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1. Hawkins DS, Arndt CA: Pattern of disease recurrence and prognostic factors in patients with osteosarcoma treated with contemporary chemotherapy. Cancer; 2003 Dec 1;98(11):2447-56
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  • [Title] Pattern of disease recurrence and prognostic factors in patients with osteosarcoma treated with contemporary chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: The goal of the current study was to define the clinical features and outcome of recurrent osteosarcoma (OS) in children and young adults initially treated with contemporary chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: The authors reviewed the clinical features, therapy, and outcome for 59 patients from the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) and Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center (Seattle, WA).
  • They were diagnosed initially with OS between January 1990 and December 2000, received multiagent chemotherapy (most frequently cisplatin, doxorubicin, high-dose methotrexate, and ifosfamide), and developed disease recurrence after achieving an initial complete response (CR).
  • RESULTS: The most common site of initial disease recurrence was the lung only (n = 36 patients), followed by distant bone (n =8 patients), combined lung and other sites (n =7 patients), and other sites (n =8 patients).
  • The median time to first disease recurrence was 15 months (range, 2-92 months) from the initial diagnosis.
  • Thirty patients with isolated pulmonary recurrence achieved a second CR, either with surgery alone (n =15 patients) or surgery and salvage chemotherapy (n =15 patients).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The DFS and overall survival rates for recurrent OS after contemporary therapy remained poor even for patients with isolated pulmonary recurrence.
  • Therefore, new treatment strategies are needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Osteosarcoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 14635080.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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2. Sher T, Miller KC, Deeb G, Lee K, Chanan-Khan A: Plasma cell leukaemia and other aggressive plasma cell malignancies. Br J Haematol; 2010 Aug;150(4):418-27
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  • [Title] Plasma cell leukaemia and other aggressive plasma cell malignancies.
  • These can be primary (de-novo) or secondary due to progressive prior multiple myeloma (MM).
  • Compared to MM, organ invasion is common in PCL, while soft tissue tumors involving the head, neck or paraspinal area are common sites for MEP.
  • Even high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue has not been able to demonstrate consistent improvement in survival outcome.
  • Although not specifically evaluated, novel anti-plasma cell agents, such as the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, and immunomodulatory drugs, such as lenalidomide, appear to be active against these aggressive cancers.
  • Clinical and translational research directed at improved understanding of disease biology and development of novel therapeutics is urgently needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Multiple Myeloma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Boronic Acids / therapeutic use. Bortezomib. Female. Humans. Leukemia, Plasma Cell / diagnosis. Leukemia, Plasma Cell / drug therapy. Leukemia, Plasma Cell / etiology. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Pyrazines / therapeutic use. Thalidomide / analogs & derivatives. Thalidomide / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 20701603.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2141
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA121044
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Pyrazines; 4Z8R6ORS6L / Thalidomide; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib; F0P408N6V4 / lenalidomide
  • [Number-of-references] 69
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS585047; NLM/ PMC4044724
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3. Freschauf GK, Mani RS, Mereniuk TR, Fanta M, Virgen CA, Dianov GL, Grassot JM, Hall DG, Weinfeld M: Mechanism of action of an imidopiperidine inhibitor of human polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase. J Biol Chem; 2010 Jan 22;285(4):2351-60
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  • Conformational analysis using circular dichroism, UV difference spectroscopy, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer all indicate that A12B4C3 disrupts the secondary structure of PNKP.
  • A12B4C3 also inhibits the repair of DNA single and double strand breaks following exposure of cells to ionizing radiation, but does not inhibit two other key strand-break repair enzymes, DNA polymerase beta or DNA ligase III, providing additional evidence that PNKP is the cellular target of the inhibitor.
  • [MeSH-major] DNA Repair Enzymes / antagonists & inhibitors. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / drug effects. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor) / antagonists & inhibitors. Piperidines / pharmacology. Pyrroles / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenosine Triphosphate / metabolism. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacology. Binding Sites. Camptothecin / pharmacology. Cell Survival / drug effects. Circular Dichroism. DNA Ligases / antagonists & inhibitors. DNA Ligases / metabolism. DNA Polymerase beta / antagonists & inhibitors. DNA Polymerase beta / metabolism. DNA Repair / drug effects. Etoposide / pharmacology. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer. Humans. Mutagenesis, Site-Directed. Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Protein Conformation. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / pharmacology. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 19940137.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-351X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of biological chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biol. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0700730; Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2-(1-hydroxyundecyl)-1-(4-nitrophenylamino)-6-phenyl-6,7a-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo(3,4-b)pyridine-5,7(2H,4aH)-dione; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / DNA ligase III alpha protein, Xenopus; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Piperidines; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8L70Q75FXE / Adenosine Triphosphate; EC 2.7.1.- / PNKP protein, human; EC 2.7.1.- / Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor); EC 2.7.7.- / DNA Polymerase beta; EC 6.5.1.- / DNA Ligases; EC 6.5.1.- / DNA Repair Enzymes; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2807293
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4. Oberlin O, Rey A, Lyden E, Bisogno G, Stevens MC, Meyer WH, Carli M, Anderson JR: Prognostic factors in metastatic rhabdomyosarcomas: results of a pooled analysis from United States and European cooperative groups. J Clin Oncol; 2008 May 10;26(14):2384-9
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  • Clinical factors, including age, histology, site of primary, and site(s) and number of sites of metastatic disease, were correlated with event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS).
  • The 3-year OS and EFS were 34% (SE, 1.7) and 27% (SE, 1.6), respectively.
  • By univariate analysis, 3-year EFS was significantly and adversely influenced by age, alveolar histology, location of primary tumor in unfavorable site (defined as extremity and "other" sites), presence of three or more sites of metastatic disease, and the presence of bone or bone marrow involvement.
  • Relative risks were 1.6 for age younger than 1 year or at least 10 years, 1.4 for unfavorable site of primary tumor, 1.4 for bone or bone marrow involvement, 1.4 for three or more metastatic sites.
  • CONCLUSION: This analysis identified subsets of patients with metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma with different outcomes to current therapy and offers a strategy to define patient candidates for experimental approaches to treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Rhabdomyosarcoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Bone Marrow Neoplasms / secondary. Child. Child, Preschool. Cohort Studies. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Infant. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Risk Factors. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18467730.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098413; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098543
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4558625
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5. Ehrlich PF, Ferrer FA, Ritchey ML, Anderson JR, Green DM, Grundy PE, Dome JS, Kalapurakal JA, Perlman EJ, Shamberger RC: Hepatic metastasis at diagnosis in patients with Wilms tumor is not an independent adverse prognostic factor for stage IV Wilms tumor: a report from the Children's Oncology Group/National Wilms Tumor Study Group. Ann Surg; 2009 Oct;250(4):642-8
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  • SUMMARY AND BACKGROUND DATA: We reviewed patients with stage IV Wilms tumor treated on National Wilms Tumor Study 4 and 5 to ascertain if they have a worse prognosis than other Stage IV disease.
  • Cohorts included those who underwent resection of the liver lesions compared with those who received only chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • After chemotherapy and/or radiation, 13 patients underwent liver resection (wedge resection, 7; lobectomy, 5; and trisegmentectomy, 1).
  • In 14 patients, the liver disease disappeared with chemotherapy only.
  • EFS for the patients with metastatic FH Wilms tumor was 75% (95% confidence interval [CI]: (71%, 78%), EFS by Stage IV category was: lung only 76% (95% CI: 72%, 80%) (513 patients); liver, not lung 76% (95% CI: 58%, 87%) (34 patients), liver and lung 70% (95% CI: 57%, 80%) (62 patients), and other sites 64% (95% CI: 42%, 79%) (25 patients).
  • There was no significant difference in EFS for patients with FH Wilms tumor treated with chemotherapy compared with that of patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation (P = 0.63).
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Wilms Tumor / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Hepatectomy. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Liver Function Tests. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19730241.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1140
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA042326; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA042326-15
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS322334; NLM/ PMC3302661
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6. Fairbanks CA, Stone LS, Wilcox GL: Pharmacological profiles of alpha 2 adrenergic receptor agonists identified using genetically altered mice and isobolographic analysis. Pharmacol Ther; 2009 Aug;123(2):224-38
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  • [Title] Pharmacological profiles of alpha 2 adrenergic receptor agonists identified using genetically altered mice and isobolographic analysis.
  • These fibers target alpha 2 adrenergic receptors (alpha(2)ARs) on both primary afferent terminals and secondary neurons, and their activation mediates substantial inhibitory control over this transmission, rivaling that of opioid receptors which share a similar pattern of distribution.
  • The terminals of primary afferent nociceptive neurons and secondary spinal dorsal horn neurons express alpha(2A)AR and alpha(2C)AR subtypes, respectively.
  • Spinal delivery of these agents serves to reduce their side effects, which are mediated largely at supraspinal sites, by concentrating the drugs at the spinal level.
  • Targeting these spinal alpha(2)ARs with one of five selective therapeutic agonists, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, brimonidine, ST91 and moxonidine, produces significant antinociception that can work in concert with opioid agonists to yield synergistic antinociception.
  • This review provides first an anatomical description of the localization of the three subtypes in the central nervous system, second a detailed account of the pharmacological history of each of the six primary agonists, and finally a comprehensive report of the specific interactions of other GPCR agonists with each of the six principal alpha(2)AR agonists featured.

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  • (PMID = 19393691.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-016X
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmacology & therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharmacol. Ther.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R01 DA015438-05; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / DA015735-02; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R21 DA015735-02; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R01 DA015438; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R21 DA017075-02; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / DA015438-05; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R21 DA015735; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / DA017075-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists; 0 / Adrenergic alpha-Agonists; 0 / Analgesics; 0 / Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2; 0 / Receptors, Opioid
  • [Number-of-references] 203
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS129387; NLM/ PMC2724647
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7. Studeny M, Marini FC, Champlin RE, Zompetta C, Fidler IJ, Andreeff M: Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles for interferon-beta delivery into tumors. Cancer Res; 2002 Jul 1;62(13):3603-8
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

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  • Molecules that physiologically control cell proliferation are often produced locally in tissues and are rapidly destroyed when they enter circulation.
  • This allows local effects while avoiding interference with other systems.
  • Unfortunately, it also limits the therapeutic use of these molecules via systemic delivery.
  • We here demonstrate that, for the purpose of anticancer therapy, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can produce biological agents locally at tumor sites.
  • We show that the tumor microenvironment preferentially promotes the engraftment of MSCs as compared with other tissues.
  • [MeSH-major] Interferon-beta / physiology. Melanoma / therapy. Stem Cells / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoviridae / genetics. Animals. Bone Marrow Cells / cytology. Bone Marrow Cells / metabolism. Bone Marrow Cells / physiology. Cell Communication / physiology. Cell Division / physiology. Coculture Techniques. Drug Carriers. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / therapy. Male. Mice. Mice, Nude. Transduction, Genetic. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 12097260.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA49639; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA55164
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Carriers; 77238-31-4 / Interferon-beta
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8. Lee J, Dibble S, Dodd M, Abrams D, Burns B: The relationship of chemotherapy-induced nausea to the frequency of pericardium 6 digital acupressure. Oncol Nurs Forum; 2010 Nov;37(6):E419-25
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  • [Title] The relationship of chemotherapy-induced nausea to the frequency of pericardium 6 digital acupressure.
  • PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To explain the relationship between the intensity of chemotherapy-induced nausea (CIN) and the frequency of pericardium 6 (P6) digital acupressure.
  • DESIGN: Secondary data analysis of a multicenter, longitudinal, randomized, clinical trial.
  • SETTING: Nine community clinical oncology programs and six independent sites in the United States.
  • SAMPLE: 53 patients with breast cancer who received moderate to highly emetogenic chemotherapy and applied P6 digital acupressure in addition to antiemetics to control CIN.
  • METHODS: A daily log measuring nausea intensity and the frequency of acupressure for 11 days after the administration of chemotherapy.
  • Hierarchical generalized linear modeling procedure (multilevel negative binomial regression) was used for analyzing the data.
  • FINDINGS: Participants used acupressure an average of two times per day (SD = 1.84, range 0-10).
  • Women who used acupressure more frequently after the peak of nausea (on day 4) were predicted to have a 0.97-point higher nausea intensity in the acute phase than women who used acupressure less frequently, controlling for the effects of other variables in the model (incidence rate ratio = 1.52, p < 0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with breast cancer whose nausea intensity started higher from the acute phase continued to experience higher symptom intensity during the 11 days after chemotherapy administration and required more frequent acupressure even after the peak of nausea.
  • IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Careful assessment and management of acute CIN with continuous monitoring and care of CIN in the delayed phase are important nursing issues in caring for patients receiving chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Acupressure / methods. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Nausea / chemically induced. Nausea / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antiemetics / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Middle Aged. Oncology Nursing / methods. Pericardium

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  • (PMID = 21059575.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-0688
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology nursing forum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol Nurs Forum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / R01-84014; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA 045809-15
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiemetics; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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9. Alexandre J, Bleuzen P, Bonneterre J, Sutherland W, Misset JL, Guastalla J, Viens P, Faivre S, Chahine A, Spielman M, Bensmaïne A, Marty M, Mahjoubi M, Cvitkovic E: Factors predicting for efficacy and safety of docetaxel in a compassionate-use cohort of 825 heavily pretreated advanced breast cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2000 Feb;18(3):562-73
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  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 825 ABC patients treated with docetaxel (100 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) were source-reviewed and analyzed for prognostic factors associated with overall response rate (ORR), time to treatment failure (TTF), overall survival (OS), febrile neutropenia, mucositis, and severe fluid retention syndrome by univariate and multivariate analysis.
  • By multivariate analysis, secondary anthracycline-resistant disease was significantly associated (P <.
  • Liver dysfunction (transaminase levels > 1.5 times the upper limit of normal [ULN] and alkaline phosphatase [AP] level > three times ULN) and time since first relapse less than 24 months were associated with shorter TTF and OS.
  • Other significant correlations included the following: elevated CA 15-3 serum level with lower ORR; more than two involved sites, and minor transaminase and AP level abnormalities with shorter OS; and no previous chemotherapy for ABC with shorter TTF.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms, Male / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / analogs & derivatives. Taxoids
  • [MeSH-minor] Anthracyclines / therapeutic use. Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Fever / chemically induced. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Prognosis. Risk Factors. Stomatitis / chemically induced. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 10653871.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anthracyclines; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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10. Radulescu VC, Gerrard M, Moertel C, Grundy PE, Mathias L, Feusner J, Diller L, Dome JS: Treatment of recurrent clear cell sarcoma of the kidney with brain metastasis. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2008 Feb;50(2):246-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of recurrent clear cell sarcoma of the kidney with brain metastasis.
  • BACKGROUND: Clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK) is known for its propensity to metastasize to bone, but it also spreads to other sites including the brain.
  • This study was undertaken to describe the treatment and outcomes of patients with recurrent CCSK involving the brain.
  • METHODS: A retrospective records review was conducted on eight patients with CCSK who developed brain metastases after complete responses to initial therapy.
  • At the time of recurrence, patients were treated with multimodal therapy including biopsy or resection, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.
  • All patients received a variable number of courses of ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE), with or without other agents.
  • Four patients received high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue.
  • One patient died from complications of bacteremia 8 weeks after starting chemotherapy.
  • The other seven patients achieved a complete response after either surgery or ICE chemotherapy.
  • Of these, six patients were alive without disease with a median follow-up of 30 months from the time of recurrence (range, 24 to 71 months).
  • All six survivors received radiation therapy and four had gross total resections.
  • Three survivors received high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue.
  • ICE chemotherapy, together with radiation therapy and surgery, provides a reasonable salvage regimen for recurrent CCSK.
  • It is unclear whether high-dose chemotherapy confers a benefit compared to conventional-dose chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Sarcoma, Clear Cell / secondary. Sarcoma, Clear Cell / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 17226850.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5017
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-21765
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. Lindrud S, Orlick M, Barnard N, Hait WN, Toppmeyer DL: Central nervous system progression during systemic response to trastuzumab, humanized anti-HER-2/neu antibody, plus paclitaxel in a woman with refractory metastatic breast cancer. Breast J; 2003 Mar-Apr;9(2):116-9
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  • Treatment of selected patients with anti-HER-2/neu antibodies alone (1) or in combination with chemotherapy (2) may be of benefit to patients with refractory breast cancer.
  • These patients may have a poorer overall prognosis (3) due to relative resistance to both hormonal therapy and chemotherapy (4-6).
  • While on combination treatment she developed cerebellar metastases.
  • Follow-up computed tomography (CT) scan revealed that her disease continued to respond in the liver, lungs, and bone.
  • This case suggests that failure of trastuzumab to cross the blood-brain barrier may compromise its overall effectiveness and raises the possibility that the central nervous system (CNS), or other sanctuary sites, may become clinically more significant in patients with breast cancer in the era of antibody-based therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Cerebellar Neoplasms / secondary. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Blood-Brain Barrier. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / secondary. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Receptor, ErbB-2 / drug effects. Time Factors. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Trastuzumab

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  • (PMID = 12603385.001).
  • [ISSN] 1075-122X
  • [Journal-full-title] The breast journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA72720
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-2; P188ANX8CK / Trastuzumab; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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12. Zhou Q, Sherwin RP, Parrish C, Richters V, Groshen SG, Tsao-Wei D, Markland FS: Contortrostatin, a dimeric disintegrin from Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix, inhibits breast cancer progression. Breast Cancer Res Treat; 2000 Jun;61(3):249-60
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  • However, contortrostatin inhibits angiogenesis induced by the breast cancer, as shown by immunohistochemical quantitation of the vascular endothelial cells in tumor tissue removed from the nude mice.
  • We have identified alpha(v)beta3, an important integrin mediating cell motility and tumor invasion, as one of the binding sites of contortrostatin on MDA-MB-435 cells.
  • We conclude that contortrostatin blocks alpha(v)beta3, and perhaps other integrins, and thus inhibits in vivo progression.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Adhesion / drug effects. Cell Division / drug effects. Disease Progression. Extracellular Matrix / metabolism. Extracellular Matrix Proteins / metabolism. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / prevention & control. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 10966001.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-6806
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast cancer research and treatment
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA14089
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Crotalid Venoms; 0 / Disintegrins; 0 / Extracellular Matrix Proteins; 0 / Receptors, Vitronectin; 0 / contortrostatin
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13. Mariani A, Webb MJ, Keeney GL, Calori G, Podratz KC: Hematogenous dissemination in corpus cancer. Gynecol Oncol; 2001 Feb;80(2):233-8
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  • METHODS: In 612 corpus cancer patients managed surgically, we defined HD as tumor spread to the lung, liver, or other sites via hematogenous routes.
  • RESULTS: We observed 142 instances of tumor spread-71 nonhematogenous and 42 hematogenous to the lung, 9 to the liver, 5 to other sites (adrenals, breast, brain, bone, skin), 3 to both liver and lung, 1 to both lung and bone, and 11 to sites unknown.
  • Stage IV disease, positive adnexae, deep myometrial invasion, primary tumor diameter, tumor involving the whole uterine cavity, positive peritoneal cytology, adjuvant radiotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, grade 3 histology, histologic subtype, and lymph-vascular invasion significantly (P < or = 0.01) correlated with HD.
  • Considering separately recurrence in the lung and in the liver and recurrence in other sites, the only independent predictors of lung recurrence were stage IV disease and myometrial invasion, whereas independent predictors of HD to the liver/other sites were age and histologic grade.
  • Considering only the 60 patients with a known site of HD, 67% with lung recurrence were > 65 years old compared with 17% with HD to the liver/other sites.
  • Furthermore, grade 1-2 disease was observed in 65% of patients with lung recurrence compared with 27% with HD to the liver/other sites.
  • Recurrence in the lung was more frequent in older patients with well or moderately differentiated tumors, whereas HD to the liver/other sites was more frequent in patients < or = 65 years of age harboring grade 3 tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Endometrial Neoplasms / blood. Endometrial Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11161865.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30CA15083
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Dodd MJ, Cho M, Miaskowski C, Quivey J: A longitudinal evaluation of oral mucositis in patients receiving radiation therapy (IMRT) with/without chemotherapy (CTX). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20572

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A longitudinal evaluation of oral mucositis in patients receiving radiation therapy (IMRT) with/without chemotherapy (CTX).
  • A variety of instruments and techniques have been used to quantify oral cavity changes during treatment.
  • A secondary aim in our study testing an innovative mouthwash is to increase our understanding of using subjective and objective methods for measuring oral mucositis, functional status, and weight changes over time.
  • METHODS: Patients reported functional status, pain and investigators measured oral mucositis and weight at four times (beginning of RT [T1], onset of mucositis [T2], end of RT [T3], and healing of mucositis [T4]) over a 10 - 15 week period, using the Karnofsky Performance Status [KPS]) and the Oral Mucositis Assessment Scale (OMAS).
  • The OMAS measures researcher-evaluated ulceration/pseudomembrane formation and erythema in specific sites in the mouth, and self-report by patients, rating severity of mouth pain, ability to swallow and chew.
  • RESULTS: Of 51 head and neck cancer patients enrolled, 3 never developed mucositis.
  • Subjective pain, chewing, and swallowing scores were positively correlated with each other (r= .31 - .73, p<.05) and objective oral mucositis scores were positively correlated with each other (r= .49 - .77, p<.01), however, no significant correlations were obtained between the subjective and objective scores.

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  • (PMID = 27961117.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Carlson RW, O'Neill A, Vidaurre T, Gomez HL, Badve S, Sledge G, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group: Randomized phase II trial of gefitinib plus anastrozole or fulvestrant in postmenopausal, metastatic breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1013

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: This multi-institutional, single-stage, non-comparative, randomized phase II study tested the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib 250 mg daily PO plus endocrine therapy with either anastrozole 1 mg/day PO (AG Arm) versus fulvestrant 250 mg IM every 4-weeks (FG Arm).
  • Eligible pts were postmenopausal women with ER+ and/or PgR+ measurable metastatic breast cancer with no prior endocrine therapy for metastatic disease, no prior adjuvant AI or fulvestrant, no more than two chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease, ECOG status 0-2, no CNS metastasis, and adequate bone marrow, liver, and renal function.
  • Primary endpoint was RECIST determined clinical benefit (CR+PR+SD for ≥6 mos) and secondary endpoints were toxicity and interaction of biomarkers with clinical benefit.
  • Treatment groups were balanced for race, age, ECOG status, and sites of disease.
  • Median N of 4-week cycles of treatment is 6 (range 1-42) in both groups.
  • Treatment was terminated for disease progression in 74% v 75%, toxicity 7% v 10%, death 1% v 3%, withdrawal 8% v 1%, and other 3% v 7% in the AG v FG arms, respectively.
  • G3 + G4 + G5 toxicities occurring in ≥5% of either treatment are diarrhea (5% v 13%), SGOT elevation (7% v 8%), and infection without neutropenia (1% v 6%) for AG v FG.

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  • (PMID = 27960741.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Spunt SL, Harper JA, Krasin MJ, Billups CA, Rodriguez-Galindo C: Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFT) as second malignant neoplasms (SMN) following treatment of a primary malignant neoplasm (PMN) during childhood. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8539

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFT) as second malignant neoplasms (SMN) following treatment of a primary malignant neoplasm (PMN) during childhood.
  • Demographic data, diagnostic and treatment information for both the PMN and SMN, and outcome data were recorded.
  • Six patients received chemotherapy for treatment of the PMN including alkylating agents (n=3), anthracyclines (n=6), and etoposide (n=1).
  • Four also received radiotherapy (RT) for the PMN (dose range, 10.8-48 Gy, median 30 Gy).
  • The ESFT primary sites were chest wall/rib (n=4), extremity (n=3) and pelvis (n=1).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of ESFT as a SMN following treatment of childhood cancer is similar to the proportion of ESFT as a PMN in childhood.
  • Patients with retinoblastoma may be at higher risk than other childhood cancer survivors for secondary ESFT.
  • Most secondary ESFT are not radiation-induced.
  • Survival appears to be only slightly inferior to that of de novo ESFT.

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  • (PMID = 28013834.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Picozzi VJ, Canlas LA, Sicuro PL, Malpass TW: A phase II trial of gemcitabine, docetaxel, and bevacizumab (GDB) in metastatic pancreas cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4606

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Benchmark response statistics in MPC include response rate (RR) 20-30%, time to disease progression (TTP) 3.5-5.5 mo, median overall survival (OS) 6-9 mo and 1- year (yr) OS 20-30%.
  • As bevacizumab (B) added to combination chemotherapy has produced major improvement in OS for other cancers (e.g. colon cancer), we chose to study the GDB regimen in MPC.
  • Eligiblity criteria included 1) diagnosis of MPC, 2) chemotherapy naivity, 3) ECOG performance status 0 /1, 4) organ function adequate for therapy.
  • Therapy included G 1000 mg/m<sup>2</sup> IV bolus, D 40 mg/m<sup>2</sup> IV and B 10 mg/kg IV every 2 weeks (wks) for 1 yr unless disease progression or prohibitive treatment toxicity occurred.
  • Secondary endpoints included therapy toxicity, radiographic RR (RECIST criteria), tumor marker RR (CA 19.9) and OS.
  • Primary metastatic disease sites were liver (n=18), peritoneum ( n=6), lymph node ( n=2) and lung (n=1).
  • 7/27 pts (26%) experienced grade 3 or higher treatment-related toxicity, including pulmonary (n=3), neutropenia (n=3), bleeding events (n=3), VTE (n=2), hypertension (n=1), hypokalemia (n=1) and skin rash (n=1).
  • 1 pt died from respiratory failure, possibly therapy-related.
  • Of 24 pts evaluable for TTP, 9/18 (50%) initial pts achieved > 9 mo TTP (range 9.2-18.5 mo); the remaining 6 pts continue progression-free on therapy (range 2+-7+ mo).
  • 1) The GDB regimen is overall well-tolerated; pulmonary toxicity was the major therapy-related toxicity concern.

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  • (PMID = 27964143.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Martin KJ, González E, Lindberg JS, Taccetta C, Amdahl M, Malhotra K, Llach F: Paricalcitol dosing according to body weight or severity of hyperparathyroidism: a double-blind, multicenter, randomized study. Am J Kidney Dis; 2001 Nov;38(5 Suppl 5):S57-63
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  • Vitamin D therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis therapy has relied on patient dry weight to determine the initial dose of medication.
  • Obtaining a patient's dry weight can be difficult, and no correlation has been established between a patient's body weight and severity of secondary hyperparathyroidism.
  • We conducted a double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, 12-week, multicenter trial to compare the incidence of hypercalcemia (single occurrence) between two dosing regimens: one regimen based on baseline intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH; PTH/80) level, and the other regimen based on patient body weight (0.04 microgram/kg).
  • One hundred twenty-five adult patients with ESRD on maintenance hemodialysis therapy were enrolled at multiple sites.
  • Before treatment, all patients were required to have PTH levels of 300 pg/mL or greater, calcium levels of 8.0 mg/dL or greater and 10.5 mg/dL or less, and a calcium x phosphorus (Ca x P) product of 70 or less.
  • Patients were randomized to one of two regimens: the nonrandomized treatment was also administered as a placebo dummy.
  • No incidence of hypercalcemia occurred in either treatment group during the study.
  • Incidences of elevated Ca x P product levels were similar between treatment groups.
  • Treatment with paricalcitol injection based on degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism incurred no greater risk for hypercalcemia and achieved meaningful therapeutic results with fewer dose adjustments than dosing based on patient body weight.
  • [MeSH-major] Body Weight. Ergocalciferols / administration & dosage. Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary / drug therapy. Kidney Failure, Chronic / complications. Parathyroid Hormone / blood. Renal Dialysis

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  • (PMID = 11689389.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-6838
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Kidney Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Ergocalciferols; 0 / Parathyroid Hormone; 6702D36OG5 / paricalcitol; EC 3.1.3.1 / Alkaline Phosphatase; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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19. Nickerson HJ, Matthay KK, Seeger RC, Brodeur GM, Shimada H, Perez C, Atkinson JB, Selch M, Gerbing RB, Stram DO, Lukens J: Favorable biology and outcome of stage IV-S neuroblastoma with supportive care or minimal therapy: a Children's Cancer Group study. J Clin Oncol; 2000 Feb;18(3):477-86
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Favorable biology and outcome of stage IV-S neuroblastoma with supportive care or minimal therapy: a Children's Cancer Group study.
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcome and prognostic factors in infants with stage IV-S neuroblastoma treated prospectively with supportive care only or, in symptomatic patients, with low-dose cytotoxic therapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty eligible infants were studied for response and survival with supportive care or, for symptomatic patients, cyclophosphamide 5 mg/kg/d for 5 days with or without hepatic radiation of 4.5 Gy over 3 days.
  • Supportive care was the only treatment provided for 44 (55%) of 80 infants, and their 5-year survival rate was 100%, compared with 81% survival for those requiring cytotoxic therapy for symptoms (P =.005).
  • The only other significant factor predictive for improved survival was favorable Shimada histopathologic classification.
  • Sites of metastatic involvement (liver, skin, or bone marrow) and surgical resection of the primary tumor were not significant for survival.
  • CONCLUSION: This study confirms the favorable biologic features and excellent survival of infants with stage IV-S neuroblastoma with minimal therapy.
  • Infants younger than 2 months old at diagnosis with rapidly progressive abdominal disease may benefit from earlier and more intensive treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroblastoma / pathology. Neuroblastoma / therapy. Palliative Care
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / pathology. Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / secondary. Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / therapy. Bone Marrow Neoplasms / secondary. Disease-Free Survival. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. Infant. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Skin Neoplasms / secondary. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 10653863.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA02649; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA13539; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA22794; etc
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Wiseman CL, Kharazi A: Objective clinical regression of metastatic breast cancer in disparate sites after use of whole-cell vaccine genetically modified to release sargramostim. Breast J; 2006 Sep-Oct;12(5):475-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Objective clinical regression of metastatic breast cancer in disparate sites after use of whole-cell vaccine genetically modified to release sargramostim.
  • A patient with recurrent breast cancer metastases following initial response to chemotherapy and hormonal maintenance was treated with a whole-cell tumor vaccine, resulting in a prompt objective complete remission of a lung lesion on computed tomography (CT) scans and near-complete regression of multiple breast lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
  • Reinstitution of vaccine inoculation resulted in major regression of the brain and breast lesions, improvement in all other areas, and no indication of new lesions.
  • Therapy consisted of inoculation of 20 x 10(6) SV-BR-1-GM cells, a unique breast cancer cell line transfected to release sargramostim (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]).
  • Each treatment was preceded 48 hours earlier with low-dose cyclophosphamide 300 mg/m2 to abrogate regulatory T-cell activity.
  • The patient developed positive delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and also antibody reactivity to the vaccine cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / therapy. Cancer Vaccines / genetics. Cancer Vaccines / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / therapy. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / immunology. Immunologic Factors / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Neoplasm / immunology. Brain Neoplasms / immunology. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Female. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / immunology. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / immunology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Middle Aged. Postmenopause. Recombinant Proteins. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


21. Ganesh SK, Skelding KA, Mehta L, O'Neill K, Joo J, Zheng G, Goldstein J, Simari R, Billings E, Geller NL, Holmes D, O'Neill WW, Nabel EG: Rationale and study design of the CardioGene Study: genomics of in-stent restenosis. Pharmacogenomics; 2004 Oct;5(7):952-1004
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND AND AIMS: in-stent restenosis is a major limitation of stent therapy for atherosclerosis coronary artery disease.
  • The CardioGene Study is an ongoing study of restenosis in bare mental stents (BMS) for the treatment of coronary artery disease.
  • Furthermore, the delineation of genetic biomarkers would be of value in the clinical setting of risk-stratify patients prior to stent therapy.
  • Prospective risk stratification would allow for the rational selection of specialized treatments against the development of in-stent restenosis (ISR), such as drug-eluting stents.
  • SETTING: Patients are enrolled at two sites in the US with high-volume cardiac catheterization facilities: the William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, MI, USA, and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, USA.
  • First, 350 patients are enrolled prospectively at the time of stent implantation.
  • The major secondary outcome is clinical restenosis at 12 months.
  • Second, a corollary case-control analysis will be carried out with the enrollment of an additional 250 cases with a history of recurrent restenosis after treatment with BMS.
  • A standardized questionnaire is used to collect clinical data primarily through direct patient interview to assess medical history, medication use, functional status, family history, environmental factors, and social history.
  • Per individual in the prospective cohort, high-quality transcript profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells at each time of blood sampling are obtained using Affymetrix U133A microarrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA).
  • Per chip, this yields 495,930 features per individual per time of sampling.
  • This represents expression levels for 22,283 genes per patients oer time of blood sampling, including 14,500 well-characterized human genes.
  • These genes are finely investigated for candidate SNPs and other gene variants.
  • These include determining blood gene and protein expression in patients with ISR, investigating the genetic basis of ISR, developing predictive gene and protein biomarkers, and the identification of new targets for treatment.
  • [MeSH-minor] Gene Expression Profiling / methods. Genotype. Humans. Multicenter Studies as Topic / methods. Patient Selection. Phenotype. Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide. Predictive Value of Tests. Prospective Studies. Proteomics / methods. RNA, Messenger / biosynthesis. Research Design. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15469413.001).
  • [ISSN] 1462-2416
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmacogenomics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharmacogenomics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger
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22. Friedberg JW, Neuberg D, Monson E, Jallow H, Nadler LM, Freedman AS: The impact of external beam radiation therapy prior to autologous bone marrow transplantation in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2001;7(8):446-53
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  • [Title] The impact of external beam radiation therapy prior to autologous bone marrow transplantation in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • External beam radiation therapy (XRT) is frequently used to treat refractory disease sites or consolidate remission in patients with relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) prior to autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT).
  • We report the long-term outcome and toxicities associated with this therapy.
  • We uniformly treated 552 patients with NHL with total body irradiation, high-dose chemotherapy, and anti-B-cell monoclonal antibody-purged ABMT.
  • Of these patients, 152 received XRT to the mediastinum, abdomen, or pelvis (n = 102) or other sites (n = 50) prior to ABMT.
  • For patients with aggressive histology, the median overall survival time was 64 months in the XRT patients and 79 months in the patients not treated with XRT (P= .09).
  • Of patients who received XRT, 12.5% developed secondary myelodysplasia compared with 5.8% of patients not receiving XRT (P = .01).
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cause of Death. Cohort Studies. Combined Modality Therapy / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy / standards. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lymphoma, B-Cell / mortality. Lymphoma, B-Cell / radiotherapy. Lymphoma, B-Cell / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Transplantation, Autologous / methods. Transplantation, Autologous / mortality

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  • (PMID = 11569890.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-8791
  • [Journal-full-title] Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA66996
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Zang RY, Zhang ZY, Cai SM, Tang MQ, Chen J, Li ZT: Epithelial ovarian cancer presenting initially with extraabdominal or intrahepatic metastases: a preliminary report of 25 cases and literature review. Am J Clin Oncol; 2000 Aug;23(4):416-9
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  • Twenty-five patients with EOC, who were treated in the Cancer Hospital of Shanghai Medical University from January 1986 to December 1997, and manifesting as extraperitoneal or liver parenchyma metastases at the time of presentation without detectable ovarian tumors, were retrospectively studied.
  • When compared with 52 other women with stage IV EOC, 20 patients who initially sought treatment for extraabdominal metastases experienced a better prognosis, with an estimated median survival of 24 months versus 10 months (p = 0.0427).
  • The median survival was 30 months in patients with pleural effusion or supraclavicular lymph node metastases versus 19 months in those with spread to other sites (p = 0.0264).
  • The prognosis of such cases, mainly for those with supraclavicular lymphadenopathy or malignant pleural effusion, is better than that for other stage IV EOC patients, probably because most of the patients who initially had distant metastases were generally in condition that permitted aggressive surgery or multicycle chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / diagnosis. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Ovarian Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Adult. Aged. CA-125 Antigen / analysis. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Linear Models. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / diagnosis. Prognosis. Remission Induction. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 10955875.001).
  • [ISSN] 0277-3732
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CA-125 Antigen
  • [Number-of-references] 13
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24. Black DM, Schwartz AV, Ensrud KE, Cauley JA, Levis S, Quandt SA, Satterfield S, Wallace RB, Bauer DC, Palermo L, Wehren LE, Lombardi A, Santora AC, Cummings SR, FLEX Research Group: Effects of continuing or stopping alendronate after 5 years of treatment: the Fracture Intervention Trial Long-term Extension (FLEX): a randomized trial. JAMA; 2006 Dec 27;296(24):2927-38
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  • [Title] Effects of continuing or stopping alendronate after 5 years of treatment: the Fracture Intervention Trial Long-term Extension (FLEX): a randomized trial.
  • CONTEXT: The optimal duration of treatment of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis is uncertain.
  • OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of discontinuing alendronate treatment after 5 years vs continuing for 10 years.
  • PARTICIPANTS: One thousand ninety-nine postmenopausal women who had been randomized to alendronate in FIT, with a mean of 5 years of prior alendronate treatment.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was total hip bone mineral density (BMD); secondary measures were BMD at other sites and biochemical markers of bone remodeling.
  • Similarly, those discontinuing alendronate had increased serum markers of bone turnover compared with continuing alendronate: 55.6% (P<.001) for C-telopeptide of type 1 collagen, 59.5% (P < .001) for serum n = propeptide of type 1 collagen, and 28.1% (P<.001) for bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, but after 5 years without therapy, bone marker levels remained somewhat below pretreatment levels 10 years earlier.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Women who discontinued alendronate after 5 years showed a moderate decline in BMD and a gradual rise in biochemical markers but no higher fracture risk other than for clinical vertebral fractures compared with those who continued alendronate.


25. Hauck ML, LaRue SM, Petros WP, Poulson JM, Yu D, Spasojevic I, Pruitt AF, Klein A, Case B, Thrall DE, Needham D, Dewhirst MW: Phase I trial of doxorubicin-containing low temperature sensitive liposomes in spontaneous canine tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 2006 Jul 1;12(13):4004-10
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  • The tumors did not involve bone and were located at sites amenable to local hyperthermia.
  • Three treatments, given 3 weeks apart, were scheduled.
  • Pharmacokinetics were evaluated during the first treatment cycle.
  • Grade 4 neutropenia and acute death secondary to liver failure, possibly drug related, were the dose-limiting toxicities.
  • Other toxicities, with the possible exception of renal damage, were consistent with those observed following free doxorubicin administration.
  • Of the 20 dogs that received > or = 2 doses of LTSL-doxorubicin, 12 had stable disease, and 6 had a partial response to treatment.
  • Tumor drug concentrations at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg averaged 9.12 +/- 6.17 ng/mg tissue.
  • CONCLUSION: LTSL-doxorubicin offers a novel approach to improving drug delivery to solid tumors.

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  • (PMID = 16818699.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA042745; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01CA42745
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Liposomes; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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26. Reuter S, Prasad S, Phromnoi K, Kannappan R, Yadav VR, Aggarwal BB: Embelin suppresses osteoclastogenesis induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and tumor cells in vitro through inhibition of the NF-κB cell signaling pathway. Mol Cancer Res; 2010 Oct;8(10):1425-36
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  • Most patients with cancer die not because of the tumor in the primary site, but because it has spread to other sites.
  • Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily and an activator of the NF-κB signaling pathway, has emerged as a major mediator of bone loss, commonly associated with cancer and other chronic inflammatory diseases.
  • Thus, embelin, an inhibitor of RANKL-induced NF-κB activation has great potential as a therapeutic agent for osteoporosis and cancer-linked bone loss.

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  • (PMID = 20826545.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-3125
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer research : MCR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA091844; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA124787; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-124787-01A2; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-16 672
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzoquinones; 0 / Bone Density Conservation Agents; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / RANK Ligand; 0 / TNFSF11 protein, human; SHC6U8F5ER / embelin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS233648; NLM/ PMC2974017
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27. Kraemer HC, Glick ID, Klein DF: Clinical trials design lessons from the CATIE study. Am J Psychiatry; 2009 Nov;166(11):1222-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health to compare the effectiveness of drugs for schizophrenia.
  • While many of the CATIE design and implementation decisions are excellent and serve as models for future research, other decisions resulted in a study with a large study group but inadequate power.
  • Multiple treatment interventions, unbalanced randomization within and across clinical sites, and multiple secondary outcomes are among the issues that require even more serious consideration in future large multisite clinical trials.
  • Moreover, it is crucial to clarify whether the intent of a study is to establish superiority of some treatments or to establish equivalence, for the appropriate designs and analyses differ in these situations.
  • If the study is designed, as was CATIE, to demonstrate some treatments' superiority, statistically nonsignificant results should not be misinterpreted as evidence of "equivalence."
  • For establishing either superiority or equivalence, future treatment comparisons might better be designed with fewer sites, more subjects per site, fewer treatments, and fewer outcomes, in order to have the power for definitively establishing superiority or equivalence at a lower cost.
  • [MeSH-major] Antipsychotic Agents / therapeutic use. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic / methods. Research Design / standards. Schizophrenia / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Benzodiazepines / therapeutic use. Double-Blind Method. Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced / etiology. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Multicenter Studies as Topic / methods. Multicenter Studies as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Perphenazine / therapeutic use. United States

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  • (PMID = 19797435.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-7228
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antipsychotic Agents; 12794-10-4 / Benzodiazepines; 132539-06-1 / olanzapine; FTA7XXY4EZ / Perphenazine
  • [Number-of-references] 26
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28. Kaluza V, Rao DS, Said JW, de Vos S: Primary extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma of the brain: a case report. Hum Pathol; 2006 Jun;37(6):769-72
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  • [Title] Primary extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma of the brain: a case report.
  • Natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphomas represent a rare type of lymphoma derived from either activated NK cells or, rarely, cytotoxic T cells.
  • Other than the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, several other extranodal sites of involvement have been reported, including the pharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and testis.
  • Although secondary involvement of the central nervous system has been reported, a convincing case of primary brain NK/T-cell lymphoma has not been previously reported.
  • Here, we report a case of primary brain lymphoma of NK/T-cell type with a characteristic phenotype expressing CD3epsilon, CD56, granzyme B, Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small nuclear RNAs, with germline T-cell receptor gene configuration, and showing an unusual intravascular component.
  • The lymphoma failed to respond to therapy and the patient eventually died after transfer to a hospice facility.
  • This unusual case highlights an unusual presentation of a rare disease entity and highlights the need for a better understanding of the biology and treatment of T-cell lymphomas.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD3 / genetics. Antigens, CD3 / metabolism. Antigens, CD56 / genetics. Antigens, CD56 / metabolism. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Enoxaparin / therapeutic use. Fatal Outcome. Fibrinolytic Agents / therapeutic use. Genes, T-Cell Receptor gamma / genetics. Granzymes. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Pulmonary Embolism / complications. Pulmonary Embolism / drug therapy. RNA, Viral / metabolism. Serine Endopeptidases / genetics. Serine Endopeptidases / metabolism. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Tumor Virus Infections / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16733220.001).
  • [ISSN] 0046-8177
  • [Journal-full-title] Human pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD3; 0 / Antigens, CD56; 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Enoxaparin; 0 / Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNA 1; 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents; 0 / RNA, Viral; EC 3.4.21.- / GZMB protein, human; EC 3.4.21.- / Granzymes; EC 3.4.21.- / Serine Endopeptidases; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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29. Germanov E, Berman JN, Guernsey DL: Current and future approaches for the therapeutic targeting of metastasis (review). Int J Mol Med; 2006 Dec;18(6):1025-36
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  • [Title] Current and future approaches for the therapeutic targeting of metastasis (review).
  • Metastasis is the process whereby cancer cells disseminate and establish secondary tumors at distant sites from the primary tumor and is estimated to be responsible for approximately 90% of all cancer deaths.
  • Cancers with metastatic spread are frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic approaches, underlining the urgent need for novel treatments in these diseases.
  • Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlining both the intrinsic cellular and extrinsic micro-environmental factors contributing to the metastatic process have resulted in the identification of a number of molecular targets for the development of specific anti-metastatic therapeutic strategies.
  • Many of these pathways interact with each other, with the possibility of multiple downstream antineoplastic consequences as well as the potential for synergistic effects by targeting more than one of these factors.
  • This review outlines several of the promising targets, and provides examples, of how these targets are being exploited as anti-metastatic therapies in conjunction with conventional treatments.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Chemokines / therapeutic use. Humans. Matrix Metalloproteinases / therapeutic use. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Neurotransmitter Agents / therapeutic use. Polysaccharides / therapeutic use. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / genetics. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / metabolism. Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled / therapeutic use. Signal Transduction / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 17089005.001).
  • [ISSN] 1107-3756
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of molecular medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Mol. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Chemokines; 0 / Neurotransmitter Agents; 0 / Polysaccharides; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 3.4.24.- / Matrix Metalloproteinases
  • [Number-of-references] 111
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30. Parikh AA, Curley SA, Fornage BD, Ellis LM: Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic metastases. Semin Oncol; 2002 Apr;29(2):168-82
ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .

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  • The liver is one of the most common sites for cancer metastases that result in significant morbidity and mortality.
  • Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an important alternative/complementary tool in the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver and can lead to palliation as well as increased survival in selected patients.
  • RFA has been shown to be safer and better tolerated than other ablative techniques and has been associated with a low rate of local recurrence when performed properly.
  • RFA also has shown some promise in combination with surgical resection and other therapies.
  • Patients who undergo RFA still suffer from progressive metastatic disease, reinforcing the premise that local therapies have little impact on the natural history of aggressive cancers.
  • Trials combining RFA with surgical resection and regional and systemic chemotherapy are ongoing and it is the hope that RFA combined with multimodality adjuvant therapy will reduce the development of both local disease and progressive metastatic disease, leading to improved overall survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Catheter Ablation. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Liver Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Needles. Patient Selection. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 11951215.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 32 CA09599-13
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 54
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31. Allison AC, Eugui EM: Mycophenolate mofetil and its mechanisms of action. Immunopharmacology; 2000 May;47(2-3):85-118
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  • This is the rate-limiting enzyme in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides.
  • T- and B-lymphocytes are more dependent on this pathway than other cell types are.
  • Moreover, MPA is a fivefold more potent inhibitor of the type II isoform of IMPDH, which is expressed in activated lymphocytes, than of the type I isoform of IMPDH, which is expressed in most cell types.
  • MPA has therefore a more potent cytostatic effect on lymphocytes than on other cell types.
  • Three other mechanisms may also contribute to the efficacy of MPA in preventing allograft rejection and other applications.
  • Second, by depleting guanosine nucleotides, MPA suppresses glycosylation and the expression of some adhesion molecules, thereby decreasing the recruitment of lymphocytes and monocytes into sites of inflammation and graft rejection.
  • MPA therefore suppresses the production by iNOS of NO, and consequent tissue damage mediated by peroxynitrite.
  • CellCept(R) suppresses T-lymphocytic responses to allogeneic cells and other antigens.
  • The drug also suppresses primary, but not secondary, antibody responses.
  • The efficacy of regimes including CellCept(R) in preventing allograft rejection, and in the treatment of rejection, is now firmly established.
  • CellCept(R) is also efficacious in several experimental animal models of chronic rejection, and it is hoped that the drug will have the same effect in humans.
  • [MeSH-major] Immunosuppressive Agents / pharmacology. Mycophenolic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Nitric Oxide Synthase / antagonists & inhibitors. Purines / antagonists & inhibitors. T-Lymphocytes / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Autoimmune Diseases / drug therapy. Cell Adhesion Molecules / drug effects. Glycosylation / drug effects. Graft Rejection / drug therapy. Graft Rejection / prevention & control. Guanosine Monophosphate / biosynthesis. Humans. IMP Dehydrogenase / antagonists & inhibitors. Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II. Prodrugs / pharmacology. Prodrugs / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 10878285.001).
  • [ISSN] 0162-3109
  • [Journal-full-title] Immunopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Immunopharmacology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Prodrugs; 0 / Purines; 85-32-5 / Guanosine Monophosphate; 9242ECW6R0 / mycophenolate mofetil; EC 1.1.1.205 / IMP Dehydrogenase; EC 1.14.13.39 / NOS2 protein, human; EC 1.14.13.39 / Nitric Oxide Synthase; EC 1.14.13.39 / Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II; HU9DX48N0T / Mycophenolic Acid
  • [Number-of-references] 150
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32. Hirao M, Onai N, Hiroishi K, Watkins SC, Matsushima K, Robbins PD, Lotze MT, Tahara H: CC chemokine receptor-7 on dendritic cells is induced after interaction with apoptotic tumor cells: critical role in migration from the tumor site to draining lymph nodes. Cancer Res; 2000 Apr 15;60(8):2209-17

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Coculture of DCs and apoptotic tumor cells resulted in decreased expression of CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 1 and increased CCR7 expression at mRNA level without alteration in other phenotypical markers on DCs.
  • Chemotaxis assay showed that CCR7 ligands, macrophage inflammatory protein 3beta and secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine significantly (P < 0.05) induced the migration of DCs when cocultured with apoptotic tumor cells.
  • The means to promote DC delivery to tumor and to nodal sites represent novel targets for the biological therapy of cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Chemokine CCL4. Chemokines, CC / pharmacology. Coculture Techniques. Female. Flow Cytometry. Lymph Nodes / drug effects. Lymph Nodes / immunology. Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins / pharmacology. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Receptors, CCR1. Receptors, CCR7. Th1 Cells / immunology. Transduction, Genetic. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Ultraviolet Rays

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  • (PMID = 10786686.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1PO1 CA73743-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA59371
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Ccr1 protein, mouse; 0 / Ccr7 protein, mouse; 0 / Chemokine CCL4; 0 / Chemokines, CC; 0 / Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, CCR1; 0 / Receptors, CCR7; 0 / Receptors, Chemokine
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33. Yu EW, McDermott G, Zgurskaya HI, Nikaido H, Koshland DE Jr: Structural basis of multiple drug-binding capacity of the AcrB multidrug efflux pump. Science; 2003 May 9;300(5621):976-80
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  • [Title] Structural basis of multiple drug-binding capacity of the AcrB multidrug efflux pump.
  • Multidrug efflux pumps cause serious problems in cancer chemotherapy and treatment of bacterial infections.
  • The bound ligand molecules often interact with each other, stabilizing the binding.
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Infective Agents / chemistry. Anti-Infective Agents / metabolism. Anti-Infective Agents, Local / chemistry. Anti-Infective Agents, Local / metabolism. Binding Sites. Cell Membrane / chemistry. Chemistry, Physical. Ciprofloxacin / chemistry. Ciprofloxacin / metabolism. Crystallization. Crystallography, X-Ray. Dequalinium / chemistry. Dequalinium / metabolism. Ethidium / chemistry. Ethidium / metabolism. Hydrogen Bonding. Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions. Ligands. Models, Molecular. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins. Physicochemical Phenomena. Protein Binding. Protein Conformation. Protein Structure, Quaternary. Protein Structure, Secondary. Protein Structure, Tertiary. Rhodamines / chemistry. Rhodamines / metabolism. Static Electricity

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  • (PMID = 12738864.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-9203
  • [Journal-full-title] Science (New York, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Science
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] PDB/ 1OY6/ 1OY8/ 1OY9/ 1OYD/ 1OYE
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI 09644
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / AcrB protein, E coli; 0 / Anti-Infective Agents; 0 / Anti-Infective Agents, Local; 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / Escherichia coli Proteins; 0 / Ligands; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins; 0 / Rhodamines; 5E8K9I0O4U / Ciprofloxacin; E7QC7V26B8 / Dequalinium; EN464416SI / Ethidium
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34. Rogers CL, Theodore N, Dickman CA, Sonntag VK, Thomas T, Lam S, Speiser BL: Surgery and permanent 125I seed paraspinal brachytherapy for malignant tumors with spinal cord compression. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2002 Oct 1;54(2):505-13
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  • One patient underwent two separate procedures at different spinal sites.
  • Of the 25 brachytherapy sites, 22 also received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT): 5, EBRT with a planned brachytherapy boost; 4, brachytherapy and prompt EBRT after recovery; and 13, brachytherapy as salvage for local failure after prior EBRT.
  • Three had no EBRT: 1 had lymphoma treated with chemotherapy, 1 had remote previous EBRT for a childhood tumor, and 1 refused EBRT.
  • Four sites (16.0%) experienced local failure.
  • The mean time to recurrence for these 4 patients was 20.3 months.
  • All patients with score I, 91% of those with score II, 67% of those with score III, and 67% of those with score IV were ambulatory after the procedure; 84% had either normal or improved ambulation postoperatively.
  • No myelopathies or other neurologic sequelae were encountered.
  • CONCLUSION: This is the largest series in the literature exploring surgery and 125I brachytherapy in the treatment of malignant spinal cord compression.
  • Our results suggest a benefit to aggressive local therapy in selected patients with spinal cord compression.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachytherapy / methods. Iodine Radioisotopes / therapeutic use. Spinal Cord Compression / radiotherapy. Spinal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Spinal Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Analysis of Variance. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Recovery of Function. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12243829.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Iodine Radioisotopes
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35. Kushner BH, Cheung NK, Barker CA, Kramer K, Modak S, Yataghene K, Wolden SL: Hyperfractionated low-dose (21 Gy) radiotherapy for cranial skeletal metastases in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2009 Nov 15;75(4):1181-6
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  • [Title] Hyperfractionated low-dose (21 Gy) radiotherapy for cranial skeletal metastases in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.
  • PURPOSE: To present a large experience (73 patients) using a standard radiotherapy (RT) protocol to prevent relapse in cranial sites where measurable metastatic neuroblastoma (NB), an adverse prognostic marker, is common.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: High-risk NB patients with measurable cranial disease at diagnosis or residual cranial disease after induction therapy had those sites irradiated with hyperfractionated 21 Gy; a brain-sparing technique was used for an extensive field.
  • The patients were grouped according to the response to systemic therapy.
  • Two relapses involved irradiated cranial sites.
  • Two other patients relapsed in the irradiated cranial sites 6 and 12 months after a systemic relapse.
  • The cranial sites showed major (n = 13), minor (n = 2), or no response (n = 4) to RT.
  • Group 2 also included 15 patients who had persistent NB in extracranial, but not cranial, sites.
  • Of these 15 patients, 2 relapsed in the irradiated cranial sites and elsewhere at 8 and 14 months.
  • CONCLUSION: Hyperfractionated 21-Gy cranial RT might help control NB and is feasible without significant toxicity in children.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroblastoma / radiotherapy. Neuroblastoma / secondary. Skull Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Skull Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Cranial Irradiation / adverse effects. Cranial Irradiation / methods. Disease-Free Survival. Dose Fractionation. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy. Neoplasm, Residual. Orbital Neoplasms / drug therapy. Orbital Neoplasms / mortality. Orbital Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Orbital Neoplasms / secondary. Remission Induction. Survival Rate. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19427746.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA008748; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA61017; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA72868
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Brell JM, Krishnamurthi SS, Javle M, Saltzman J, Wollner I, Pelley R, Dowlati A, Kantharaj BN, Schluchter MD, Rath L, Ivy SP, Remick SC: A multi-center phase II study of oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and capecitabine in advanced gastric/gastroesophageal junction carcinoma. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2009 Apr;63(5):851-7
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  • [Title] A multi-center phase II study of oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and capecitabine in advanced gastric/gastroesophageal junction carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: There is no standard first-line therapy for advanced gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma and the prognosis remains poor.
  • The regimen was tolerated; pharmacodynamic studies revealed no drug interactions, and there was one confirmed response in a gastric cancer patient.
  • METHODS: This was a multi-center single treatment arm study involving six sites.
  • Only prior adjuvant therapy was allowed.
  • Patients had ECOG performance status of 0-2, adequate organ function, and were able to tolerate oral medications.
  • All patients received oxaliplatin 60 mg/m(2) intravenously (IV) and irinotecan 50 mg/m(2) IV weekly times 4 weeks with a 2-week rest period.
  • There were no grade 5 treatment related events, with all deaths secondary to disease progression.
  • However, the total response rate is modest and not an improvement over other regimens.

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  • (PMID = 18670776.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0843
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062502; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA62502
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 6804DJ8Z9U / Capecitabine; 7673326042 / irinotecan; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS634366; NLM/ PMC4209292
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37. Minzenberg MJ, Carter CS: Modafinil: a review of neurochemical actions and effects on cognition. Neuropsychopharmacology; 2008 Jun;33(7):1477-502
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  • Modafinil (2-[(Diphenylmethyl) sulfinyl] acetamide, Provigil) is an FDA-approved medication with wake-promoting properties.
  • In addition, modafinil shows initial promise for a variety of off-label indications in psychiatry, including treatment-resistant depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia.
  • Cognitive dysfunction may be a particularly important emerging treatment target for modafinil, across these and other neuropsychiatric disorders.
  • Many of these effects may be secondary to catecholamine effects, with some selectivity for cortical over subcortical sites of action.
  • In addition, modafinil (at well-tolerated doses) improves function in several cognitive domains, including working memory and episodic memory, and other processes dependent on prefrontal cortex and cognitive control.
  • [MeSH-major] Benzhydryl Compounds / pharmacology. Brain Chemistry / drug effects. Cognition / drug effects. Neuroprotective Agents / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Humans. Mental Disorders / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 17712350.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-133X
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuropsychopharmacology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH066629; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH59883
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzhydryl Compounds; 0 / Neuroprotective Agents; R3UK8X3U3D / modafinil
  • [Number-of-references] 216
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38. Erkanli S, Kayaselcuk F, Kuscu E, Bolat F, Sakalli H, Haberal A: Lobular carcinoma of the breast metastatic to the uterus in a patient under adjuvant anastrozole therapy. Breast; 2006 Aug;15(4):558-61
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  • [Title] Lobular carcinoma of the breast metastatic to the uterus in a patient under adjuvant anastrozole therapy.
  • This is the first report of breast carcinoma metastatic to the endometrium in a patient on adjuvant anastrozole therapy.
  • We report a case of metastatic lobular carcinoma of the breast in a 63-year-old patient on adjuvant anastrozole therapy for 8 months.
  • She was asymptomatic and metastatic endometrium was diagnosed after transvaginal ultrasound revealed suspicious findings along with elevated Ca 15-3 levels.
  • As further work up showed no other metastatic sites her uterus was taken out along with her ovaries and pelvic lymph nodes.
  • Uterine metastases should be kept in mind in asymptomatic patients on anastrozole therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Aromatase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / secondary. Carcinoma, Lobular / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Lobular / pathology. Endometrial Neoplasms / secondary. Nitriles / therapeutic use. Triazoles / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy. Immunohistochemistry. Keratins / metabolism. Mastectomy, Modified Radical. Middle Aged. Mucin-1 / blood. Ovariectomy. Vagina / ultrasonography

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  • (PMID = 16311034.001).
  • [ISSN] 0960-9776
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Aromatase Inhibitors; 0 / Mucin-1; 0 / Nitriles; 0 / Triazoles; 2Z07MYW1AZ / anastrozole; 68238-35-7 / Keratins
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39. Lokeshwar BL, Selzer MG, Zhu BQ, Block NL, Golub LM: Inhibition of cell proliferation, invasion, tumor growth and metastasis by an oral non-antimicrobial tetracycline analog (COL-3) in a metastatic prostate cancer model. Int J Cancer; 2002 Mar 10;98(2):297-309
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  • However, their low in vivo efficacy and associated morbidity limit their long-term application in cancer therapy.
  • One of the CMTs, 6-deoxy, 6-demethyl, 4-de-dimethylamino tetracycline (CMT-3, COL-3), was the most potent inhibitor (50% inhibition dose [GI(50)] < or = 5.0 ,microg/ml).
  • CMT-3 and DC decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 secretion in treated cultures and inhibited activity of secreted MMPs, CMT-3 was a stronger inhibitor.
  • Decreases in tumor growth (27-35%) and lung metastases were observed (28.9 +/- 15.4 sites/animal [CMT-3-treated] versus 43.6 +/- 18.8 sites/animal [DC-treated] versus 59.5 +/- 13.9 [control]; p < 0.01].
  • No significant drug-induced morbidity was observed in any of the animals.
  • These results, along with a recently concluded clinical trial, suggest a potential use of CMT-3 as an oral, nontoxic drug to treat metastatic prostate and other cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protease Inhibitors / pharmacology. Tetracyclines / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Animals. Apoptosis. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Cell Division / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Doxycycline / adverse effects. Doxycycline / pharmacology. Hydroxyl Radical / metabolism. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Matrix Metalloproteinases / biosynthesis. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Transplantation. Rats. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases / metabolism. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 11857423.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1R29-CA 63108; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5R01 CA 63108
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors; 0 / Protease Inhibitors; 0 / Tetracyclines; 0 / Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases; 0 / tetracycline CMT-3; 3352-57-6 / Hydroxyl Radical; EC 3.4.24.- / Matrix Metalloproteinases; N12000U13O / Doxycycline
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40. Meyer BC, Raman R, Hemmen T, Obler R, Zivin JA, Rao R, Thomas RG, Lyden PD: Efficacy of site-independent telemedicine in the STRokE DOC trial: a randomised, blinded, prospective study. Lancet Neurol; 2008 Sep;7(9):787-95
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  • We prospectively assessed whether telemedicine (real-time, two-way audio and video, and digital imaging and communications in medicine [DICOM] interpretation) or telephone was superior for decision making in acute telemedicine consultations.
  • METHODS: From January, 2004, to August, 2007, patients older than 18 years who presented with acute stroke symptoms at one of four remote spoke sites were randomly assigned, through a web-based, permuted blocks system, to telemedicine or telephone consultation to assess their suitability for treatment with thrombolytics, on the basis of standard criteria.
  • The primary outcome measure was whether the decision to give thrombolytic treatment was correct, as determined by central adjudication.
  • Secondary outcomes were the rate of thrombolytic use, 90-day functional outcomes (Barthel index [BI] and modified Rankin scale [mRS]), the incidence of intracerebral haemorrhages, and technical observations.
  • Correct treatment decisions were made more often in the telemedicine group than in the telephone group (108 [98%] vs 91 [82%], odds ratio [OR] 10.9, 95% CI 2.7-44.6; p=0.0009).
  • There was no difference in mortality (1.6, 0.8-3.4; p=0.27) or rates of intracerebral haemorrhage after treatment with thrombolytics (2 [7%] telemedicine vs 2 [8%] telephone, 0.8, 0.1-6.3; p=1.0).
  • INTERPRETATION: The authors of this trial report that stroke telemedicine consultations result in more accurate decision making compared with telephone consultations and can serve as a model for the effectiveness of telemedicine in other medical specialties.
  • The more appropriate decisions, high rates of thrombolysis use, improved data collection, low rate of intracerebral haemorrhage, low technical complications, and favourable time requirements all support the efficacy of telemedicine for making treatment decisions, and might enable more practitioners to use this medium in daily stroke care.
  • [MeSH-major] Referral and Consultation. Stroke / diagnosis. Stroke / drug therapy. Telemedicine. Thrombolytic Therapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Double-Blind Method. Emergency Medical Services / standards. Female. Fibrinolytic Agents / pharmacology. Fibrinolytic Agents / therapeutic use. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Quality Assurance, Health Care / methods. Telephone. Time Factors. Tissue Plasminogen Activator / pharmacology. Tissue Plasminogen Activator / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome. Videoconferencing

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  • [CommentIn] Lancet Neurol. 2008 Sep;7(9):763-5 [18676181.001]
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  • (PMID = 18676180.001).
  • [ISSN] 1474-4422
  • [Journal-full-title] The Lancet. Neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00283868
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P50 NS044148; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P50 NS044148-050004; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P50NS044148
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents; EC 3.4.21.68 / Tissue Plasminogen Activator
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS108864; NLM/ PMC2744128
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41. Mustra DJ, Warren AJ, Wilcox DE, Hamilton JW: Preferential binding of human XPA to the mitomycin C-DNA interstrand crosslink and modulation by arsenic and cadmium. Chem Biol Interact; 2007 Jun 30;168(2):159-68
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  • DNA interstrand crosslinks are of particular interest as a form of DNA damage, since these lesions involve both strands of duplex DNA and present special challenges to the repair machinery, and mitomycin C (MMC) is one of several useful cancer chemotherapy drugs that induce these lesions.
  • Purified XPA and the minimal DNA-binding domain of XPA are both fully capable of preferentially binding to MMC-DNA interstrand crosslinks in the absence of other proteins from the NER complex.
  • Circular dichroism (CD) and gel shift assays were used to investigate XPA-DNA binding and to assess changes in secondary structure induced as a consequence of the interaction of XPA with model MMC-crosslinked and unmodified DNAs.
  • This change in conformation may be more important in recruiting other proteins into a competent NER complex at damaged sites than preferential binding per se.
  • [MeSH-minor] Circular Dichroism. Drug Interactions. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay. Humans. Zinc Fingers

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  • (PMID = 17512921.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-2797
  • [Journal-full-title] Chemico-biological interactions
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chem. Biol. Interact.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / P42 ES07373; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA09658
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / DNA Adducts; 0 / Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein; 00BH33GNGH / Cadmium; 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; N712M78A8G / Arsenic
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42. Shukla GS, Krag DN: Developing bifunctional beta-lactamase molecules with built-in target-recognizing module for prodrug therapy: identification of Enterobacter Cloacae P99 cephalosporinase loops suitable for randomization and phage-display selection. J Mol Recognit; 2009 Nov-Dec;22(6):425-36
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  • [Title] Developing bifunctional beta-lactamase molecules with built-in target-recognizing module for prodrug therapy: identification of Enterobacter Cloacae P99 cephalosporinase loops suitable for randomization and phage-display selection.
  • This study was focused on developing catalytically active beta-lactamase enzyme molecules that have target-recognizing sites built within their scaffold.
  • The complexity of the loop-2 linear library, as determined by the frequency and diversity of amino acid distributions in the randomized region, appears consistent with the standards of other types of phage display library systems.
  • This is an enabling step in our long-term goal of developing bifunctional beta-lactamase molecules against cancer-specific targets for enzyme prodrug therapy of cancer.

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  • (PMID = 19437416.001).
  • [ISSN] 1099-1352
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of molecular recognition : JMR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Mol. Recognit.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA112091-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA112091; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA112091-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA112091
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Peptide Library; 0 / Peptides; 0 / Prodrugs; EC 3.5.2.- / Cephalosporinase; EC 3.5.2.6 / beta-Lactamases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS174379; NLM/ PMC2824592
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43. Nelson JB, Love W, Chin JL, Saad F, Schulman CC, Sleep DJ, Qian J, Steinberg J, Carducci M, Atrasentan Phase 3 Study Group: Phase 3, randomized, controlled trial of atrasentan in patients with nonmetastatic, hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Cancer; 2008 Nov 1;113(9):2478-87
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  • The primary endpoint was the time to disease progression (TTP), which was defined as the onset of metastases.
  • Secondary endpoints were the time to PSA progression, change in bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) levels, PSA doubling time, and overall survival.
  • Large geographic differences in the median TTP were noted: in the US: The difference was 81 days longer with placebo; whereas, in non-US sites, the difference was 180 days longer with atrasentan.
  • Atrasentan lengthened the PSA doubling time (P= .031) and slowed the increase in BALP (P< .001).
  • The biologic activity was consistent with findings from other clinical trials of atrasentan in HRPC.

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  • (PMID = 18785254.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] None / None / / P30 CA006973-48; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA006973-48
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Endothelin-1; 0 / Placebos; 0 / Pyrrolidines; EC 3.1.3.1 / Alkaline Phosphatase; V6D7VK2215 / atrasentan
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS283078; NLM/ PMC3085548
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44. Salk RS, Chang TJ, D'Costa WF, Soomekh DJ, Grogan KA: Sodium hyaluronate in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the ankle: a controlled, randomized, double-blind pilot study. J Bone Joint Surg Am; 2006 Feb;88(2):295-302
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  • [Title] Sodium hyaluronate in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the ankle: a controlled, randomized, double-blind pilot study.
  • BACKGROUND: Intra-articular injections of hyaluronans have been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of pain associated with osteoarthritis of the knee.
  • This pilot study was undertaken to gather preliminary data on the efficacy and safety of five weekly intra-articular injections of Hyalgan (sodium hyaluronate; molecular weight, 500 to 730 kDa) as compared with saline solution for the treatment of pain associated with osteoarthritis of the ankle.
  • METHODS: Twenty patients at two test sites were randomized with use of a double-blind (blinded observer), saline solution-controlled, parallel experimental design.
  • Several secondary outcome measures also were assessed.
  • No withdrawals were directly attributable to the injections of sodium hyaluronate or saline solution, and no severe medication-related adverse events were observed.
  • These findings are consistent with those of previously published studies involving intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate in other joints, but they require confirmation in a large, randomized, saline solution-controlled study.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / administration & dosage. Hyaluronic Acid / administration & dosage. Osteoarthritis, Knee / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 16452740.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9355
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Bone Joint Surg Am
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 9004-61-9 / Hyaluronic Acid
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