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1. Vojtechová M, Turecková J, Kucerová D, Sloncová E, Vachtenheim J, Tuhácková Z: Regulation of mTORC1 signaling by Src kinase activity is Akt1-independent in RSV-transformed cells. Neoplasia; 2008 Feb;10(2):99-107
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  • Increased activity of the Src tyrosine protein kinase that has been observed in a large number of human malignancies appears to be a promising target for drug therapy.
  • In the present study, a critical role of the Src activity in the deregulation of mTOR signaling pathway in Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed hamster fibroblasts, H19 cells, was shown using these cells treated with the Src-specific inhibitor, SU6656, and clones of fibroblasts expressing either the active Src or the dominant-negative Src kinase-dead mutant.
  • These observations might have an implication in drug resistance to mTOR inhibitor-based cancer therapy in certain cell types.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoviridae / genetics. Animals. Cell Line. Cell Line, Transformed. Cricetinae. Indoles / pharmacology. Phosphorylation. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Rous sarcoma virus / genetics. Signal Transduction. Sulfonamides / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 18283331.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5586
  • [Journal-full-title] Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neoplasia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Indoles; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / SU 6656; 0 / Sulfonamides; EC 2.7.- / Protein Kinases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2244684
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2. Vogel A, Chernomordik VV, Riley JD, Hassan M, Amyot F, Dasgeb B, Demos SG, Pursley R, Little RF, Yarchoan R, Tao Y, Gandjbakhche AH: Using noninvasive multispectral imaging to quantitatively assess tissue vasculature. J Biomed Opt; 2007 Sep-Oct;12(5):051604
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  • [Title] Using noninvasive multispectral imaging to quantitatively assess tissue vasculature.
  • This research describes a noninvasive, noncontact method used to quantitatively analyze the functional characteristics of tissue.
  • Through a reconstruction algorithm, we can quantify the percent of blood in a given area of tissue and the fraction of that blood that is oxygenated.
  • Imaging normal tissue confirms previously reported values for the percent of blood in tissue and the percent of blood that is oxygenated in tissue and surrounding vasculature, for the normal state and when ischemia is induced.
  • This methodology has been applied to assess vascular Kaposi's sarcoma lesions and the surrounding tissue before and during experimental therapies.
  • Results indicate that these techniques are able to provide quantitative and functional information about tissue changes during experimental drug therapy and investigate progression of disease before changes are visibly apparent, suggesting a potential for them to be used as complementary imaging techniques to clinical assessment.
  • [MeSH-major] Dermoscopy / methods. Hemoglobins / analysis. Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted / methods. Sarcoma, Kaposi / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Spectrophotometry, Infrared / methods

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  • (PMID = 17994873.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-3668
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of biomedical optics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Biomed Opt
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z01 CT000261-11
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Hemoglobins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS55350; NLM/ PMC2443549
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3. Spano JP, Salhi Y, Costagliola D, Rozenbaum W, Girard PM: Factors predictive of disease progression and death in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. HIV Med; 2000 Oct;1(4):232-7
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  • [Title] Factors predictive of disease progression and death in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma.
  • BACKGROUND: The natural history of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is poorly documented.
  • The following variables were assessed as potential predictors of progression and death, in a Cox proportional hazards model: age, sex, ethnic group, transmission group, site of the first KS lesions, duration of KS, concomitant opportunistic infections or malignancies, antiretroviral drug therapy (excluding protease inhibitors), antiherpes treatments, neutrophil counts, CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts, plasma HIV load, p24 antigenaemia, beta2-microglobulinaemia and immunoglobin A and G serum levels.
  • The median survival time after progression was 68 months (9-126 months).
  • Multivariate analysis identified only visceral KS, a high neutrophil count and a high serum immunoglobulin (Ig) level as independent predictors of progression (P < 0.05).
  • Previous and concomitant opportunistic diseases (P = 0.003) and low CD4+ cell counts (P = 0.013) were independently associated with shorter survival; in contrast KS therapy did not independently influence survival.
  • CONCLUSION: Progression of KS is predicted by markers of KS severity, while overall survival is best predicted by markers of immunodeficiency (opportunistic diseases and the CD4+ cell count).
  • [MeSH-major] AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections / mortality. Sarcoma, Kaposi / mortality. Sarcoma, Kaposi / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Analysis of Variance. Disease Progression. Female. France / epidemiology. Humans. Male. Multivariate Analysis. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Severity of Illness Index. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 11737354.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-2662
  • [Journal-full-title] HIV medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] HIV Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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4. Wang E, Lichtenfels R, Bükur J, Ngalame Y, Panelli MC, Seliger B, Marincola FM: Ontogeny and oncogenesis balance the transcriptional profile of renal cell cancer. Cancer Res; 2004 Oct 15;64(20):7279-87
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  • [Title] Ontogeny and oncogenesis balance the transcriptional profile of renal cell cancer.
  • Global transcript analysis is increasingly used to describe cancer taxonomies beyond the microscopic reach of the eye.
  • We compared the transcriptional profile of primary renal cell cancers (RCCs) with that of normal kidney tissue and several epithelial cancers of nonrenal origin to weigh the contribution that ontogeny and oncogenesis make in molding their genetic profile.
  • When renal lineage-associated genes are removed from the analysis and cancer-specific genes are analyzed, RCCs segregate with other cancers with limited lineage specificity underlying a predominance of the oncogenic process over lineage specificity.
  • However, a RCC-specific set of oncogenesis-related genes was identified and surprisingly shared by sarcomas.
  • Genes responsible for lineage specificity may represent poor molecular targets for immune or drug therapy.
  • Most genes associated with oncogenesis are shared with other cancers and may represent better therapeutic targets.
  • Finally, a small subset of genes is associated with lineage-specific oncogenesis, and these may provide information regarding the biological behavior of RCCs and facilitate diagnostic classification of RCCs.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / enzymology. Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / genetics. Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / metabolism. Carbonic Anhydrases / biosynthesis. Carbonic Anhydrases / genetics. Disease Progression. Gene Expression Profiling. Glutathione Transferase / biosynthesis. Glutathione Transferase / genetics. Humans. Melanoma / genetics. Melanoma / metabolism. Multigene Family. Prognosis. Sarcoma / genetics. Sarcoma / metabolism. Transcription, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 15492247.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.5.1.18 / Glutathione Transferase; EC 4.2.1.1 / Carbonic Anhydrases
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5. Hu J, Renaud G, Golmes T, Ferris A, Hendrie PC, Donahue RE, Hughes SH, Wolfsberg TG, Russell DW, Dunbar CE: Reduced Genotoxicity of Avian Sarcoma Leukosis Virus Vectors in Rhesus Long-term Repopulating Cells Compared to Standard Murine Retrovirus Vectors. Mol Ther; 2008 Sep;16(9):1617-1623

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  • [Title] Reduced Genotoxicity of Avian Sarcoma Leukosis Virus Vectors in Rhesus Long-term Repopulating Cells Compared to Standard Murine Retrovirus Vectors.
  • : Insertional mutagenesis continues to be a major concern in hematopoietic stem-cell gene therapy.
  • Nonconventional gene transfer vectors with more favorable integration features in comparison with conventional retrovirus and lentivirus vectors are being developed and optimized.
  • In this study, we report for the first time a systematic analysis of 198 avian sarcoma leukosis virus (ASLV) insertion sites identified in rhesus long-term repopulating cells, and a comparison of ASLV insertion patterns to Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) (n = 396) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) (n = 289) using the newly released rhesus genome databank.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2008 The American Society of Gene Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28189014.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Blay JY, Bonvalot S, Fayette J, Stockle E, Ray-Coquard I, Coindre JM, Duffaud F, Taieb S, Sunyach MP, Ranchere D, Meeus P, Le Cesne A, Bui BN: [Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in sarcoma]. Bull Cancer; 2006 Nov;93(11):1093-8
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  • [Title] [Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in sarcoma].
  • [Transliterated title] Chimiothérapie néoadjuvante des sarcomes.
  • This document describe s the proposed clinical practices guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in soft tissue sarcomas proposed by the French Sarcoma Group.Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy remains an experimental therapeutic procedure in soft tissue sarcomas.
  • Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy may be proposed in three different types of situations:.
  • 1) a locally advanced tumor, non accessible to R0 or 1 removal of the lesion.
  • Its objective is there to allow for R0 or R1 surgical removal of the tumor.
  • 2) A locally advanced tumor, accessible to R0 or 1 removal of the lesion, but with a mutilating surgery (amputation).
  • Its objective is there to allow for R0 or R1 conservative surgical removal of the tumor.
  • In both situation, the strategy should be discussed beforehand in a multidisciplinary specialized consultation for sarcoma.
  • 3) In the case where complete (R0 or R1) surgical removal of the tumor can be performed, neooadjuvant chemotherapy has no demonstrated role.
  • The only randomized phase III clinical trial testing neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in this setting, i.e. the STBSG 62871 STBSG trial, failed to demonstrate any benefit in terms of overall or progression free survival.
  • The selection of the type of chemotherapy regimen given in the neoadjuvant setting should be discussed in a multidisciplinary setting, considering the age and the general status of the patient; young patients, without associated concomittent illnesses should be proposed for a combined chemotherapy regimen, combining doxorubicin (> or = 50 mg/m2) and ifosfamide (> 5 g/m2) on the basis of randomized trials demonstrating an improvement of response rate versus single agent therapy with doxorubine.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoadjuvant Therapy / methods. Sarcoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion / methods. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial / methods. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 17145578.001).
  • [ISSN] 1769-6917
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin du cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull Cancer
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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7. Nunes LF, Fiod NJ, Vasconcelos RA, Meohas W, Rezende JF: [Epithelioid sarcoma: clinical behavior, prognostic factors and survival]. Rev Col Bras Cir; 2010 Aug;37(4):251-5
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  • [Title] [Epithelioid sarcoma: clinical behavior, prognostic factors and survival].
  • [Transliterated title] Sarcoma epitelióide: aspectos clínicos, fatores prognósticos e sobrevida.
  • OBJECTIVE: To relate the clinical characteristics and evaluations of patients with epithelioid sarcomas.
  • METHODS: Careful analysis of 25 epithelioid sarcoma cases registered in Instituto Nacional do Cancer between june 1987 and july 2005.
  • RESULTS: Mean age at diagnosis was 33 years old, ranged from 10 to 70.
  • The size of the tumor was given in 19 cases, with the mean size of 5 cm, while they ranged from 1.5 to 15 cm.
  • Tumors margins were free in fifteen patients, positive in three and in seven were not studied.
  • Six received any type of chemotherapy and 14 received treatment with radiotherapy with mean dose of 46,5 Gy.
  • Six patients underwent cancer treatment in its entirety at the National Institute of Cancer.
  • At present twelve patients are alive without disease, two have disease and eleven patients have died.
  • CONCLUSION: Epithelioid sarcoma is a rare subset of soft tissue sarcoma with high rate of local recurrence, regional node and distant metastases.
  • Surgical treatment of epithelioid sarcoma consists of early wide local resection to negative microscopic margins.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma / diagnosis. Sarcoma / mortality. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / mortality

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  • (PMID = 21085839.001).
  • [ISSN] 1809-4546
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista do Colégio Brasileiro de Cirurgiões
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Col Bras Cir
  • [Language] por
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
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8. Voeks D, Martiniello-Wilks R, Madden V, Smith K, Bennetts E, Both GW, Russell PJ: Gene therapy for prostate cancer delivered by ovine adenovirus and mediated by purine nucleoside phosphorylase and fludarabine in mouse models. Gene Ther; 2002 Jun;9(12):759-68
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  • [Title] Gene therapy for prostate cancer delivered by ovine adenovirus and mediated by purine nucleoside phosphorylase and fludarabine in mouse models.
  • A gene-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (GDEPT) based on purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), that converts the prodrug, fludarabine to 2-fluoroadenine, has been described, but studies are limited compared with other GDEPTs.
  • We investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacies of PNP-GDEPT for treating androgen-independent (AI) prostate cancer.
  • The PNP gene controlled by Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) constitutive promoter was delivered using a recombinant ovine adenovirus vector (OAdV220) that uses a different receptor from human adenovirus type 5.
  • In vitro, OAdV220 provided increased transgene expression over a comparable human Ad5 vector in infected AI, murine RM1 prostate cancer cells.
  • Transduction of RM1 cells with OAdV220 before implantation in immunocompetent mice dramatically inhibited subcutaneous (s.c.) tumor growth when fludarabine phosphate was administered systemically and increased mouse survival in a dose-dependent manner.
  • In tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice, a single intratumoral injection of OAdV220 produced detectable PNP activity for at least 6 days and with prodrug, retarded the growth of aggressive RM1 s.c. tumors by 35% at day 14.
  • There was a consistent trend to reduction of pre-established intraprostatic RM1 tumors.
  • A similar regimen induced significant therapeutic efficacy in human PC3 xenografts.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenine / analogs & derivatives. Avian Sarcoma Viruses / genetics. Genetic Therapy / methods. Prodrugs / administration & dosage. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy. Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase / genetics. Vidarabine Phosphate / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Gene Expression. Genetic Vectors / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Mastadenovirus / genetics. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Neoplasms, Experimental / therapy. Transduction, Genetic / methods. Transplantation, Heterologous. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 12040457.001).
  • [ISSN] 0969-7128
  • [Journal-full-title] Gene therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gene Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Prodrugs; 106XV160TZ / Vidarabine Phosphate; 1X9VK9O1SC / fludarabine phosphate; 700-49-2 / 2-fluoroadenine; EC 2.4.2.1 / Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase; JAC85A2161 / Adenine
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9. Tsoupras AB, Chini M, Tsogas N, Fragopoulou E, Nomikos T, Lioni A, Mangafas N, Demopoulos CA, Antonopoulou S, Lazanas MC: Anti-platelet-activating factor effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART): a new insight in the drug therapy of HIV infection? AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses; 2008 Aug;24(8):1079-86
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  • [Title] Anti-platelet-activating factor effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART): a new insight in the drug therapy of HIV infection?
  • Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent inflammatory mediator, which seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of several AIDS manifestations such as AIDS dementia complex, Kaposi's sarcoma, and HIV-related nephropathy.
  • In order to examine the possible interactions between PAF and antiretroviral therapy, we studied the effect of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitors against PAF biological activities and its basic biosynthetic enzymes dithiothreitol-insensitive PAF-cholinephosphotransferase (PAF-CPT) and lyso-PAF-acetyltransferase (Lyso-PAF-AT), as well as its main degradative enzyme PAF-acetylhydrolase, of human mesangial cell line (HMC).
  • We also studied the effect of several backbones and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens against PAF activity.
  • Among the drugs tested, several inhibited PAF-induced platelet aggregation in a concentration-depended manner, with tenofovir, efavirenz, and ritonavir exhibiting the higher inhibitory effect.
  • In addition, when these drugs were combined in backbones and HAART regimens based on American antiretroviral therapy proposals, they also synergistically exhibited an inhibitory effect against PAF-induced platelet aggregation.
  • Several of these drugs have also inhibited in vitro microsomal PAF-CPT activity, and concentrations of lopinavir-r or tenofovir-DF (similar to their IC(50) against PAF-induced platelet aggregation) exhibited the same effect against PAF-CPT and Lyso-PAF-AT when added in the cell medium of cultured HMC.
  • In addition, in naïve patients treated with one of the most potent anti-PAF HAART regimens (efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir-DF) for a period of 1 month, a significant reduction of the specific activity of PAF-CPT of washed human leukocytes of these patients was also observed, compared with its levels before the HAART treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Retroviral Agents / therapeutic use. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. HIV Infections / drug therapy. Platelet Activating Factor / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] 1-Alkyl-2-acetylglycerophosphocholine Esterase / drug effects. Acetyltransferases / drug effects. Cells, Cultured. Diacylglycerol Cholinephosphotransferase / drug effects. Humans. Leukocytes / drug effects. Leukocytes / metabolism. Mesangial Cells / drug effects. Mesangial Cells / metabolism. Platelet Aggregation / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 18620493.001).
  • [ISSN] 1931-8405
  • [Journal-full-title] AIDS research and human retroviruses
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Retroviral Agents; 0 / Platelet Activating Factor; EC 2.3.1.- / Acetyltransferases; EC 2.3.1.67 / 1-alkylglycerophosphocholine acetyltransferase; EC 2.7.8.2 / Diacylglycerol Cholinephosphotransferase; EC 3.1.1.47 / 1-Alkyl-2-acetylglycerophosphocholine Esterase
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10. Bundow D, Aboulafia DM: Potential drug interaction with paclitaxel and highly active antiretroviral therapy in two patients with AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma. Am J Clin Oncol; 2004 Feb;27(1):81-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Potential drug interaction with paclitaxel and highly active antiretroviral therapy in two patients with AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma.
  • Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) consisting of multiple combinations of antiretroviral agents that inhibit HIV (HIV) replication has been associated with improvements in CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell counts, suppression of HIV replication, and regression of HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS).
  • Several of these agents have complex drug-drug interactions and have the potential to aggravate paclitaxel-associated toxicities.
  • Herein two patients with KS are described who received paclitaxel while on HAART and who developed life-threatening toxicities.
  • These cases are presented to alert clinicians to potentially serious drug interactions that can occur between various components of HAART and paclitaxel.
  • Clinicians contemplating taxane-based chemotherapy for HIV-associated KS should carefully monitor patients for adverse events and, depending on their patient's HAART regimen, consider reducing the taxane dose.
  • [MeSH-major] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Anti-HIV Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacology. Paclitaxel / pharmacology. Sarcoma, Kaposi / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Drug Interactions. Humans. Male. Middle Aged


11. Saif MW: Thromboembolism associated with HIV infection: a case report and review of the literature. AIDS Read; 2000 Aug;10(8):492-6
HIV InSite. treatment guidelines - Cardiac Cardiac Manifestations of HIV .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Recent literature is encumbered with reports of various abnormalities consistent with a hypercoagulable state leading to thromboembolic complications.
  • The coexistence of HIV/AIDS-related illnesses, such as malignancies, opportunistic infections, or autoimmune diseases, as well as drug therapy, may also predispose HIV-infected patients to thromboembolic disease.
  • A case report of a 39-year-old man with Kaposi sarcoma who developed pulmonary embolism is presented, along with a review of the literature.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation / complications. Humans. Male. Sarcoma, Kaposi / complications

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  • (PMID = 10967811.001).
  • [ISSN] 1053-0894
  • [Journal-full-title] The AIDS reader
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AIDS Read
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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12. Pinheiro A, Marcenes W, Zakrzewska JM, Robinson PG: Dental and oral lesions in HIV infected patients: a study in Brazil. Int Dent J; 2004 Jun;54(3):131-7
HIV InSite. treatment guidelines - Human Herpesvirus-8 .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • AIM: To determine the prevalence of dental and oral lesions, as well as treatment need, in a group of HIV sero-positive Brazilians.
  • In addition, to test the association between oral manifestation of HIV infection and age, sex, mode of transmission and drug therapy.
  • Most of the participants were male (76%), had acquired HIV sexually (74.5%), and were taking some form of antiretroviral therapy (70.8%).
  • Candidiasis was the most common (28.6%), followed by hairy leukoplakia (9.3%), Kaposi sarcoma (2.5%), ulceration (2.5%), herpes simplex (1.2%), papiloma (0.6%), and 4.4% had periodontal disease.
  • There were no differences in the prevalence of oral manifestations of HIV infection between age groups, sexes, modes of transmission and types of drug therapy (P>0.05).
  • The mean DMF-T score was 19 (SD 8) and 78.9% needed some form of dental treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: While the prevalence of oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS was low in this sample of HIV seropositive Brazilians, dental status was poor and need for dental treatment was high.
  • [MeSH-major] HIV Infections / complications. Mouth Diseases / complications. Tooth Diseases / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Anti-HIV Agents / therapeutic use. Brazil. Candidiasis, Oral / complications. DMF Index. Female. HIV Seropositivity / complications. Humans. Leukoplakia, Hairy / complications. Male. Middle Aged. Mouth Neoplasms / complications. Needs Assessment. Oral Ulcer / complications. Papilloma / complications. Periodontal Diseases / complications. Sarcoma, Kaposi / complications. Sex Factors. Stomatitis, Herpetic / complications


13. Bernstein ML, Devidas M, Lafreniere D, Souid AK, Meyers PA, Gebhardt M, Stine K, Nicholas R, Perlman EJ, Dubowy R, Wainer IW, Dickman PS, Link MP, Goorin A, Grier HE, Pediatric Oncology Group, Children's Cancer Group Phase II Study 9457, Children's Oncology Group: Intensive therapy with growth factor support for patients with Ewing tumor metastatic at diagnosis: Pediatric Oncology Group/Children's Cancer Group Phase II Study 9457--a report from the Children's Oncology Group. J Clin Oncol; 2006 Jan 1;24(1):152-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intensive therapy with growth factor support for patients with Ewing tumor metastatic at diagnosis: Pediatric Oncology Group/Children's Cancer Group Phase II Study 9457--a report from the Children's Oncology Group.
  • PURPOSE: Prognosis is poor for Ewing sarcoma patients with metastasis at diagnosis.
  • We intensified a five-drug therapy (ifosfamide, etoposide alternated with vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide) using filgrastim but not stem-cell support.
  • We studied topotecan alone and combined with cyclophosphamide in therapeutic windows before the five-drug therapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eligible patients were < or = 30 years old and had histologically proven Ewing sarcoma or primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) and metastasis at diagnosis.
  • Three had partial responses (PRs), and 17 had progressive disease (PD).
  • The best responses to the overall therapy included 45 complete responses, 41 PRs, stable disease in 14 patients, and PD in five patients.
  • For the 39 patients with isolated pulmonary metastases, the 2-year EFS rate was 31% (+/- 7%) compared with 20% (+/- 5%) for patients with more widespread disease.
  • CONCLUSION: Topotecan had limited activity in patients with Ewing sarcoma or PNET metastatic at diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Amifostine / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Sarcoma, Ewing / drug therapy. Topotecan / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 16382125.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 7M7YKX2N15 / Topotecan; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; M487QF2F4V / Amifostine
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14. Ivorra A, Al-Sakere B, Rubinsky B, Mir LM: Use of conductive gels for electric field homogenization increases the antitumor efficacy of electroporation therapies. Phys Med Biol; 2008 Nov 21;53(22):6605-18
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Use of conductive gels for electric field homogenization increases the antitumor efficacy of electroporation therapies.
  • Electroporation is used in tissue for gene therapy, drug therapy and minimally invasive tissue ablation.
  • In the case of irregularly shaped tissue structures, such as bulky tumors, electric field homogeneity is almost impossible to be achieved with current electrode arrangements.
  • We propose the use of conductive gels, matched to the conductivity of the tissues, to fill dead spaces between plate electrodes gripping the tissue so that the electric field distribution becomes less heterogeneous.
  • Here it is shown that this technique indeed improves the antitumor efficacy of electrochemotherapy in sarcomas implanted in mice.
  • [MeSH-major] Electric Conductivity. Electrochemotherapy / methods. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Computer Simulation. Female. Gels. Mice. Models, Chemical. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18978447.001).
  • [ISSN] 0031-9155
  • [Journal-full-title] Physics in medicine and biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Phys Med Biol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / R01 RR018961
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Gels
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15. Mentkevich GL, Dolgopolov IS, Popa AV, Boiarshinov VK, Ravshanova RS: [Blood stem cell transplantation in pediatric oncology]. Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk; 2001;(9):89-92
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Blood stem cell transplantation in pediatric oncology].
  • Large-dose chemotherapy (LDCT) with auto- and allogenic transplantation of blood stem cells (BSC) in pediatric oncology remains so far the last hope for many patients.
  • At the same time many issues of the place and role of transplantation in pediatric oncology remains unclear.
  • Based on 240 sessions of cytopheresis, the author show that BSC can be sampled from severe pretreated patients despite the drug therapy regimen.
  • After LDCT with BSC autotransplantation, the relapse-free survival rates in patients with Ewing's sarcoma and acute myeloblast-cell leukemia were 55.4 and 44.4%, respectively (in the first and second remissions).
  • Consolidation as LDCT with BSC autotransplantation without cleansing the material from malignant cells is not a sufficient therapeutical measurement in disseminated neuroblastoma.
  • Whether partial compatible related BSC transplantation can be possible made after non-myeloablative preparation regimens is shown.

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  • (PMID = 11676265.001).
  • [ISSN] 0869-6047
  • [Journal-full-title] Vestnik Rossiiskoi akademii meditsinskikh nauk
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vestn. Akad. Med. Nauk SSSR
  • [Language] RUS
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Number-of-references] 11
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16. Hamberg P, Steeghs N, Loos WJ, van der Biessen DJ, den Hollander MA, Tascilar M, Verweij J, Gelderblom H, Sleijfer S: Phase I safety and pharmacokinetic (PK) study of sunitinib (S) in combination with ifosfamide (I) in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors (STs). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13520

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I safety and pharmacokinetic (PK) study of sunitinib (S) in combination with ifosfamide (I) in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors (STs).
  • As combinations of VEGFR-TKI with cytotoxic therapy are promising, this phase I study aimed to determine the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of S in combination with 2 different I schedules.
  • METHODS: Pts with progressive STs, good PS, organ function, and no standard therapy available, were eligible.
  • After establishing the RP2D of S with I*3, feasibility of this S dose with I at 1.2 g/m<sup>2</sup>/day for 5 days CIV (I*5) every 3 wks was assessed without further scheduled dose-escalation.
  • Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) were measured prior to the 1<sup>st</sup>, 3<sup>rd</sup> and 6<sup>th</sup> cycle.
  • Most frequent drug related adverse events (all grades/grade 3-4) were: neutropenia (77%/62%), thrombocytopenia (73%/31%), elevated transaminases (65%/0%), renal (42%/4%), nausea (77%/0%), vomiting (58%/0%) and alopecia (62%/0%).
  • 4/22 pts evaluable for response had PR: 1 CUP, 1 small cell carcinoma (SCC) and 2 sarcoma pts.
  • 7 pts had SD for ≥ 3 months: 1 CUP, 1 uveal melanoma, 1 SCC, and 4 sarcoma pts.
  • The AUC ratio of I and its metabolites in cycles I*3 without versus with S ranged from 0.72 to 1.36.
  • No consistent change in the number of CECs during treatment was observed.
  • Antitumor activity was observed in pts with diverse tumor entities including sarcoma.

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  • (PMID = 27961277.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Chawla SP, Chua VS, Fernandez L, Quon D, Saralou A, Blackwelder WC, Hall FL, Gordon EM: Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of pathotropic nanoparticles bearing a dominant negative cyclin G1 construct for chemoresistant osteosarcoma and other sarcomas: Phase I, II, and III studies. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10513

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of pathotropic nanoparticles bearing a dominant negative cyclin G1 construct for chemoresistant osteosarcoma and other sarcomas: Phase I, II, and III studies.
  • (1) To evaluate the safety/anti-tumor potential of intravenous (i.v.
  • ) Rexin-G in chemotherapy-resistant sarcoma (Phase I/II), and (2) to confirm the efficacy/safety of i.v.
  • Rexin-G in chemotherapy-resistant osteosarcoma (Phase II).
  • METHODS: Twenty patients in the Phase I/II study and 22 patients in the Phase II study received 1-2 × 10e11 cfu Rexin-G i.v., 2-3 times a week for 4 weeks.
  • Treatment was continued if the patient had < Grade 1 toxicity.
  • RESULTS: Treatment-related adverse events included chills (n=1), presyncope (n=1), photophobia (n=1) of Grade 1 severity, and fatigue (n=4) of Grade 1-2 severity.
  • In the Phase I/II sarcoma study, 3/6 patients had stable disease at Dose Level 0, median progression free survival (PFS) was 5 weeks, and overall survival (OS) was 14 weeks, while 10/14 patients had stable disease at Dose Level I-II, median PFS was 16 weeks and median OS was 34 weeks.
  • Kaplan-Meier analysis shows a dose-response relationship between overall survival and Rexin-G dosage in the combined Phase I/II sarcoma and Phase II osteosarcoma studies (p = 0.02; n=42).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These studies suggest that (i) intravenous Rexin-G is safe and well-tolerated, and (ii) Rexin-G controls tumor growth and prolongs progression-free survival and overall survival in a dose-dependent manner in chemotherapy-resistant osteosarcoma and sarcoma.

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  • (PMID = 27963649.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Chasen MR, Eades M, Jelowicki M, Amdouni S, Sharma R: The McGill Cancer Nutrition and Rehabilitation Program. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9623

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The McGill Cancer Nutrition and Rehabilitation Program.
  • : 9623 Background: Cancer rehabilitation is a process that assists the individual with cancer to obtain optimal physical, social, psychological, and vocational functioning within the limits created by the disease and treatment.
  • The McGill Cancer Nutrition and Rehabilitation (CNR) program developed as a result of the ever-increasing demand to address the individual cancer patients and their needs, as well as on achieving optimal tumour-related outcomes.
  • METHODS: To assess the effect of an interdisciplinary 8-week rehabilitation program on the functional outcomes of patients with advanced cancer.
  • Sixty-five patients were assessed prior to and following an 8-week interdisciplinary cancer rehabilitation program consisting of medical, nursing, physiotherapy and nutritional interventions.
  • All patients were evaluated with the Edmonton Symptom assessment Score (ESAS), Distress thermometer (DT), Patient Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), Simmonds Functional Assessment Tool and the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT).
  • Their cancer diagnoses were: gastro-esophageal (20%), hepatobiliary (19%), breast (17%), hematological (12%), lung, ENT and sarcoma (9% each), colorectal (3%) and CNS lymphoma (2%) There was a significant improvement after an 8-week cancer rehabilitation program in strength (p=.
  • 02), appetite (p< 0.001), nausea (p< =0.02), nervousness (p< 0.001) sleepiness (p=0.01), shortness of breath (p=0.02), depression (p< 0.001), DT (p< 0.001), total PG-SGA score (p< 0.001) and 6MWT (p=0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary findings suggest that participation in a cancer rehabilitation program ameliorates symptoms and global distress resulting in an increase in physical activities.
  • We can conclude that participation in the Cancer Rehabilitation Program is beneficial.

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  • (PMID = 27963902.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Palmerini E, Brach Del Prever A, Fagioli F, Luksch R, Prete A, Tamburini A, Abate ME, Picci P, Ferrari S, Tienghi A: High-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation for relapsed Ewing's sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10545

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] High-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation for relapsed Ewing's sarcoma.
  • : 10545 Background: Nearly 30-40% of patients with newly diagnosed, non-metastatic Ewing's Sarcoma (EWS) relapse.
  • The role of high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is under investigation in metastatic and high risk localized EWS patients.
  • METHODS: All non-metastatic EWS patients treated in Italian Sarcoma Group centers who relapsed between 1999 and June 2008 were offered HDCT (busulfan 4 mg/kg × 4 days orally and melphalan 140 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) with ASCT whenever possible (no previous HDCT; stable or responding disease after standard dose chemotherapy; adequate peripheral blood stem cells harvest).
  • RESULTS: 72 EWS patients experienced disease recurrence.
  • Pattern of relapse was: lung metastases in 20 (28%) patients, bone metastases in 12 (16%), local recurrence in 11 (15%) and multiple sites in 29 (40%).
  • Treatment at 1<sup>st</sup> relapse was: standard dose chemotherapy in 31 (43%) patients; HDCT followed by ASCT in 24 (33%); palliative treatment in 12 (17%) and surgery only in 5 (7%).
  • Three patients died of treatment-related toxicity.
  • With a median follow-up of 24 months (1-64), the 3-year post-relapse survival (PRS) was 21% (95%CI 7-35).
  • 3-year PRS was better for patients with a lung only relapse [48%, (95%CI 21-74)] and a RFI > 2 years [51%, (95%CI 27-76)].
  • 3-year PRS was 33% (95%CI 13-54) for patients treated with HDCT and 22% (95%CI 6-39) for those receiving standard dose chemotherapy.
  • A significant (P 0.02) advantage was observed in the subgroup of patients with a shorter RFI treated with HDCT [3-year PRS 29% (95%CI 5-52)] compared to those treated with standard dose chemotherapy [3-years PRS 13%, (95%CI 2-29)].

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  • (PMID = 27963952.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Oberlin O, Castex MP, Rubie H, Delattre O, Calvo Escribano C, Rey A, Stevens M: Extra osseous Ewing's tumors: Which is the most appropriate treatment? Experience of the French and International Societies of Pediatric Oncology (SFOP and SIOP). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9038

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Extra osseous Ewing's tumors: Which is the most appropriate treatment? Experience of the French and International Societies of Pediatric Oncology (SFOP and SIOP).
  • : 9038 Background: The best treatment for Extra-Osseous Ewing Sarcoma (EOE) is still matter of debate Methods: Between 1989 and 1999, according to countries, patients (pts) with EOE were treated either in SIOP MMT 89 study (32 pts) or SFOP osseous Ewing's tumor (OE) study (31 pts).
  • Briefly, MMT strategy included chemotherapy (IVA: Ifosfamide-Vincristine-Actinomycine, 6 to 9 courses), surgical resection in pts with incomplete response to chemotherapy (CT) and local irradiation in case of post-operative residue.
  • OE protocol included CT (Cyclophosphamide-Doxorubicin, CPM-DXR, 5 courses), surgical resection; then, treatment was stratified on histological response: good responders (< 10% viable cells) received alternating courses of CPM-DXR and Vincristine-Actino during 6 months.
  • Four poor responders were given intensified chemotherapy (Ifosfamide-VP16) before high-dose chemotherapy (Bu-Mel) followed by local irradiation for 3 of them.
  • Although local treatment was more intensive in OE strategy (96% resections vs 75%, 71% irradiations vs 50%), the difference in the outcome is explained by a higher rate of metastatic relapses in pts treated with MMT protocol (Metastasis-free survival of 82 vs 54%).
  • Univariate analysis for disease-free survival showed that size < 5 cm and OE protocol were favourable predictive factors.
  • However, in multivariate analysis, only type of protocol remained significant for overall and disease-free survivals.

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  • (PMID = 28013727.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Penel N, Italiano A, Isambert N, Bompas E, Bousquet G, Bousquet G, Duffaud F: Effect of metastasectomy and doxorubicin dose on the outcome of patients with metastastic leiomyosarcoma: A multicenter study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10580

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 10580 Background: The role of metastasectomy and front-line chemotherapy modalities remain debated in the metastastatic soft tissue sarcoma setting.
  • The respective impact of treatment modalities on PFS and OS were assessed after adjustment to prognostic factors.
  • RESULTS: This database included 46 (31%) uterus and 101 soft-tissues (69%) M-LMS.
  • After front-line chemotherapy, 36 patients with lung metastasis (24%) underwent subsequent complete metastasectomy.
  • Only one treatment parameter was associated with better PFS: planned doxorubicin dose superior to 60 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/3 weeks (HR=7.57 [1.32-10.40], p=0.023).
  • The univariate analysis identified the following prognostic factors: PS, time interval between diagnosis and metastatic relapse, local relapse and grade.
  • Under multivariate analysis, there was only one good prognostic factor for PFS: interval time between initial diagnosis and metastasis > 12 months (p=0.006).
  • Other chemotherapy parameters did not significantly modify OS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Doxorubicin dose and metastasectomy remain the cornerstone of the optimal treatment of M-LMS.

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  • (PMID = 27963870.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Rushing DA, Quinney SK, Murry DJ: Epirubicin dose escalation in the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9034

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Epirubicin dose escalation in the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma.
  • : 9034 Background: Epirubicin (Epi), a topoisomerase II-targeted anthracycline, has been used safely in doses ranging from 75-160 mg/m<sup>2</sup> for the treatment of patients (pts) with soft tissue sarcoma (STS).
  • Epi concentrations were determined using a validated LC-MS assay and Epi area under the concentration-time curve (EAUC) was calculated.
  • After 2 cycles of chemotherapy pts with EAUC<2133 (ng-hr/ml) and progressive disease (PD) were dose escalated in order to achieve a target EAUC of 3200 ng-hr/ml.
  • Treatment with Epi 75 mg/m<sup>2</sup> produced a median EAUC= 1538(range 1140-3677).
  • 9 pts had PD, but 1 pt had minor response (MR), 4 had stable disease (SD), 1 of theses was negative by PET scan.

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  • (PMID = 28013731.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Garcia Del Muro X, Fra J, Lopez Pousa A, Maurel J, Martín J, Martínez Trufero J, Casado A, Cruz J, Gómez España MA, Lavernia J: Randomized phase II study of dacarbazine plus gemcitabine versus DTIC alone in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: A Spanish Group for Research on Sarcomas (GEIS) study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10529

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Randomized phase II study of dacarbazine plus gemcitabine versus DTIC alone in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: A Spanish Group for Research on Sarcomas (GEIS) study.
  • : 10529 Background: Dacarbazine (D) and gemcitabine (G) are active as single agents in the treatment of patients (pts) with advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) resistant to standard chemotherapy.
  • The purpose of this study was to assess if the combination of D and G (Buesa et al. Cancer.
  • METHODS: Pts with advanced STS progressing after doxorubicin and ifosfamide, PS 0-2, no prior G or D, measurable disease and adequate organ function, were randomized to receive G 1,800 mg/m2 as a fixed dose infusion rate (10 mg/m2/min) and D 500 mg/m2 every 2 weeks, or D 1,200 mg/m2 alone every 3 weeks.
  • Pts were stratified by PS and interval since the initial diagnosis.
  • To detect an increase in PFR at 3 months from 40% to 60% with a power of 80% and a two-sided alpha of 0.05, 49 pts had to be accrued per arm (an additional 10% was permitted, to allow for pts who could not be evaluated).
  • The median number of cycles administered of D+G and D were 6 (2-13) and 2 (1-10), respectively.
  • 29 pts were free of progression at 3 months among the first 49 pts in the D+G arm (26 required to be the study positive).
  • Severe anemia and thrombocytopenia were more frequent with D and granulocytopenia with D+G.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The combination of D plus G is active and well-tolerated in pts with pretreated STS, yielding significant improvement in survival.

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  • (PMID = 27963921.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Ferrari S, Smeland S, Bielack S, Comandone A, Dileo P, Picci P, Sundby Hall K, Eriksson M, Honegger H, Reichardt P: A European treatment protocol for bone sarcoma in patients older than 40 years. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10516

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A European treatment protocol for bone sarcoma in patients older than 40 years.
  • : 10516 Background: EUROpean Bone Over 40 Sarcoma Study (EURO-B.O.S.S.) is the first prospective multicenter international study for patients 41 - 65 years old with high-grade bone sarcoma.
  • METHODS: Patients with HG Osteosarcoma (OS), HG sarcoma NOS (S), Fibrosarcoma, MFH, Leiomyosarcoma, Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma (DCh) were included.
  • Chemotherapy: Combinations of cisplatin/doxorubicin (CDP 100mg/m2/ADM 60mg/m2), ifosfamide/CDP(IFO 6g/m2/CDP 100mg/m2) and IFO/ADM (IFO 6g/m2/ADM 60mg/m2) were repeated three times (9 cycles).
  • Synchronous metastases in 30 (21%) patients, central location of tumor in 45 (32%).
  • One surgical-related and one chemotherapy-related death were reported.
  • With a median follow-up of 25 months (4-68) 3 year OS was 58% (95%CI 48-68%) [7% (95%CI 0-19%) without SCR].
  • In patients with SCR, 3 year OS and EFS were 46% (95%CI 9-83%) and 0% in case of synchronous metastases and 69% (95%CI58-80%) and 45% (95%CI33-57%) for localized patients; 50% (95%CI 29-71%) and 40% (95%CI 20-59%) for patients with central tumor, 73% (95%CI61-85%) and 44% (95%CI31-57%) for those with extremity tumor; 68% (95%CI 52-83%) and 46% (95%CI 32-54%) for OS, 64% (95%CI 42-85%) and 48% (95%CI 25-71%) for S, 48% (95%CI 13-82%) and 27% (95%CI 1-54%) for DCh.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The protocol is feasible, but the chemotherapy-related toxicity is remarkable.
  • Central location and synchronous metastases are negative prognostic factors, but 50% 3-year OS can be achieved with aggressive local and systemic treatment.
  • Osteosarcoma and high-grade sarcoma NOS benefit from chemotherapy more than patients with dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma.

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  • (PMID = 27963653.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Piperno-Neumann S, Homicsko K, Mussot S, Anract P, Laurence V, Pierga J, Mignot L, Chapelier A: A retrospective study of parameters influencing survival after surgical resection of lung metastases of bone and soft tissue sarcomas. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10541

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A retrospective study of parameters influencing survival after surgical resection of lung metastases of bone and soft tissue sarcomas.
  • : 10541 Background: Due to the high rate of isolated lung metastases of sarcomas, a multidisciplinary approach combining chemotherapy with pulmonary metastasectomy (PM) is helpful to achieve R0 resection and try to increase progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).
  • The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the clinical and tumor features of 70 consecutive operated patients and to identify the factors influencing survival.
  • METHODS: 70 patients undergoing PM at Foch Hospital or CCML between 1995 and 2006 were identified, with follow-up (FU) for a minimum of 3 years after last PM.
  • RESULTS: 64 patients had grade II/III sarcomas of mainly lower limb origin.15 patients had synchronous lung metastases, 35 showed bilateral lesions (mean number of 4, mean size of 12 mm).
  • No patient had extrapulmonary disease at the time of PM.
  • 51% were primary bone sarcomas (24 osteo, 9 Ewing, 3 chondro) and 49 % were soft tissue sarcomas (including 12 synovial, 9 leio).
  • The primary tumor treatment consisted in conservative surgery in 58 patients (83%).
  • 49 patients received neo and/or adjuvant chemotherapy, 22 patients had postoperative radiotherapy.
  • With a median FU from diagnosis of 7.7 years, the median OS for all patients reached 59 months, and the median survival after metastasectomy (OSPM) 31 months.
  • DFI may be a surrogate marker for tumor biology.

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  • (PMID = 27963959.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Rossi JF, Safsafi K, Royce P, Caraux J, Safsafik K: Ancestim (r-metHuSCF) in combination with filgrastim to rescue mobilization and collection of peripheral blood progenitor cells for autologous transplantation. Compassionate use in 288 patients at 62 sites in France (1998-2003). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6642

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: Ancestim (r-metHuSCF, Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA) was delivered on a named-pt basis under the French Temporary Authorization for Use program to 288 pts with prior failure to achieve 20 CD34+ cells/μL peripheral blood (no leukapheresis attempt, n = 209 pts) or failure to collect an adequate PBPC yield (2x10<sup>6</sup> CD34+ cells/kg; n = 64 pts) (no. of prior failed attempts: 1 to 5)(median age 53 yrs [1 -70 yrs], n ≤ 18 yrs of age = 31) (lymphomas, 140 pts; myeloma, 84 pts; CLL, 21 pts; Ewing's sarcoma, 12 pts; neuroblastomas, 11 pts; other tumor types: 20 pts).
  • Ancestim (20μg/kg/d) was combined with filgrastim alone (10μg/kg/d; median 7 d, 151 pts) or with chemotherapy and filgrastim (5μg/kg/d, median 12 d, 136 pts).

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  • (PMID = 28016344.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Shimizu K, Tanigawa K, Takeshita N, Aruga A, Mulé JJ, Takasaki K: A phase I trial of combination therapy of tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells and adoptive transfer of anti-CD3 activated T cells (TP-DC/CAT) in patients with advanced gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):2585

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I trial of combination therapy of tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells and adoptive transfer of anti-CD3 activated T cells (TP-DC/CAT) in patients with advanced gastrointestinal (GI) cancers.
  • : 2585 Background: We have previously shown that tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccination (TP-DC) elicited therapeutic rejection of established tumor in animal models.
  • Administration of activated T cells was also shown to inhibit tumor relapse in patients (pts) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after curative operation.
  • In addition, combination of TP-DC with administration of activated T cells elicited more significant therapeutic rejection of established tumor than the single therapy alone in animal models.
  • We therefore sought to examine the therapeutic potency of TP-DC with administration of anti-CD3 activated T cells (CAT) against GI cancers: 3 pts were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, 7 pts with HCC, 3 pts with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, 2 pts with esophageal sarcoma, 12 pts with colorectal cancer.
  • ) 4 times every 3 weeks with 1 x 109 CAT activated with interleukin-2 and antibody to CD3: 4 pts received 1 x 106 DC, 7 received 2 x 107, 16 received 1 x 108.
  • Ten of these pts had evaluable unresected tumor resistant to conventional chemotherapy.
  • Two of 10 pts with evaluable unresected tumor achieved partial remission (6 months); 4 pts achieved stable disease (4 months).
  • 13 of 16 pts receiving 1 x 108 DC developed a strong positive skin reaction to tumor lysates.
  • In 6 pts, a positive skin reaction to tumor lysates was shown to be maintained in 12 months after the development of the positive skin reaction to tumor lysates.

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  • (PMID = 28015283.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Arnaoutakis K, Morse AB, Ambika S, Wong G, Parameswaran R: Practice-based improvement (PBI) via web based tool (WBT) in multidisciplinary gynecologic oncology clinic (MGOC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17545

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Practice-based improvement (PBI) via web based tool (WBT) in multidisciplinary gynecologic oncology clinic (MGOC).
  • Our MGOC brings together oncology fellows and oncology nurse practitioners (NPs).
  • Surgery, chemotherapy or radiation results in early menopause which increase OP risk.
  • Few studies document evaluation of risk of late side effects of cancer therapy.
  • With a retrospective sequential patient (pts) sample, we used American Board of Internal Medicine Practice Improvement Module (ABIM PIM) to assess documented comprehensiveness of OP risk factor evaluation in 25 MGOC pts.
  • Part 1 evaluation showed that 68 % pts had endometrial adenocarcinoma; 20% cervical cancer; 12% uterine sarcoma or carcinosarcoma.
  • 67% pts had normal bone density scan.
  • 64% of pts had bone density scans.

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  • (PMID = 27963762.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Hawkins DS, Barker L, Sanders JE, Pendergrass T: Outcome of patients with recurrent Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8517

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcome of patients with recurrent Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT).
  • : 8517 Background: The overall survival (OS) of relapsed ESFT is poor, and the relative benefit of high-dose therapy (HDT) is controversial.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively identified 52 consecutive ESFT patients initially diagnosed before December 31, 2000, with disease recurrence between 1985 and 2002, who were treated at CHRMC and had adequate medical records for review.
  • RESULTS: All patients initially received multi-agent chemotherapy, most frequently vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophospamide (C), etoposide (E), and ifosfamide (I) (27 patients).
  • Twenty-five patients had metastatic disease at presentation.
  • Forty patients received second-line treatment with systemic chemotherapy, most frequently IE (23 patients), IE with carboplatin (6 patients), or topotecan and C (5 patients), with or without additional surgery and/or radiotherapy.
  • Twenty-six (50%) patients achieved a partial or complete response to second-line treatment, with a median duration of response of 30 months (range 5-119 months).
  • By univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with response to second-line treatment (47% vs. 0%, p <0.0001), RFI > 24 months (51% vs. 12%, p = 0.0001), and no metastases at initial diagnosis (34% vs. 12%, p = 0.03).
  • Reduced risk of death was associated with response to second-line therapy (odds ratio 0.16, 95% CI 0.05-0.48), RFI > 24 months (odds ratio 0.28, 95% CI 0.12-0.66) and receiving HDT (odds ratio 0.29, 95% CI 0.09-0.93), but not metastases at initial diagnosis (odds ratio 1.0, 95% CI 0.4-2.4).
  • CONCLUSIONS: HDT as consolidation therapy for relapsed ESFT is associated with improved OS, even after adjusting for RFI and response to second-line treatment.

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  • (PMID = 28013778.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Pink D, Rahm J, Schoeler D, Schoenknecht TM, Reichardt P: Activity of paclitaxel in radiation induced and other secondary angiosarcomas. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10578

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 10578 Background: Angiosarcomas (AS) represent 1-2% of adult soft tissue sarcomas and can arise anywhere in the body.
  • Major predisposing factors are therapeutic radiation and chronic lymphedema.
  • Paclitaxel has shown an exceptionally high activity of 75-89% in angiosarcomas of the face and scalp and to a lesser and less consitent degree of 15-58% in other disease locations.
  • We report on a retrospectice single center experience with chemotherapy in 17 patients (pts.) with secondary angiosarcomas (SAS).
  • METHODS: Data from 17 patients were analysed including 15 females and 2 males with a median age of 63 years (range 18-80 years).
  • 12 female patients suffered from angiosarcoma of the breast/thoracic wall following operation and radiation + chemotherapy of a primary breast cancer with an interval of a median of 6 years (range 2-15 years).
  • 1 patient developed a SAS 6 years after resection and radiation of a liposarcoma in the limb.
  • RESULTS: 14/17 pts. received surgery as first treatment for SAS.
  • 10 pts. developed a locoregional recurrence, 1 pt. distant metastases.
  • 3 pts. remain free of disease.
  • All 14 patients with recurrent/metastatic disease were treated with chemotherapy.
  • 12 pts. received paclitaxel at a dose of 175 mg/m<sup>2</sup> q3w or 50-70 mg/m<sup>2</sup> q1w as first- or second-line therapy.
  • Responses were 8 PR with a median PFS of 6 months (range 3-23 months), and 1 SD (PFS 4 months) with a disease control rate of 75%.
  • In only 3/11 cases, pts. responded to Anthracycline-based chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Paclitaxel shows high activity in SAS, comparable to the results in face and scalp angiosarcomas and can be considered a standard treatment option.

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  • (PMID = 27963758.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Grisanti S, Consoli F, Ferrari VD, Bercich L, Amoroso V, Rangoni G, Cetto GL, Dei Tos AP, Facchetti F, Marini G: Proliferation heterogeneity in synovial sarcoma (SS) defines different patterns of clinical outcome: A retrospective study of 32 patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e21511

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Proliferation heterogeneity in synovial sarcoma (SS) defines different patterns of clinical outcome: A retrospective study of 32 patients.
  • : e21511 Background: SS is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma (STS) characterized by a constitutive overexpression of the bcl-2 proteins and high proliferation rate (Ki67).
  • METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 32 patients treated at three oncology centers between January 2000 and August 2008 was conducted.
  • Histologic diagnosis of SS was confirmed by FISH analysis of t(X;18).
  • Bcl-2 and Ki67 were determined by immunohistochemistry at baseline and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CT).
  • Treatment-induced pathological response (pCR) was defined as tumor necrosis of 100%.
  • Endpoints were recurrence rate (RR), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS).
  • RESULTS: 13/32 patients received an anthracycline/ifosfamide-based chemotherapy (CT) before surgery.
  • After a median follow-up of 21 months (range 13-64 months), 9/13 pts without pCR experienced progression disease and 5 of them were dead of SS.
  • Downregulation of bcl-2 and Ki67 index after treatment could be a predictor of recurrence and overall survival.
  • 2. SS is characterized by cellular heterogeneity in which a high proliferative compartment coexists with low proliferative/anti-apoptotic compartment with different response to treatment.

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  • (PMID = 27963443.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Grosso F, Sanfilippo R, Jones RL, Collini P, Morosi C, Raspagliesi F, Tercero JC, D'Incalci M, Judson IR, Casali PG: Role of trabectedin (T) in the management of advanced uterine leiomyosarcoma (U-LM). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10530

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 10530 Background: To explore the clinical impact of T in U-LM.
  • T has been approved in Europe for second line treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcomas (STS).
  • These differences may be responsible for the sensitivity of this subtype to therapy, thus justifying an evaluation of the activity of T in a relatively homogeneous series of U-LM patients.
  • METHODS: From April 2000, 56 patients (pts) with advanced disease, previously exposed to a median of 3 chemotherapy lines (range 1-5), received T within an expanded access programme at two European referral institutions for sarcoma.
  • The clinical records were reviewed focusing on response and treatment outcome.
  • Two pts were excluded from the analysis having received only 1 course of T.
  • RESULTS: A total of 252 courses were delivered (median 3, IQR2-6) and 36% of patients received more than 5 courses of T.
  • A partial response was observed in 11 patients and stable disease in 15, for a PR rate of 21% and a tumor control rate of 50%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results compare favourably with other systemic treatments in advanced U-LMS and support their sensitivity to T.
  • This should prompt further studies to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of T in U-LMS and elucidate possible biological predictive factors (e.g.

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  • (PMID = 27963908.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Seddon BM, Scurr MR, Jones RL, Wood Z, Propert-Lewis C, A'Hern R, Whelan JS, Judson IR: Phase II study of gemcitabine and docetaxel as first-line chemotherapy in locally advanced/metastatic leiomyosarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10528

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II study of gemcitabine and docetaxel as first-line chemotherapy in locally advanced/metastatic leiomyosarcoma.
  • : 10528 Background: Locally advanced/metastatic soft tissue sarcoma is invariably incurable with a poor prognosis.
  • This study aims to investigate the combination as first line treatment in patients with unresectable incurable leiomyosarcoma.
  • Patients were evaluated for response by RECIST after cycles 2, 4, 6, and 8, and three-monthly after completing treatment.
  • The study was conducted with a Simon 2-stage design, recruiting 19 patients in stage 1, and 25 patients in stage 2.
  • Eligible patients had histologically proven leiomyosarcoma of the uterus (48.9%) or other sites (51.1%) unresectable for cure, with measurable disease, no previous chemotherapy, adequate organ function, and performance status 0-2.
  • 84.4% had metastatic disease, and 15.6% had locally advanced disease.
  • 11% of patients had grade 1 disease, and 89% had grade 2/3 disease.
  • All patients had demonstrated disease progression prior to trial entry.
  • Responses were as follows: partial response 12 (27%), stable disease (confirmed) 16 (36%), stable disease (unconfirmed) 5 (11%), progressive disease 11 (25%).
  • Further investigation comparing the combination with current standard therapies for leiomyosarcoma is warranted.

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  • (PMID = 27963919.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Broker LE, De Vos FY, Gall H, Gietema JA, Voi M, Cohen MB, De Vries EG, Giaccone G: A phase I trial of the novel oral taxane BMS-275183 in patients with advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):2029

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I trial of the novel oral taxane BMS-275183 in patients with advanced solid tumors.
  • : 2029 Background: BMS-275183, a novel orally administered taxane, has been studied in this phase I trial to assess its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and possible anti-tumor activity.
  • METHODS: BMS-275183 was given in a continuous, weekly schedule to adult patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors refractory to standard therapy.
  • Plasma samples were collected on weeks 1 and 3 for 48 h after drug administration and analyzed using a LC/MS/MS assay.
  • Most common and dose limiting toxicity (DLT) consists of peripheral neuropathy, which was severe (CTC grade 3) in 1/6 pts at 320 and 2/2 pts at 240 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, and developed rapidly after the first dose but generally recovered to gr 1 after dose reduction or discontinuation.
  • PK analysis at the 200 mg/m<sup>2</sup>dose level (n=15) revealed a rapid uptake with a median Tmax of 1 h and a mean T<sub>½</sub> of 20.3 h.
  • Interestingly, a correlation between the AUC and the severity of the side effects was observed, as most patients with a DLT or dose reduction, had an AUC > 5600 ng.h/mL following the first dose.
  • Seven confirmed partial responses were observed in 23 evaluable pts, all treated at a dose ≥ 160 mg/m<sup>2</sup>: 4/8 evaluable NSCLC pts (duration 26, 28, 20 and 26+ weeks), 1/3 NSCLC pts with non-measurable disease (16 weeks), 1/1 sarcoma pt (50 weeks) and 1/1 prostate/NSCLC pt (19 weeks).

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  • (PMID = 28015583.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Hoban CJ, Hoering A, Synold TW, Chung V, Gandara DR, Schott AF, Kingsbury L, Lew D, LoRusso PM, Gadgeel SM: Phase I evaluation of lapatinib and everolimus in patients with advanced malignancies: Southwest Oncology Group trial S0528. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3553

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I evaluation of lapatinib and everolimus in patients with advanced malignancies: Southwest Oncology Group trial S0528.
  • : 3553 Background: Anti-tumor activity of Her inhibitors including lapatinib, an oral inhibitor of Her1 and Her 2, appears to correlate with their ability to down regulate PI3/Akt pathway.
  • METHODS: Pts with advanced tumors, for which there was no effective therapy, were eligible.
  • In Part I dose escalation to define MTD was performed with both drugs being given together.
  • In Part II, PK of both drugs are being analyzed in patients treated at MTD and randomized to either cohort A- everolimus alone for a week followed by both drugs, or cohort B- lapatinib alone for a week followed by both drugs.
  • 12 PK eligible pts will be accrued to each cohort to detect the influence of one drug over the other drug's PK.
  • Common tumors were breast (4), lung cancer (3), adenoid cystic (3).
  • 6 pts developed DLTs: pneumonitis, rash, diarrhea, stomatitis (2), and fatigue (2).
  • None of the pts had a response but 11 pts (2 liver, 1 breast, 1 renal, 1 sarcoma, 2 adenoid cystic, 1 melanoma, 1 bladder, 1 NSCLC, 1 colorectal) had stable disease for 8 weeks or longer.

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  • (PMID = 27961366.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Tsuchiya H, Ii S, Yamamoto N, Karita M, Shirai T, Nishida H, Hayashi M, Tomita K: Treatment of the elderly with high-grade bone and soft-tissue sarcomas (BSTS). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9055

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of the elderly with high-grade bone and soft-tissue sarcomas (BSTS).
  • : 9055 Background: For patients with high-grade BSTS who are over 60 years of age, we expect to obtain similar benefits from neoadjuvant chemotherapy (C) and surgical treatment as we do with their younger counterparts.
  • In this study, we reviewed clinical outcomes of treatment for these patients.
  • Of those patients receiving more than 3 courses of C good responders (clinically confirmed PR or CR, or histologically identified more than 90% of necrosis) were 5 of 7 (71%) with bone sarcomas and 8 of 16 (50%) with soft-tissue sarcomas.
  • The 5-year disease-free survival rate (SR) was 41% in stage II patients treated with surgery combined with more than 3 courses of C and 33% in those treated with surgery alone or combined with less than 2 courses of C.
  • The 5-year overall SR of good responders for more than 3 courses of C was 80%, and of poor responders (clinically confirmed NC, or histologically identified less than 90% of necrosis) was 47%.
  • However, we could not find statistically significant differences in SR between sufficient C and insufficient or no C group.
  • For all patients, especially poor responders, an adequate surgical margin was the most necessary for a favorable outcome.

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  • (PMID = 28014102.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Mita AC, Sankhala K, Sarantopoulos J, Carmona J, Okuno S, Goel S, Chugh R, Coffey MC, Mettinger K, Mita MM: A phase II study of intravenous (IV) wild-type reovirus (Reolysin) in the treatment of patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas metastatic to the lung. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10524

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase II study of intravenous (IV) wild-type reovirus (Reolysin) in the treatment of patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas metastatic to the lung.
  • In vitro and in vivo studies with Reolysin in sarcoma cell lines revealed significant antitumor activity.
  • METHODS: This phase II open-label, single agent study was designed to characterize the efficacy and safety of Reolysin given IV every 28 days in patients (pts) with bone or soft tissue sarcoma with lung metastasis using a Simon two-stage design.
  • 38 pts received prior chemotherapy, radiotherapy, biological agents or combinations for their metastatic disease, 15 pts received more than 3 chemotherapy regimens.
  • The sarcoma subtypes included: synovial sarcoma (13 pts), osteosarcoma (7 pts), leiomyosarcoma (7 pts), MFH (5 pts), Ewing/PNET (1 pt), chordoma (1 pt), others (9 pts).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of single agent reovirus for treatment of sarcoma is a novel and unique therapeutic approach to date.
  • Reolysin is well tolerated and shows promise for the treatment of metastatic sarcoma.

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  • (PMID = 27963913.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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38. Hensley ML, Anderson S, Soslow R, Antonescu C, Upham T, Riedel E, Aghajanian C, Maki RG: Activity of gemcitabine plus docetaxel in leiomyosarcoma (LMS) and other histologies: Report of an expanded phase II trial. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9010

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Our phase II trial was expanded to include non-LMS histologies.
  • We report the longer-term progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for LMS, and response rates (RR) for 52 patients with LMS and non-LMS sarcomas.
  • METHODS: From 6/99-4/03, 52 patients with unresectable LMS (n=42) or other sarcoma (n=10) who had failed 0-2 prior chemotherapy regimens were enrolled on a phase II study of gemcitabine 900 mg/m<sup>2</sup> IV days 1 and 8, plus docetaxel 100 mg/m<sup>2</sup> IV day 8 with GCSF SQ days 9-15, delivered every 21 days for a maximum of 8 on-study cycles.
  • RR in LMS was 40%, and RR in non-LMS was 10%.
  • In non-LMS histologies small numbers preclude firm conclusion about this regimen's activity.
  • A multi-center study is underway to examine gemcitabine vs. gemcitabine with docetaxel in patients with metastatic soft-tissue sarcoma.

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  • (PMID = 28013678.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Hernandez-Morales DE, Hernàndez-Zaccaro AE: Gastrointestinal and cutaneous AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma: Different activity of liposomal doxorubicin according to location of lesions. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9030

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gastrointestinal and cutaneous AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma: Different activity of liposomal doxorubicin according to location of lesions.
  • : 9030 Background: Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) continuous being a frequent neoplasm in third world AIDS patients.
  • Liposomal doxorubicin (LD) is the drug of choice for advanced KS; nevertheless, it is very expensive for third world countries.
  • In addition, we believe that the greatest usefulness of LD is in patients with visceral KS and that there is a different activity of the drug according to the location of the lesions.
  • They were treated with LD, 20 mg/m2 every 21 days, during 6 cycles, and half of them were under highly active antiretroviral therapy.
  • Regarding the cutaneous lesions, there was only one patient (8%) who showed a complete response, five (38%) showed partial responses and seven (54%) stabilized their disease.

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  • (PMID = 28013733.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. Steinert DM, Blakely LJ, Patel SR, Burgess MA, Chen LL, Trent JC, Raymond AK, Benjamin RS: Outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and other intra-abdominal sarcomas (IAS) in the era of imatinib therapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9047

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and other intra-abdominal sarcomas (IAS) in the era of imatinib therapy.
  • In the era of kit immunohistochemistry and imatinib mesylate therapy the outcome of IASs is unknown.
  • METHODS: We analyzed 268 consecutive patients who were referred to our institution for evaluation of the diagnosis of GIST from 12/15/00 to 9/1/01.
  • Patients diagnosed with GIST were treated with imatinib mesylate, and patients diagnosed with other IAS were treated with standard sarcoma chemotherapy.
  • A single sarcoma pathologist reviewed all patients' tumor blocks.
  • RESULTS: Of 268 patients, 4 patients were excluded because of diagnoses other than sarcoma.
  • Another 46 patients were excluded because no data were available at the time of this abstract.
  • Of the remaining 218 patients, 159 (72.9%) were GIST and 59 (27.1%) were IAS specifically: 31 leiomyosarcoma, 10 spindle cell tumors, 4 unclassified sarcomas, and 14 other types of sarcoma.
  • The most common primary tumor sites for patients with GIST were stomach (37.1%), small bowel (34%), and colon (6.3%); whereas, patients with other intra-abdominal sarcomas occurred in the retroperitoneum (25.4%), abdominal viscera (18.6%), and pelvis (11.9%).
  • While median survival from the time of diagnosis has not been reached in patients with GIST, in other IAS median survival is 63.8 months.
  • Time to progression in patients with GIST was 16.4 months after imatinib and 5.1 months in patients with IAS treated with standard sarcoma chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Survival and time to progression are worse for IAS compared to GISTs.
  • New therapies for these tumors are needed.

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  • (PMID = 28014121.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. D'Adamo DR, Anderson S, Albritton K, Yamada J, Riedel E, Scheu K, Schwartz GK, Chen H, Maki RG: Cardiac toxicity in a phase II study of doxorubicin (DOX) and bevacizumab (BEV) for patients (pts) with metastatic soft-tissue sarcomas (STS). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9012

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cardiac toxicity in a phase II study of doxorubicin (DOX) and bevacizumab (BEV) for patients (pts) with metastatic soft-tissue sarcomas (STS).
  • Since STS are largely resistant to standard chemotherapy, we hoped to determine response rate (RR), toxicity, time to progression, and survival of pts with STS treated with BEV and DOX.
  • METHODS: Pts could have had up to 1 non-anthracycline line of therapy.
  • RESULTS: From 12/02 to 12/03 17 pts were enrolled: 13 F, 4 M; median age 54 (range 39-71); ECOG PS median 0 (range 0-2); prior therapy: surgery 12, radiation 2, chemotherapy 6.
  • Ten pts (59%) had stable disease ≥ 4 cycles (SD).
  • Four pts developed cardiac toxicity (EF<50%), three grade G2 (DOX 300, 300, 420 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) and one G3 (DOX 591 mg/m<sup>2</sup>).
  • One pt with extensive lung disease died of recurrent bilateral pneumothoraces, possibly treatment related.

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  • (PMID = 28013679.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Gupta AA, Al-Hussaini H, Yu C, Griffin A, Tsung V, Stephens D, Blackstein M, Hogg D, Ferguson P, Wunder J: Clinical features, treatment, and outcome in 108 patients with localized, high-grade synovial sarcoma (SS). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10584

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical features, treatment, and outcome in 108 patients with localized, high-grade synovial sarcoma (SS).
  • : 10584 Background: There remains ongoing controversy in the treatment of localized SS, with no clear consensus on routine use of chemotherapy.
  • Sixty-six (61%) patients had large tumours (> 5 cm), 7 (6.5%) had neuro-vascular invasion, and 10 (9.3%) had bone invasion.
  • 16 (17%) AP and 13 (87%) PP received chemotherapy.
  • All patients underwent definitive surgery with gross total resection; 9 patients (8 PP) had positive margins.
  • Some patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and response was evaluable in 15 patients: 10 SD, 2 PR, 1 CR, 1 PD.
  • With a median follow-up of 5.6 years, EFS and OS was 72 ± 4.6% and 82 ± 4.2%, respectively and was similar for AP and PP.
  • Patients with tumours > 5 cm had significantly worse EFS (63 ± 6.5%) compared to patients with small tumours (88 ± 5.4%, p=0.02), as did those with bone invasion (47 ± 18 vs.75 ± 4.9, p=0.05).
  • The effect of chemotherapy was assessed in the entire cohort.
  • Of 29 who received chemotherapy, 9 (31%) relapsed, and of 79 who did not receive chemotherapy, 23 (29%) relapsed.
  • In patients with tumours >5 cm, relapse occurred in 41% (7/17) of those who received chemotherapy compared to 37% (18/49) in those that received no chemotherapy.
  • Large tumours and those with evidence of bone invasion have a poor outlook.
  • It is unlikely that chemotherapy contributes to an improvement in survival in SS.

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  • (PMID = 27963882.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Wanebo HJ, Begossi G, Belliveau J, Gustafson E: Isolated chemotherapeutic perfusion as neoadjuvant therapy for advanced/unresectable pelvic malignancy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2555

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Isolated chemotherapeutic perfusion as neoadjuvant therapy for advanced/unresectable pelvic malignancy.
  • : 2555 Background: Isolated pelvic perfusion (IPP) provides higher tissue drug levels than high-dose systemic therapy and may enhance resectability and survival in patients failing chemo radiation ± surgery.
  • METHODS: 42 patients had advanced (irradiated) rectal cancer, 8 pts had advanced anorectal cancer, 5 patients had sarcoma.
  • Other cancers included melanoma (M 4pts), endometrial cancer (EC) 2, ovarian cancer (OC) 2, and bladder cancer (BC) 1.
  • Chemotherapy agents included 5FU, (1,500-2,000mg/M<sup>2</sup>), cisplatinum (100mg/M<sup>2</sup>), Oxaliplatin and mitomycin (10-20mg/M<sup>2</sup>) for epithelial cancer and selected agents (Adriamycin, Ifosamide, DTIC, Phenyl Alanine Mustard (PAM) for the remaining tumors: 6 pts received high dose PAM (110/M<sup>2</sup>), Paclitaxel 60mg/m<sup>2</sup> and Cisplatin 150mg/m<sup>2</sup>, 3 required stem cell support (advanced M (1 pt), SCC (1 pt), Endometrial ca (1pt).
  • RESULTS: Palliative IPP for advanced rectal cancer pts provided significant pain control (1-4 months) in 11 of 14 pts with narcotic resistant pain and induced tumor regression in 6 pts.
  • Preoperative perfusion in 26 advanced rectal cancer pts induced a complete path response (in pelvis) in 2 pts and significant regression in 11 pts rendering them resectable.
  • Median survival post IPP was 24 mos in 12 patients considered resectable vs. 8 mos in 12 patients considered non resectable p<0.05.
  • It was 30 months in 8 pts with advanced anorectal squamous cancer (1pt survived >90 mos), 20 months in 4 patients with endometrial/ovarian recurrence, (1 died NED >48 mos), 13 mos in 4 melanoma pts and only 5 months in 5 pts pelvic sarcoma (4-34 mos-NED).
  • CONCLUSIONS: IPP with high dose chemo therapy has promise in palliating or augmenting resectability of advanced pelvic malignancy persisting after conventional surgical and chemoradiation therapy.
  • Stem cell support and biologic therapy merit further exploration.

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  • (PMID = 27961873.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. O'Brien MM, Donaldson SS, Whittemore AS, Link MP: Second malignant neoplasms among survivors of pediatric Hodgkin disease treated with low-dose radiation (15-25.5 Gy) and chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10003

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Second malignant neoplasms among survivors of pediatric Hodgkin disease treated with low-dose radiation (15-25.5 Gy) and chemotherapy.
  • : 10003 Background: Second malignant neoplasms (SMN) are a known complication of Hodgkin disease (HD) treatment.
  • We report the occurrence of SMN among pediatric HD survivors treated at Stanford with chemotherapy and low-dose radiation from 1970 to 1990.
  • METHODS: Patients received 6 cycles of MOPP (mechlorethamine, vincristine, prednisone, procarbazine) with 15-25.5 Gy radiation ± 10 Gy boost or 3 MOPP and 3 ABVD cycles (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) with 15 Gy radiation ± 10 Gy boost.
  • Multivariate analysis was performed with Cox proportional hazards regression using chronological age as the time scale.
  • Four patients developed secondary leukemia.
  • Fifteen patients developed 17 secondary solid tumors (5 thyroid carcinomas, 6 breast carcinomas, 4 sarcomas, 1 bladder paraganglioma, 1 melanoma) at a median of 15.4 years.
  • All solid tumors except the melanoma occurred within or at the margin of radiation fields, ranging in dose from 15-26.5 Gy.
  • Cumulative incidence of any SMN is 17% (95%CI 10.5-26.7) at 20 years following HD diagnosis.
  • In univariate analysis, older age at HD diagnosis (>11 years) and female gender were associated with SMN (p<0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of SMN in pediatric HD survivors is elevated following treatment with chemotherapy and low-dose radiation.
  • Sarcomas, breast, and thyroid carcinomas occurred with similar frequency and latency as found in studies of HD survivors who received high-dose radiation.

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  • (PMID = 27962547.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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45. Morgan JA, George S, Desai J, St Amand M, Horton D, Wilkins E, Manola J, Demetri GD: Phase II study of gemcitabine/vinorelbine (GV) as first or second line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9009

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II study of gemcitabine/vinorelbine (GV) as first or second line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS).
  • : 9009 Background: Both single agent gemcitabine and vinorelbine have efficacy for treatment of STS.
  • Combination GV is active therapy for metastatic carcinoma, with acceptable toxicity.
  • This single institution phase II trial has been undertaken to determine response rates and toxicity of combination GV for treatment of metastatic STS.
  • Gemcitabine at 800mg/m2 was infused over 90 minutes on days 1 and 8 of a 21 day cycle, following vinorelbine at 25mg/m2.
  • Pts with grade 3 or 4 toxicity were subsequently treated at the same doses on days 1 and 15 of a 28 day cycle.
  • Histology was uterine or extremity leiomyosarcoma (LMS) in 9, high grade pleomorphic sarcoma in 2, and 1 each with carcinosarcoma, pleomorphic liposarcoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST), desmoplastic small round cell tumor, rhabdomyosarcoma, and small round cell sarcoma.
  • No treatment related deaths have occurred.
  • Of the remaining 9, 4 have been treatment related, including cough, nausea, vomiting, and SGPT elevation.
  • 3 pts have experienced clinical benefit defined as partial response (PR) or stable disease for greater than 4 months.
  • There have been two confirmed PRs, one high grade uterine LMS progressing after single agent doxorubicin, and one small round cell tumor recurring within 6 months of completion of a 5 drug Ewing's regimen.
  • One metastatic MPNST has exhibited stable disease for greater than 4 months.
  • Median time to progression has been 4.2 months and median survival 6.25 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: GV appears to be a well-tolerated and potentially effective regimen for first or second line treatment of metastatic STS.

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  • (PMID = 28013692.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. Baker LH, Wathen K, Chugh R, Thomas D, Thall PF, Maki RG, Samuels BL, Meyers PA, Priebat DA, Benjamin RS: Activity of imatinib mesylate in desmoid tumors: Interim analysis of a Sarcoma Alliance for Research thru Collaboration (SARC) phase II trial. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9013

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Activity of imatinib mesylate in desmoid tumors: Interim analysis of a Sarcoma Alliance for Research thru Collaboration (SARC) phase II trial.
  • : 9013 Background: Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) are rare clonal neoplastic proliferations of connective tissues.
  • Standard treatment involves wide surgical resection and/or radiation therapy.
  • In cases of unresectable or recurrent disease, tamoxifen, chemotherapy, and NSAIDs have been used with varying success.
  • We and others have previously reported desmoid tumors expressing c-kit, PDGFRα, and/or PDGFR.
  • We reported two patients with extraabdominal desmoid tumors treated with the selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib (Gleevec) with significant shrinkage.
  • SARC, in association with the Connective Tissue Oncology Society, initiated a prospective phase II trial in patients with desmoid tumors, or one of nine sarcoma subtypes.
  • Here, we report specifically on patients with desmoid tumors.
  • METHODS: Patients ≥ 10 years old with desmoid tumors that were not curable by surgical management or in whom curative surgery would lead to undesirable functional impairment were eligible.
  • Rules for early termination within each disease type were based on a hierarchical Bayesian probability model accounting for correlation of the responses of the 10 disease types.
  • Tissue specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of c-kit, PDGFRα, PDGFRß, AKT, PTEN, FKHR, and beta catenin.
  • Tumor DNA was analyzed for PDGFRα exon 18 and APC mutations by allelic discrimination PCR.
  • RESULTS: 26 patients with desmoid tumors have been enrolled with 22 currently evaluable.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Imatinib appears to be a promising agent in the management of unresectable or difficult to resect desmoid tumors.

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  • (PMID = 28013675.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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47. Ramon Y Cajal T, Mazarico J, Lopez Pousa A, Quintana M, Sala N, Altabas M, Sebio A, Robert L, Alonso C, Barnadas A: Clinical features and outcome in primary breast sarcomas (BS): Analysis of a single-institution experience. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e21520

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical features and outcome in primary breast sarcomas (BS): Analysis of a single-institution experience.
  • Controversy remains about local and adjuvant treatment.
  • METHODS: We analyzed clinicopathological variables, treatment and outcome of 33 BS patients treated at our institution from 1966 to 2007.
  • Tumor size 57 (0-230) mm.
  • Pathology: 17 cistosarcoma phylodes (CPh), 9 angiosarcoma, 2 extraesqueletical osteosarcoma, 2 fibrosarcomas, 1 liposarcoma, 1 leiomiosarcoma, 1 malignant fibrous histiocitoma (2.9%).
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in 9 and 7 patients.
  • Radical surgery in BS should be always considered as first treatment option.
  • High-grade non-phylodes BS types may be considered for adjuvant chemotherapy although there were non-statistical differences in OS.

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  • (PMID = 27963450.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Gardner K, Judson I, Leahy M, Barquin E, Marotti M, Collins B, Young H, Scurr M: Activity of cediranib, a highly potent and selective VEGF signaling inhibitor, in alveolar soft part sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10523

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Activity of cediranib, a highly potent and selective VEGF signaling inhibitor, in alveolar soft part sarcoma.
  • : 10523 Background: Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a rare entity making up <1% of soft tissue sarcomas (STS).
  • It is typically indolent but with a high incidence of metastatic disease, usually to lungs, but also to sites such as the brain.
  • Response to conventional chemotherapy is poor (overall response rates are approximately 7% [Reichardt P et al,Eur J Cancer.2003;39:1511-1516]).
  • This is a preliminary report of the activity of cediranib, a highly potent and selective VEGF signaling inhibitor, in this disease.
  • One patient was treated in a phase II randomized trial of cediranib ± prophylactic antihypertensive therapy and six were treated in a Phase II study in patients with imatinib-refractory gastrointestinal stromal tumors or other STS.
  • Response was assessed using RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors).
  • RESULTS: Median age at diagnosis was 39 years (range: 26-49).
  • All patients had pulmonary metastases and two had additional sites of disease (brain, bone, intra-abdominal) at study entry.
  • Four patients had a best response of partial response, two patients had a confirmed reduction in maximum tumor diameter of ≥10% and <30% and one patient experienced stable disease.
  • As of November 2008, three patients remain on treatment with a median (range) time on study of 61 weeks (49-74).
  • Time to progression and progression-free survival will be calculated and available at the time of presentation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate the promising preliminary activity and safety of chronic administration of cediranib in this disease.
  • Further investigation is warranted, particularly as there is no effective systemic treatment for patients with advanced ASPS.

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  • (PMID = 27963912.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Olaya Vargas A, Castellanos Toledo A, Rivera Luna R, Cardenas Cardos R, Rivera Ramirez A, Gonzalez Perez R, Escamilla Asiain G: Gemcitabine based chemotherapy in recurrent or advanced pediatric solid tumors: A phase II study. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8574

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gemcitabine based chemotherapy in recurrent or advanced pediatric solid tumors: A phase II study.
  • : 8574 Background: Although rare, cancer is the leading cause of death in children younger than 15 years around the world.
  • Advances have been made in treating these patients over the last three decades by apropiate therapy.
  • This dramatic improvement in outcome has led to the estimation that in the year 2000, one in every 1,000 young adults between the ages 20 and 29 years would have been a survivor of childhood cancer; and this due to the chemotherapy.
  • Patients had recurrent or refractory solid tumor; TREATMENT: Gemcitabine alone 800 mg/m2 days 1 and 8 or in combination with cisplatin at 80 mg/m2 day 1.
  • RESULTS: The median age was 7.7 years (2-17) The histopathology was 2 pts with Ewing sarcoma, 2 pts germ cell tumors, 1 pt Wilms tumor, 2 pt rhabdomiosarcoma, 1 pt rethnoblastoma, 1 pt ostheosacoma and 1 pt hepatoblastoma.
  • All patients were previous treated with chemotherapy: 5 pts received VAC (vincristine, adryamicin and cyclophospamide); 3 received ICE (Ifosfamide, cyclophospamide and epirubicin); and 3 pts received: VeIP, VAI and ethoposide- carboplatin.
  • There were 1 Partial Response (PR), 3 patients with Stable disease (SD) and 3 with progresión disease (PD).0verall Survival (OS) by Kaplan Meier curves was 66.7% at 6 mo.
  • There were 24 courses of chemotherapy.
  • Conclusión: Gemcitabine alone or in combination with cisplatin demostrated some efficacy in patients heavly previous treated with good tolerance, it could be an option for rescue treatment.

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  • (PMID = 28013923.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. Nickenig C, Buecklein V, Lindner LH, Abdel-Rahman S, Kuhlencordt M, Hiddemann W, Issels RD: Ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE) in combination with regional hyperthermia (RHT) in chemotherapy-pretreated nonresponders with locally advanced high-risk soft tissue sarcoma (HR-STS). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10581

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE) in combination with regional hyperthermia (RHT) in chemotherapy-pretreated nonresponders with locally advanced high-risk soft tissue sarcoma (HR-STS).
  • : 10581 Background: Regional hyperthermia (RHT) improves outcome in combination with neoadjuvant chemotherapy as first-line therapy in locally advanced HR-STS (Issels et al., Abstract 10009, ASCO 2007).
  • Efficacy of ICE combined with RHT as second-line treatment strategy in pts with locally advanced HR-STS pretreated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy ± RHT was evaluated.
  • METHODS: Between 9/97 and 6/08, 49 pts were treated with ICE + RHT (median age: 51 years, range: 21-74 years), with high-grade (G2 24 pts; G3 25 pts) STS histology (20 Lipo-Sa; 6 Leiomyo-Sa, 6 MPNST, 5 NOS, 2 DSRCT, 10 others).
  • As first-line therapy 35 pts had received chemotherapy combined with RHT and 14 pts without RHT.
  • Hematological toxicity grade III (11 pts)/ IV (23 pts) occurred in 34 pts (69 %), 3 pts (6 %) suffered from therapy-related deaths due to infection during cytopenia (2 pts) or postsurgery-related complications (1 pt).
  • In 35 of 49 pts evaluable for OR, 26% achieved objective remission (1 CR + 8 PR), 51% showed stable disease (18 SD) and 23% progressive disease (8 PD).
  • OR rates after initial chemotherapy with or without RHT were 17 % (4 PR of 24 pts) and 45% (1 CR + 4 PR of 11 pts), respectively (p=0.13).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Second-line ICE combined with RHT is feasible and effective in pts with locally advanced HR-STS non-responding to first-line anthracycline-based chemotherapy with or without RHT. (Supported by Deutsche Krebshilfe and HelmholtzZentrum münchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) No significant financial relationships to disclose.

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  • (PMID = 27963873.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Des Guetz G, Delattre O, Peters M, Ranchere-Vince D, Terrier P, Vilain MO, Blot E, Savignoni A, Pouillart P: Study of the prognostic value and chemosensitivity according to the type of translocation in synovial sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9016

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Study of the prognostic value and chemosensitivity according to the type of translocation in synovial sarcoma.
  • : 9016 Background Synovial sarcomas, which represent 5% to 10% of all sarcomas, are characterized by the X-18 chromosomal translocation.
  • A large-scale multicenter study published in 2002 revealed that the SYT-SSX1 translocation was associated with a poorer prognosis (Ladanyi, Cancer Res 62, 135-140).
  • Methods The prognostic value of the type of translocation X-SSX1 or X-SSX2 was investigated in a series of 38 patients with synovial sarcoma (28 localized and 10 initially metastatic), treated by surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy in 3 major cancer centers (IGR, Centre L.
  • Chemotherapy was evaluated for 14 patients (neoadjuvant treatment or treatment for metastatic disease) The type of transcript was determined on the initial biopsies of the tumor by RT-PCR.
  • The median follow-up was 47 months (7-256) Results For patients with a non-metastatic tumor (28 patients), a recurrence-free survival benefit was demonstrated in the X-SSX2 group (23 versus 10 months p<0,05) .
  • For the 10 patients with metastatic disease initially, the X-SSX2 translocation is associated with a better prognosis (overall survival : 31 versus 9 months p=0,01).
  • [Figure: see text] Conclusion Synovial sarcomas are rare but it seems important to determine prognostic factors.
  • The type of transcript is an element which could guide the prognosis and determine treatment, and, more importantly, can constitute a useful line of research.

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  • (PMID = 28013676.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Cheng EY, Froelich JW, Manivel JC, Weigel BJ, Skubitz KM: Correlation of FDG PET-CT with histologic response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for soft tissue sarcomas. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10583

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Correlation of FDG PET-CT with histologic response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for soft tissue sarcomas.
  • : 10583 Background: Surrogate endpoints for survival are needed to allow rapid assessment of new therapies without doing lengthy studies using a survival endpoint.
  • Non-invasive assessment of treatment response is also needed to guide chemotherapy.
  • FDG- PET-CT has potential for assessing response to treatment in sarcoma.
  • This study's goal was to correlate FDG-PET-CT, along with standard CT, with histologic response after chemotherapy for high grade soft tissue sarcomas before resection.
  • METHODS: Patients with high grade soft tissue sarcomas > 5 cm were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial and given ifosfamide/doxorubicin before tumor excision.
  • FDG-PET-CT was performed at baseline before treatment, after cycle 1, & just before surgery.
  • RESULTS: 25 patients were enrolled and 4 had disease progression prior to completing all 3 PET-CT's yielding 21 evaluable cases.

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  • (PMID = 27963879.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. Almeida GF, Siqueira SA, Castro G Jr, Snitcovsky IL, Akaishi EH, Camargo OP, Oliveira CR, Filippi RZ, Federico MH: Ezrin immunohistochemical expression in advanced soft tissue sarcoma biopsy specimens from patients treated in a phase II trial of dose-dense doxorubicin- and ifosfamide-based chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e21508

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ezrin immunohistochemical expression in advanced soft tissue sarcoma biopsy specimens from patients treated in a phase II trial of dose-dense doxorubicin- and ifosfamide-based chemotherapy.
  • : e21508 Background: Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) protein family and links F-actin to the cell membrane, and it is involved in regulating growth and metastatic behaviour of cancer cells.
  • Ezrin expression is associated with tumor progression and metastasis in several cancers, including sarcomas.
  • This study evaluated ezrin expression as a predictor of response to chemotherapy and as a prognostic factor in soft tissue sarcoma (STS) patients (pts) treated in a dose-dense schedule protocol.
  • METHODS: 21 chemotherapy-naïve pts diagnosed with high-grade STS, not candidates for a limb-sparing surgery, were enrolled in a prospective phase II study of a sequential and dose-dense regimen consisting of doxorubicin 30 mg/m<sup>2</sup> d1-3 q2w and ifosfamide 2.5 g/m<sup>2</sup> d1-5 q3w, 3 cycles each, with G-CSF support.
  • Ezrin expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on slides from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, primary tumor biopsy blocks, with the anti-ezrin antibody clone AB-1(3C12) (NeoMarkers).
  • Cytoplasmic immunostaining in more than 10% of tumor cells was considered as positive.
  • RESULTS: Leiomyo-, synovial and sarcoma NOS were the most frequent subtypes (5 pts each).
  • With a median follow-up of 11.7 mo, median PFS and OS were 8.9 and 20.1 mo, respectively.
  • In univariate analysis, OS was higher for synovial sarcoma pts (not reached vs. 14.2 mo, HR 0.0, 95%CI 0.06-0.82, p=0.02), and for those aged 45 y or less (20.1 vs. 4.2 mo, HR 0.30, 95%CI 0.03-0.88, p=0.04).
  • Ezrin expression was not related to tumor response (p = 0.40), and no significant association was detected between ezrin expression and median PFS or OS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Expression of ezrin was not a useful marker to predict outcomes in STS pts treated with dose-dense doxorubicin- and ifosfamide-based chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 27963399.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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54. Ruka W, Rutkowski P, Falkowski S, Morysinski T, Nowecki ZI: Aggressive combined treatment of synovial sarcoma patients (pts) without distant metastases - single-center experience. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9018

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Aggressive combined treatment of synovial sarcoma patients (pts) without distant metastases - single-center experience.
  • : 9018 Background: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a common type of high-grade soft tissue sarcoma (STS) with significant sensitivity to chemotherapy and poor prognosis (ASCO 1994, abst. 1645).
  • The aim of this single-center study was to analyze the results of intensive chemo- and radiotherapy treatment in pts with nonmetastastic (M0) SS.
  • METHODS: One hundred consecutive M0 SS pts (median age 32 years, range: 15-70; 23 pts had primary tumors and 77 pts - recurrences or scars after non-radical excision, 40% of tumors >5 cm) treated between 1995 and 2003 received chemotherapy (2 cycles of high-dose ifosfamide at dose of 11.9g/m<sup>2</sup>/7 days) and radiotherapy (20Gy over 5 days - 4Gy/fractions; fields contained the tumor - primary, recurrent or scar with drain sites and margins ≥ 5 cm) before surgical resection, followed by 4 cycles of postoperative multiagent chemotherapy (2 of ifosfamide - 11.9g/m<sup>2</sup>/7days and 2 of doxorubicin - 60mg/m<sup>2</sup> and cisplatin - 120mg/m<sup>2</sup>).
  • Median follow-up time was 21 months.
  • RESULTS: 92 pts received complete treatment, grade 3 and 4 toxicity (CTC 2.0) was observed in 27% of pts.
  • There were 15 deaths due to disease progression and 31 recurrences of the disease (primary: mostly - lung metastases in 18 pts and local recurrences in 7 pts).
  • Estimated 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 76% and 5-year disease free survival (DFS) rate was 50%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The encouraging results of intensive combined treatment of pts with localized SS indicate the 5-year survival rate of about 80% in this highly malignant type of STS.

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  • (PMID = 28013671.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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55. Gibbon D, Wagreich A, Nieves-Neira W, Shih W, Ziang W, Rodriguez-Rodriguez L, Germino J: A retrospective review of metastatic or recurrent uterine sarcomas treated with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and gemcitabine chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):5143

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A retrospective review of metastatic or recurrent uterine sarcomas treated with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and gemcitabine chemotherapy.
  • : 5143 Background: The prognosis of metastatic uterine sarcoma is poor with median survival reported between 4-26 months.
  • The primary objective of this study was to assess the activity of paclitaxel, carboplatin and gemcitabine (GCP) in the treatment of primary, metastatic, or recurrent uterine sarcomas.
  • The efficacy of the GCP regimen in women with metastatic or recurrent uterine sarcomas was assessed.
  • Patients were treated on a phase II soft tissue sarcoma protocol or off protocol by the gynecologic oncology division.
  • 4 patients were inevaluable; 3 patients for less than one month of therapy and 1 patient without measurable disease.
  • Histology included 6 leiomyosarcomas (LMS), 1 endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS), and 2 carcinosarcomas (CS).
  • There was one 9 month complete response (11%) (LMS) pt remains NED, one 10 month partial response (11%) (CS), 4 patients (44%) with stable disease (3 LMS, 1 ESS), and 3 patients with progressive disease (33%) (2 LMS, 1 CS).
  • The duration of stable disease ranged 5 to 22.8 months.
  • Median time to progression for all patients was 10 months (95% CI {83 -530 days}).
  • CONCLUSIONS: GCP combination chemotherapy demonstrates moderate activity, with acceptable toxicity, in patients with advanced uterine sarcomas.
  • Given the durable median time to progression and overall survival, this pilot data supports the evaluation of this regimen in a multi-institutional phase II study.

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  • (PMID = 28016800.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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56. Brunetto AL, Castillo LA, Petrilli AS, Boldrini E, Gregianin LJ, Costa C, Almeida MT, Rosario K, Rodriguez-Galindo C, Castro CG Jr, Dufort G: Ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide as front-line therapy in patients with Ewing sarcoma family tumors (EFT): A study of the Brazil/Uruguay Cooperative Group. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10547

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide as front-line therapy in patients with Ewing sarcoma family tumors (EFT): A study of the Brazil/Uruguay Cooperative Group.
  • : 10547 Background: Chemotherapy (CT) with ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE) is effective in refractory solid tumors.
  • The aim of this trial was to determine the efficacy and safety of ICE as front line therapy for patients (pts) with newly-diagnosed EFT.
  • After induction, pts were allocated to low (LR) or high-risk (HR) according to LDH (<or>1,5×NL), site (pelvic/non-pelvic) and resection (complete/unresectable) or metastatic (mets).
  • 3y EFS for lung and non-lung mets were 40% and 19% (P=0.013).
  • Multivariate analysis showed that mets disease was the only independent prognostic factor (P=0.006) for the entire group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: ICE regimen is safe and despite a high proportion of pts with advanced disease the survival are similar to larger series.

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  • (PMID = 27963954.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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57. Lindner LH, Schlemmer M, Hohenberger P, Wust P, Abdel-Rahman S, Schmidt M, Judson I, Blay JY, Verweij J, Issels RD, EORTC STBSG and ESHO: First interim report on the randomized EORTC 62961/ESHO-RHT 95 Intergroup Study (phase III) combined with regional hyperthermia (RHT) versus chemotherapy alone in the treatment of high-risk soft tissue sarcomas (HR-STS) in adults. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9015

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] First interim report on the randomized EORTC 62961/ESHO-RHT 95 Intergroup Study (phase III) combined with regional hyperthermia (RHT) versus chemotherapy alone in the treatment of high-risk soft tissue sarcomas (HR-STS) in adults.
  • : 9015 Background: Based on our phase II results, RHT is considered a promising neoadjuvant treatment strategy for HR-STS and is being evaluated in a prospective RCT (phase III).
  • We are now reporting the results of the first interim analysis after recruitment of 146 patients (pts) with HR-STS (tumors ≥ 5 cm, grade 2 or 3, extracompartmental, and deep).
  • Pts were stratified by extremity (E=64) vs non-extremity (Non-E=82), and by primary (S1=65) vs recurrent (S2=29) vs previously inadequate (R1/R2) resected (S3=52) tumors.
  • For 141 pts entering the protocol treatment, 95% (preoperative) and 89% (postoperative) of prescribed EIA cycles could begiven.
  • At median follow-up of 36 months (cut-off 4/03) the 3-year local progression free rate (LPFR), distant progression free rate (DPFR), and overall survival (OS) for E are 86.6% (95% CI: 77.3-96.0%), 78.1% (95% CI:67.0-89.1%) and 77.3%(95%CI:65.8-88.7%) andfor Non-E are 40.9%(95% CI:28.1-53.7%), 54.9%(95% CI:40.3-69.5%) and 41.5% (95% CI:28.9-54.0) repectively.

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  • (PMID = 28013677.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. Amin C, Hemphill B, Sittisomwong T, Malpica A, Hunt W, Verschraegen C: Characteristics of patients with endometrial stromal sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):5145

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Characteristics of patients with endometrial stromal sarcoma.
  • : 5145 Background: Endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) is by definition a low grade sarcoma, accounting for less than 1% of all tumor malignancies.
  • By comparison, the prevalence of endometrial cancer is 700 per million women.
  • Because of its rarity, the natural history of the disease and the optimal therapy have not been well established.
  • METHODS: After IRB approval, the charts of 78 patients diagnosed for the first time with ESS and treated at the University of Texas MDACC were reviewed, with emphasis on patient demographics, therapies, recurrence, and survival.
  • Patients with stromal nodule, high grade ESS (undifferentiated sarcoma), or other sarcomas were excluded.
  • RESULTS: The median age of 78 patients was 43 (range 20-78), 85% were Caucasian, and 37% had received exogenous hormones before diagnosis.
  • The median age of onset is younger than the one of endometrial cancer, but interestingly about 75% are postmenopausal at diagnosis.
  • Various treatments including hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and hysterectomy with oophorectomy have been used, and we plan to study their impact on this disease, to present at the annual meeting.

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  • (PMID = 28016810.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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59. Oechsle K, Aebert H, Teichmann R, Budach W, Kanz L, Ziemer G, Hartmann JT: Primary malignant sarcomas of the heart and great vessels - a single center experience. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9044

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Primary malignant sarcomas of the heart and great vessels - a single center experience.
  • : 9044 Background: Sarcomas of the heart and the great vessels are very rare entities.
  • Prognosis is very poor because of locally advanced or metastatic stage at diagnosis.
  • METHODS: Between 6/2001 and 10/2003 12 patients (pts) have been identified in the sarcoma registry of Tuebingen University.
  • All pts were symptomatic with reduction of vitality, anorexia, dyspnoea, or neurological symptoms at the time of reception.
  • Tumors were located in atrium [(n=5), left (3)/right (2)], Art. pulmonalis (n=3), Aorta (n=2), pericardium or left chamber, (n=1 each).
  • Six pts presented with localized disease and 5 pts underwent curative intended resection (n=1 considered as irresectable).
  • Six pts had advanced disease including brain mets (4 pts), lymph nodes involvement (2), lung (3) and liver mets (2).
  • Five of these 6 pts underwent palliative resection to relieve the physiologic effects of the tumor.
  • Three out of 5 pts with curative intended surgery have subsequently developed recurrence within 6, 8 and 25 mos despite adjuvant treatment.
  • Palliative chemotherapy including adriamycin and ifosfamide has been applied in 7 pts and 4 pts attained some response to treatment (n=1 PR, n=3 SD).
  • Palliative radiation included 3 pts with brain metastases and a single pt with progressive primary tumor.
  • After a median follow up 13 mos (2 -28) 2 pts had NED, 3 pts are alive with disease and 7 pts have died due to tumor progression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Pts with primary sarcomas of the heart and the great vessels were often of young age, and half of them presented with locally or distant advanced disease.
  • These pts should preferentially be referred to a tertiary Cancer Center immediately after diagnosis without preceding treatment attempts.
  • Although the majority of pts cannot be treated curatively due to the delay in diagnosis, an optimized treatment approach including neoadjuvant chemo-/radiotherapy might enhanced the rate of complete resection depending on the histological subtype and responsiveness to treatment.

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  • (PMID = 28013704.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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60. Ratain MJ, Flaherty KT, Stadler WM, O'Dwyer P, Kaye S, Xiong H, Patnaik A, Gore M, Lee RJ, Eisen T: Preliminary antitumor activity of BAY 43-9006 in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and other advanced refractory solid tumors in a phase II randomized discontinuation trial (RDT). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):4501

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preliminary antitumor activity of BAY 43-9006 in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and other advanced refractory solid tumors in a phase II randomized discontinuation trial (RDT).
  • : 4501 Background: BAY 43-9006 (BAY) is a novel signal transduction inhibitor that prevents tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis through blockade of the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway at the level of Raf kinase and the receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR-2 and PDGFR-β.
  • The phase II RDT study was undertaken to determine the antitumor activity (either regression or disease stabilization) of BAY in patients (pts) with a variety of advanced refractory solid tumors.
  • METHODS: Pts were enrolled in a placebo-controlled, RDT consisting of a 12-week induction phase, in which pts received 400 mg bid oral BAY, followed by a randomization phase.
  • At the end of the 12-week phase pts whose target lesion tumor burden showed growth >25% (progressive disease PD) were discontinued.
  • Pts whose target lesion tumor burden showed shrinkage ≥25% (responders) continued open label BAY until PD or toxicity.
  • Pts whose target tumor lesion remained within 25% of baseline (stable disease SD) were randomized to receive 400 mg bid oral BAY or placebo.
  • The most common tumor types were colorectal (CRC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and melanoma.
  • Typical drug-related toxicities were hand-foot skin reaction, rash, fatigue, diarrhea, anorexia and hypertension.
  • Tumor regressions were observed in multiple tumor types including RCC, CRC, melanoma, thyroid, sarcoma and pancreas.
  • CONCLUSIONS: BAY has activity (as measured by disease regressions) in multiple tumor types, particularly RCC, and is well tolerated in pts with advanced cancers.
  • The randomized portion will provide information about BAY's disease-stabilizing effect and long-term safety, in particular in pts with RCC.
  • An ongoing phase III study in RCC will assess BAY's effect on time to progression and survival.

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  • (PMID = 28016014.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Schoeffski P, Cerbone L, Wolter P, Stas M, Dumez H, Clement P, Wildiers H, Paridaens R, van Oosterom AT: Administration of 24-hour intravenous infusions of trabectedin every 3 weeks in ambulatory patients with mesenchymal tumors via disposable elastomeric pumps. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13530

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Administration of 24-hour intravenous infusions of trabectedin every 3 weeks in ambulatory patients with mesenchymal tumors via disposable elastomeric pumps.
  • : e13530 Background: Patients (pts) with sarcoma whose disease progresses after standard chemotherapy have poor outcome.
  • It is administered as 24-h i.v. infusion q3w with steroid co-medication.
  • To overcome the inconvenience of hospitalization for drug delivery TRA is now given in Leuven via disposable elastomeric pumps, which facilitate ambulatory treatment and are compatible with the drug.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Heavily pre-treated pts with sarcoma were offered chemotherapy with TRA 1.5 mg/m<sup>2</sup> as 24-h i.v. infusion via port catheter, either during hospitalization using electronic pumps or as outpatients using the Baxter LV10 disposable pump (drug dissolved in 267 ml NaCl 0.9%).
  • Co-medication consisted of antiemetics and dexamethasone 2x4 mg days -1,1,2,3.
  • RESULTS: Between 09/07-12/08 28 pts were treated, and 21 (75%) elected outpatient therapy (9 F, 12 M, med. age 49 yrs, range 19-68).
  • They had local relapse (2), distant metastasis (12) or both (7) when starting TRA, 19 had received previous chemotherapy with a med. number of 2 prior lines (range, 0-5).
  • We administered 130 cycles of TRA in 21 pts, with a med. number of 3 cycles/patient (range, 1-24).

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  • (PMID = 27961332.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Comandone A, Oliva C, Dal Canton O, Bergnolo P, Pochettino P, Garetto F, Chiado Cutin S, Boglione A, Gino G, Brach Del Prever E: Metastatic soft tissue sarcomas (MSTS): Second line chemotherapy (CT) using two different schedules of high dose ifosfamide (HDI). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9035

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Metastatic soft tissue sarcomas (MSTS): Second line chemotherapy (CT) using two different schedules of high dose ifosfamide (HDI).
  • The same drugs at different doses or schedules therapy offer 10-15% objective responses, TTP of 3-4 months and MS of 10-12 months.
  • Protocol B): 36 pts received IFO 1 g/m<sup>2</sup>/d c.i. for 14 days + Mesna equidose).
  • Leiomiosarcomas, MFH, Synovialsarcomas and Liposarcomas were the most represented histological types.

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  • (PMID = 28013726.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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63. Kasper B, Ouali M, Van Glabbeke M, Blay J, Bramwell VH, Woll PJ, Schöffski P: Prognostic factors in adolescents and young adults (AYA) with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma (STS) treated by adjuvant chemotherapy: A study based on two pooled European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) clinical trials. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10573

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic factors in adolescents and young adults (AYA) with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma (STS) treated by adjuvant chemotherapy: A study based on two pooled European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) clinical trials.
  • METHODS: Patients selected for analysis were treated in two randomized trials of adjuvant chemotherapy in STS (EORTC 62771 and 62931).
  • A total of 793 patients were included with a median follow-up (FU) of 8.74 years (AYA population: n = 161, median FU 9.46 years; patients ≥ 30 years: n = 632, median FU 8.62 years).
  • The variables of the multivariate analysis were gender, subtype and grade, tumor size and localization (limb vs. other), absence or presence of local recurrence and treatment (control arm vs. adjuvant chemotherapy).
  • RESULTS: Patients' characteristics were globally similar with two exceptions, histological subtype (p = 0.0043) and tumor size (p < .0001).
  • The commonest sarcoma subtype in the AYA population was synovial sarcoma (29 %), whereas leiomyosarcoma (18 %), malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH, 16 %) and liposarcoma (15 %) were more frequent in patients ≥ 30 years.
  • For OS, independent favorable prognostic factors were low grade and small tumor size for both groups; radical resection and MFH or liposarcoma subtype were factors of favorable prognosis for patients ≥ 30 years only.
  • For RFS, favorable prognostic factors were small tumor size and low grade for both groups; tumor location in the extremities was a factor of favorable prognosis for the AYA population only, whereas radical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy treatment were favorable factors for patients ≥ 30 years only.
  • Interestingly, adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS only in patients ≥ 30 years.
  • The results may have further implications on the treatment of STS patients in different age groups as well as the design of future clinical trials.

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  • (PMID = 27963782.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Comandone A, Boglione A, Pochettino P, Berno E, Inguì M, Papotti M, Borasio P, Maggi G, Brach Del Prever E, Gino G: Primary sarcomas of the lungs and mediastinum: Clinicopathological study and therapy results of Piedmontese Group for Sarcomas. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e21509

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Primary sarcomas of the lungs and mediastinum: Clinicopathological study and therapy results of Piedmontese Group for Sarcomas.
  • : e21509 Background: Primary sarcomas of the lungs and mediastinum are rare and few data are reported on treatment and results of therapy.
  • Pts characteristics: median age 41 (19-80 y), male/female 19/12; symptoms at diagnosis: dyspnoea (42%), chest and shoulder pain (39%), cough (35%), hemophtoae (13%), discomfort (10%).
  • 4 pts had a previous history of mediastinal radiation for Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's linfomas.
  • 5 mediastinal tumours were located as follows: 2 in anterior part, 1 in posterior and 2 in the middle (sarcomas of the heart).
  • 26 lung sarcomas presented as a singular mass in 23 cases and as a metastatic disease in 3.
  • RESULTS: In 20/31 cases the tumour was immediately resected (3 mediastinal masses and 17 lung sarcomas).
  • Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was performed in 4 cases (3 resected).
  • The histology were: peripheral nerve tumour 7, leiomyosarcoma 4, MFH 2, fibrosarcoma 2, liposarcoma 1, angiosarcoma 2, undifferentiated sarcoma 1, solitary fibrous tumour 2, rhabdomyosarcoma 2, synovialsarcoma 2, pulmonary artery sarcoma 1, pleuropolmonary blastoma 1, malignant hemangiopericytoma 1, mixoid chondrosarcoma 1, ectopic osteosarcoma 1, aggressive fibromatosis 1.
  • Only 4 pts received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 11 adjuvant CT, 5 exclusive CT + RT for inoperable disease.
  • Of these only 8 are alive (2 with disease).
  • Volume of disease, complete resection and grading are the dominant prognostic factors.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Primary sarcomas of the lungs and mediastinum have a very severe prognosis.
  • Surgical resection is the fundamental therapy, but in the future the role of neoadjuvant CT will increase.

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  • (PMID = 27963441.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. Spunt SL, Irving H, Frost J, Sender L, Yang B, Santana VM: Pegfilgrastim in pediatric sarcoma patients undergoing dose-intensive chemotherapy: Phase II study results. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10024

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pegfilgrastim in pediatric sarcoma patients undergoing dose-intensive chemotherapy: Phase II study results.
  • : 10024 Background: Children with cancer undergoing dose-intensive chemotherapy often require G-CSF support.
  • Patients (pts) < 2 yrs have the highest risk of prolonged neutropenia due to imprecise dosing and immature drug clearance.
  • Young pts, who receive relatively more myeloablative chemotherapy, should have the highest pegfilgrastim exposure.
  • METHODS: Pts ≤21 yrs (age groups 0-5, 6-11, and ≥12 yrs) with sarcoma and scheduled to receive VAdriaC (cycles 1 & 3) and IE (cycles 2 & 4) were randomized 6:1 to receive pegfilgrastim 100 μg/kg or filgrastim (5 μg/kg/d until ANC ≥ 10×10<sup>9</sup>/L) 24 hrs after chemotherapy administration.
  • One child did not achieve ANC recovery by day 21 in cycle 1: an 8-mo-old 7.9-kg boy with non-metastatic undifferentiated sarcoma had 24 days of severe neutropenia in cycle 1.
  • Treatment-related adverse events were generally mild to moderate (pegfilgrastim 22%, filgrastim 33%); the only treatment-related event reported by >1 pt was bone pain (pegfilgrastim=11%, filgrastim=17%).
  • Consistent with neutrophil-mediated clearance, adequate exposure to pegfilgrastim was maintained in the youngest pts who received the most myelosuppressive chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 27962628.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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66. Kanjeekal S, Chambers A, Fung Kee Fung M, Verma S, Cancer Care Ontario's Practice Guidelines Initiative Gynecology Cancer Disease Site Group, Ontario: Metastatic uterine sarcoma: A systematic review of the literature. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):5105

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Metastatic uterine sarcoma: A systematic review of the literature.
  • : 5105 Background: Uterine sarcomas are rare and management of metastatic disease often conforms to treatment practice for other metastatic soft tissue sarcomas.
  • We have conducted a systematic review of systemic chemotherapy in the management of metastatic uterine sarcoma.
  • METHODS: MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library databases, as well as the proceedings from ASCO, were searched for articles that were (1) systematic reviews, practice guidelines, meta-analysis, or randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing treatment regimens for metastatic uterine sarcoma or (2) prospective phase II trials or retrospective reviews reporting the effects of treatment for > 20 patients.
  • The overall response rate (RR) for single agent doxorubicin (D) was 19% for all sub-types of metastatic uterine sarcomas.
  • D combined with either dimethyl triazenoimidazole carboxamide (DTIC) or cyclophosphamide compared to D alone showed no survival benefit and there was increased toxicity with combination treatment.
  • The two most active single agents for first-line treatment of mixed mesodermal tumours (MMT) were ifosfamide (I) (RR=39% and cisplatinum (C) (RR=19%).
  • In an RCT of first-line treatment of MMT, the combination of I and C compared to I alone, resulted in a higher RR (57% versus 39%) and a small improvement in progression-free survival (6.0 vs 4.0 months, p=0.02).
  • A small phase II study of second-line therapy in patients with leiomyosarcoma (LMS) treated with the combination of gemcitabine and docetaxel reported a RR of 53% and a relatively mild toxicity profile.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is a paucity of high quality RCTs that examine the role of systemic therapy in patients with metastatic uterine sarcoma.

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  • (PMID = 28015694.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Saraiya B, Karantza-Wadsworth V, Stein MN, Chugh R, Mehnert J, Moss R, Lin Y, Poplin E: Phase I study of gemcitabine, docetaxel, and imatinib in refractory and relapsed solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13538

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I study of gemcitabine, docetaxel, and imatinib in refractory and relapsed solid tumors.
  • : e13538 Background: The combination of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib with cytotoxic chemotherapy targets multiple pathways of tumor progression.
  • Given the activity seen when combining gemcitabine and docetaxel in some solid tumors, this phase I trial studied the addition of docetaxel to gemcitabine/imatinib.
  • METHODS: Twenty patients with relapsed/refractory solid tumors were enrolled in this IRB-approved study at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Michigan.
  • Five patients had lung cancer; 5, sarcoma; 3 ampullary-biliary tumors; 2 mesothelioma and bladder, 3, other.
  • The dose limiting toxicities were neutropenic fever, pleural and pericardial effusion after cycle 1 of chemotherapy.
  • The best response achieved was stable disease at 6 cycles in one patient each with mesothelioma and non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at the MTD.
  • Two other patients with NSCLC had stable disease at 4 cycles.
  • Our results suggest possible drug-drug interactions that amplify toxicities with little initial evidence of improved tumor control.

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  • (PMID = 27961346.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Foster R, Ehrlich Y, Ulbright TM, Cheng L, Bihrle R, Beck SD, Andreoiu M, Brames MJ, Einhorn LH: Malignant transformation of teratoma to primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET): Outcome analysis with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and PNET specific chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5081

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant transformation of teratoma to primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET): Outcome analysis with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and PNET specific chemotherapy.
  • : 5081 Background: Malignant transformation of teratoma to PNET is a rare entity.
  • Surgical resection has been the mainstay of therapy because these tumors are not curable with cisplatin based chemotherapy.
  • We report long-term survival and potential cure with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) and PNET specific chemotherapy.
  • 74 had RPLND as part of initial treatment or at relapse.
  • PNET specific chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine alternating with ifosfamide and etoposide.
  • Available PNET specimens were tested for the Ewing's sarcoma (EWS) translocation using a FISH-based method.
  • 27 pts presented with clinical stage I disease.
  • 4 are dead of disease (DOD).
  • 9 elected surveillance or adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • 48 pts presented with metastatic disease.
  • 20 are DOD, 24 have no evidence of disease (NED) and 4 are alive with disease.
  • 50 of 75 pts had PNET documented metastasis with an estimated 5 years disease specific survival of 47%.
  • 10 of these were treated with PNET specific chemotherapy for unresectable disease.
  • 2 additional pts were treated with PNET specific chemotherapy as adjuvant to RPLND.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Malignant transformation of teratoma to PNET carries an adverse prognosis.
  • RPLND is an integral part of the therapeutic strategy.
  • PNET specific chemotherapy, adjuvant to RPLND or for treatment of unresectable disease followed by surgery, may result in long-term survival and potential cure.

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  • (PMID = 27964284.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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69. Clisant S, Adenis A, Dansin E, Desauw C, Degardin M, Mortier L, Fournier C, Penel N: Oral metronomic chemotherapy using cyclophosphamide in metastatic patients (pts) after standard treatment: Results of a randomized phase II trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13519

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Oral metronomic chemotherapy using cyclophosphamide in metastatic patients (pts) after standard treatment: Results of a randomized phase II trial.
  • : e13519 Background: Oral metronomic chemotherapy (OMC) has antiangiogenic properties and megestrol acetate (MA) is an orexigen used to maintain the general condition in critically ill pts.
  • Anecdotal responses have been reported with each treatment.
  • We hypothesized that each treatment offer disease control without significant severe toxicity.
  • METHODS: This multi-center-randomized study was aimed to assess the efficacy and tolerance of both treatments.
  • Primary endpoint was stable disease rate at 2 months: 2mSD (RECIST).
  • Main eligibility criteria were as follows: non-breast cancer, pts with progressive disease refractory to standard therapies or without established standard care, ECOG=0-1, neither hypercalcemia nor hypoalbuminemia.
  • Most common primaries were: colorectal cancer (30 pts), soft tissue sarcoma (17), lung cancer (13), head & neck (8) and unknown primaries (4).
  • The median number of previous lines of treatment was 4 (0-10).
  • Three long-lasting SD (6 months +) are currently being observed in 3 pts receiving OMC (2 sarcomas and 1 RCC).
  • Treatment was discontinued in 1 case because of MA- induced deep venous thrombosis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: OMC and MA offer SD in patients with advanced, refractory and progressive tumors, without any significant toxicity.
  • The non-progression rate with OMC (15%) is in a same range of efficacy that was recently reported with new targeted therapy or anti-angiogenic agents administered in such pts.
  • The accrual is now completed, and a longer follow-up is necessary to better analyze the clinical benefit and the prognostic factors.

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  • (PMID = 27961314.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. Reynolds JT, Reinke D, Weiler S: Irradiated haploidetical donor lymphocytes: A different approach to the immunotherapy of advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):2573

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Irradiated haploidetical donor lymphocytes: A different approach to the immunotherapy of advanced solid tumors.
  • : 2573 Background:This is a pilot study to determine the practicality of a new form of immunotherapy.
  • The basic concept of this treatment is to grow cytotoxic T-cells and helper T-cells against the tumor in the patients themselves rather than in the laboratory.
  • Standard chemotherapy is used to generate the tumor antigen, as the tumor cells undergo apoptosis.
  • IL-2 is used as a T-cell growth factor.
  • The treatment is based on a murine leukemia model.
  • METHODS: All patients had painful bulky heavily pre-treated cancer, rapidly progressive despite salvage therapy.
  • Treatment consisted of intravenous VP-16 100 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/d plus cyclosporine 1 mg/kg/d for three days followed by GM-CSF 500 μgr/d s.q. for 5 days.
  • IL-2 is also given s.q. three times a week at a starting dose of 10x10<sup>6</sup> IU/m<sup>2</sup>.
  • RESULTS: Patients with clear cell sarcoma, colon and small lung cancer have been enrolled.
  • A large delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction occurs at the site of IL-2 injection.
  • Tumors markers were stable or imaging showed a mixed response.
  • The patient with lung cancer is again in clinical remission with further weekly IL-2 and chemotherapy and an even larger DTH reaction.
  • Despite advanced solid tumors, temporary responses were seen in all patients.

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  • (PMID = 28015302.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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71. Soliman HH, Antonia S, Sullivan D, Vanahanian N, Link C: Overcoming tumor antigen anergy in human malignancies using the novel indeolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme inhibitor, 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1MT). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3004

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Overcoming tumor antigen anergy in human malignancies using the novel indeolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme inhibitor, 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1MT).
  • : 3004 Background: The limited effect of cancer immunotherapy is due to the tumor's ability to induce host anergy towards its antigens.
  • The preclinical data support the activity of 1-MT in preventing T-cell anergy in TDLN, slowing growth of LLC mouse xenografts, and synergizing with chemotherapy in regression of autochthonous breast tumors in MMTV-Neu mice.
  • This led to a phase I first-in-man trial using 1-MT in solid tumors.
  • Correlative studies include serum kyn/trp levels, T-reg cell quantification by flow, tumor IDO expression by IHC, and humoral immune response using a proprietary tumor antigen microarray.
  • Tumors treated included 1 esophageal, 1 peritoneal, 3 melanomas, 2 sarcomas, and 3 NSCLC.
  • PK results show good bioavailability and a t1/2 of 2-4 hrs.
  • Five pts remain on treatment currently.
  • Three pts had decreased T-reg cells after treatment with 1MT and 4 pts showed marked CRP increases.
  • One pt had increased autoantibody titers against 3 tumor antigens compared to baseline.
  • Development of hypophysitis in 2 patients indicates the drug can break tolerance resulting in autoimmunity.
  • Future trials will combine 1-MT with other immunotherapies and chemotherapies for solid tumors.

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  • (PMID = 27962050.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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72. Syed SK, Beeram M, Takimoto CH, Jakubowitz J, Kimura M, Ducharme M, Gadgeel S, De Jager R, Rowinsky E, Lorusso P: Phase I and Pharmacokinetics (PK) of DJ-927, an oral taxane, in patients (Pts) with advanced cancers. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):2028

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 2028 Background: DJ-927, a novel semi-synthetic taxane and a poor substrate of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), is orally bioavailable and possesses potent anti-tumor activity against Pgp expressing human cancers.
  • Pts were stratified based on prior therapy into minimally (MP) and heavily (HP) pretreated cohorts.
  • Primary tumors are colorectal [15], breast [4], pancreas [5], renal cell [3], soft tissue sarcoma [3] and others [10].
  • Minimal drug-related toxicities were observed at doses 5 days duration [7] and grade 3 thrombocytopenia [4] were the predominant hematological toxicities observed at 40 and 35 mg/m<sup>2</sup> doses.
  • Non-hematological toxicities included: transient grade 3 peripheral sensory neuropathy after 3 cycles [1] at 27 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, grade 3 diarrhea and grade 3 mucositis [1] at 40mg/m<sup>2</sup>.
  • Disease stabilization for >3 months was noted in 8 pts.
  • CONCLUSIONS: DJ-927 generates predictable systemic drug exposures and has been well tolerated when orally administered.

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  • (PMID = 28015577.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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73. Murakami M, Tsukada H, Ikeda M, Watanabe M, Muramatsu T, Miyamoto T, Makino T, Yasuda S, Ide M, Nasu S: Availability of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) for the detection of metastatic sites in recurrent uterine sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):5100

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Availability of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) for the detection of metastatic sites in recurrent uterine sarcoma.
  • : 5100 Background: Uterine sarcomas are relatively rare and its prognosis is poor.
  • Accurate diagnosis of the metastatic sites is important for the treatment strategy.
  • Unfortunately current diagnostic techniques, including CT, MRI, and ultrasonography (US) are not efficient for the detection of recurrence.
  • There is little report of the experience with whole-body 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET for the detection of recurrence in the follow up of patients with uterine sarcomas.
  • The purpose of this study is to evaluate the availability of FDG-PET for the detection of recurrence in patients with uterine sarcomas.
  • METHODS: Twelve patients with pathologically proven uterine sarcomas (nine leiomyosarcoma and three carcinosarcoma) took FDG-PET, CT, MRI and US for the purpose of the detection of recurrence after the primary treatment.
  • Images of CT scan showed false negative of intraperitoneal tumors in the two cases.
  • Positive results of PET scan did not affect the prognosis in four patients, but another patient with solitary intraperitoneal tumor by PET scan could received the chemotherapy and operation, which histologically confirmed the recurrence of leiomyosarcoma.
  • PET was useful to detect solitary small intraperitoneal tumor, which was very difficult to detect by CT or US.
  • Application of PET scan for the early detection of recurrence may affect the prognosis of some patients with uterine sarcoma.

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  • (PMID = 28015696.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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74. Cioffi A, LeCesne A, Blay J, Delaloge S, Yovine A, Maki R, Nieto A, Jiao JJ, Demetri GD: Trabectedin phase II clinical trials: Pooled analysis of safety in patients with solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13510

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Trabectedin phase II clinical trials: Pooled analysis of safety in patients with solid tumors.
  • Its unique antitumor properties, attributed to specific binding to the small groove of DNA, have been demonstrated activity against soft-tissue sarcoma (STS), ovarian, breast and prostate cancer.
  • Trabectedin treatment has been authorized by EMEA for STS after failure of standard treatment and shows efficacy in relapsed ovarian cancer in a phase III study.
  • This retrospective report on safety includes single-agent trabectedin phase II studies in patients (pts) with solid tumors.
  • METHODS: A total of 1,132 pts were treated with trabectedin in 19 international trials (Feb'99 - Apr'08).
  • MedDRA and NCI-CTC v1.0/2.0 were used to code and grade treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs).
  • Diagnosis included sarcoma (56%), ovary (26%) and breast (7%) cancer, for which 90% of pts had received chemotherapy, 37.5% radiotherapy, and 96.0% surgery.
  • Trabectedin lasted for a median of 3 cy (9.4 wks) and 28% of pts received ≥ 6 cycles, with a median dose intensity of 0.4 (0.1-0.6) mg/m<sup>2</sup>/wk.
  • Fifteen drug-related deaths (1.3%) occurred.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Single-agent trabectedin was reasonably well tolerated, with low rates of drug-related discontinuations and deaths.
  • Sustained clinical benefit in the absence of relevant cumulative toxicities allows its administration to patients for prolonged periods of time.

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  • (PMID = 27961298.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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75. Longhi A, Pasini A, Baldini N, Baronio F, Pellacani A, Cicognani A, Bacci G: Height as a risk factor in osteosarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9042

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 9042 Background: The highest incidence of osteosarcoma in dogs of large breed suggested that height can play a role in the pathogenesis of this human bone sarcoma typical of childhood and adolescence Methods: A continuous series of 962 patients (560 males and 402 females) with bone osteosarcoma treated at the same institution between 1981 and 2001 were evaluated.
  • 836 had localized disease, whereas 126 were metastatic at diagnosis.
  • The median age at diagnosis was 16.1 years (2.5-60) with a peak at 12.5 years in females (mean 18.9+/-9) and 15 years in males (mean 17.1+/-8.9).
  • All patients underwent surgery and chemotherapy.
  • The following data were retrieved: age, height and pubertal stage at diagnosis, stage of disease, site, chemotherapy protocol.
  • RESULTS: At diagnosis, a high percentage of patients of Groups 1, 2, and 3 were found to be above the 50th percentile for height of the reference population, and their mean SDS height value was significantly higher than the mean SDS Final Height value, as measured at the end of puberty (p<0.0001), both in males and females.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The higher incidence during the pubertal spurt, in the anatomic sites of greater growth and in taller individuals, suggests that the GH-IGF axis may play a role in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma, in agreement with a number of previous experimental studies.
  • The finding that final height of osteosarcoma patients does not differ from that of the standard reference population may reflect the detrimental influence of aggressive multiagent chemotherapy on osteogenesis.

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  • (PMID = 28013701.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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76. Biron P, Rolland F, Thyss A, Baranzelli MC, Rios M, Roché H, Bui B, Perol D, Blay JY, French Sarcoma group: OSAD 93: A multicentric prospective phase II study of preoperative high dose Ifosfamide and CDDP in adult patients with non metastatic osteosarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9019

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] OSAD 93: A multicentric prospective phase II study of preoperative high dose Ifosfamide and CDDP in adult patients with non metastatic osteosarcoma.
  • : 9019 Objectives: Based on a previous monocentric phase II trial with neoadjuvant ifosfamide CDDP based regimen in adults, a multicentric phase II study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma of patients over 16 years was initiated in 1993 in the French Sarcoma Group.
  • METHODS: Four preoperative courses of ifosfamide 9g/m2 in 3 days and CDDP 100mg/m2 on day 4 (SHOC) were given, followed by local treatment.
  • Post operative chemotherapy was adapted according to pathological response, doxorubicin (60mg/m2) being added (HOCA regimen) in patients with tumors >10% of viable tumor cells.
  • RESULTS: Between January 94 and June 1998, 63 pts were included, 14 females, 49 males, with a median age of 27 (range: 16-63).
  • Primary tumors were femur (39%), tibia (12%), humerus (10%), flat bones (28%).
  • Respectively 13%, 19%, 24%, 32% and 12% of patients had grade 4, 3, 2, 1, and non evaluable pathological response to preoperative chemotherapy.
  • With a 68 months median follow-up, overall and progression-free survival at 5 year are 54% and 47% both (PFS 72% and 35%, and OS 81% and 50% respectively for good and poor responders) Conclusions: In adult patients, preoperative high dose ifosfamide and CDDP (SHOC) regimen yields response rate and survival comparable to that achieved with doxorubicin containing regimen.

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  • (PMID = 28013673.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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77. Abdelkrim SB, Trabelsi A, Hammedi F, Boudagga MZ, Bdioui A, Jomaa W, Mokni M: Synovial Sarcoma: A Clinicopathological and Radiological Study of 12 Cases Seen Over 18 Years. World J Oncol; 2010 Feb;1(1):14-18

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Synovial Sarcoma: A Clinicopathological and Radiological Study of 12 Cases Seen Over 18 Years.
  • Background: Synovial sarcoma is a rare malignant soft tissue tumor characterized by a poor outcome.
  • We report herein our experience concerning synovial sarcoma and review its diagnosis, histology, treatment and prognosis.
  • Methods: This is a retrospective review, from 1990 to 2007, of cases of synovial sarcoma diagnosed at the Department of Pathology, Farhat Hached hospital, Sousse, Tunisia.
  • The clinical, radiological and pathological features as well as treatment modalities and patient's outcome were recorded.
  • Results: From 1990 to 2007, 12 cases of synovial sarcoma have been diagnosed in our department.
  • Patients' mean age at the time of diagnosis was 21 years.
  • Ten patients underwent surgery, in association with adjuvant chemotherapy in 4 cases, one of whom underwent post-operative radiotherapy.
  • Histological subtypes included monophasic synovial sarcoma in 8 cases, biphasic synovial sarcoma in 3 cases and poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma in one case.
  • At the time of analysis, 6 patients were dead with an average follow-up of 18 months.
  • Conclusions: Synovial sarcoma is a rare malignancy with a propensity for young adults and a poor prognosis.
  • Its symptomatology is non-specific and it is characterized by histopathological diversity.
  • Diagnosis can be suggested by radiology and definitive diagnosis is achieved after pathological analysis.

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  • (PMID = 29147174.001).
  • [ISSN] 1920-454X
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Histology / Prognosis / Radiology / Synovial sarcoma / Treatment
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78. Chow WA, Chu P, Chung V, Lawrence J, Garcia D, Doroshow JH: Imatinib mesylate therapy for recurrent Ewing's family of tumors (EFT). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9054

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Imatinib mesylate therapy for recurrent Ewing's family of tumors (EFT).
  • : 9054 Background: The prognosis for patients with recurrent Ewing's sarcoma (ES) and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) remains poor.
  • Novel therapies are urgently needed.
  • We previously demonstrated that EFT cell lines express the c-Kit and PDGFR-α tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs).
  • Standard dosage reductions were followed for hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities.
  • Staging evaluation revealed bone and bone marrow involvement.
  • Chemotherapy with vincristine, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide, altenating with ifosfamide and etoposide was initiated.
  • Progression was documented after 11 cycles of chemotherapy.
  • IHC of the original tumor revealed 3+/3 IHC positivity for both c-Kit and PDGFR-α.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This case report demonstrates that imatinib mesylate was an effective alternative therapy for this patient with recurrent EFT whose tumor expressed the c-Kit and PDGFR-α TKRs.

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  • (PMID = 28014099.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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79. Stevens M, Rey A, Bouvet N, Ellershaw C, Sanchez de Toledo J, Oberlin O: SIOP MMT 95: Intensified (6 drug) versus standard (IVA) chemotherapy for high risk non metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8515

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] SIOP MMT 95: Intensified (6 drug) versus standard (IVA) chemotherapy for high risk non metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS).
  • : 8515 Background: MMT 95 was 3<sup>rd</sup> in a series of SIOP collaborations for children with non metastatic STS.
  • Principal study objectives were: low and standard risk patients, to maintain excellent survival with limited chemotherapy and very selective use of local therapy.
  • ; high risk patients, to explore survival advantage for an intensified chemotherapy strategy in a randomised trial.
  • METHODS: Eligibility for randomisation included age ≥ 6 months ≤18 years, no distant metastases, diagnosis within previous 8 weeks without prior treatment except surgery, pathology available for central review, written consent according to institutional requirement.
  • From July 1995 to July 2003, 456 high risk patients (incompletely resected embryonal RMS, undifferentiated sarcoma and soft tissue PNET at all sites except paratesticular, vagina and uterus, and all alveolar RMS) were randomised to receive IVA (ifosfamide, vincristine, actinomycin D) or a 6 drug combination (IVA + carboplatin, epirubicin, etoposide) both delivered over 27 weeks.
  • Cumulative dose / m<sup>2</sup> = ifosfamide 54g (both arms), epirubicin 450 mg, etoposide 1350 mg (6 drug).
  • Delivery of radiotherapy was determined according to site and / or response to chemotherapy ± surgery.
  • Non randomised exceptions were: orbital tumours (allocated IVA); SIOP stage III (node positive) and young (age < 3yr) parameningeal tumours (allocated 6 drugs).
  • RESULTS: Data given only for randomised patients [Figure: see text] Toxicity was significantly greater (infection, myelosuppression, mucositis) for the 6 drug arm.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Intensification of chemotherapy provides no overall advantage for non metastatic RMS / other chemosensitive STS, and adds toxicity.

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  • (PMID = 28013776.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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80. Assi H, Le Deley MC, Missenard G, Terrier P, Le Péchoux C, Bonvalot S, Vanel D, Meric JB, Tursz T, Le Cesne A: Intensive induction chemotherapy (CT) without methotrexate (MTX) in adult patients with localized osteosarcoma (LO): Updated results of the Institut Gustave Roussy phase II trial. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9020

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intensive induction chemotherapy (CT) without methotrexate (MTX) in adult patients with localized osteosarcoma (LO): Updated results of the Institut Gustave Roussy phase II trial.
  • RESULTS: from March 1993 to March 2000, 32 adult pts with LO (male/female : 19/13) with a median age of 21 yrs, [range 15-49], were included in the study.
  • The planned protocol was given in 75% of pts, 16% received only 3 c for hematologic toxicity (T), and 10% received 5 c due to delay surgery.
  • The median delay between each c of CT was 15 days (range 12-32).
  • Two pts developed hemopathy: 1 AML5 in a PR with concomitant relapse and 1 MDS in a GR.
  • These promising results had to be corroborated by an ongoing national multicenter coordinated by the French Sarcoma Group.

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  • (PMID = 28013658.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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81. Gore L, Holden SN, Basche M, Raj SK, Arnold I, O'Bryant C, Witta S, Rohde B, McCoy C, Eckhardt SG: Updated results from a phase I trial of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor MS-275 in patients with refractory solid tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):3026

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Updated results from a phase I trial of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor MS-275 in patients with refractory solid tumors.
  • : 3026 Background: Inhibition of HDACs in vitro has resulted in tumor cell growth arrest, differentiation and/or tumor apoptosis.
  • METHODS: MS-275 was given orally to 3-6 fasting patients per dose level with refractory/relapsed solid tumors or lymphoma.
  • Histone H3 and H4 acetylation was analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by immunohistochemical detection.
  • Eighty cycles have been administered on Sch A and 13 on Sch B.
  • No drug related grade (gr) 4 adverse events (AEs) have been reported.
  • The most common drug related AEs were gr 1-3 hypophosphatemia, asthenia, nausea and anorexia.
  • The plasma profile of MS-275 demonstrates rapid absorption, with a T<sub>max</sub> of 0.5-2.0 h, and a dose-dependent increase in systemic exposure over the dose range 2-6 mg/m<sup>2</sup>.
  • One pt with melanoma continued to exhibit a partial response (Sch A), and 1 pt each with Ewing's sarcoma (Sch A), rectal carcinoma (Sch A) and melanoma (Sch B) had stable disease after 60+, 38+ and 20+ weeks of therapy, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: PK analyses indicate that MS-275 is rapidly absorbed, with a T<sub>1/2</sub> of 100 h, and preliminary evidence of increased H3 and H4 histone acetylation has been observed.

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  • (PMID = 28015195.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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82. D'Amato GZ, Mohapatra S, Jove R, Windham TC, Burns AC, Sullivan D, Muro-Cacho C, Letson GD, Pledger WJ: The effect of the PI3K/AKT pathway inhibition on leiomyosarcoma cells. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9002

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 9002 Background: Leiomyosarcomas (LMS) are one of the most common histological types of soft tissue sarcomas and are usually resistant to standard chemotherapy.
  • The PI3K/AKT pathway is an important survival pathway and is upregulated in many tumor cells.
  • Recent publications have shown that the AKT pathway is an important survival pathway for a uterine LMS cell line, SKLMS-1.
  • Cells were harvested at these time points and counted.
  • Apoptosis occurred in both a time and dose dependent manner.
  • Expression of cyclin A and cyclin D3 was reduced in the treated cells.
  • Interestingly, p27 levels did not increase with treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The PI3K inhibitor, LY294002 caused apoptosis in a both dose and time dependent manner.
  • These preclinical data may provide an opportunity for the development of novel therapies that target the P13K/AKT pathway No significant financial relationships to disclose.

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  • (PMID = 28013695.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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83. Guida M, Porcelli G, Ruggieri E, Zito A, Mattioli V, Montemurro S, Colucci G: Electrochemoterapy (ECT) for the treatment of superficial tumor localizations. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13526

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Electrochemoterapy (ECT) for the treatment of superficial tumor localizations.
  • : e13526 Background: ECT is an effective local treatment for palliation on inoperable superficial neoplastic lesions from any type of tumour.
  • It combines chemotherapy and electric pulses that permeabilize the cell membrane in a transient and reversible manner, allowing low-perrneant drugs to enter the cell, thus magnifying their cytotoxicity.
  • Recent1y, a new device (Clinoporetor, IGEA-Srl, Italy) has been developed to supply electric pulses with appropriate parameters permitting the clinical use of ECT.
  • METHODS: We treated 26 pts, M/F 12/14; median age 61 yrs, range 38-87: 7 breast cancer with nodular or infiltrating lesions in thoracic or abdominal wall; 12 melanoma (2 wide infiltration of thoracic wall, 10 in transit metastases or loco-regional recurrences); 2 head-neck cancer with a wide neck-scalp infiltration; 3 lymphomas with cutaneous lesions, 1 soft tissue sarcoma with a subcutaneous recurrence, 1 gastric cancer with 2 cutaneous localizations.
  • Intravenous bleomycin (15 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) were used in all patient; electric pulses were than applied to the tumor areas by needle electrodes in a time window of 20 minutes.
  • RESULTS: Treatment was safe and well tolerated, particularly when general anaesthesia was used.
  • At the second/third week, all pts showed a regression of almost all lesions with a necrotic, fibro-sclerotic evolution.
  • After 1-2 months from ECT, we obtained a 70% CR and a 10%PR of the lesions.
  • Some pts showed a response after the second procedure.
  • About 50% of lesions remained in remission for a long period (median 8 months, range 1-23+); 11 of 12 pts previously undergone surgical debulking never relapsed in the treated area.
  • Concomitant systemic treatment, no rapid spreading of the disease and surgical debulking were related to a better local control and survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: ECT is a promising and safe treatment for superficial lesions from different malignancies.
  • General anaesthesia and surgical debulking permit to treat very large and deeper lesion with a very good local control.

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  • (PMID = 27961294.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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84. Delaloge S, Tedesco KL, Blum J, Gonçalves A, Lubinski J, Efrat N, Osborne C, Lebedinsky C, Tercero JC, Holmes FA: Preliminary safety and activity results of trabectedin in a phase II trial dedicated to triple-negative (ER-, PR-, HER2-), HER2+++, or BRCA1/2 germ-line-mutated metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients (pts). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1010

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preliminary safety and activity results of trabectedin in a phase II trial dedicated to triple-negative (ER-, PR-, HER2-), HER2+++, or BRCA1/2 germ-line-mutated metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients (pts).
  • T has EMEA authorization in soft tissue sarcoma after failure of standard treatment.
  • Preliminary data have shown activity of T as single agent in MBC.
  • Endpoints were objective response (OR) rate by RECIST, duration of response, progression free survival (PFS), tumor volume changes, safety and exploratory pharmacogenomics (PGx).
  • Med number of prior chemotherapy regimens: 4 (1-10).
  • Med number of T cycles administered: 2 (1-12) for all groups.
  • Long-lasting disease stabilizations were described in all groups.
  • Tissue samples from 36 pts were collected for RNA expression analysis (XPG + ERCC1 + BRCA1).

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  • (PMID = 27960738.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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85. Macapinlac M, Elrafei T, Cunningham I, Horowitz M, Fauzia P, Mbaoma R, Jayabalan D, Mani S: Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: Neoadjuvant therapy with imatinib mesylate and use of plasma PDGF-B levels to monitor clinical response. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9049

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: Neoadjuvant therapy with imatinib mesylate and use of plasma PDGF-B levels to monitor clinical response.
  • : 9049 Background: Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance (DFSP) is a rare soft tissue sarcoma; most cases show t(17:22) resulting in a COL1A1-PDGF-B fusion protein.
  • Imatinib mesylate, a known inhibitor of the PDGF receptor tyrosine kinase, has produced responses in some patients with chemotherapy-resistant locally advanced or metastatic DFSP.
  • Wide surgical excision of the tumor is still the accepted treatment despite local recurrence rate of 20-50% in completely resected patients.
  • We present a 39-year-old man with a 7 month history of gradually enlarging facial masses with biopsy consistent with DFSP.
  • METHODS: Weekly plasma PDGF-B levels was measured using ELISA Results: After 3 weeks, CT scan showed ∼50% reduction in the left cheek and chin tumors with near complete resolution of the facial skin lesions.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This case shows the potential use of imatinib as neoadjuvant treatment in DFSP, and the potential value of measuring serial PDGF-B levels as a novel tumor marker not only in DFSP but perhaps in all tumors that depend on the PDGF-B pathway.

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  • (PMID = 28014126.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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86. Eilber FC, Eilber FR, Eckardt JJ, Rosen G, Forscher C, Maki RG, Grobmyer SR, Brennan MF, Singer S: Impact of ifosfamide-based chemotherapy on survival in patients with primary extremity synovial sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9017

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Impact of ifosfamide-based chemotherapy on survival in patients with primary extremity synovial sarcoma.
  • : 9017 Background: The impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on the survival of patients with soft tissue sarcoma is controversial.
  • Although ifosfamide based chemotherapy (IF) has generated significant responses in the treatment of metastatic synovial sarcoma, its effect on the survival of patients with primary disease remains unclear.
  • The objective of this study is to determine if IF offers a survival benefit to patients with primary extremity synovial sarcoma.
  • METHODS: Two prospectively collected sarcoma databases were used to identify a contemporary cohort of 101 adult (≥16yrs) patients with primary, extremity, ≥5cm, deep, synovial sarcomas that underwent surgical treatment for cure from 1990 to 2002.
  • 68 patients were treated with IF and 33 received no chemotherapy (NoC).
  • Clinical, pathologic and treatment variables were analyzed for disease specific survival (DSS) and distant recurrence free survival (DRFS).
  • 90%(91/101) underwent limb-sparing surgery and 97%(88/91) of these patients received radiation therapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Ifosfamide based chemotherapy is associated with improved DRFS and DSS in patients with large, primary, extremity synovial sarcoma.

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  • (PMID = 28013672.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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87. Chugh R, Thomas D, Wathen K, Thall PF, Benjamin RS, Maki RS, Samuels BL, Keohan ML, Priebat DA, Baker LH: Imatinib mesylate in soft tissue and bone sarcomas: Interim results of a Sarcoma Alliance for Research thru Collaboration (SARC) phase II trial. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9001

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Imatinib mesylate in soft tissue and bone sarcomas: Interim results of a Sarcoma Alliance for Research thru Collaboration (SARC) phase II trial.
  • : 9001 Background: The success of imatinib (Gleevec) in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is proof that a small oncogene targeted molecule can have significant benefit in a solid tumor.
  • Sarcomas, other than GIST, also overexpress one or more of the tyrosine kinases inhibited by imatinib.
  • We are performing a multi-institutional study to evaluate imatinib activity in nine different sarcoma subtypes and desmoid tumors.
  • METHODS: Patients ≥10 years old with a sarcoma subtype not curable by multidisciplinary management were eligible.
  • Rules for early termination within each disease type were based on a hierarchical Bayesian probability model accounting for correlation of the responses of the 10 disease types.
  • Tissue specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for c-kit, PDGFRα, PDGFR****223'3f NEEDS TO BE ADDED TO TIMES NEW ROMAN GREEK FONT****, AKT, PTEN, FKHR, and by allelic PCR analysis for PDGFRα exon 18.
  • Patients received prior chemotherapy and all had progressive disease.
  • Four month progression-free survival (PFS) rates follow: all sarcoma subtypes 18% (27/147), angiosarcoma 10% (1/10), Ewing sarcoma 0% (0/13), fibrosarcoma 29% (2/7), liposarcoma 32% (9/28), leiomyosarcoma (LMS) 20% (6/30), malignant fibrous histiocytoma 1/15 (7%), osteosarcoma 18% (3/17), peripheral nerve sheath tumor 20% (1/5), rhabdomyosarcoma 0% (0/2), synovial sarcoma 20% (4/20).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Further investigation of imatinib in the therapy of liposarcoma, LMS, and fibrosarcoma is warranted.
  • Imatinib is less likely to be active in the other sarcoma subtypes.
  • The hierarchical Bayesian probability model is an effective method for studying rare diseases and their subtypes, when it is reasonable to assume that their response rates are exchangeable.

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  • (PMID = 28013622.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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88. Memon M, Raja MA, Moreau P, Allam A: Outpatient chemotherapy for non-metastatic Ewing's sarcoma (ES): Pilot experience. Sarcoma Group, King Faisal Specialist Hospital, Saudi Arabia. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9057

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outpatient chemotherapy for non-metastatic Ewing's sarcoma (ES): Pilot experience. Sarcoma Group, King Faisal Specialist Hospital, Saudi Arabia.
  • : 9057 Background: Non-metastatic ES is considered curable with combined modality therapy involving surgery (S), chemotherapy (C) ± radiation therapy (RT).
  • C involves prolonged treatment with multiple cycles, thus adding to in-patient cost.
  • We report our experience with combined modality therapy in ES in ambulatory care setting.
  • METHODS: Patients (age = 14) with newly diagnosed non-metastatic ES diagnosed between May 1999 -December 2001 included.
  • Dose intensities of all drugs identical to previously used in-patient regime.
  • Total 14 cycles q 21 days, response evaluation after 4, 8, 12 cycles and end of therapy.
  • Toxicities: febrile neutropenia 2, non neutropenic grade 3 infections 2, grade 3 mucositis 1.
  • With median follow up 22 months (8-50), 10/19 (53%) alive with no evidence of disease, 6 alive with disease, 3 died of disease.
  • CONCLUSION: Outpatient chemotherapy for ES is feasible, well tolerated with manageable toxicities, outcome is comparable to in-patient management.

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  • (PMID = 28014097.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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89. Casanova M, Ferrari A, Bisogno G, Merks JH, De Salvo GL, Tettoni K, Provenzi M, Fossati Bellani F, Carli M: Vinorelbine and low dose cyclophosphamide in pediatric sarcoma. A pilot study for the future European rhabdomyosarcoma protocol. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8540

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Vinorelbine and low dose cyclophosphamide in pediatric sarcoma. A pilot study for the future European rhabdomyosarcoma protocol.
  • Cancer 2002; 94: 3263) on the activity of vinorelbine (VNB) in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), we report the results of a pilot study aimed to define the dose of VNB in combination with low dose continuous oral cyclophosphamide (CTX) in patients with refractory or recurrent sarcomas.
  • The study was performed in the view of utilizing this treatment as maintenance therapy in the future European protocol for high risk RMS patients.
  • There was a median of 2 prior regimens (range 1-4); 5 patients previously received high dose chemotherapy with PBSC rescue and 12 prior radiotherapy.
  • Among 5 patients treated at dose level 4 (VNB 30 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) 2 dose limiting toxicities (grade 4 neutropenia) were observed in the first 2 cycles therefore a decision was made to enter 3 more patients at dose level 3.
  • Four patients were still on treatment after 5-10 cycles.
  • Partial responses were observed in 7/17 assessable patients: 3/8 RMS (2 embryonal, 1 alveolar), 1/1 clear cell sarcoma, 1/2 synovial sarcoma, 1/2 desmoplastic small round cell tumor, 1/1 osteosarcoma.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This combination appears to be feasible and active in relapsed sarcoma.

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  • (PMID = 28013816.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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90. Casali PG, Stacchiotti S, Palassini E, Marrari A, Negri T, Morosi C, Messina A, Pastorino U, Gronchi A, Pilotti S: Evaluation of the antitumor activity of sunitinib malate (SM) in solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10571

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of the antitumor activity of sunitinib malate (SM) in solitary fibrous tumor (SFT).
  • : 10571 Background: SFT is a rare soft tissue tumor, with an unpredictable metastatic potential.
  • When medical therapy is needed, cytotoxic chemotherapy is poorly active in this sarcoma subtype, but the activity of bevacizumab + temozolomide was recently reported.
  • We explored the activity of SM in SFT, given the vascular pattern of this tumor and our preliminary observations about RTK activation (with upregulation of the PDGFR family, VEGFR and EGFR).
  • METHODS: From April 2008, 5 patients with progressive metastatic SFT resistant to conventional chemotherapy (male/female: 3/2 - mean-age: 58 years - PS: 0-3 - site: peritoneum 3, pleura 1, bladder 1) have been treated with continuous-dosing SM 37.5 mg/day, on an individual use basis.
  • All patients were evaluated for response at least once, while 2 more patients are now starting therapy.
  • RTK biochemical analysis was performed in 3 patients of this series, in addition to a group of other patients with malignant SFT whose cryopreserved material was available.
  • RESULTS: Between 3 weeks and 3 months, 4 in 5 patients had a tumor response according to Choi's criteria (all with RECIST stable disease) .
  • The other patient stopped therapy for progression after 3 weeks and died 2 weeks later.
  • One responsive patient stopped therapy after 3 weeks for side effects and depression.
  • The remaining 3 responsive patients are currently on treatment, although one had a focal progression after 9 months.
  • In two, surgery of residual disease is planned, and downstream RTK signaling analysis will be performed on the specimen.
  • This might help address an unmet clinical need in a rare sarcoma subtype.

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  • (PMID = 27963778.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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91. Laufman LR, Spiridonidis H, Laufman H, Baker L, Kuebler P, Young D: Smoking status affects chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8097

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Smoking status affects chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.
  • : 8097 Background: A regimen of gemcitabine (G) and docetaxel (T) was tested concurrently in 39 patients with breast and 40 with lung cancer, and different toxicity profiles were observed.
  • Multivariate analysis incorporating cancer type, gender, age and prior treatment showed that grade 4 neutropenia was seen more frequently among non-smokers, (p=0.03).
  • Pharmacokinetic effect of smoking status on the clearance of both drugs was examined.
  • T is metabolized by the enzyme cytochrome p450 3A4 (cyp 3A4), whose activity is not associated with smoking status, as demonstrated by measurement of erythromycin breath tests in a separate cohort of 79 sarcoma patients.
  • Cohorts were defined by drug dose and regimen.
  • RESULTS: Compared to non-smokers, smokers had higher ANC after single agent G 800-1200/m<sup>2</sup>, or after G plus T 100/m<sup>2</sup> (p=0.01),** but had lower ANC after single agent T 75 or 100/m<sup>2</sup>.
  • Smokers treated with G plus T 75/m<sup>2</sup> had higher ANC than did those treated with the same dose of T alone (p=0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Smokers have higher ANC when treated with G, either alone or with T, but have lower ANC when treated with T alone.

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  • (PMID = 28015988.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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92. Kosmas C, Mylonakis N, Tsakonas G, Vorgias G, Pantelis N, Politis P, Kalinoglou N, Tsavaris N, Akrivos T, Karabelis A: Paclitaxel (T), ifosfamide (I), and carboplatin (Cb) (TICb) combination chemotherapy in advanced uterine and adnexal malignant mixed mullerian tumors (MMMTs). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5517

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Paclitaxel (T), ifosfamide (I), and carboplatin (Cb) (TICb) combination chemotherapy in advanced uterine and adnexal malignant mixed mullerian tumors (MMMTs).
  • : 5517 Background: Malignant mixed mullerian tumors (MMMTs) of the uterus and adnexa represent aggressive gynecologic malignancies with a high rate of locoregional and distant failure.
  • METHODS: Patients with advanced MMMTs [stages III-IV and relapses after surgery (Sx)±RT], WHO-PS 0-2, no prior chemotherapy, unimpaired hematopoietic/organ function were eligible.
  • Chemotherapy was administered as follows; T: 175 mg/m<sup>2</sup> d1, I: 2.0 g/m<sup>2</sup>/d-d1+2, and Cb at a target AUC = 5 (according to creatinine clearance based on Calvert's formula) on d2 after I.
  • RESULTS: Thirty-two patients with MMMTs of the uterus (n = 28), tubes (n = 2), or ovary (n = 2) have entered so far and all are evaluable for response and toxicity: median age = 61 (45-72), PS = 1 (0-1), stages; III = 18 (56%), IV = 14 (44%), histologies were; with homologous sarcoma component: 21, with heterologous component: 11.
  • Prior treatment for locoregional disease included Sx: 23, Sx+RT: 9.
  • Disease sites at diagnosis included: pelvic disease 12; pelvic/paraortic lymph nodes 14; peritoneal implants 16; liver 4; lung nodules 9; bone metastases 1; malignant pleural effusion 4.
  • Responses were as follows: 21/32 (66%) evaluable patients responded, with 9 complete responses (CR) and 12 partial responses (PR), while 8 had stable disease (SD), and 3 developed progressive disease (PD).
  • The median response duration was 8 mo (4-28), median time-to-progression (TTP) 12.5mo (4-26), while median overall survival (OS) has not been reached yet since most patients receive second-line therapy.

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  • (PMID = 27962459.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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93. Perez DG, Aubry MC, Molina JR, Marks RS, Okuno S, Yang P: Primary lung sarcomas. The Mayo Clinic experience. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):7370

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Primary lung sarcomas. The Mayo Clinic experience.
  • : 7370 Background: Primary lung sarcomas are rare tumors accounting for 0.013% to 0.4% of all lung malignancies.
  • It is estimated that 1 in 500 primary lung malignancies is a sarcoma.
  • At our institution, primary lung sarcomas represent 0.6% of lung cancers.
  • With less than 250 patients reported in the English medical literature, very little is known about the clinical behavior and treatment of these tumors.
  • The primary goal of this study was to review the Mayo Clinic experience with this rate tumors.
  • METHODS: All cases of primary lung sarcomas seen at the Mayo Clinic from 1976 to 2002 were reviewed.
  • Medical records were analyzed for demographic information as well as for survival and treatment data.
  • Pathology specimens were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis of primary lung sarcoma.
  • RESULTS: A total of 65 cases of primary lung sarcoma were found during the last 52 years at Mayo Clinic.
  • Hypoglycemia, which has been described in patients with this malignancy, was seen only in one patient with a very large tumor.
  • The main duration of symptoms at the time of diagnosis was 2 months.
  • The presence of an infiltrate or a mass was the most common finding (90%).
  • In most cases, the tumor was more than 5 cm in diameter (65%).
  • Surgery was the main treatment modality (lobectomy 70%, wedge resection 20%, and pneumonectomy 10%).
  • Radiation as the only treatment modality was used in 18% of patients.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy or radiation was used in 30% of cases.
  • Relapses were treated with surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation or both.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of primary lung sarcoma requires careful exclusion of primary sarcoma elsewhere.
  • Surgical resection, if complete, is curative for small, well-differentiated primary lung sarcomas.
  • Poorly differentiated tumors are less curable, but resection may provide palliation and should be considered.
  • Unresectable or recurrent sarcomas may be treated with radiation therapy or chemotherapy, although responses are usually brief and survival is less than 1 year.

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  • (PMID = 28015141.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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94. Hughes DP, Crutchley M, Douglas WI, Munsell MF, Vaporciyan AA, Herzog C, Tsai FW, Huh W: Incidence, detection, and management of cardiac metastasis in pediatric sarcoma patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10060

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence, detection, and management of cardiac metastasis in pediatric sarcoma patients.
  • : 10060 Background: Sarcoma metastasizing to the heart is a difficult and complicated clinical problem, yet local control is feasible and effective for select patients with cardiac metastasis.
  • Diligence is required to detect these lesions while still amenable to treatment, and echocardiogram remains the best tool for detecting cardiac disease.
  • METHODS: We reviewed all echocardiograms (1330) performed on 307 pediatric sarcoma patients treated at UT M. D.
  • Anderson Cancer Center between 1997 and 2008.
  • The probability of a patient with pericardial effusion having a cardiac metastasis was 28.6% (95% CI: 3.7%-71%).
  • Of the 5 patients with documented sarcoma metastasis to the heart, 3 had widespread refractory disease, were given no cardiac-specific therapy, and rapidly died from disease.
  • One patient who had widespread disease controlled with chemotherapy and radiation had open resection of 2 cardiac metastases which resulted in site-specific disease control for 6 months before succumbing to progressive extra-cardiac disease.
  • Another patient had isolated cardiac metastasis, treated with open resection of 2 metastases followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, and has been without recurrent cardiac metastases for 5 years and 9 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Durable local control for sarcoma metastasizing to the heart is possible and effective for select patients.
  • Echocardiogram monitoring of sarcoma patients remains important, and should include screening for possible cardiac metastasis.

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  • (PMID = 27962495.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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95. Castillo Fernandez OO, Pacheco M, Lim M, Singh C: Prognostic factors in synovial sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e21525

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic factors in synovial sarcoma.
  • : e21525 Background: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a relatively rare type of soft tissue sarcoma.
  • METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed on clinical and histopathological data of patients treated at National Oncology Institute (Panama) between 1995 - 2007.
  • Demographic, clinical, pathological, and therapeutic variables were reviewed.
  • Tumour site; extremities based 85%, truncal 15%.
  • Median tumour size was 8cm.
  • Presentation; non-metastatic 84%, metastatic 16%.
  • Histological type; monophasic 78%, biphasic 22%.
  • TREATMENT: adjuvant treatment 52% (3 chemotherapy only, 7 radiation therapy, 4 both).
  • In patients with localized disease, time to recurrence decreased with histological grade (p=0.05 ns).

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  • (PMID = 27963455.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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96. Karapanagiotou E, Pandha HS, Hall G, Chester J, Melcher A, Coffey M, de Bono J, Gore ME, Nutting CM, Harrington KJ: Phase I/II trial of oncolytic reovirus (Reolysin) in combination with carboplatin/paclitaxel in patients (pts) with advanced solid cancers. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14519

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e14519 Background: Reolysin, a wild type reovirus (Dearing strain), replicates preferentially in Ras-activated cancer cells.
  • Preclinical data have demonstrated synergistic tumor kill when reolysin is combined with standard chemotherapies including platinum agents and taxanes, justifying the clinical evaluation of this drug combination.
  • Secondary endpoints were to evaluate pharmacokinetics, immune response and anti-tumour activity.
  • RESULTS: 17 heavily pre-treated pts (11 M, median age 55 yrs) with advanced cancer: H&N (10), melanoma (4), peritoneal/endometrial cancer (2), and sarcoma (1) have received 82 cycles of treatment to date; 4 pts are still on study.
  • Response rates in 15 evaluable patients were partial response (PR) (4 pts), stable disease (SD) (6 pts) and progressive disease (5 pts).
  • Of note, all PRs and 4/5 SDs were in H&N disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The combination of reolysin and carboplatin/paclitaxel was well tolerated and resulted in disease control in the majority of pts.

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  • (PMID = 27963522.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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97. Mueller M, Calvo AR: Acute Shoulder Monoarthritis in a Patient With Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia With Novel Translocation t(5;13). World J Oncol; 2010 Feb;1(1):50-51

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We present the case of a patient with acute myelomonocytic leukemia with trisomy 8 and novel translocation t(5;13).
  • In addition to acute leukemia she had debilitating left shoulder arthritis due to granulocytic sarcoma formation in the joint space.
  • Her shoulder pain did not improve during induction chemotherapy but she experienced rapid relief of symptoms with use of local radiation.
  • Her leukemia was found to be primary refractory to chemotherapy and despite an attempt at salvage therapy she died 2 months after diagnosis.

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  • (PMID = 29147181.001).
  • [ISSN] 1920-454X
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; 13) / Acute myelogenous leukemia / Arthritis / Hypercalcemia / t(5
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98. Kyasa MJ: Phase II trial of tamoxifen and interferon alpha in patients with metastatic or recurrent soft tissue sarcoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9031

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II trial of tamoxifen and interferon alpha in patients with metastatic or recurrent soft tissue sarcoma.
  • : 9031 Background: Management of patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is difficult and often disappointing.
  • METHODS: Patients with advanced STS who had failed at least one prior systemic therapy, with performance status of 0-2 on ECOG scale, and adequate organ functions were enrolled on this study between October 1999 and June 2003.Patients received 20 mg of Tamoxifen daily and subcutaneous Interferon alpha 2b (Schering-Plough) 3 million-unit/square meters three times weekly .Patients were evaluated for response at 8 weeks and at 6 months, and those with stable or responsive disease continued treatment up to 26 weeks after which treatment was discontinued and patients were followed.
  • All patients had received at east one prior chemotherapy regimen and 8 patients had received prior radiotherapy.
  • Two of the seventeen patients were not started on treatment due to rapidly deteriorating condition, 4 patients developed early severe toxicity and eventually were taken off protocol.
  • Out of the 11 evaluable study patients, There was 1(7%) Complete remission with 70 weeks duration of response, no partial responses, and 2(13%) stable disease of 84 and 45 weeks duration, 8(53%) had progressive disease.
  • Encountered Grade 3 and 4 toxicities included thrombocytopenia (1), neutropenia (1), abnormal LFTs (1) and non-Q wave myocardial infarction.
  • No treatment related deaths were encountered.

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  • (PMID = 28013730.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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99. Kawai A, Chuman H, Makimoto A, Ito Y, Yamaguchi U, Morimoto Y, Beppu Y: Ifosfamide - etoposide chemotherapy in patients with advanced adult soft tissue sarcomas. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9062

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ifosfamide - etoposide chemotherapy in patients with advanced adult soft tissue sarcomas.
  • : 9062 Background: Doxorubicin and ifosfamide are considered to be the two most active agents in the treatment of adult soft tissue sarcoma (STS).
  • Etoposide has substantial activity in wide range of malignancies and is highly active against sarcomas in children and young adults when combined with ifosfamide.
  • There are several conflicting data about the effect of ifosfamide - etoposide combination chemotherapy in adult patients with STS.
  • METHODS: Patients who had histologically confirmed advanced non-small round cell STS were enrolled.
  • At least 4 weeks interval was present since previous chemotherapy.
  • The response was evaluated after at least two chemotherapy courses.
  • Histological diagnoses comprised 6 synovial sarcoma, 5 MFH, 5 MPNST, 2 liposarcoma, 2 leiomyosarcoma, and 2 others.
  • Evaluation sites were metastatic disease in 13, local recurrence in 5 and inoperable primary tumor in 4.
  • Six patients achieved partial response, 14 had stable disease and 2 had progressive disease, with an overall response rate of 27%.
  • Of 8 patients who had received previous anthracycline containing chemotherapy, two responded.
  • Two of five patients with MPNST and MFH had objective tumor regression.
  • Treatment was well tolerated except for neutropenic fever that occurred in 10% of the courses.

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  • (PMID = 28014085.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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100. Binh NN, Chevreau C, Penel N, Bay J, Coindre J, Mathoulin-Pelissier S, Ray-Coquard I, Italiano A, Genève J, Blay J: Consolidation with high-dose chemotherapy for responding patients to standard chemotherapy in advanced, metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS): A randomized trial from FNCLCC-French Sarcoma Group. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10505

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Consolidation with high-dose chemotherapy for responding patients to standard chemotherapy in advanced, metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS): A randomized trial from FNCLCC-French Sarcoma Group.
  • : 10505 Background: Whether high dose (HD) chemotherapy improves disease-free (DFS) or overall (OS) survival has been suggested in phase II trial, but never explored in a randomized setting.
  • This randomized, open, phase III study was designed to assess whether or not an HD chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) would improve OS in patients with advanced or metastatic STS responding to MAID chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: From 03/00 to 06/08, 266 patients were included and 87 were randomised (15 centres); low accrual and new treatment concepts lead to an IDMC in 11/08 who analysed 45 treated in the control arm (41 with full treatment) and 40 in the HD arm [only 21 received MICE, because consent withdrawal (6), insufficient PBSC harvest (5), tumor reprogression (4)].
  • Baseline characteristics (pts and tumors) were similar between treatment arms.
  • With a 39 months follow-up, 25 pts were alive in the control arm, and 19 in the HD arm.
  • Two treatment-related deaths occurred, both in the HD arm.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this study, HD chemotherapy for STS patients didn't improve OS and DFS.

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  • (PMID = 27963694.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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