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1. Seidemann K, Tiemann M, Schrappe M, Yakisan E, Simonitsch I, Janka-Schaub G, Dörffel W, Zimmermann M, Mann G, Gadner H, Parwaresch R, Riehm H, Reiter A: Short-pulse B-non-Hodgkin lymphoma-type chemotherapy is efficacious treatment for pediatric anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a report of the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Group Trial NHL-BFM 90. Blood; 2001 Jun 15;97(12):3699-706
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  • [Title] Short-pulse B-non-Hodgkin lymphoma-type chemotherapy is efficacious treatment for pediatric anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a report of the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Group Trial NHL-BFM 90.
  • Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) accounts for approximately 10% of pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
  • Previous experience from NHL-Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) trials indicated that the short-pulse B-NHL-type treatment strategy may also be efficacious for ALCL.
  • The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of this protocol for treatment of childhood ALCL in a large prospective multicenter trial and to define risk factors.
  • Immunophenotype was T-cell in 40 patients, B-cell in 5, null in 31, and not determined in 13.
  • Stages were as follows: I, n = 8; II, n = 20; III, n = 55; IV, n = 6.
  • Extranodal manifestations were as follows: mediastinum, n = 28; lung, n = 13; skin, n = 16; soft tissue, n = 13; bone, n = 14; central nervous system, n = 1; bone marrow, n = 5.
  • After a cytoreductive prephase, treatment was stratified into 3 branches: patients in K1 (stage I and II resected) received three 5-day courses (methotrexate [MTX] 0.5 g/m(2), dexamethasone, oxazaphorins, etoposide, cytarabine, doxorubicin, and intrathecal therapy); patients in K2 (stage II nonresected and stage III) received 6 courses; patients in K3 (stage IV or multifocal bone disease) received 6 intensified courses including MTX 5 g/m(2), high-dose cytarabine/etoposide.
  • Events were as follows: progression during therapy, n = 2; progression or relapse after therapy, n = 20; second malignancy, n = 1.
  • It was concluded that short-pulse chemotherapy, stratified according to stage, is effective treatment for pediatric ALCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Germany. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Infant. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Male. Prospective Studies. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / metabolism. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases. Recurrence. Risk Factors. Treatment Failure


2. Kim TM, Park YH, Lee SY, Kim JH, Kim DW, Im SA, Kim TY, Kim CW, Heo DS, Bang YJ, Chang KH, Kim NK: Local tumor invasiveness is more predictive of survival than International Prognostic Index in stage I(E)/II(E) extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. Blood; 2005 Dec 1;106(12):3785-90
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  • [Title] Local tumor invasiveness is more predictive of survival than International Prognostic Index in stage I(E)/II(E) extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type.
  • This study was launched to determine the prognostic significance of local tumor invasiveness (LTI) in 114 patients diagnosed with stage I(E)/II(E) extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (NTCL).
  • LTI was defined as bony invasion or destruction or tumor invasion of the skin.
  • Complete remission (CR), overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were compared between each group according to LTI, Ann Arbor stage, and International Prognostic Index (IPI).
  • Using multivariate analysis, factors associated with low probability of CR were the presence of LTI (P < .001), the presence of B symptoms (P = .003), and single-modality chemotherapy (P = .045).
  • LTI is the most important prognostic factor in predicting low probability of CR and reduced OS and DFS in nasal stage I(E)/II(E) NTCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, T-Cell / mortality. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Nose Neoplasms / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Killer Cells, Natural / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Radiotherapy. Remission Induction. Survival Analysis. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 16109779.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Kim TM, Heo DS: Extranodal NK / T-cell lymphoma, nasal type: new staging system and treatment strategies. Cancer Sci; 2009 Dec;100(12):2242-8
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  • [Title] Extranodal NK / T-cell lymphoma, nasal type: new staging system and treatment strategies.
  • Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (NTCL) is characterized by clinical heterogeneity based on clinical prognostic factors and survival outcome.
  • NTCL subsets are classified as upper aerodigestive tract (UAT) NTCL or non-UAT NTCL; non-UAT has pathologic similarity to UAT-NTCL but is a clinically distinct subtype.
  • Due to the clinical heterogeneity of NTCL, optimal treatment modalities and prognostic factors have been difficult to determine.
  • Ann Arbor staging for lymphomas and the International Prognostic Index (IPI) have been used to predict prognosis for UAT-NTCL; however, local tumor invasiveness (bony invasion or perforation or invasion of the overlying skin) is the most significant factor for poor outcomes in localized UAT-NTCL.
  • Thus, a new staging system is proposed: limited disease (stage I/II UAT-NTCL without local tumor invasiveness) and extensive disease (stage I/II with local invasiveness or stage III/IV disease of UAT NTCL, and non-UAT NTCL) based on treatment outcomes.
  • NTCL is resistant to anthracycline-based chemotherapy, whereas non-anthracycline combination chemotherapy (such as ifosfamide, methotrexate, etoposide, and prednisolone) has an activity against NTCL as either a front-line or as a second-line treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Extranodal NK-T-Cell / pathology. Nose Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19758393.001).
  • [ISSN] 1349-7006
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 65
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4. Wollina U, Looks A, Meyer J, Knopf B, Koch HJ, Liebold K, Hipler UC: Treatment of stage II cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with interferon alfa-2a and extracorporeal photochemotherapy: a prospective controlled trial. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2001 Feb;44(2):253-60
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  • [Title] Treatment of stage II cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with interferon alfa-2a and extracorporeal photochemotherapy: a prospective controlled trial.
  • BACKGROUND: Both interferon alpha and extracorporeal photochemotherapy have been shown to be effective in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs).
  • However, no prospective trial has been published on the combination of both treatments, although retrospective investigations suggested a better efficacy than for either interferon or extracorporeal photochemotherapy.
  • Fourteen patients (all male) aged 38 to 72 years with CTCL of the mycosis fungoides type, stage IIa/IIb, and a 72-year-old male patient with a Ki-1 lymphoma were treated twice a month for 6 months with extracorporeal photochemotherapy using oral 8-methoxypsoralen as photosensitizer in combination with interferon alfa-2a subcutaneously 3 times a week in the maximal tolerable dosage (ie, up to 18 x 10(6) U).
  • The effects were investigated by a skin score, staging, histologic score (density of the T-cell infiltrate; from 0 = absent to 3 = heavy), immunohistology, and laboratory investigations including total peripheral T-cell count, CD4/CD8 ratio, and soluble interleukin 2 receptor (sIL-2R).
  • In responders the time to best response was 4.3 +/- 1.4 months.
  • The skin score decreased from 22.5 +/- 8.1 to 15.1 +/- 11.0 (P <.001), the histologic score decreased from 2.57 +/- 0.51 to 1.21 +/- 0.80 (P <.001).
  • In the lesional skin the percentage of CD4 cells decreased from 75% to 51% (P =.038) and Ki-67-positive cells decreased from 6.7% to 2.4% (P =.001).
  • The total T-cell count/microL decreased from 1018.9 +/- 557.1 to 667.9 +/- 417.9 (P =.012), and the CD4/CD8 ratio also decreased from 1.88 +/- 0.92 to 1.51 +/- 0.67 (P =.038).
  • The sIL-2R levels did not change significantly during the first 4 months of treatment.
  • Among patients of stage IIa the response rate was 60% in contrast to only 25% of those in stage IIb.
  • There was no need for additional therapy, but interferon dose was decreased because of side effects.
  • After 1 year of follow-up the total response rate was 46.2% (6 of 13 patients): 5 of 9 with stage IIa(55.6%) and 1 of 4 with stage IIb (25.0%).
  • CONCLUSION: These results indicate that patients with CTCL stage IIa can achieve a total response rate of 56% with combined interferon alfa-2a and extracorporeal photochemotherapy.
  • Responders seem to experience their best response within the first 6 months of treatment.
  • The treatment is well tolerated and does not cause severe side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. PUVA Therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Humans. Injections, Subcutaneous. Male. Methoxsalen / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Mycosis Fungoides / pathology. Prospective Studies. Recombinant Proteins

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  • (PMID = 11174383.001).
  • [ISSN] 0190-9622
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a; U4VJ29L7BQ / Methoxsalen
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5. Kwong YL: High-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic SCT in the management of natural killer-cell malignancies. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2009 Dec;44(11):709-14
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  • [Title] High-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic SCT in the management of natural killer-cell malignancies.
  • Natural killer (NK)-cell lymphomas are aggressive.
  • Patients with early (stage I/II) diseases respond favorably to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • Patients with relapses and advanced (stage III/IV) diseases have poor outcome.
  • To improve treatment results, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) has been performed.
  • As patients achieving CR with chemotherapy and radiotherapy also have favorable outcome, a definite advantage of autologous HSCT cannot be established.
  • Allogeneic HSCT had been reported in about 30 patients, with a 2-year OS of 40%.
  • To evaluate the efficacy of allogeneic HSCT, optimal conditioning regimens and a clear graft-versus-lymphoma effect should be defined.
  • HSCT is a potential option in NK-cell lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Lymphoma, Extranodal NK-T-Cell / therapy. Skin Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Transplantation Conditioning. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19767784.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5365
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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6. Marchi E, Alinari L, Tani M, Stefoni V, Pimpinelli N, Berti E, Pagano L, Bernengo MG, Zaja F, Rupoli S, Pileri S, Baccarani M, Zinzani PL: Gemcitabine as frontline treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: phase II study of 32 patients. Cancer; 2005 Dec 1;104(11):2437-41
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  • [Title] Gemcitabine as frontline treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: phase II study of 32 patients.
  • BACKGROUND: Based on the activity of gemcitabine in heavily pretreated patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), the objective of the current study was to determine the role of gemcitabine in the treatment of patients with advanced, untreated CTCL.
  • METHODS: Between June 2002 and February 2004, 32 untreated patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) (n = 26 patients); peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified (PTCLU) with exclusive skin involvement (n = 5 patients); and Sezary syndrome (SS) (n = 1 patient) were enrolled in a 7-institution, Phase II trial and treated with gemcitabine.
  • This drug was given on Days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day schedule at a dose of 1200 mg/m2 intravenously over 30 minutes for a total of 6 cycles.
  • RESULTS: Of the 32 patients studied, 7 (22%) achieved a complete response (CR) and 17 (53%) achieved a partial response (PR), whereas the remaining 8 patients showed no benefit from the treatment.
  • Treatment appeared to be well tolerated; hematologic toxicity was mild and no nausea/emesis or organ toxicity was noted.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current Phase II study demonstrate the activity of gemcitabine as a single agent in untreated CTCL patients.
  • Further studies using gemcitabine in combination, either contemporary or sequentially, with other drugs in patients with advanced stage, untreated CTCL are needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / toxicity. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16216001.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine
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7. Mann BS, Johnson JR, Cohen MH, Justice R, Pazdur R: FDA approval summary: vorinostat for treatment of advanced primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Oncologist; 2007 Oct;12(10):1247-52
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  • [Title] FDA approval summary: vorinostat for treatment of advanced primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • Food and Drug Administration granted regular approval to vorinostat (Zolinza(R); Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, for the treatment of cutaneous manifestations of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) in patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease on or following two systemic therapies.
  • The pivotal study supporting approval was a single-arm open-label phase II trial that enrolled 74 patients with stage IB and higher CTCL who had failed two systemic therapies (one of which must have contained bexarotene).
  • Sixty-one patients (82%) had stage IIB or higher CTCL and 30 patients (41%) had Sézary syndrome.
  • The median duration of protocol treatment was 118 days.
  • The objective response rate was 30% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19.7%-41.5%), the estimated median response duration was 168 days, and the median time to tumor progression was 202 days.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Hydroxamic Acids / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Approval. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors. Humans. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Salvage Therapy. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. United States. United States Food and Drug Administration


8. Mann BS, Johnson JR, He K, Sridhara R, Abraham S, Booth BP, Verbois L, Morse DE, Jee JM, Pope S, Harapanhalli RS, Dagher R, Farrell A, Justice R, Pazdur R: Vorinostat for treatment of cutaneous manifestations of advanced primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Clin Cancer Res; 2007 Apr 15;13(8):2318-22
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  • [Title] Vorinostat for treatment of cutaneous manifestations of advanced primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • PURPOSE: To discuss vorinostat approval for treatment of cutaneous manifestations of advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Data from 1 single-arm, open-label, multicenter pivotal trial and 11 other trials submitted to support the new drug application for vorinostat in the treatment of advanced primary CTCL were reviewed.
  • The pivotal trial assessed responses by changes in overall skin disease score using a severity-weighted assessment tool (SWAT).
  • RESULTS: The pivotal trial enrolled 74 patients with stage IB or higher CTCL.
  • Median number of prior treatments was 3, and 61 patients (82%) had stage IIB or higher disease.
  • The objective response rate in the skin disease assessed by change in the overall SWAT score from the baseline was 30% (95% CI, 18.5 to 42.6) in patients with stage IIB or higher disease.
  • Median time to tumor progression was 148 days for overall population and 169 days for patients with stage IIB or higher disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Vorinostat showed activity in CTCL, and skin responses were a clinical benefit.
  • Vorinostat was approved for treatment of cutaneous manifestations of CTCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Hydroxamic Acids / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cats. Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic. Dogs. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Patient Selection. Pruritus / drug therapy. Pruritus / etiology. Skin / drug effects. Skin / pathology. United States. United States Food and Drug Administration

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  • (PMID = 17438089.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Hydroxamic Acids; 58IFB293JI / vorinostat
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9. Haas A, Lobeck H, Hummel M, Maschmeyer G: [Prolonged remission after immunotherapy of a previously refractory peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma]. Dtsch Med Wochenschr; 2006 Oct 27;131(43):2386-9
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  • [Title] [Prolonged remission after immunotherapy of a previously refractory peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma].
  • [Transliterated title] Anhaltende Remission nach Immuntherapie bei zuvor refraktärem peripherem T-Non-Hodgkin-Lymphom.
  • HISTORY AND ADMISSION FINDINGS: A 54-year-old woman in good condition was admitted because of a rapidly growing tumor in the right groin with skin infiltration.
  • INVESTIGATIONS: Histology revealed a peripheral T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
  • Staging computed tomography (CT) revealed widespread moderately enlarged lymph nodes and the main lesion in right groin measuring 5 x 6 cm which was classified as stage IIIAE.
  • TREATMENT AND COURSE: According to the phase-II-trial DSHNHL-2003 - 1 (German study group for high grade NHL) the patient was scheduled for cycles of CHOEP at 14-day intervals plus granulocyte colony stimulating factor.
  • During the first cycle she developed a worsening wound infection and an infection of her port catheter.
  • Because response to treatment was only minimal a biopsy was performed which showed persisting malignant lymphoma.
  • A good partial response was obtained, followed by radiotherapy with 36 Gy to the main lesion in the right groin.
  • The follow up CT-scans one year after treatment showed a stable remission.
  • CONCLUSION: In T-NHL with primary non-response it is especially difficult to induce a stable remission.
  • Despite a course which was complicated by infections and a failing response to increased chemotherapy a remission was achieved in this patient with a monotherapy of alemtuzumab for eight weeks without complications, followed by radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Neoplasm / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Immunotherapy. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Female. Germany. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Humans. L-Lactate Dehydrogenase / blood. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prednisolone / therapeutic use. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Recombinant Proteins. Remission Induction. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 17054053.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-0472
  • [Journal-full-title] Deutsche medizinische Wochenschrift (1946)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dtsch. Med. Wochenschr.
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antibodies, Neoplasm; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 3A189DH42V / alemtuzumab; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; EC 1.1.1.27 / L-Lactate Dehydrogenase; CHOEP protocol
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10. Duvic M, Talpur R, Wen S, Kurzrock R, David CL, Apisarnthanarax N: Phase II evaluation of gemcitabine monotherapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Clin Lymphoma Myeloma; 2006 Jul;7(1):51-8
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  • [Title] Phase II evaluation of gemcitabine monotherapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate safety and efficacy of gemcitabine monotherapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients with CTCL on a phase II open-label trial and 8 patients off study received intravenous gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on day 1, 8, and 15 for > or = 6 cycles.
  • Physicians' global assessment was based on body surface area involvement in skin, measurement of lymph nodes, and blood by flow cytometry.
  • RESULTS: Two patients with CD30+ anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma and 31 with mycosis fungoides (stage IB [T2, n = 2], stage IIA [T2, n = 1], stage IIB [T3, n = 13], stage IVA [T3 N3, n = 3; T4b2, n = 2; T4b2 N3, n = 2], and stage IVB [T4b2 N1, n = 6; T4 N3b2 M1, n = 1; T3 N3 M1, n = 1]) had received a median of 5 previous therapies (range, 1-13 therapies).
  • Increased hepatic transaminases (n = 4), mucositis (n = 3), lethargy (n = 7), fever (n = 8), cutaneous hyperpigmentation (n = 6), infusion-related maculopapular rash (n = 1), and radiation recall (n = 1) were also seen.
  • CONCLUSION: Gemcitabine is an effective monotherapy with a 68% overall response rate in patients with advanced, heavily pretreated CTCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Sezary Syndrome / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Mycosis Fungoides / complications. Receptors, Interleukin-2 / blood. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16879770.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-9190
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lymphoma & myeloma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lymphoma Myeloma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16672-22; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K24 CA 86815
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Receptors, Interleukin-2; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine
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11. Argiris A, Heald P, Kuzel T, Foss FM, DiStasio S, Cooper DL, Arbuck S, Murren JR: Phase II trial of 9-aminocamptothecin as a 72-h infusion in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Invest New Drugs; 2001;19(4):321-6
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  • [Title] Phase II trial of 9-aminocamptothecin as a 72-h infusion in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the role of 9-aminocamptothecin (9-AC), a synthetic camptothecin analog, in advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).
  • METHODS: Eligible patients had stage IIB-IV CTCL.
  • Nine patients had stage IV disease, 5 patients had circulating Sezary cells, and 2 patients had evidence of tranformation to a large cell lymphoma.
  • Most of the patients were heavily pretreated: 10 had received prior chemotherapy (83%), 5 of whom had received 2 or more prior regimens, including a patient who had received high-dose chemotherapy, and 7 had previously received total-skin electron beam therapy.
  • Six patients (50%) developed an indwelling central venous catheter-related infection, 5 during a period of neutropenia.
  • Three patients died due to sepsis 4-8 weeks after their last 9-AC treatment.
  • Four patients (33%) developed grade IV thrombocytopenia.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Camptothecin / administration & dosage. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Disease Progression. Female. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Neutropenia / therapy. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11561692.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-6997
  • [Journal-full-title] Investigational new drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Invest New Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 5MB77ICE2Q / 9-aminocamptothecin; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
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12. Talpur R, Ward S, Apisarnthanarax N, Breuer-Mcham J, Duvic M: Optimizing bexarotene therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2002 Nov;47(5):672-84
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  • [Title] Optimizing bexarotene therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Bexarotene (Targretin oral capsules), the first RXR-selective retinoid "rexinoid" approved for all stages of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), had a response rate (RR) of 45% at the optimal dose of 300 mg/m(2) per day in 2 multicenter trials.
  • Statins (inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase) may modulate class II major histocompatibility class expression and T-cell responses.
  • Thirteen had stage IA-IIA disease (RR = 53%, 1 complete response [CR]); 41 had stage IIB-IVB disease (RR = 46%, 2 CRs).
  • Sixteen patients with advanced disease treated with bexarotene (225-750 mg/d) in combination with other CTCL therapies achieved an overall RR of 69% (11/16) with concomitant statin therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: This single-center study supports the safety and efficacy of bexarotene as both a monotherapy and a combination therapy for CTCL.
  • When bexarotene is combined with other active CTCL therapies, higher RRs were achieved in patients with advanced disease, without unacceptable side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Algorithms. Dermatitis, Exfoliative / complications. Dermatitis, Exfoliative / therapy. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Hypertriglyceridemia / complications. Hypertriglyceridemia / drug therapy. Hypothyroidism / chemically induced. Middle Aged. Photopheresis. Prospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004 Jun;50(6):e16; author reply e17 [15153920.001]
  • [CommentIn] J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004 Sep;51(3):482; author reply 482-3 [15338005.001]
  • (PMID = 12399758.001).
  • [ISSN] 0190-9622
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16672-22; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K24 CA 86815; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21-CA74117
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene
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13. Olsen EA, Kim YH, Kuzel TM, Pacheco TR, Foss FM, Parker S, Frankel SR, Chen C, Ricker JL, Arduino JM, Duvic M: Phase IIb multicenter trial of vorinostat in patients with persistent, progressive, or treatment refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2007 Jul 20;25(21):3109-15
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  • [Title] Phase IIb multicenter trial of vorinostat in patients with persistent, progressive, or treatment refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the activity and safety of the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) in persistent, progressive, or recurrent mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) cutaneous t-cell lymphoma (CTCL) subtypes.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with stage IB-IVA MF/SS were treated with 400 mg of oral vorinostat daily until disease progression or intolerable toxicity in this open-label phase IIb trial (NCT00091559).
  • Patients must have received at least two prior systemic therapies at least one of which included bexarotene unless intolerable.
  • The primary end point was the objective response rate (ORR) measured by the modified severity weighted assessment tool and secondary end points were time to response (TTR), time to progression (TTP), duration of response (DOR), and pruritus relief ( > or = 3-point improvement on a 10-point visual analog scale).
  • RESULTS: Seventy-four patients were enrolled, including 61 with at least stage IIB disease.
  • The ORR was 29.7% overall; 29.5% in stage IIB or higher patients.
  • Median TTR in stage IIB or higher patients was 56 days.
  • Median TTP was 4.9 months overall, and 9.8 months for stage IIB or higher responders.
  • The most common drug-related adverse experiences (AE) were diarrhea (49%), fatigue (46%), nausea (43%), and anorexia (26%); most were grade 2 or lower but those grade 3 or higher included fatigue (5%), pulmonary embolism (5%), thrombocytopenia (5%), and nausea (4%).
  • CONCLUSION: Oral vorinostat was effective in treatment refractory MF/SS with an acceptable safety profile.
  • [MeSH-major] Hydroxamic Acids / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Salvage Therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Confidence Intervals. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Probability. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome


14. Link MP, Devidas M, Murphy SB, Behm FG, Hutchison R: Favorable treatment outcome of children with early stage large B-cell and anaplastic large cell lymphomas. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8500

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Favorable treatment outcome of children with early stage large B-cell and anaplastic large cell lymphomas.
  • : 8500 Background: The non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) of childhood are heterogeneous.
  • Large cell lymphomas (LCL) are relatively rare in children and sub-divided among diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL), anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), peripheral T (PT) and other rare subtypes.
  • METHODS: We conducted a trial (POG 9219) for stage I and II NHL which accrued 396 children between 1992 and 1999.
  • One hundred fifty-six (40%) had large cell lymphoma.
  • All patients received nine weeks of chemotherapy including vincristine 1.5mg/m2 weekly for seven doses; doxorubicin 40mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 750mg/m2 on days 1, 22 and 43; and prednisone 40mg/m2 daily for 28 days during the first 4 weeks and on days 43-47.
  • Among children with ALCL, primary sites included lymph node (36), skin (11), bone (6), and other (5).
  • Only one patient with DLBCL developed recurrent disease and died.
  • At 5 years, the projected event-free survival (EFS) is 98 % (SE 3%), and the overall survival (OS), 98 % (SE 3%).
  • Thirty-five children with ALCL (60%) had T cell markers, and the remainder had null cell markers.
  • Nine patients with ALCL (T=5; null=4) failed treatment: three failed induction, and six relapsed from complete remission, but were effectively salvaged.
  • The projected 5 year EFS for early stage ALCL is 84 % (SE 7%) (DLBCL versus ALCL, p-value 0.02); the OS, 100%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Nine weeks of modest intensity chemotherapy are sufficient for children with early stage DLBCL.

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  • (PMID = 28014540.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Gniadecki R, Assaf C, Bagot M, Dummer R, Duvic M, Knobler R, Ranki A, Schwandt P, Whittaker S: The optimal use of bexarotene in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Br J Dermatol; 2007 Sep;157(3):433-40
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  • [Title] The optimal use of bexarotene in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • The management goal in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) is to improve symptoms and induce remission.
  • Early-stage disease is generally treated with skin-directed therapies.
  • However, if these do not control the disease, systemic therapy becomes necessary.
  • Bexarotene, a novel rexinoid, is an oral, noncytotoxic drug that has been approved in Europe for the treatment of refractory advanced-stage CTCL and in the U.S.A. for refractory CTCL.
  • We provide guidance on the use of bexarotene in the management of CTCL, based on data from phase II/III clinical trials and the authors' clinical experience, and suggest how the potential of the drug can be maximized.
  • The clinical trial results with bexarotene are reviewed, especially in comparison with interferon-alpha, which is the other commonly used noncytotoxic systemic therapy for CTCL.
  • A treatment algorithm for bexarotene in refractory CTCL is suggested.
  • As bexarotene may take time to achieve a maximum response, this algorithm recommends that therapy should be continued for a sufficient period to allow for a delayed onset of action.
  • In addition, possible combination therapies with bexarotene are discussed.
  • An on-going randomized clinical trial comparing psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) with PUVA plus bexarotene will provide valuable information about this combination regimen in early-stage disease, but further data are needed on the relative efficacies of other combination therapies with bexarotene in CTCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Algorithms. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Male. PUVA Therapy. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17553039.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0963
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene
  • [Number-of-references] 66
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16. Prince HM, McCormack C, Ryan G, Baker C, Rotstein H, Davison J, Yocum R: Bexarotene capsules and gel for previously treated patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: results of the Australian patients treated on phase II trials. Australas J Dermatol; 2001 May;42(2):91-7
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  • [Title] Bexarotene capsules and gel for previously treated patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: results of the Australian patients treated on phase II trials.
  • We describe eight previously treated patients who entered phase II international multicentre studies examining the role of bexarotene in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • Of the seven patients who received 300 mg/m2 per day capsules, five (71%) achieved a partial response, with mean time to onset of response of 27 days (range, 20-29) with responses persisting for a mean of 92 days (range, 57-115).
  • The single patient receiving the topical preparation (stage IB) remains in partial response at 31 months.
  • The major toxicity with oral administration was hypertriglyceridaemia requiring therapy.
  • Bexarotene capsules and gel are active and generally well-tolerated agents in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and studies examining its role in previously untreated patients or as part of combination therapy are warranted.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / administration & dosage. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Administration, Topical. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Australia. Capsules. Disease-Free Survival. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Gels. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Remission Induction. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11309029.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-8380
  • [Journal-full-title] The Australasian journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Australas. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Capsules; 0 / Gels; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene
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17. Zhang YJ, Ren ZM, Wu QL, He ZY, Huang Y, Xia YF, Lin TY, Cui NJ: [Treatment outcome and prognosis of 112 patients with nasal and nasopharyngeal peripheral T cell lymphomas]. Zhonghua Xue Ye Xue Za Zhi; 2006 Apr;27(4):217-21
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  • [Title] [Treatment outcome and prognosis of 112 patients with nasal and nasopharyngeal peripheral T cell lymphomas].
  • OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively analyze the treatment outcomes and prognostic factors of nasal and nasopharyngeal peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCL) patients.
  • METHODS: One hundred and twelve patients with pathologically confirmed nasal and nasopharyngeal PTCL were included, among which 39 were CD56(+) NK/T cell lymphomas.
  • The median pre-treatment disease course was 4 months.
  • 91.1% of the patients had Ann Arbor I(E)/II(E) diseases.
  • Seventy two patients received combined chemo-radiotherapy, 32 chemotherapy only, 3 radiotherapy only and 5 no any treatment.
  • Chemotherapy achieved a complete remission (CR) rate of 34.4% for initial treatment, and of 65.1% after primary treatment.
  • The local tumor controlled rate was 50.5%, and the median time to tumor progression (TTP) was 11 months.
  • Univariate analysis showed that favorable prognostic factors for survival were pre-treatment course > 3 months, earlier clinical stage, non NK/T lymphoma, no skin involvement, lower IPI, CR after initial chemotherapy, radiotherapy, CR after primary treatment and local tumor controlled.
  • Multivariate analysis showed that, pre-treatment course > 3 months (P = 0.011), non NK/T lymphoma (P = 0.007), CR after initial chemotherapy (P = 0.008) and radiotherapy (P = 0.000) were favorable prognostic factors for survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although most nasal and nasopharyngeal peripheral T-cell lymphomas were diagnosed at early stage diseases, some of them were highly aggressive with poor prognosis, particularly CD56(+) NK/T cell lymphomas.
  • Combination chemo/radiotherapy, though remained principal treatments, more effective therapeutic modalities are expected.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / therapy. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Nose Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Therapy / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Radiotherapy / methods. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 16875549.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-2727
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua xue ye xue za zhi = Zhonghua xueyexue zazhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Xue Ye Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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18. Kempf W, Kettelhack N, Duvic M, Burg G: Topical and systemic retinoid therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am; 2003 Dec;17(6):1405-19
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  • [Title] Topical and systemic retinoid therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • Because curative therapies for CTCL are not yet available, short of TSEB in patients who have early-stage disease and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in patients who have more advanced disease, the goal of current therapies is to prevent progression of MF and to preserve quality of life.
  • The overall conclusion drawn from the studies reported in the literature, is that retinoids as monotherapy, or in combination with other nonaggressive treatment modalities, represent a low-risk treatment alternative that is especially suitable for controlling early stages of MF and other CTCL.
  • A combination of therapies may be more effective in controlling CTCL as shown with IFN-alpha plus retinoids, and, recently, IFN-alpha with bexarotene and other modalities.
  • For example, isotretinoin, followed by TSEB (for stage I to II disease) or preceded by chemotherapy (for stage II and IV disease) and bexarotene plus PUVA or photopheresis plus IFN, gave overall response rates of 82% and 69% in patients who had MF and SS, respectively.
  • Even in cases with clinically complete clearance of skin lesions, lymphoid infiltrates persisted, which are most likely the source of recurrences.
  • The new generation of retinoids, the RXR selective agonists like bexarotene, represent a promising approach for refractory or persistent MF that is unresponsive to first-line therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Retinoids / therapeutic use. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adjuvants, Immunologic / administration & dosage. Adjuvants, Immunologic / therapeutic use. Administration, Cutaneous. Angiogenesis Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Immunologic Factors / administration & dosage. Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Injections, Subcutaneous. PUVA Therapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14710892.001).
  • [ISSN] 0889-8588
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology/oncology clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol. Oncol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 0 / Retinoids
  • [Number-of-references] 85
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19. Lin P, Jones D, Dorfman DM, Medeiros LJ: Precursor B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma: a predominantly extranodal tumor with low propensity for leukemic involvement. Am J Surg Pathol; 2000 Nov;24(11):1480-90
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  • [Title] Precursor B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma: a predominantly extranodal tumor with low propensity for leukemic involvement.
  • Precursor B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LBL) is uncommon and accounts for less than 10% of cases of lymphoblastic lymphoma.
  • Patients with concurrent precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) or a history thereof were excluded.
  • There was no evidence of bone marrow disease at the time of diagnosis in 23 patients; two patients had focal (<5%) involvement.
  • The treatment and survival data available for a subset of patients with B-LBL were compared with those from a series of patients with B-ALL at our institution.
  • The primary sites of disease were skin (nine cases), bones (five cases), soft tissue (four cases), lymph nodes, (three cases), breast (two cases), stomach and colon (one case), and mediastinum (one case).
  • Clinical stage was stage I in 13 cases, stage II in seven cases, stage III in three cases, and stage IV in two cases.
  • All cases were positive for B-cell antigens and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase.
  • Of 14 patients with available survival data, all achieved complete clinical response after combination chemotherapy (13 patients) or surgical excision followed by local irradiation (one patient).
  • Five (35.7%) patients subsequently relapsed, including the patient who had received only irradiation, and four of these patients died after a median survival time of 60 months.
  • None of the patients had leukemia, although one patient developed extensive bone marrow involvement.
  • Unlike precursor T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, which commonly involves lymph nodes and the mediastinum, B-LBL usually involves extranodal sites, most often the skin, and rarely presents as a mediastinal mass.
  • With aggressive chemotherapy, patients with precursor B-LBL rarely develop leukemia and appear to have a better prognosis than do patients with B-ALL.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, B-Cell / pathology. Precancerous Conditions / pathology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11075849.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm
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20. Breneman D, Duvic M, Kuzel T, Yocum R, Truglia J, Stevens VJ: Phase 1 and 2 trial of bexarotene gel for skin-directed treatment of patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Arch Dermatol; 2002 Mar;138(3):325-32
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase 1 and 2 trial of bexarotene gel for skin-directed treatment of patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety, dose tolerance, and efficacy of topical bexarotene gel in patients with early-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).
  • PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-seven adults with early-stage (TNM stages IA-IIA) CTCL.
  • INTERVENTIONS: Bexarotene gel, 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1.0%, applied in incremental dose adjustments from 0.1% gel every day to 1.0% gel 4 times daily or the maximal tolerated dose.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients were followed for efficacy and safety, and treatment continued as long as they benefited.
  • Response (> or =50% improvement) was evaluated by the Physician's Global Assessment of cutaneous disease and by an overall severity assessment of cutaneous disease, including signs of CTCL and area involved.
  • Adverse events were generally mild to moderate in severity and were confined to treatment sites.
  • Treatment-limiting toxic effects were associated with skin irritation and increased with gel exposure.
  • Median projected time to onset of response was 20.1 weeks (range, 4.0-86.0 weeks), and the estimated median response duration from the start of therapy was 99 weeks.
  • Patients with no previous therapy for mycosis fungoides responded at a higher rate (75%) than those who previously underwent topical therapies (67%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Bexarotene gel was well tolerated, was easily self-applied, and had a substantial response rate in treating patients with early-stage CTCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / administration & dosage. Lymphoma, T-Cell / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Gels. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Safety. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Arch Dermatol. 2002 Mar;138(3):398-9 [11902993.001]
  • [ErratumIn] Arch Dermatol 2002 Oct;138(10):1386
  • (PMID = 11902983.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-987X
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Dermatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Gels; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene
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21. Foss FM: Activity of pentostatin (Nipent) in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: single-agent and combination studies. Semin Oncol; 2000 Apr;27(2 Suppl 5):58-63
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. PENTOSTATIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Activity of pentostatin (Nipent) in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: single-agent and combination studies.
  • Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) comprises a constellation of diseases of malignant clonal T lymphocytes that present initially in the skin.
  • Since biochemical studies of pentostatin suggested that T cells are more sensitive to the effects of inhibition of adenosine deaminase by purine analogs, early studies with pentostatin were conducted in patients with refractory T-cell neoplasms.
  • Of 94 CTCL patients treated on five phase II studies with single-agent pentostatin, the overall response rate was 40%, with a 7% complete response rate; the median time to progression ranged from 1.3 to 8.3 months.
  • A phase II study combining pentostatin with intermittent high-dose interferon-alpha demonstrated a 41% overall response rate, with two complete responses, both in patients with Sézary syndrome and diffuse erythroderma Toxicities have been tolerable at doses of 4 to 5 mg/m2 administered weekly or for 3 consecutive days, with grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity in 31 patients, renal insufficiency in seven, nausea in 17, and conjunctivitis in three.
  • Additional studies using pentostatin in earlier-stage CTCL or in combination with other active agents in advanced disease are warranted.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Pentostatin / therapeutic use. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenosine Deaminase Inhibitors. Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic. Disease Progression. Enzyme Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Enzyme Inhibitors / adverse effects. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Humans. Interferon-alpha / administration & dosage. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Remission Induction. Sezary Syndrome / drug therapy. T-Lymphocytes / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 10877054.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adenosine Deaminase Inhibitors; 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 395575MZO7 / Pentostatin
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22. Duvic M, Martin AG, Kim Y, Olsen E, Wood GS, Crowley CA, Yocum RC, Worldwide Bexarotene Study Group: Phase 2 and 3 clinical trial of oral bexarotene (Targretin capsules) for the treatment of refractory or persistent early-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Arch Dermatol; 2001 May;137(5):581-93
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase 2 and 3 clinical trial of oral bexarotene (Targretin capsules) for the treatment of refractory or persistent early-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • DESIGN: The effects of 2 randomized doses of 6.5 mg/m(2) per day (with crossover for progression) vs 650 mg/m(2) per day (later modified to 300 mg/m(2) per day) were evaluated in an open-label, multicenter, phase 2 and 3 study conducted between February 1997 and November 1998.
  • SETTING: Eighteen international cutaneous T-cell lymphoma clinics at academic referral centers.
  • PATIENTS: Fifty-eight patients with biopsy-proven stage IA through IIA cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that was refractory to (or patients were intolerant of) treatment or had reached at least a 6-month response plateau under at least 2 forms of prior therapy (median of 3.5 prior therapies).
  • Body surface area, time to response, duration of disease control, time to disease progression, individual index lesion signs and symptoms, and quality of life parameters were secondary outcomes.
  • The median duration of response from start of therapy could not be estimated for the 15 patients at 300 mg/m(2) per day owing to low relapse rates in 2 patients (13%); at higher doses it was 516 days.
  • The following drug-related adverse effects were reversible and treatable: hypertriglyceridemia (46 patients [79%]), hypercholesterolemia (28 patients [48%]), headache (27 patients [47%]), central hypothyroidism (23 patients [40%]), asthenia (21 patients [36%]), and leukopenia (16 patients [28%]).
  • No cases of drug-related neutropenic fever, sepsis, or death occurred.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Bexarotene (Targretin capsules) (the first retinoid X receptor-selective rexinoid) was well tolerated and effective as an oral treatment for 15 (54%) of 28 patients with refractory or persistent early-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma at doses of 300 mg/m(2) per day.
  • Hypertriglyceridemia and hypothyroidism require monitoring but are reversible and manageable with concomitant medication.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / administration & dosage. Lymphoma, T-Cell / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Capsules. Cross-Over Studies. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Quality of Life. Retreatment. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Arch Dermatol. 2001 May;137(5):649-52 [11346343.001]
  • (PMID = 11346336.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-987X
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Dermatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16672-22; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21-CA74117
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Capsules; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene
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23. Whittaker SJ, Demierre MF, Kim EJ, Rook AH, Lerner A, Duvic M, Scarisbrick J, Reddy S, Robak T, Becker JC, Samtsov A, McCulloch W, Kim YH: Final results from a multicenter, international, pivotal study of romidepsin in refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Oct 10;28(29):4485-91
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Final results from a multicenter, international, pivotal study of romidepsin in refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • PURPOSE: The primary objective of this study was to confirm the efficacy of romidepsin in patients with treatment refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: This international, pivotal, single-arm, open-label, phase II study was conducted in patients with stage IB to IVA CTCL who had received one or more prior systemic therapies.
  • Response was determined by a composite assessment of total tumor burden including cutaneous disease, lymph node involvement, and blood (Sézary cells).
  • Most patients (71%) had advanced stage disease (≥ IIB).
  • The median time to response was 2 months, and the median duration of response was 15 months.
  • Drug-related adverse events were generally mild and consisted mainly of GI disturbances and asthenic conditions.
  • CONCLUSION: Romidepsin has significant and sustainable single-agent activity (including improvement in pruritus) and an acceptable safety profile, making it an important therapeutic option for treatment refractory CTCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Depsipeptides / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin / drug effects. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / adverse effects. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Asthenia / chemically induced. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Nausea / chemically induced. Neoplasm Staging. Prospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Vomiting / chemically induced


24. Duvic M, Olsen EA, Breneman D, Pacheco TR, Parker S, Vonderheid EC, Abuav R, Ricker JL, Rizvi S, Chen C, Boileau K, Gunchenko A, Sanz-Rodriguez C, Geskin LJ: Evaluation of the long-term tolerability and clinical benefit of vorinostat in patients with advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Clin Lymphoma Myeloma; 2009 Dec;9(6):412-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Vorinostat .

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  • [Title] Evaluation of the long-term tolerability and clinical benefit of vorinostat in patients with advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • INTRODUCTION: Vorinostat, an orally active histone deacetylase inhibitor, was approved in October 2006 by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of cutaneous manifestations of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) in patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease during or after treatment with 2 systemic therapies.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A multicenter, open-label phase IIb trial evaluated the activity and safety of vorinostat 400 mg orally daily in patients with > or = stage IB, persistent, progressive, or treatment-refractory mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome CTCL subtypes.
  • We report the safety and tolerability of long-term vorinostat therapy in patients who experienced clinical benefit in the previous phase IIb study.
  • RESULTS: As of December 11, 2008, 6 of 74 patients enrolled in the original study had received vorinostat for > or = 2 years: median age, 65 years; median number of previous therapies, 2.5; median time from diagnosis to enrollment, 1.8 years.
  • During the follow-up study, the most common drug-related grade 1-4 adverse events (AEs) were diarrhea, nausea, fatigue, and alopecia (6, 5, 4, and 3 patients, respectively).
  • Five patients have discontinued the study drug, and 1 patient is continuing therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: This post hoc subset analysis provides evidence for the long-term safety and clinical benefit of vorinostat in heavily pretreated patients with CTCL, regardless of previous treatment failures.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Hydroxamic Acids / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19951879.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-0712
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lymphoma & myeloma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lymphoma Myeloma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors; 0 / Hydroxamic Acids; 58IFB293JI / vorinostat
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25. Duvic M, Hymes K, Heald P, Breneman D, Martin AG, Myskowski P, Crowley C, Yocum RC, Bexarotene Worldwide Study Group: Bexarotene is effective and safe for treatment of refractory advanced-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: multinational phase II-III trial results. J Clin Oncol; 2001 May 01;19(9):2456-71
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Bexarotene is effective and safe for treatment of refractory advanced-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: multinational phase II-III trial results.
  • PURPOSE: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are malignancies of T cells appearing as skin lesions and are responsive to retinoid therapy.
  • Safety and efficacy of a novel RXR-selective retinoid (rexinoid) bexarotene (Targretin, LGD1069; Ligand Pharmaceuticals Inc, San Diego, CA) was evaluated as a single-agent oral therapy administered once daily in an open-label study in patients with refractory advanced-stage CTCL.
  • Improvements were also seen in overall body-surface area involvement, median index lesion surface area, adenopathy, cutaneous tumors, pruritus, and CTCL-specific quality of life.
  • The most frequent drug-related adverse events included hypertriglyceridemia (associated rarely with pancreatitis), hypercholesterolemia, hypothyroidism, and headache.
  • CONCLUSION: Bexarotene is the first in a novel class of pharmacologic agents, the RXR-selective retinoids, or rexinoids.
  • Bexarotene is orally administered, safe, and generally well tolerated with reversible side effects, and is effective for the treatment of advanced, refractory CTCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11331325.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA116672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21-CA74117
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene
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26. Pagano L, Gallamini A, Trapè G, Fianchi L, Mattei D, Todeschini G, Spadea A, Cinieri S, Iannitto E, Martelli M, Nosari A, Bona ED, Tosti ME, Petti MC, Falcucci P, Montanaro M, Pulsoni A, Larocca LM, Leone G, Intergruppo Italiano Linfomi: NK/T-cell lymphomas 'nasal type': an Italian multicentric retrospective survey. Ann Oncol; 2006 May;17(5):794-800
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] NK/T-cell lymphomas 'nasal type': an Italian multicentric retrospective survey.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcome of NK/T-cell lymphoma 'nasal type' developed in Italian patients.
  • PATIENTS: Between 1997 and 2004, 26 new cases of NK/T-cell lymphoma 'nasal type' were diagnosed in 10 Italian Hematology institutions.
  • RESULTS: All patients were Caucasian, male/female ratio was 19/7, with a median age of 50 years (range 20-80).
  • In 23 cases presentation at the onset was in the nasal cavity or adjacent structures, in two cases the lymphoma onset with skin lesions was followed successively by rhynopharyngeal dissemination, while the remaining case had bone marrow and lymph node involvement followed by oro-pharyngeal involvement.
  • Regarding the stage of disease: 12 patients were in stage I; six in stage II; eight in stage IV.
  • Diagnosis was based on the finding of a NK/T-cell phenotype at the histological and immunophenotypic examination of oropharyngeal or cutaneous lesions.
  • All patients but one were treated with chemotherapy, alone in nine cases or associated to radiotherapy in 14 cases; two patients had chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, while one patient underwent only surgery.
  • Chemotherapy was anthracycline-based in 17 out of 25 cases.
  • In those patients in whom radiotherapy was performed, radiation dosages ranged between 36 Gy and 47.5 Gy, with a median dosage of 40 Gy.
  • Nine patients (34%) were responsive to the treatments: six patients obtained a complete remission and other three a partial remission.
  • The remaining 17 patients resulted refractory or presented a limited response to therapy.
  • The median disease-free survival was 14 months and the median overall survival time was 9 months.
  • CONCLUSION: The results of this retrospective survey confirmed that NK/T-cell lymphoma 'nasal type' is a very rare lymphoma in the Italian population, and it is characterized by a very bad prognosis.
  • Due to the rarity of this disease, a standardized therapeutic approach is lacking.
  • More data are needed to know the epidemiology of this kind of lymphoma in Europe.

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  • (PMID = 16497823.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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27. Yamashita H, Nakagawa K, Asari T, Murakami N, Igaki H, Ohtomo K: Radiotherapy for 41 patients with stages I and II MALT lymphoma: a retrospective study. Radiother Oncol; 2008 Jun;87(3):412-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Radiotherapy for 41 patients with stages I and II MALT lymphoma: a retrospective study.
  • PURPOSE: Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a distinct disease with specific clinical and pathologic features that may affect diverse organs.
  • We analyzed our recent experience with Stage I/II MALT lymphoma presenting in the stomach and other organs to assess the outcome following radiation therapy (RT) alone.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty-one patients with Stages I (37) and II (4) disease were treated between 2000 and 2006.
  • Presenting sites included stomach, 11; orbital adnexa, 21; thyroid, 1; other head and neck, 3; small bowel, 3; skin, 1; and rectum, 1.
  • Mean follow-up time was 32.0 months (range, 2.1-162 months).
  • Only one patient died from bile duct carcinoma at 22 months from the start of irradiation for conjunctiva MALT lymphoma without recurrence of lymphoma.
  • One patient with a duodenal lymphoma had a recurrence in non-irradiated distant sites at 1 month.
  • Another patient with a bilateral eye lid lymphoma had a recurrence within radiation field at 41 months.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Helicobacter Infections / complications. Helicobacter Infections / drug therapy. Helicobacter pylori. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiation Injuries / pathology. Radiotherapy Dosage

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  • (PMID = 18423914.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-8140
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiotherapy and oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiother Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
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28. Chiarion-Sileni V, Bononi A, Fornasa CV, Soraru M, Alaibac M, Ferrazzi E, Redelotti R, Peserico A, Monfardini S, Salvagno L: Phase II trial of interferon-alpha-2a plus psolaren with ultraviolet light A in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Cancer; 2002 Aug 1;95(3):569-75
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II trial of interferon-alpha-2a plus psolaren with ultraviolet light A in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: From May 1993 to January 1999, 63 symptomatic patients with all stages of MF and SS were treated in a prospective Phase II trial with systemic escalating doses of IFN-alpha-2a combined with PUVA for 1 year, followed by indefinite PUVA maintenance in complete responding patients.
  • RESULTS: Sixty-three patients were enrolled (Stage IA, n = 6; IB, n = 37; IIA, n = 3; IIB, n = 3; III, n = 12; IVA, n = 2).
  • Ten patients had received previous therapy.
  • Of 63 patients, 51 achieved a complete response (CR; 74.6%) or partial response (PR; 6%) to therapy.
  • Five patients stopped IFN-alpha-2a therapy due to toxicity.
  • Eighty-four percent of the patients received more than 75% of the planned dose (12 million units three times a week).
  • CONCLUSIONS: This combination of IFN-alpha-2a and phototherapy is an effective and safe therapy for patients with symptomatic MF.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. PUVA Therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Recombinant Proteins. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 12209749.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a
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29. Quereux G, Marques S, Nguyen JM, Bedane C, D'incan M, Dereure O, Puzenat E, Claudy A, Martin L, Joly P, Delaunay M, Beylot-Barry M, Vabres P, Celerier P, Sasolas B, Grange F, Khammari A, Dreno B: Prospective multicenter study of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin treatment in patients with advanced or refractory mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome. Arch Dermatol; 2008 Jun;144(6):727-33
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prospective multicenter study of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin treatment in patients with advanced or refractory mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the rate of objective response to pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride (Caelyx) in patients with advanced or refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).
  • PATIENTS: Twenty-five patients with either (1) stage II to stage IV CTCL previously unsuccessfully treated with at least 2 lines of treatments or (2) histologically transformed epidermotropic CTCL requiring chemotherapy.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The response to treatment was evaluated by clinical evaluation.
  • RESULTS: At the end of treatment, we observed an objective response (primary end point) in 56% of the patients (14 of 25): 5 complete responses and 9 partial responses.
  • The median overall survival time was 43.7 months.
  • For the 14 patients who experienced an objective response, the median progression-free survival time after the end of treatment was 5 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This prospective study demonstrates the effectiveness of Caelyx in treating CTCL, with an overall response rate of 56% in spite of the high proportion of patients with advanced-stage disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Doxorubicin / analogs & derivatives. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Polyethylene Glycols / therapeutic use. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Injections, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prospective Studies. Syndrome. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Arch Dermatol. 2008 Jun;144(6):786-7 [18559771.001]
  • (PMID = 18559761.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-3652
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Dermatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / liposomal doxorubicin; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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30. Di Lorenzo G, Di Trolio R, Delfino M, De Placido S: Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in stage IVB mycosis fungoides. Br J Dermatol; 2005 Jul;153(1):183-5
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in stage IVB mycosis fungoides.
  • BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (LD) is effective in the treatment of relapsing or recalcitrant cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the activity and toxicity of LD in patients with stage IVB mycosis fungoides (MF).
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that LD is beneficial in terms of activity and toxicity in stage IVB MF.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Drug Evaluation. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / radiography. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Polyethylene Glycols. Retrospective Studies. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16029347.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0963
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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31. Abbott RA, Whittaker SJ, Morris SL, Russell-Jones R, Hung T, Bashir SJ, Scarisbrick JJ: Bexarotene therapy for mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome. Br J Dermatol; 2009 Jun;160(6):1299-307
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Bexarotene therapy for mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome.
  • BACKGROUND: Bexarotene (Targretin) is a synthetic retinoid which is licensed for the treatment of advanced refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).
  • Nineteen patients had early-stage (IB-IIA) refractory mycosis fungoides and 47 patients had advanced-stage CTCL (IIB-IVB).
  • RESULTS: Fifty-two out of 66 (79%) patients completed over 1 month of therapy with an intention-to-treat response rate of 44% (29/66).
  • Median time to maximal response was 3 months (1-9 months).
  • Median time to progression was 9 months (3-44 months).
  • Fourteen patients (21%) did not complete a month of bexarotene therapy.
  • Adverse effects of the whole group included central hypothyroidism in 100% (all grade II and managed with thyroid replacement) and hyperlipidaemia in 100% (all managed with lipid-lowering therapy +/- dose reduction).
  • Responses were seen in all stages and were higher in advanced stages: 26% (five of 19) with early-stage and 51% (24/47) of advanced-stage disease.
  • Responses were seen in skin, blood and lymph nodes.
  • Twenty-eight out of 66 patients were treated with bexarotene monotherapy and the remainder were on one or more additional anti-CTCL therapies.
  • However partial responses were not graded and would include any improvement seen in the skin, blood and lymph node.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Sezary Syndrome / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Sex Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19222457.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2133
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene
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32. Hurst RE: Bexarotene ligand pharmaceuticals. Curr Opin Investig Drugs; 2000 Dec;1(4):514-23
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The company launched the drug for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), as Targretin capsules, in the US in January 2000 [359023].
  • The company filed an NDA for Targretin capsules in June 1999, and for topical gel in December 1999 [329011], [349982] specifically for once-daily oral administration for the treatment of patients with early-stage CTCL who have not tolerated other therapies, patients with refractory or persistent early stage CTCL and patients with refractory advanced stage CTCL.
  • The FDA approved Targretin capsules at the end of December 1999 for once-daily oral treatment of all stages of CTCL in patients refractory to at least one prior systemic therapy, at an initial dose of 300 mg/m2/day.
  • After an NDA was submitted in December 1999 for Targretin gel, the drug received Priority Review status for use as a treatment of cutaneous lesions in patients with stage IA, IB or IIA CTCL [354836].
  • Ligand had received Orphan Drug designation for this indication [329011].
  • The company filed an MAA with the EMEA for Targretin Capsules to treat lymphoma in November 1999 [348944].
  • The NDA for Targretin gel is based on a multicenter phase III trial that was conducted in the US, Canada, Europe and Australia involving 50 patients and a multicenter phase I/II clinical program involving 67 patients.
  • Targretin gel was evaluated for the treatment of patients with early stage CTCL (IA-IIA) who were refractory to, intolerant to, or reached a response plateau for at least 6 months on at least two prior therapies.
  • Efficacy results exceeded the protocol-defined response target rates; side effects were primarily limited to local skin reactions [349982].
  • Ligand has worldwide rights to market bexarotene capsules, and will market the drug in the US, Canada and selected European markets.
  • In Spain, Portugal, Greece and Central and South America, Ferrer Internacional will market and distribute the drug.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / pharmacology. Drugs, Investigational / pharmacology. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Receptors, Retinoic Acid / antagonists & inhibitors. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / pharmacology. Transcription Factors / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 11249708.001).
  • [ISSN] 1472-4472
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in investigational drugs (London, England : 2000)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Investig Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Drugs, Investigational; 0 / Receptors, Retinoic Acid; 0 / Retinoid X Receptors; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; 0 / Transcription Factors; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene
  • [Number-of-references] 74
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33. Wollina U, Looks A, Meyer J, Knopf B, Koch HJ, Liebold K, Hipler UC: Treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma stage II with interferon-alpha-2a and extracorporeal photochemotherapy: a prospective controlled trial. Ann N Y Acad Sci; 2001 Sep;941:210-3
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma stage II with interferon-alpha-2a and extracorporeal photochemotherapy: a prospective controlled trial.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Photopheresis. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Erythema / diagnosis. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Recombinant Proteins. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11594576.001).
  • [ISSN] 0077-8923
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a
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