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1. Cvetković RS, Scott LJ: Dexrazoxane : a review of its use for cardioprotection during anthracycline chemotherapy. Drugs; 2005;65(7):1005-24
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  • [Title] Dexrazoxane : a review of its use for cardioprotection during anthracycline chemotherapy.
  • As shown in clinical trials, intravenous dexrazoxane significantly reduces the incidence of anthracycline-induced congestive heart failure (CHF) and adverse cardiac events in women with advanced breast cancer or adults with soft tissue sarcomas or small-cell lung cancer, regardless of whether the drug is given before the first dose of anthracycline or the administration is delayed until cumulative doxorubicin dose is > or =300 mg/m2.
  • The drug also appears to offer cardioprotection irrespective of pre-existing cardiac risk factors.
  • Importantly, the antitumour efficacy of anthracyclines is unlikely to be altered by dexrazoxane use, although the drug has not been shown to improve progression-free and overall patient survival.
  • The drug is generally well tolerated and has a tolerability profile similar to that of placebo in cancer patients undergoing anthracycline-based chemotherapy, with the exception of a higher incidence of severe leukopenia (78% vs 68%; p < 0.01).
  • Dexrazoxane is the only cardioprotective agent with proven efficacy in cancer patients receiving anthracycline chemotherapy and is a valuable option for the prevention of cardiotoxicity in this patient population.
  • [MeSH-major] Anthracyclines / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Cardiovascular Agents / therapeutic use. Cardiovascular Diseases / chemically induced. Cardiovascular Diseases / prevention & control. Neoplasms / complications. Razoxane / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15892593.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-6667
  • [Journal-full-title] Drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anthracyclines; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cardiovascular Agents; 5AR83PR647 / Razoxane
  • [Number-of-references] 85
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2. Hartmann JT: Systemic treatment options for patients with refractory adult-type sarcoma beyond anthracyclines. Anticancer Drugs; 2007 Mar;18(3):245-54
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  • [Title] Systemic treatment options for patients with refractory adult-type sarcoma beyond anthracyclines.
  • For the subgroup of patients with inoperable gastrointestinal stromal tumors, progress has been made by the rapid development and approval of the targeted therapy imatinib mesylate.
  • Small round cell sarcoma, such as Ewing/PNET, desmoplastic small round cell sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma, are chemotherapy-sensitive and potentially curable malignancies, which are treated with multimodality, dose-intensitive and neoadjuvant protocols regardless of size or overt metastatic disease.
  • A limited number of effective agents available for the treatment of patients with metastatic adult soft-tissue sarcoma exists, which have failed anthracyline and ifosfamide-based chemotherapy.
  • Most other high-grade (grading >I) so-called adult-type soft-tissue sarcomas such as fibro, lipo, pleomorphic and synovial sarcoma are treated with a anthracycline-based regimen with or without ifosfamide as front-line therapy.
  • In this review, the therapeutic activities of drugs currently available as second-line treatment in patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcoma are summarized, providing an overview of contentious or emerging treatment issues.
  • In relapsed 'adult-type' soft-tissue sarcomas trofosfamide, gemcitabine and ecteinascidin (ET-743) appear to be drugs associated with moderate activity and an acceptable toxicity profile.
  • An interesting finding to be noted is that the different drugs have particular effects in distinct subtypes of soft-tissue sarcoma; however, it has to be taken into account that the number of patients included in those phase II trials are limited.
  • The so-called selective therapy targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (receptor), epidermal growth factor receptor, c-kit, Raf kinase or platelet-derived growth factor receptor and bcl-2 antisensing, proteasome, protein kinase C/B, and mammalian target of rabamycin inhibition will continue to be tested in gastrointestinal stromal tumors patients refractory to imatinib mesylate as well as in selected sarcoma subtypes.
  • [MeSH-major] Anthracyclines / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Sarcoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Alkylating Agents / therapeutic use. Animals. Antimetabolites / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic. DNA, Neoplasm / chemistry. DNA, Neoplasm / drug effects. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Humans. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Receptors, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Taxoids / therapeutic use. Thymidylate Synthase / antagonists & inhibitors. Topoisomerase I Inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 17264755.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-4973
  • [Journal-full-title] Anti-cancer drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Alkylating Agents; 0 / Anthracyclines; 0 / Antimetabolites; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Taxoids; 0 / Topoisomerase I Inhibitors; EC 2.1.1.45 / Thymidylate Synthase; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptors, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor
  • [Number-of-references] 91
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3. Antonescu CR, Rosenblum MK, Pereira P, Nascimento AG, Woodruff JM: Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma: a study of 16 cases and confirmation of a clinicopathologically distinct tumor. Am J Surg Pathol; 2001 Jun;25(6):699-709
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is an uncommon tumor of deep soft tissues, originally described in 1995 by Meis-Kindblom et al.
  • In the current study, the authors identified 16 cases of SEF in the pathology files of their institutions and studied their pathologic features and disease course.
  • Histologically, the SEFs were composed predominantly of small to moderate-size round to ovoid, relatively uniform cells, often with clear cytoplasm, embedded in a hyalinized fibrous stroma.
  • The only consistent immunohistochemical finding was a strong, diffuse reactivity of tumor cells for vimentin.
  • Treatment consisted of intralesional excision (n = 2), attempted wide local excision (n = 11), and amputation (n = 3), with either adjuvant radiation therapy (n = 9) or chemotherapy (n = 3).
  • Follow-up of at least 1 year in 14 cases revealed persistent disease or local recurrence in seven patients (50%), and distant metastasis in 12 patients (86%).
  • Eight patients (57%) died of disease 16 to 86 months after diagnosis.
  • Five patients were alive with disease as of last follow-up.
  • SEF shares some pathologic features with two other fibrosing fibrosarcomas, low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma and hyalinizing spindle cell tumor with giant rosettes, but in the authors' experience behaves clinically as a fully malignant sarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibrosarcoma / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11395547.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Mohammadianpanah M, Omidvai S, Mosalei A, Ahmadloo N: Treatment results of tonsillar lymphoma: a 10-year experience. Ann Hematol; 2005 Apr;84(4):223-6
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  • [Title] Treatment results of tonsillar lymphoma: a 10-year experience.
  • In this study we analyzed our cases of tonsillar lymphoma treated in our institution during the last 10 years to compare the finding of this study with those of previous studies.
  • The patients were treated by combined chemotherapy [a median of six cycles of a CHOP regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone)] and radiation therapy (40-50 Gy to the primary site and neck).
  • Chemotherapy mainly preceded radiotherapy, although the sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy was determined by individual physicians and patients' choice.
  • Surgery was used mainly to establish the diagnosis, and tonsillectomy was performed for localized small lesions.
  • Between 1992 and 2002, 19 patients with stage IE (10), IIE (7), and IIIE (2) disease were treated.
  • Median and mean age was 48 and 44 years (range: 22-76 years), respectively, at the time of diagnosis, with a male to female ratio of 1.2:1.
  • Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas were the most prevalent.
  • The patients were treated by combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
  • All patients achieved and maintained complete remission with a median of 60 months relapse-free survival and a 5-year cause-specific survival rate of 100%.
  • All patients developed some degree of oropharyngeal mucositis.
  • A late fatal side effect was observed in one patient who developed radiation-induced sarcoma 7 years after initial diagnosis and died 8 months later without evidence of recurrent lymphoma.
  • The follow-up period ranged from 18 to 141 months with a median of 60 and a mean of 60.4 months.
  • At the time of last follow-up, all patients but one were alive.
  • Age, sex, stage, bulk of disease, performance status, number of chemotherapy cycles, number of involved sites, histologic subtypes, and radiation dose were analyzed as prognostically significant for disease-specific survival in our cases.
  • Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy is safe, highly effective, and probably curative for most patients with primary tonsillar lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Tonsillar Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Remission Induction / methods. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Survival Rate. Tonsillectomy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15042316.001).
  • [ISSN] 0939-5555
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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6. Krzakowski M: Systemic therapy options in malignant bone diseases. Ortop Traumatol Rehabil; 2005 Oct 30;7(5):567-72

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Systemic therapy options in malignant bone diseases.
  • The differing histogenesis of primary and secondary malignant bone neoplasms (respectively, mesenchymal and epithelial origin) influences the variability of activity and indications for systemic therapy.
  • A common response is the use of systemic therapy within a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach.
  • The principles of chemotherapy used for primary bone neoplasms are essentially similar in spindle-cell and small-cell sarcomas.
  • Initial multi-drug chemotherapy should be administered in all stages.
  • Chemotherapy may also be used following local treatment, although the role of adjuvant chemotherapy is better defined in small-cell sarcomas.
  • Chemotherapy is also applied in the palliative management of disseminated sarcomas.
  • Systemic therapy plays an essential role in the management of patients with bone metastases during the course of breast and prostate carcinoma.
  • The use of hormonal therapy is based on endocrine dependency of both malignancies.
  • Chemotherapy represents a treatment of choice in several clinical situations due to high chemosensitivity of the underlying malignancy (e. g., small-cell lung cancer or lymphoma).

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  • (PMID = 17611451.001).
  • [ISSN] 1509-3492
  • [Journal-full-title] Ortopedia, traumatologia, rehabilitacja
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ortop Traumatol Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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