuvant therapy is recommended.
  • Surgery should be followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • The panel advocates a conservative post-treatment surveillance program for colon carcinoma patients.
  • Patients whose disease progresses during 5-FU-based therapy should be treated with bolus irinotecan.
  • Patients who progress on irinotecan are candidates for 5-FU/leucovorin/oxaliplatin therapy or should be encouraged to participate in a phase I or phase II clinical trial.

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  • (PMID = 19764149.001).
  • [ISSN] 1540-1405
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : JNCCN
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Natl Compr Canc Netw
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Practice Guideline
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Thomschke D, Kyau-Ummen B, Halbfass HJ: [Local recurrence and survival rate after rectal cancer operations and multimodal therapy]. Chirurg; 2002 Mar;73(3):245-54
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  • [Title] [Local recurrence and survival rate after rectal cancer operations and multimodal therapy].
  • [Transliterated title] Lokalrezidiv- und Uberlebensraten nach Rektumkarzinomoperationen und multimodaler Therapie.
  • INTRODUCTION: In the guidelines of the German specialist medical societies, postoperative chemoradiotherapy is recommended for rectal carcinomas in stages II and III.
  • In the present unicentric study, the clinical results after preoperative irradiation and postoperative chemotherapy are to be determined.
  • In period II, the treatment was developed further with exclusive preoperative radiation and total mesorectal excision.
  • Since from 1994 the therapy regimen has changed with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and improved radiotherapy, the present study was carried out to check whether this has led to better results of therapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Over a period of 7 years, data from 607 patients with rectal carcinoma were recorded and stored in an Excel file.
  • Multimodal treatment was administered in stage uT3.
  • In period I, sandwich radiation was carried out with 24 Gy preoperatively and 24 Gy postoperatively, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • In period II, 50.4 Gy were applied preoperatively, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Calcium folinate and 5-fluoroucil were administered in six chemotherapy cycles.
  • Primarily inoperable patients received preoperative irradiation with up to 50.4 Gy in both periods to attain down-staging.
  • The following surgical procedures were applied: abdominal perineal extirpations, deep anterior resections, coloanal anastomoses, colon pouch anal anastomoses and transanal microsurgical resections.
  • RESULTS: In 469 curatively operated patients, including primarily inoperable patients after down-staging radiotherapy, the rates of local recurrence were 5.8% with a mean follow-up observation of 4.29 years, and the carcinoma-specific 4-year actuarial survival was 84%.
  • The rates of local recurrence were 7.4% in period I and 4.3% in period II (P = 0.44).
  • The carcinoma-specific 4-year actuarial survivals were 81% in period I and 87% in period II (P = 0.202).
  • Investigation of the subgroups of irradiated patients showed complete freedom from recurrence after a mean follow-up observation time of 3.58 years for patients in stage uT3 with total mesorectal excision, preoperative radiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy (n = 51).
  • The difference from patients without postoperative chemotherapy was significant (P = 0.018).
  • CONCLUSION: Total mesorectal excision, preoperative radiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy can effectively influence the rate of local recurrences after rectal carcinoma operations (0-4.3% after a mean period of follow-up observation of 3.58 years).
  • [MeSH-minor] Actuarial Analysis. Aged. Cause of Death. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Germany. Hospital Mortality. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Reoperation. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11963499.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-4722
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Chirurg; Zeitschrift für alle Gebiete der operativen Medizen
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chirurg
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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27. Polglase AL, McMurrick PJ, Tremayne AB, Bhathal PS: Local recurrence after curative anterior resection with principally blunt dissection for carcinoma of the rectum and rectosigmoid. Dis Colon Rectum; 2001 Jul;44(7):947-54

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Local recurrence after curative anterior resection with principally blunt dissection for carcinoma of the rectum and rectosigmoid.
  • PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of local pelvic recurrence of carcinoma of the rectum and rectosigmoid (tumors where the lower edge is 18 cm or less from the anal verge) in a consecutive series of patients operated on by a single surgeon.
  • METHOD: During the period April 1986 to December 1997, 157 consecutive anterior resections for carcinoma of the rectum and rectosigmoid were performed by one surgeon (ALP).
  • Local recurrences occurred between 16 and 38 months from the time of resection, and the cumulative risk of developing local recurrence at five years was 5.2 percent.
  • The probability of developing local recurrence at five years for Stage I tumors was 0, Stage II was 5.9 percent, and Stage III was 8.9 percent.
  • In addition, there was a significantly higher incidence of local recurrence in the group of patients undergoing ultralow anterior resection (between 3 and 6 cm from the anal verge) as compared with patients undergoing low or high anterior resection (P = 0.03).
  • Local recurrence developed in 3 of 28 (10.7 percent) patients having ultralow anterior resection, 1 of 57 (1.8 percent) patients having low anterior resection (between 6 and 10 cm from the anal verge), and no patients having high anterior resection (above 10 cm from the anal verge).
  • The overall five-year cancer-specific survival rate of the entire group of 131 patients was 81.8 percent, and the overall probability of being disease free at five years including both local and distal recurrence was 72.9 percent.
  • Three local recurrences occurred in the 101 patients (77 percent) who did not receive any form of adjuvant therapy.
  • No recurrence occurred in the 12 patients (9.2 percent) who had adjuvant chemotherapy alone.
  • CONCLUSION: Curative anterior resection for carcinoma of the rectum and rectosigmoid with principally blunt dissection of the rectum in this study is associated with a 3.1 percent incidence and a 5.2 percent probability at five years of developing local recurrence.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / surgery. Digestive System Surgical Procedures / methods. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Rectal Neoplasms / surgery. Sigmoid Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Anastomosis, Surgical. Female. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11496074.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-3706
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Garlipp B, Ptok H, Schmidt U, Meyer F, Gastinger I, Lippert H: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal carcinoma: effects on anastomotic leak rate and postoperative bladder dysfunction after non-emergency sphincter-preserving anterior rectal resection. Results of the Quality Assurance in Rectal Cancer Surgery multicenter observational trial. Langenbecks Arch Surg; 2010 Nov;395(8):1031-8
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal carcinoma: effects on anastomotic leak rate and postoperative bladder dysfunction after non-emergency sphincter-preserving anterior rectal resection. Results of the Quality Assurance in Rectal Cancer Surgery multicenter observational trial.
  • INTRODUCTION: Randomized trials have demonstrated a reduction in local recurrence rate in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy and total mesorectal excision (TME) compared to patients undergoing TME alone.
  • Accordingly, preoperative chemoradiotherapy in all UICC stages II and III rectal cancers has been recommended in the German treatment guidelines as of 2004.
  • However, this policy has been questioned in recent years, partly due to concern regarding an increase in postoperative complications through preoperative therapy.
  • It was the aim of our analysis to investigate the influence of preoperative chemoradiotherapy on anastomotic leak rate and postoperative bladder dysfunction in rectal cancer patients using a representative data set from the Quality Assurance in Rectal Cancer Surgery multicenter observational trial.
  • METHOD: This is a retrospective analysis of data from the Quality Assurance in Rectal Cancer Surgery prospective multicenter observational trial.
  • Data of all patients undergoing curatively intended sphincter-preserving resection for UICC stage I through III rectal carcinoma between 01 Jan 2005 and 31 Dec 2007 with or without preoperative chemoradiotherapy (groups A and B, respectively) were included.
  • RESULTS: A total of 2,085 patients were included (group A, n = 676, group B, n = 1,409).
  • Significant differences were present between groups regarding age, sex, distance of the tumor from the anal verge, pT-stage, UICC stage, hepatic risk factors, and use of protective enterostomy by univariate analysis.
  • CONCLUSION: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal carcinoma does not increase the risk for anastomotic leakage or postoperative bladder dysfunction after curatively intended sphincter-preserving rectal resection.
  • [MeSH-major] Anal Canal / surgery. Anastomotic Leak / etiology. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Postoperative Complications / etiology. Quality Assurance, Health Care. Rectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Rectal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Rectum / surgery. Urinary Bladder Diseases / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Neoplasm Staging. Prospective Studies. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 20711786.001).
  • [ISSN] 1435-2451
  • [Journal-full-title] Langenbeck's archives of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Langenbecks Arch Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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29. Pelletier F, Drobacheff-Thiebaut C, Aubin F, Venier AG, Mougin C, Laurent R: [Effects of imiquimod on latent human papillomavirus anal infection in HIV-infected patients]. Ann Dermatol Venereol; 2004 Nov;131(11):947-51
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Imiquimod .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Effects of imiquimod on latent human papillomavirus anal infection in HIV-infected patients].
  • [Transliterated title] Effets de l'imiquimod sur l'infection périanale latente à papillomavirus humain chez des malades infectés par le virus de l'immunodéficience humaine.
  • INTRODUCTION: High risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) have emerged as risk factors for anal carcinoma particularly in HIV-infected patients who demonstrate a high rate of anal HPV infection.
  • Considering the relationship between the presence of anal infection and the development of neoplastic lesions, we wished to assess the capacity of imiquimod to eradicate latent HPV infection in HIV-infected patients.
  • Two consecutive anal swabs were taken at 2 month intervals and only patients with two consecutive tests positive for the detection of HPV-DNA (Hybrid Capture II) were included.
  • HPV-DNA presence was then investigated 2 and 4 months following the onset of treatment.
  • There was no significant difference between treatment groups according to the following criteria: gender, route of HIV transmission, CDC stage, prior medical history of sexually transmitted diseases or anogenital warts.
  • In spite of the low number of treated patients, we did not observe a statistically significant decrease in HPV-DNA in anal swabs from imiquimod-treated patients as compared to placebo-treated patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / pharmacology. Aminoquinolines / pharmacology. HIV Infections / complications. Papillomavirus Infections / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Anus Diseases / drug therapy. Anus Diseases / virology. Anus Neoplasms / prevention & control. Anus Neoplasms / virology. Carcinoma / prevention & control. Carcinoma / virology. Double-Blind Method. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 15602380.001).
  • [ISSN] 0151-9638
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales de dermatologie et de vénéréologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Dermatol Venereol
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Aminoquinolines; 99011-02-6 / imiquimod
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30. Tajima Y, Ishibashi K, Gonda T, Miyazaki T, Nakada H, Takahashi T, Ishida H: [Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal showing complete response following chemoradiotherapy--a case report]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2007 Nov;34(12):2050-2
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Anal Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal showing complete response following chemoradiotherapy--a case report].
  • We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal which showed complete response following chemoradiotherapy.
  • A 54-year-old woman was diagnosed as having squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (T2N0M0 stage II).
  • Chemoradiotherapy comprising peroral tegafur/uracil and external radiotherapy (60 Gy) to the pelvic space resulted in complete response 4 months after the initiation of the treatment.
  • PET-CT showed recurrence in paraortic lymph node, right sacral and left pubic bone 11 months after the initiation of treatment, although the primary lesion did not relapse.
  • The patient is now given 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin in addition to external radiotherapy (57.5 Gy) to the metastatic lymph node.
  • This case suggests that we should take measures to prevent distant metastases in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / drug therapy. Anus Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Colonoscopy. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology. Neoplasm Metastasis / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 18219895.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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