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1. Eggermont AM, de Wilt JH, ten Hagen TL: Current uses of isolated limb perfusion in the clinic and a model system for new strategies. Lancet Oncol; 2003 Jul;4(7):429-37
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Current uses of isolated limb perfusion in the clinic and a model system for new strategies.
  • Isolated limb perfusion with melphalan is the treatment of choice for multiple (small) melanoma-in-transit metastases.
  • The use of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) in isolated limb perfusion is successful for treatment of locally advanced limb soft-tissue sarcomas and other large tumours; this approach can avoid the need for amputation.
  • TNFalpha was approved in Europe after a multicentre trial in patients with locally advanced soft-tissue sarcomas, deemed unresectable by an independent review committee; the response rate to isolated limb perfusion with TNFalpha plus melphalan was 76% and the limb was saved in 71% of patients.
  • Moreover, the trial showed the efficacy of isolated limb perfusion of TNFalpha and melphalan against various other limb-threatening tumours such as skin cancers and drug-resistant bony sarcomas.
  • Laboratory models of isolated limb perfusion have helped to elucidate mechanisms of action and to develop new treatment modalities.
  • They have identified TNFalpha-mediated vasculotoxic effects on the tumour vasculature and have shown that addition of TNFalpha to the perfusate results in an increase of three to six times in uptake of melphalan or doxorubicin by tumours.
  • New vasoactive drugs and new mechanisms of action are being discovered.
  • Moreover, isolated limb perfusion is an effective modality for gene therapy mediated by an adenoviral vector.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion / methods. Melanoma / pathology. Melphalan / therapeutic use. Sarcoma. Soft Tissue Neoplasms. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Animals. Female. Humans. Leg. Rats. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12850194.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-2045
  • [Journal-full-title] The Lancet. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan
  • [Number-of-references] 75
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2. Indelicato DJ, Meadows K, Gibbs CP Jr, Morris CG, Scarborough MT, Zlotecki RA: Effectiveness and morbidity associated with reirradiation in conservative salvage management of recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2009 Jan 1;73(1):267-72
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  • [Title] Effectiveness and morbidity associated with reirradiation in conservative salvage management of recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma.
  • PURPOSE: The management of isolated local recurrence of soft-tissue sarcoma is therapeutically complex, and functional conservative management is preferable to radical or amputative salvage surgery.
  • This study reviews the University of Florida experience using conservative resection and reirradiation to manage isolated local recurrences of soft-tissue sarcoma.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 1976 and 2005, a total of 14 patients who underwent primary conservative resection and irradiation developed isolated local recurrence and were managed with salvage conservative resection and reirradiation.
  • Of the patients treated, 3 had tumors of the distal extremity, 8 had tumors of the proximal extremity, and 3 had tumors of the trunk.
  • At the time of recurrence, 64% of tumors were greater than 5 cm and 79% were high grade.
  • Two patients received chemotherapy.
  • Of the 14 patients, only 1 has remained disease free and without significant complications.
  • No treatment factors, including achieving wide surgical margins or delivering higher radiation dosages, seemed to confer an advantage in local control.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Salvage therapy for management of locally recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma is challenging, and the effects of reoperation and reirradiation can be severe.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma / radiotherapy. Sarcoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Survival. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 18707824.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Rigamonti F, Beris P, Sanchez-Pareja A, Meyer P, Ashrafpoor G, Zaza S, Passweg J, Chalandon Y: Atypical presentation of acute myeloid leukemia: cardiac myeloid sarcoma. Int J Hematol; 2009 Jun;89(5):693-8
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  • [Title] Atypical presentation of acute myeloid leukemia: cardiac myeloid sarcoma.
  • We present the case of a 52-year-old man with a 2-month history of dyspnea, bilateral pleural effusion and cardiomegaly of rapid onset.
  • Despite 1% blast cells in the peripheral blood, 2 bone marrow biopsies were negative for malignancy.
  • Flow cytometry analysis of the blood and immunohistochemistry study of the pleural liquid showed a blast population of CD34+, CD33+, CD13+ and HLA-DR+ cells; a percutaneous cardiac biopsy showed CD34+ cells in the pericardium which led to the diagnosis of extramedullary acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • The patient was treated with induction chemotherapy allowing remission, but unfortunately died of septic shock of fungal origin.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / diagnosis. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / diagnosis. Sarcoma, Myeloid / diagnosis


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4. Devogelaer JP: Treatment of bone diseases with bisphosphonates, excluding osteoporosis. Curr Opin Rheumatol; 2000 Jul;12(4):331-5
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  • [Title] Treatment of bone diseases with bisphosphonates, excluding osteoporosis.
  • The main biologic action of bisphosphonates consists of the inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption, and, at least, for the drugs introduced after etidronate, without any significant inhibition of bone mineralization.
  • Bisphosphonates therefore play a major role in conditions that are characterized, at least partly, by an increased bone resorption.
  • Potentially crippling conditions such as symptomatic Paget disease of bone remain a major therapeutic challenge for bisphosphonates, but the prevention of the major complications such as sarcoma has still to be proven.
  • The availability of more potent bisphosphonates, less toxic for bones, has certainly widened the therapeutic interventions to asymptomatic patients, bearing in mind the various potential troublesome complications.
  • Fibrous dysplasia resembles, in certain aspects, Paget disease; it is therefore not surprising that bisphosphonate therapy has been proposed in this indication.
  • For those with a bone metastatic propensity or malignant hematologic condition, such as multiple myeloma, the most recent generation of more potent bisphosphonates may bring more comfort to crippled patients and even, hopefully, have a direct antitumoral activity, if used synergistically with the armamentarium already available to the clinician.
  • Now that the fear of theoretically freezing bone remodeling has been reasonably dismissed, potential uses for bisphosphonates might be considered nearly infinite.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Diseases / drug therapy. Diphosphonates / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Abnormalities, Drug-Induced. Adult. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms / secondary. Child. Female. Fibrous Dysplasia of Bone / drug therapy. Humans. Male. Multiple Myeloma / drug therapy. Osteitis Deformans / drug therapy. Osteogenesis Imperfecta / drug therapy. Osteoporosis / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 10910187.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-8711
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in rheumatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Rheumatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Diphosphonates
  • [Number-of-references] 30
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5. Ferrari A, Gronchi A, Casanova M, Meazza C, Gandola L, Collini P, Lozza L, Bertulli R, Olmi P, Casali PG: Synovial sarcoma: a retrospective analysis of 271 patients of all ages treated at a single institution. Cancer; 2004 Aug 1;101(3):627-34
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  • [Title] Synovial sarcoma: a retrospective analysis of 271 patients of all ages treated at a single institution.
  • BACKGROUND: The optimal treatment strategy for synovial sarcoma (SS) is subject to debate, and different strategies have been used for pediatric and adult patients.
  • METHODS: The study included 271 patients who ranged in age from 5 years to 87 years; 255 had localized disease, which was macroscopically resected in 215 cases and deemed unresectable at diagnosis in 40 cases.
  • Chemotherapy was administered to 41% of patients, corresponding to 76% of patients age or 16 years and < 20% of older patients; 28% of patients with macroscopically resected disease received chemotherapy on an adjuvant basis.
  • Chemotherapy was used more commonly for children than for adults.
  • Among patients with surgically resected disease, the 5-year metastasis-free survival (MFS) rate was 60% for those who were treated with chemotherapy and 48% for those who were not; the benefit associated with chemotherapy use appeared to be greatest for patients age > or = 17 years who had tumors measuring > 5 cm (MFS, 47% [chemotherapy] vs. 27% [no chemotherapy]).
  • In the subgroup of patients with measurable disease, the rate of tumor response to chemotherapy was approximately 48%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although the authors await more convincing proof of the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of adult soft tissue sarcoma, they recommend that patients with high-risk SS (tumor size > 5 cm) be the first to be considered for this type of treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma, Synovial / epidemiology. Sarcoma, Synovial / therapy. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / epidemiology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Distribution. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Amputation / methods. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Cohort Studies. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Radiation. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Sex Distribution. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 15274077.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Bafaloukos D, Papadimitriou C, Linardou H, Aravantinos G, Papakostas P, Skarlos D, Kosmidis P, Fountzilas G, Gogas H, Kalofonos C, Dimopoulos AM: Combination of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and paclitaxel in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: a phase II study of the Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group. Br J Cancer; 2004 Nov 1;91(9):1639-44
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  • [Title] Combination of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and paclitaxel in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: a phase II study of the Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group.
  • Patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS), even after complete local disease control, often relapse locally or with distant metastases.
  • This multicenter phase II study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and paclitaxel, as first-line treatment in patients with advanced STS.
  • In all, 42 patients with locally advanced or metastatic STS, median age 54 years and median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS) 1 were treated with PLD 45 mg m(-2) and paclitaxel 150 mg m(-2), every 28 days for a total of six cycles.
  • Histological types included mainly leiomyosarcomas (43%), malignant fibrous histiocytomas (14%) and liposarcomas (12%).
  • Overall response rate was 16%, including one complete (CR 2%) and six partial responses (PRs 14%), while an additional 14 patients had disease stabilization (SD 33%).
  • At median follow-up 41.5 months, median time to progression (TTP) was 5.7 months with median overall survival (OS) 13.2 months.
  • There were no treatment-related deaths.
  • The combination of PLD and paclitaxel is a safe and well-tolerated regimen demonstrating modest efficacy as first-line treatment in patients with advanced STS.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / drug therapy. Leiomyosarcoma / drug therapy. Liposarcoma / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Sarcoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Disease Progression. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Liposomes. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Safety. Survival Rate. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15494721.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Liposomes; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2409958
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7. Jacobs VR, Zemzoum I, Kremer M, Gottschalk N, Baumgärtner AK, Krol J, Kiechle M: Primary metastatic leiomyosarcoma of the fallopian tube: a rare case report. Onkologie; 2010;33(1-2):49-52
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Leiomyosarcoma of the fallopian tube is an extremely unusual gynecologic neoplasm.
  • Since 1886, only 19 of about 35 sarcomas of the fallopian tube have been identified as leiomyosarcomas.
  • As such, clinical diagnosis and therapy management are difficult.
  • CASE REPORT: We report on the case of a 59-year-old woman with leiomyosarcoma of the fallopian tube and liver metastases at the time of diagnosis.
  • After initial tumor debulking, she received palliative chemotherapy with gemcitabine 900 mg/m(2) (d1+8) and docetaxel 100 mg/m(2) (d8) (q21).
  • For additional bone metastases, she started local radiation plus bisphosphonates (q28).
  • After 2 cycles of chemotherapy, the disease progressed, and the patient died within 8 months of diagnosis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Primary metastatic leiomyosarcoma of the fallopian tube is a progressive disease with limited therapy options.
  • For better prognostic evaluation and disease management in such rare cases, it is important to report and compare more cases regarding course of disease and outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Fallopian Tube Neoplasms / diagnosis. Leiomyosarcoma / secondary. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Peritoneal Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Diagnostic Imaging. Disease Progression. Fallopian Tubes / pathology. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Liver / pathology. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Palliative Care. Prognosis


8. Zmonarski SC, Boratyńska M, Rabczyński J, Kazimierczak K, Klinger M: Regression of Kaposi's sarcoma in renal graft recipients after conversion to sirolimus treatment. Transplant Proc; 2005 Mar;37(2):964-6
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  • [Title] Regression of Kaposi's sarcoma in renal graft recipients after conversion to sirolimus treatment.
  • Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a rare complication of renal transplantation in Poland (in our center 2 of 1000 patients).
  • Since confirmation of KS immunosuppression has been minimized in both patients; all drugs except prednisone were withdrawn, and sirolimus was introduced (1-2 mg/24 hours blood level 5-8 ng/mL).
  • Within a month the progression of lung and skin disease ceased, and patients' conditions began to improve with lung opacities regressing, the biggest skin lesions diminishing and smaller ones disappearing.
  • It is difficult to ascertain whether KS regression may be attributed to sirolimus treatment or to the reduced overall immunosuppression.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Kidney Transplantation / immunology. Sarcoma, Kaposi / drug therapy. Sirolimus / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Cadaver. Drug Therapy, Combination. Graft Rejection / drug therapy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Tissue Donors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15848592.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1345
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
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9. Sarjeant JM, Butany J, Cusimano RJ: Cancer of the heart: epidemiology and management of primary tumors and metastases. Am J Cardiovasc Drugs; 2003;3(6):407-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cancer of the heart: epidemiology and management of primary tumors and metastases.
  • Cardiac tumors, benign or malignant, are rare and most are benign.
  • The most common benign tumor is the cardiac myxoma.
  • Malignant cardiac tumors are usually sarcomas.
  • The pericardium can be the site of benign and malignant cardiac tumors, though metastatic tumors occur here far more commonly than do primary tumors.
  • Successful treatment for benign cardiac tumors is usually achieved by surgical resection.
  • Surgery for primary malignant tumors is, however, much less successful as complete resection is usually not possible.
  • Primary cardiac lymphoma may be successfully treated by chemotherapy.
  • Tumors that metastasize to the heart from other organs occur 100- to 1000-fold more commonly than primary cardiac tumors.
  • Metastatic spread to the heart has been identified in approximately one-fifth of all patients who have metastatic cancer with lung carcinoma being the most common primary tumor.
  • Treatment varies depending on the pathology of the primary tumor.
  • However, the aim of treatment is usually symptomatic relief.
  • With the advent of AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma and high grade B cell lymphomas have also been identified in cardiac tissue.
  • The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathology and treatment of cardiac tumors.
  • [MeSH-minor] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Carcinoid Heart Disease / diagnosis. Carcinoid Heart Disease / pathology. Hematologic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Hematologic Neoplasms / pathology. Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis. Pericardium / pathology

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  • (PMID = 14728061.001).
  • [ISSN] 1175-3277
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of cardiovascular drugs : drugs, devices, and other interventions
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Cardiovasc Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Number-of-references] 62
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10. Pantanowitz L, Früh K, Marconi S, Moses AV, Dezube BJ: Pathology of rituximab-induced Kaposi sarcoma flare. BMC Clin Pathol; 2008 Jul 23;8:7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pathology of rituximab-induced Kaposi sarcoma flare.
  • BACKGROUND: Kaposi sarcoma (KS) flare may occur following therapy with corticosteroids, as part of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome seen with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and after rituximab therapy.
  • METHODS: A case of AIDS-associated cutaneous KS flare following rituximab therapy was compared to similar controls by means of immunohistochemistry using vascular makers (CD34, CD31), monoclonal antibodies to Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) gene products (LNA-1, K5), as well as B-lymphocyte (CD20) and T-lymphocyte (CD3, CD4, CD8) markers.
  • Effective management of iatrogenic KS flare therefore depends upon the control of HHV8 viremia in conjunction with specific chemotherapy for KS.

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  • (PMID = 18651955.001).
  • [ISSN] 1472-6890
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC clinical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Clin Pathol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / P51 RR000163-496078; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / P51 RR000163; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA094011-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA094011-04; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / RR000163-496078; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA094011; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA094011-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA094011-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2515841
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11. Kurzrock R: Studies in target-based treatment. Mol Cancer Ther; 2007 May;6(5):1477
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  • [Title] Studies in target-based treatment.
  • In this issue, Molecular Cancer Therapeutics inaugurates a new feature-The Cutting Edge: Spotlight on Clinical Response-whose objective is the rapid publication of breaking discoveries regarding target- or mechanism-based clinical responses in cancer.
  • Targeted molecules are poised to alter the landscape of clinical cancer treatment.
  • For example, because they can distinguish cancer cells from their normal counterparts, agents such as imatinib mesylate, a Bcr-Abl and Kit kinase inhibitor, can result in remarkable responses with minimal host toxicity in patients suffering from diseases characterized by abnormalities in the targeted kinases.
  • Furthermore, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), a notoriously chemotherapy-refractory sarcoma, characterized by activating Kit kinase mutations, can show dramatic metabolic responses within days after initiation of treatment.
  • Indeed, in this issue, a paper by Senzer et al. documents, for the first time, successful use of adenoviral p53 therapy to treat a tumor in a patient with Li Fraumeni Syndrome, a hereditary cancer syndrome caused by the mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene.
  • Some of the features of this response, such as the early disappearance of metabolic activity on fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scans, are reminiscent of those of GIST responses to imatinib.
  • These findings have important implications for patients with this syndrome, who are prone to develop numerous tumors and often succumb at a young age.
  • In addition, because mutations in p53 are one of the more common aberrations in cancer in general, identification of these mutations and exploration of this approach is warranted in patients with sporadic cancers.
  • In summary, the era of "molecular cancer therapeutics" has begun.
  • Molecular Cancer Therapeutics believes that providing a forum for the rapid dissemination of cutting-edge findings of successful, albeit early, clinical research should stimulate further study and will ultimately benefit patients with cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Mutation. Neoplasms / therapy. Research Design
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor / methods. Genetic Therapy / methods. Humans. Models, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 17483434.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-7163
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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12. Boivin G, Gaudreau A, Routy JP: Evaluation of the human herpesvirus 8 DNA load in blood and Kaposi's sarcoma skin lesions from AIDS patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy. AIDS; 2000 Sep 8;14(13):1907-10
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  • [Title] Evaluation of the human herpesvirus 8 DNA load in blood and Kaposi's sarcoma skin lesions from AIDS patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) skin lesions of subjects with AIDS and to correlate these measures with the tumour load.
  • DESIGN: Assessment of the HHV-8 DNA load was performed every 3 months in PBMC and every 6 months in KS skin lesions from seven subjects with AIDS who were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).
  • Staging of KS was performed by evaluating the number and type of cutaneous KS lesions.
  • All but one subject who also had multicentric Castleman's disease had low amounts of HHV-8 DNA in PBMC.
  • CONCLUSION: There is a strong relationship between the tumour burden and the HHV-8 viral load in KS skin lesions of subjects with AIDS, reinforcing the causal link between this herpesvirus and AIDS-related KS.
  • [MeSH-major] AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections / drug therapy. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. DNA, Viral / blood. Herpesvirus 8, Human / physiology. Sarcoma, Kaposi / virology. Skin Neoplasms / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] HIV Infections / complications. HIV Infections / drug therapy. Humans. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Skin / pathology. Skin / virology. Viral Load. Viremia


13. Kusuzaki K, Aomori K, Suginoshita T, Minami G, Takeshita H, Murata H, Hashiguchi S, Ashihara T, Hirasawa Y: Total tumor cell elimination with minimum damage to normal tissues in musculoskeletal sarcomas following photodynamic therapy with acridine orange. Oncology; 2000 Aug;59(2):174-80
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  • [Title] Total tumor cell elimination with minimum damage to normal tissues in musculoskeletal sarcomas following photodynamic therapy with acridine orange.
  • Acridine orange (AO) has unique biological actions enabling tumor visualization (fluorovisualization) and a strong cytocidal effect (photodynamic therapy: AO-PDT) under illumination with blue light.
  • Accordingly, in this study, we attempted to develop a new surgical technique for total tumor cell elimination using these photodynamic reactions with AO in a mouse osteosarcoma model.
  • The results showed that local tumor recurrence was significantly inhibited (23%) in the group treated with curettage under fluorovisualization and AO-PDT, compared to that (80%) in the control group treated with curettage alone under ordinary light.
  • Therefore, we concluded that the combination of curettage under fluorovisualization and AO-PDT may be useful for total tumor cell elimination with minimum damage to normal tissue in musculoskeletal sarcomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Acridine Orange / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Curettage. Disease Models, Animal. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C3H. Musculoskeletal Diseases / drug therapy. Mutagens / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 10971178.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-2414
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Mutagens; F30N4O6XVV / Acridine Orange
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14. Morales-Arias J, Meyers PA, Bolontrade MF, Rodriguez N, Zhou Z, Reddy K, Chou AJ, Koshkina NV, Kleinerman ES: Expression of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and its receptor in human Ewing sarcoma cells and patient tumor specimens: potential consequences of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor administration. Cancer; 2007 Oct 1;110(7):1568-77
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  • [Title] Expression of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and its receptor in human Ewing sarcoma cells and patient tumor specimens: potential consequences of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor administration.
  • BACKGROUND: Ewing sarcoma (ES) is a highly vascular malignancy.
  • It has been demonstrated that both angiogenesis and vasculogenesis contribute to the growth of ES tumors.
  • Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a cytokine known to stimulate bone marrow (BM) stem cell production and angiogenesis, is routinely administered to ES patients after chemotherapy.
  • Whether ES cells and patient tumor samples express G-CSF and its receptor (G-CSFR) and whether treatment with this factor enhances tumor growth was examined.
  • Sixty-eight paraffin-embedded and 15 frozen tumor specimens from patients with ES were also evaluated for the presence of G-CSF and G-CSFR.
  • Using a TC/7-1 human ES mouse model, the effect of G-CSF administration on ES tumors was investigated.
  • Tumor growth was found to be significantly increased in mice treated with G-CSF.
  • The average tumor volume for the group treated with G-CSF was 1218 mm(3) compared with 577 mm(3) for the control group (P = .006).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The findings that ES cells and patient tumors expressed both G-CSF and its receptor in vitro and in vivo and that the administration of G-CSF promoted tumor growth in vivo suggest that the potential consequences of G-CSF administration should be investigated further.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / chemistry. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / analysis. Receptors, Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / analysis. Sarcoma, Ewing / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Chemotaxis. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Neovascularization, Pathologic. RNA / analysis. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 17694551.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Receptors, Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 63231-63-0 / RNA
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15. Dimopoulos MA, Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou V: Adverse effects of thalidomide administration in patients with neoplastic diseases. Am J Med; 2004 Oct 1;117(7):508-15
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  • [Title] Adverse effects of thalidomide administration in patients with neoplastic diseases.
  • Moreover, the antiangiogenic and immunomodulatory properties of thalidomide have led to its evaluation in several malignant diseases, including myelofibrosis, renal cell cancer, prostate cancer, and Kaposi sarcoma.
  • A combination of thalidomide with steroids or chemotherapy is being evaluated in several phase 2 studies.
  • While it is not yet clear whether these combinations will enhance efficacy, they appear to increase the toxicity of thalidomide, and thalidomide analogs are being developed to minimize this toxicity.
  • Ongoing studies will clarify the potential advantages of these agents in the treatment of neoplastic diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / adverse effects. Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Teratogens / toxicity. Thalidomide / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Inflammatory Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic. Constipation / chemically induced. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Eruptions / etiology. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Hypothyroidism / chemically induced. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Patient Selection. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases / chemically induced. Sleep Stages / drug effects. Time Factors. Venous Thrombosis / chemically induced

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  • (PMID = 15464708.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9343
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Teratogens; 4Z8R6ORS6L / Thalidomide
  • [Number-of-references] 91
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16. López de Mesa R, López de Ceráin Salsamendi A, Ariznabarreta LS, Calasanz Abínzano MJ, Patiño-García A: Measurement and analysis of the chemotherapy-induced genetic instability in pediatric cancer patients. Mutagenesis; 2002 Mar;17(2):171-5
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  • [Title] Measurement and analysis of the chemotherapy-induced genetic instability in pediatric cancer patients.
  • Bleomycin sensitivity has been proven to be a useful biomarker for environmental carcinogenesis and tumor genetic instability.
  • We have previously reported a significant increase in the chromosomal aberrations induced by chemotherapy regimens.
  • This study aimed to test whether there is an inherent increased genetic instability in cancer patients at diagnosis, to determine the increase and time course of the chemotherapy-induced instability and to test whether bleomycin sensitivity can be used as a predictor of tumor evolution or relapse.
  • The analysis included 99 pediatric cancer patients with four different tumor types (Ewing's sarcoma, osteosarcoma, lymphoma and CNS tumors) and 25 controls.
  • Blood samples (n = 171) were obtained before and at the end of treatment, during clinical remission and at relapse and bleomycin tests on lymphocyte cultures were performed.
  • We detected a significant increase (P = 0.004) in mutagen sensitivity in patients at the end of treatment compared with untreated patients, regardless of the tumor type.
  • In both the longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses maximal and similar values of mutagen sensitivity were found in patients during treatment (1.84 +/- 0.82) and at relapse (1.78 +/- 0.52); minimum and similar values were found in controls (0.93 +/- 0.23), untreated patients (1.15 +/- 0.65) and in those who had fulfilled the chemotherapy protocols for at least 2 years before their sample was collected (1.09 +/- 0.53).
  • From this preliminary data we can conclude that cytostatic drugs induce a transient increase in chromosomal instability in pediatric cancer patients that can be monitored by bleomycin-induced sensitivity tests and that the genetic instability indices should be further investigated as predictors of relapse.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Bleomycin / pharmacology. Brain Neoplasms / genetics. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. DNA, Neoplasm / drug effects. Lymphoma / genetics. Osteosarcoma / genetics. Sarcoma, Ewing / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Chromosome Aberrations. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Karyotyping. Longitudinal Studies. Lymphocytes / drug effects. Lymphocytes / ultrastructure. Male

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  • (PMID = 11880547.001).
  • [ISSN] 0267-8357
  • [Journal-full-title] Mutagenesis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mutagenesis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin
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17. Menu-Branthomme A, Rubino C, Shamsaldin A, Hawkins MM, Grimaud E, Dondon MG, Hardiman C, Vassal G, Campbell S, Panis X, Daly-Schveitzer N, Lagrange JL, Zucker JM, Chavaudra J, Hartman O, de Vathaire F: Radiation dose, chemotherapy and risk of soft tissue sarcoma after solid tumours during childhood. Int J Cancer; 2004 May 20;110(1):87-93
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  • [Title] Radiation dose, chemotherapy and risk of soft tissue sarcoma after solid tumours during childhood.
  • Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is one of the most frequent second primary cancer that occurs during the first 20 years following treatment for a solid cancer in childhood.
  • Our aim was to quantify the risk of STS as a second malignant neoplasm and to investigate its relationship with radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • A cohort study of 4,400 3-year survivors of a first solid cancer diagnosed during childhood in France or the United Kingdom, between 1942 and 1985, was followed 15 years on average.
  • In a partially nested case-control study, we matched 25 cases of STS and 121 controls for sex, type of first cancer, age at first cancer and duration of follow-up.
  • The SIR was 113 (95% CI: 62-185) after chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (13 STS), whereas it was 28 (95%CI: 2-125) after chemotherapy alone (1 STS) and 19 (95%CI: 3-60) after radiotherapy alone (2 STS).
  • After adjustment for treatment, there was no evidence of variation in the annual excess of incidence or in the SIR with either age at first cancer or time since 1st cancer.
  • In the case-control study, the risk of a STS was increased with the square of the dose of radiation to the site of STS development and with the administration of Procarbazine.
  • The increased risk of soft tissue sarcoma that occurred after childhood cancer is independently related to exposure to radiotherapy and Procarbazine.
  • A closer surveillance of children treated with this treatment combination is strongly recommended.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Radiotherapy Dosage. Sarcoma / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Case-Control Studies. Child. Child, Preschool. Cohort Studies. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Middle Aged. Risk


18. Oberlin O, Deley MC, Bui BN, Gentet JC, Philip T, Terrier P, Carrie C, Mechinaud F, Schmitt C, Babin-Boillettot A, Michon J, French Society of Paediatric Oncology: Prognostic factors in localized Ewing's tumours and peripheral neuroectodermal tumours: the third study of the French Society of Paediatric Oncology (EW88 study). Br J Cancer; 2001 Nov 30;85(11):1646-54
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  • [Title] Prognostic factors in localized Ewing's tumours and peripheral neuroectodermal tumours: the third study of the French Society of Paediatric Oncology (EW88 study).
  • PURPOSE:. (1) To improve survival rates in patients with Ewing's sarcoma (ES) or peripheral neuroectodermal tumours (PNET) using semi-continuous chemotherapy and aiming to perform surgery in all;.
  • (2) To identify early prognostic factors to tailor therapy for future studies.
  • Induction therapy consisted of five courses of Cytoxan, 150 mg/m(2) x 7 days, followed by Doxorubicin, 35 mg/m(2) i.v on day 8 given at short intervals.
  • The delivery of radiation therapy was based on the quality of resection and the histological response to CT.
  • Maintenance chemotherapy consisted of vincristine + actinomycin and cytoxan + doxorubicin.
  • The total duration of therapy was 10 months.
  • RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 8.5 years, the projected overall survival at 5 years was 66% and disease-free survival (DFS) was 58%.
  • In patients treated by surgery, only the histological response to CT had an influence on survival: 75% DFS for patients with a good histological response (less than 5% of cells), 48% for intermediate responders and only 20% for poor responders (> or = 30% of cells), P < 0.0001.
  • The initial tumor volume by itself had no influence on DFS in these patients.
  • In contrast, the tumour volume had a strong impact on DFS in patients treated by radiation therapy alone.
  • CONCLUSION: Therapeutic trials for localized Ewing's sarcoma should be based on the histological response to chemotherapy or on the tumour volume according to the modality used for local therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive, Peripheral / therapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dactinomycin / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Prognosis. Radiotherapy. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2001 Cancer Research Campaign
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  • (PMID = 11742482.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1CC1JFE158 / Dactinomycin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2363978
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19. Husain EA, Prescott RJ, Haider SA, Al-Mahmoud RW, Zelger BG, Zelger B, Al-Daraji WI: Gallbladder sarcoma: a clinicopathological study of seven cases from the UK and Austria with emphasis on morphological subtypes. Dig Dis Sci; 2009 Feb;54(2):395-400
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  • [Title] Gallbladder sarcoma: a clinicopathological study of seven cases from the UK and Austria with emphasis on morphological subtypes.
  • BACKGROUND: Primary sarcoma of the gallbladder (PGBS) is rare, with only 40 cases reported in the literature.
  • We aimed to evaluate the histological features of a case series of this rare tumor and correlate these with clinical features.
  • DESIGN: Cases recorded as "gallbladder sarcoma" from different institutes were reviewed and the clinicopathological features of these cases were recorded.
  • Only primary gallbladder wall mesenchymal tumors were included.
  • Epithelial tumors, mixed tumors (carcinosarcoma or sarcomatoid carcinoma), and tumors extending into the gallbladder from the abdomen or sarcoma with other known primaries were specifically excluded.
  • RESULT: PGBS occurred in one male and six females with a median age of 70 (range 64-82) years.
  • Tumors ranged from 1.1 to 4 cm with a median size of 3 cm.
  • All tumors were associated with ulcerated mucosa.
  • Based on morphological and immunohistochemical features of the PGBS, there were three myxofibrosarcomas (malignant fibrous histiocytoma, MFH, storiform pleomorphic), one leiomyosarcoma (LMS), one angiosarcoma (AS), and two liposarcomas (LS).
  • All patients received cholecystectomy and three received adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Follow-up revealed that six patients died of the disease 6 weeks to 2 years after diagnosis and one died of unrelated causes.
  • A variety of sarcoma types are found with MFH being the predominant variant.
  • [MeSH-major] Gallbladder / pathology. Gallbladder Neoplasms / pathology. Sarcoma / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18618258.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-2568
  • [Journal-full-title] Digestive diseases and sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dig. Dis. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Vaupel P, Mayer A: Hypoxia in cancer: significance and impact on clinical outcome. Cancer Metastasis Rev; 2007 Jun;26(2):225-39
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  • [Title] Hypoxia in cancer: significance and impact on clinical outcome.
  • Hypoxia, a characteristic feature of locally advanced solid tumors, has emerged as a pivotal factor of the tumor (patho-)physiome since it can promote tumor progression and resistance to therapy.
  • Hypoxia represents a "Janus face" in tumor biology because (a) it is associated with restrained proliferation, differentiation, necrosis or apoptosis, and (b) it can also lead to the development of an aggressive phenotype.
  • Independent of standard prognostic factors, such as tumor stage and nodal status, hypoxia has been suggested as an adverse prognostic factor for patient outcome.
  • Studies of tumor hypoxia involving the direct assessment of the oxygenation status have suggested worse disease-free survival for patients with hypoxic cervical cancers or soft tissue sarcomas.
  • Technical limitations of the direct O(2) sensing technique have prompted the use of surrogate markers for tumor hypoxia, such as hypoxia-related endogenous proteins (e.g., HIF-1alpha, GLUT-1, CA IX) or exogenous bioreductive drugs.
  • Noninvasive assessment of hypoxia using imaging techniques can be achieved with PET or SPECT detection of radiolabeled tracers or with MRI techniques (e.g., BOLD).
  • In the clinical studies performed up until now, the lack of standardized treatment protocols, inconsistencies of the endpoints characterizing the oxygenation status and methodological differences (e.g., different immunohistochemical staining procedures) may compromise the power of the prognostic parameter used.
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 17440684.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-7659
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer metastasis reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Metastasis Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Number-of-references] 144
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21. Ryan CW, Dolan ME, Brockstein BB, McLendon R, Delaney SM, Samuels BL, Agamah ES, Vokes EE: A phase II trial of O6-benzylguanine and carmustine in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2006 Nov;58(5):634-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase II trial of O6-benzylguanine and carmustine in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma.
  • PURPOSE: Tumor resistance to alkylating agents such as carmustine (BCNU) has been found to be associated with intracellular expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT).
  • Administration of O6-benzylguanine (O6-BG), a substrate that inactivates MGMT, may help overcome chemotherapy resistance.
  • We performed a phase II study to explore the activity of O6-BG in combination with BCNU in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Informed consent was obtained from patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcoma naïve to systemic chemotherapy (adjuvant chemotherapy allowed).
  • Treatment was repeated every 6 weeks until disease progression or development of unacceptable toxicity.
  • Four patients exhibited stable disease lasting 11-25+ weeks.
  • Immunohistochemical estimation of MGMT expression from archival tissue ranged from 20 to 99% positive staining cells.
  • The degree of MGMT expression was variable in this small sample of heterogeneous sarcomas.
  • Further development of this regimen and dose for the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma is not warranted due to the lack of objective responses.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Sarcoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Anemia / chemically induced. Carmustine / administration & dosage. Carmustine / adverse effects. Enzyme Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Enzyme Inhibitors / adverse effects. Female. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors / drug therapy. Guanine / administration & dosage. Guanine / adverse effects. Guanine / analogs & derivatives. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Infant. Injections, Intravenous. Leiomyosarcoma / drug therapy. Male. Middle Aged. O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase / antagonists & inhibitors. O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase / metabolism. Survival Analysis. Tachycardia, Supraventricular / chemically induced. Thrombocytopenia / chemically induced. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16520986.001).
  • [ISSN] 0344-5704
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01CA63187
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 19916-73-5 / O(6)-benzylguanine; 5Z93L87A1R / Guanine; EC 2.1.1.63 / O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase; U68WG3173Y / Carmustine
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22. Wang E, Lee MD, Dunn KW: Lysosomal accumulation of drugs in drug-sensitive MES-SA but not multidrug-resistant MES-SA/Dx5 uterine sarcoma cells. J Cell Physiol; 2000 Aug;184(2):263-74
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Lysosomal accumulation of drugs in drug-sensitive MES-SA but not multidrug-resistant MES-SA/Dx5 uterine sarcoma cells.
  • Sequestration of drugs in intracellular vesicles has been associated with multidrug-resistance (MDR), but it is not clear why vesicular drug accumulation, which depends upon intracellular pH gradients, should be associated with MDR.
  • Using a human uterine sarcoma cell line (MES-SA) and a doxorubicin (DOX)-resistant variant cell line (Dx-5), which expresses p-glycoprotein (PGP), we have addressed the relationship between multidrug resistance, vesicular acidification, and vesicular drug accumulation.
  • Consistent with a pH-dependent mechanism of vesicular drug accumulation, studies of living cells vitally labeled with multiple probes indicate that DOX and daunorubicin (DNR) predominately accumulate in lysosomes, whose lumenal pH was measured at < 4.5, but are not detected in endosomes, whose pH was measured at 5.9.
  • However, vesicular DOX accumulation is more pronounced in the drug-sensitive MES-SA cells and minimal in Dx5 cells even when cellular levels of DOX are increased by verapamil treatment.
  • We found no differences in the pH of either endosomes or lysosomes between MES-SA and Dx5 cells, suggesting that, in contrast to other MDR cell systems, the drug-resistant Dx5 cells are refractory to pH-dependent vesicular drug accumulation.
  • These studies demonstrate that altered endomembrane pH regulation is not a necessary consequence of cell transformation, and that vesicular sequestration of drugs is not a necessary characteristic of MDR.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Daunorubicin / pharmacology. Doxorubicin / pharmacology. Drug Resistance, Multiple / physiology. Lysosomes / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Female. Humans. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Sarcoma / physiopathology. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / physiopathology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 10867652.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9541
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cellular physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cell. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R29DK51098
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; ZS7284E0ZP / Daunorubicin
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23. Bosincu L, Massarelli G, Cossu Rocca P, Isaac MA, Nogales FF: Rectal endometrial stromal sarcoma arising in endometriosis: report of a case. Dis Colon Rectum; 2001 Jun;44(6):890-2
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  • [Title] Rectal endometrial stromal sarcoma arising in endometriosis: report of a case.
  • PURPOSE: Endometriosis of the rectovaginal septum can harbor different types of secondary tumors that may involve the rectal wall and protrude into its lumen, thus making diagnosis difficult.
  • Extrauterine low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma may rarely arise in endometriosis.
  • Concomitant peritoneal nodules and a metastatic paracolic lymph node were also found.
  • Histopathologically, primary endometriotic foci were found in close relationship with an endometrial stromal sarcoma which invaded the rectal wall.
  • The patient was treated by surgery and subsequent chemotherapy and was alive and well 20 months later.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Endometriosis and its possible malignant changes should be taken into account in the differential endoscopic diagnosis of rectal masses in females.
  • [MeSH-major] Endometrial Neoplasms / etiology. Endometriosis / complications. Sarcoma / etiology


24. Jung SH, Kim HC, Yu CS, Kim JC: Solitary preleukemic granulocytic sarcoma as a cause of small bowel obstruction. Gut Liver; 2007 Jun;1(1):82-6
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  • [Title] Solitary preleukemic granulocytic sarcoma as a cause of small bowel obstruction.
  • Granulocytic sarcoma is an extramedullary tumor composed of immature granulocytic cells.
  • These tumors usually occur simultaneously with or follow after the onset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or other myeloproliferative disorders.
  • We report a case of a 48-year-old man presenting with symptoms of small bowel obstruction.
  • Initially, there was no evidence of blood or bone marrow involvement suggesting acute leukemia or other myeloproliferative disorders.
  • The findings were consistent with the diagnostic findings of solitary granulocytic sarcoma (preleukemic).
  • However, one month later, bone marrow biopsy revealed 57% myeloblasts.
  • Sequentially, the patient developed FAB M2 acute myeloid leukemia.
  • Induction chemotherapy including cytarabine and idarubicine was done which led to complete remission.
  • Allograft bone marrow transplantation was performed later, and there is no evidence of recurrence till present.

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  • (PMID = 20485664.001).
  • [ISSN] 2005-1212
  • [Journal-full-title] Gut and liver
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gut Liver
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2871656
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Acute myeloid leukemia / Granulocytic sarcoma / Small bowel obstruction
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25. Corona G, Vaccher E, Sandron S, Sartor I, Tirelli U, Innocenti F, Toffoli G: Lopinavir-ritonavir dramatically affects the pharmacokinetics of irinotecan in HIV patients with Kaposi's sarcoma. Clin Pharmacol Ther; 2008 Apr;83(4):601-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Lopinavir-ritonavir dramatically affects the pharmacokinetics of irinotecan in HIV patients with Kaposi's sarcoma.
  • The coadministration of protease inhibitors with anticancer drugs in the management of human immunodeficiency virus-related malignancies can cause potential drug-drug interactions.
  • The effect of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/RTV) on the pharmacokinetics of irinotecan (CPT11) has been investigated in seven patients with Kaposi's sarcoma.
  • The LPV/RTV treatment also inhibited the formation of SN38 glucuronide (SN38G), as shown by the 36% decrease in the SN38G/SN38 AUCs ratio (5.9+/-1.6 vs 9.2+/-2.6, P=0.002) consistent with UGT1A1 inhibition by LPV/RTV.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-HIV Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacokinetics. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. HIV Infections / drug therapy. Pyrimidinones / pharmacology. Ritonavir / pharmacology. Sarcoma, Kaposi / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenine / analogs & derivatives. Adenine / pharmacology. Adult. Aged. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Area Under Curve. Drug Therapy, Combination. European Continental Ancestry Group. Humans. Lamivudine / pharmacology. Lopinavir. Male. Middle Aged. Organophosphonates / pharmacology. Tenofovir


26. Lambert PJ, Shahrier AZ, Whitman AG, Dyson OF, Reber AJ, McCubrey JA, Akula SM: Targeting the PI3K and MAPK pathways to treat Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated herpes virus infection and pathogenesis. Expert Opin Ther Targets; 2007 May;11(5):589-99
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeting the PI3K and MAPK pathways to treat Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated herpes virus infection and pathogenesis.
  • To initiate, inhibit and control these processes, the cell has developed a complex network of signaling cascades.
  • Recently, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) has been added to the list.
  • Manipulation of the PI3K and MAPK pathways also plays a role in malignant transformation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Drug Delivery Systems. Herpesviridae Infections / drug therapy. Herpesvirus 8, Human / pathogenicity. MAP Kinase Signaling System / drug effects. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Sarcoma, Kaposi / prevention & control. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Tumor Virus Infections / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Adolescent. Adult. Child. Gene Expression Regulation, Viral. Humans. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Virus Activation. Virus Latency. raf Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. raf Kinases / physiology

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  • (PMID = 17465719.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-7631
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on therapeutic targets
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin. Ther. Targets
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; EC 2.7.1.- / Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; EC 2.7.11.1 / raf Kinases
  • [Number-of-references] 139
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27. Heyns CF, Groeneveld AE, Sigarroa NB: Urologic complications of HIV and AIDS. Nat Clin Pract Urol; 2009 Jan;6(1):32-43
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In recent years the nature of HIV infection has been dramatically transformed from an invariably fatal disease to a chronic disorder with a relatively benign course.
  • Disease progression from HIV to AIDS and HIV-related mortality can be reduced effectively by several years of treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).
  • For patients who do not have access to HAART, HIV infection continues to be a lethal disorder characterized by opportunistic infection with uncommon organisms (e.g. mycobacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses), as well as lethal malignancies such as Kaposi sarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the penis or cervix.
  • In patients receiving HAART, urologic complications are likely to be caused by adverse effects of antiretroviral medication (e.g. indinavir urolithiasis) or disorders associated with aging, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] HIV Infections / complications. Urologic Diseases / etiology

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  • [ErratumIn] Nat Clin Pract Urol. 2010 Apr;7(4):178
  • (PMID = 19132004.001).
  • [ISSN] 1743-4289
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature clinical practice. Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Clin Pract Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 134
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28. Peacock KH, Lesser GJ: Current therapeutic approaches in patients with brain metastases. Curr Treat Options Oncol; 2006 Nov;7(6):479-89
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  • [Title] Current therapeutic approaches in patients with brain metastases.
  • The development of brain metastases is often viewed as the end stage of a disease course and engenders skepticism about the efficacy of treatment.
  • The majority of patients with controlled intracranial metastases will expire from systemic disease rather than from recurrence of these metastases.
  • Single brain metastases should be treated with surgical resection or stereotactic radiosurgery, though it is unclear at this time if one modality is more effective than the other.
  • Surgical resection is preferred when a pathologic diagnosis is needed, for tumors larger than 3.5 cm, or when immediate tumor mass decompression is required.
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) should be applied for single tumors less than 3.5 cm in surgically inaccessible areas and for patients who are not surgical candidates.
  • Small tumors (ie, < 3.5 cm) that cause minimal edema and are surgically accessible may be treated with either surgery or SRS.
  • There is controversy over whether whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) can be omitted following surgical resection or SRS.
  • Omission of WBRT increases intracranial tumor recurrence; however, this has not been correlated with decreased survival.
  • Clinicians who choose to omit upfront WBRT are obligated to monitor the patient closely for intracranial recurrence, at which time further salvage therapy in the form of surgery, SRS, or WBRT may be considered.
  • Histology is of particular importance when considering WBRT for patients with radioresistant tumors such as melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, or sarcoma.
  • Chemotherapy has been demonstrated to improve response rates when used as an adjunct to radiation therapy.
  • Phase III trials to assess the benefit of motexafin in patients with metastatic lung cancer and efaproxiral in patients with metastatic breast cancer are ongoing.
  • Targeted therapies offer promise in achieving therapeutic efficacy while minimizing side effects.
  • Surgical adjuncts such as BCNU (carmustine) wafers and the GliaSite Radiation System (Cytyc Corporation, Marlborough, MA) may be useful in the future in achieving optimal local tumor control.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis. Radiosurgery. Salvage Therapy. Stereotaxic Techniques

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  • (PMID = 17032560.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-2729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current treatment options in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Treat Options Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 58
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29. Saenz NC, Hass DJ, Meyers P, Wollner N, Gollamudi S, Bains M, LaQuaglia MP: Pediatric chest wall Ewing's sarcoma. J Pediatr Surg; 2000 Apr;35(4):550-5
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  • [Title] Pediatric chest wall Ewing's sarcoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Chest wall tumors of primitive neuroectodermal origin (PNET, Ewing's sarcoma [ES]) are rare and have a poor prognosis.
  • Multimodality therapy has improved survival results, and long-term survival is possible.
  • Whether adjuvant radiation therapy is uniformly beneficial remains unclear.
  • Seven patients presented with a mass, 12 with pain, 1 with respiratory distress, and 1 with a neuropathy.
  • Initial therapy consisted of biopsy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chest wall resection in 12 patients.
  • Of the remaining 8 patients, 6 underwent biopsy, followed by chest wall resection and adjuvant chemotherapy, 1 underwent biopsy, chemotherapy, and resection of a lung nodule, and 1 underwent biopsy, chemotherapy, and a laminectomy and decompression procedure.
  • All 20 patients were included in institutional-based trials using multiagent chemotherapy.
  • Fifteen patients received radiation therapy with a median dose of 3,000 cGy.
  • At last follow-up, 11 patients are alive and disease free, with a median survival of 7.5 years (range, 7 months to 19.4 years).
  • Seven of 11 (64%) survivors had neoadjuvant therapy followed by chest wall resection.
  • Seven of 11 (64%) survivors had radiation therapy.
  • Twelve patients had treatment-related complications, 3 of which were related to surgical resection.
  • There were no survivors among patients with recurrent disease.
  • Three of the patients who died of disease had both local and distant recurrences, 4 patients had distant recurrence only, and one patient had local recurrence only.
  • Only 4 of 9 (44%) patients who died were treated initially with chemotherapy followed by chest wall resection.
  • All but 1 of those that died (89%) received initial radiation therapy.
  • This may be facilitated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Long-term survival without radiation therapy is possible, and consideration of radiation therapy should be made on a case-by-case basis.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma, Ewing / mortality. Sarcoma, Ewing / therapy. Thoracic Neoplasms / mortality. Thoracic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Prognosis. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 10770379.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3468
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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30. Bozzi F, Tamborini E, Negri T, Pastore E, Ferrari A, Luksch R, Casanova M, Pierotti MA, Bellani FF, Pilotti S: Evidence for activation of KIT, PDGFRalpha, and PDGFRbeta receptors in the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors. Cancer; 2007 Apr 15;109(8):1638-45
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  • [Title] Evidence for activation of KIT, PDGFRalpha, and PDGFRbeta receptors in the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors.
  • BACKGROUND: The Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) is one of the most common malignant neoplasms of children and adolescents, characterized by nonrandom translocations involving the Ewing sarcoma (EWS) gene.
  • Over the years the adoption of intensive multimodality treatment approaches has led to a gradual improvement in the survival of patients with ESFT.
  • The prognosis is still unsatisfactory for high-risk patients, however, and novel therapeutic approaches are desirable.
  • The aim of the study was to investigate the expression/activation of KIT, PDGFRalpha, and PDGFRbeta receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) as potential therapeutic targets in ESFT.
  • In particular, when compared with a protein pool obtained from normal adult tissues, PDGFRbeta showed a greater protein expression and/or a stronger phosphorylation signal.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with an autocrine/paracrine loop activation of the KIT, PDGFRalpha, and PDGFRbeta receptors and suggest a rationale for the use of RTK inhibitors, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / metabolism. Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha / metabolism. Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta / metabolism. Sarcoma, Ewing / metabolism. Stem Cell Factor / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17342771.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Stem Cell Factor; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta
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31. Oberlin O, Fawaz O, Rey A, Niaudet P, Ridola V, Orbach D, Bergeron C, Defachelles AS, Gentet JC, Schmitt C, Rubie H, Munzer M, Plantaz D, Deville A, Minard V, Corradini N, Leverger G, de Vathaire F: Long-term evaluation of Ifosfamide-related nephrotoxicity in children. J Clin Oncol; 2009 Nov 10;27(32):5350-5
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  • PURPOSE: Ifosfamide is widely used in pediatric oncology but its nephrotoxicity may become a significant issue in survivors.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Of the 183 patients prospectively investigated for renal function, 77 treated for rhabdomyosarcoma, 39 for other soft tissue sarcoma, 39 for Ewing's sarcoma, and 28 for osteosarcoma were investigated at least 5 years after treatment.
  • Ifosfamide dose and interval from therapy to investigations were predictors of tubulopathy in univariate and multivariate analysis.
  • In a multivariate analysis, an older age at diagnosis and the length of interval since treatment had independent impacts on the risk of abnormal GFR.
  • CONCLUSION: Renal toxicity is moderate with a moderate dose of ifosfamide.
  • However, since it can be permanent and can get worse with time, repeated long-term evaluations are important, and this risk should be balanced against efficacy.
  • [MeSH-major] Ifosfamide / adverse effects. Kidney / drug effects. Kidney Diseases / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Child. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Kidney Function Tests. Multivariate Analysis. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Prospective Studies. Regression Analysis. Rhabdomyosarcoma / drug therapy. Risk Factors. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / drug therapy. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 19826134.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
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32. Lim TW, Lee MH, Park JG, Cho BK: Classic Kaposi sarcoma presenting as rapidly growing nodules. Cutis; 2001 Jul;68(1):50-2
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  • [Title] Classic Kaposi sarcoma presenting as rapidly growing nodules.
  • Classic Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a sporadic disease that usually affects persons older than 50 years, with a distinct male predominance.
  • Although classic KS has a protracted, indolent course, there appears to be a rare disseminated fulminant type.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma, Kaposi / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Biopsy. Fatal Outcome. Hand. Humans. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Male. Middle Aged. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary / complications. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary / drug therapy. Vinblastine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11480148.001).
  • [ISSN] 0011-4162
  • [Journal-full-title] Cutis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cutis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine
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33. Fernández Pérez I, Vázquez Tuñas L, Lázaro Quintela M, Lamas Domínguez P, Gentil González M, Carrasco Alvarez J, López Jato C, Castellanos Díez J: Disseminated classic Kaposi's sarcoma. Clin Transl Oncol; 2007 Apr;9(4):255-7
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  • [Title] Disseminated classic Kaposi's sarcoma.
  • Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is characterised by proliferation of vascular endothelial and lymphoreticular cells, frequently with a multicentric expression developed from a single node and evolving to multiple cutaneous lumps or plaque-like appearance.
  • Four types of KS with similar histological patterns have been described in terms of their clinical and epidemiological features: classic KS, endemic (African) KS, iatrogenic KS and epidemic (AIDS-related) KS.
  • The differences in clinical features are quite relevant: classic KS is usually limited to the lower extremities; whereas immunodeficiency-related diseases frequently involve several organs.
  • A case of a 67-year-old woman with metastatic KS and unproven immunodeficiency is presented.
  • [MeSH-major] Herpesvirus 8, Human. Sarcoma, Kaposi. Skin Neoplasms
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic. Biopsy. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Leg / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / radiography. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / radiography. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Radiography, Abdominal. Radiography, Thoracic. Remission Induction. Skin / pathology. Splenic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Splenic Neoplasms / radiography. Splenic Neoplasms / secondary. Time Factors. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 17462979.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-048X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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34. Kong PK, Theodorou S, Beran E, Singh H, Dimitri W: Primary cardiac undifferentiated sarcoma of the right atrium presenting with cardiac tamponade. Cardiovasc Pathol; 2009 Mar-Apr;18(2):110-3
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  • [Title] Primary cardiac undifferentiated sarcoma of the right atrium presenting with cardiac tamponade.
  • This report illustrates the serial imaging of a primary cardiac undifferentiated sarcoma of the right atrium using echocardiography, chest X-ray, and computed tomography.
  • Symptoms were controlled with pericardiocentesis, pericardial window, and radiotherapy but recurred 8 months later with pleural effusion and tumor spread to the great arteries.
  • Primary cardiac sarcoma (PSC) is a rare and aggressive malignancy that is usually diagnosed late due to its nonspecific symptoms.
  • Cytology and cardiac biopsy may be negative, and suspicion for the tumor is warranted in recurrent pericardial effusion.
  • Analogous to parietal pleural biopsy in lung tumors with pleural effusion, parietal pericardial biopsy may be positive in PSC of the right atrium with pericardial effusion.
  • There is no proven effective treatment for PSC, and treatments include surgical resection, cardiac transplant, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiac Tamponade / diagnosis. Heart Atria / pathology. Heart Neoplasms / diagnosis. Sarcoma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Diagnosis, Differential. Dyspnea / etiology. Dyspnea / pathology. Dyspnea / physiopathology. Echocardiography. Female. Humans. Ifosfamide / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Pericardial Effusion / complications. Pericardial Effusion / diagnosis. Pericardial Effusion / physiopathology. Pericardiocentesis. Radiography, Thoracic. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 18402817.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1336
  • [Journal-full-title] Cardiovascular pathology : the official journal of the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cardiovasc. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
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35. Grande AM, Rinaldi M, Sinelli S, D'Armini AM, Viganŏ M: Heart transplantation in chemotherapeutic dilated cardiomyopathy. Transplant Proc; 2003 Jun;35(4):1516-8
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  • Nine patients (four men) experienced postchemotherapy DCM: age at time of tumour diagnosis ranged from 1-45 years (mean 13.5 +/- 19 years); interval time between tumour and HT was 3-23 years (mean 10.8 +/- 6.6) and age at HT ranged from 10-65 years (30.8 +/- 20.1).
  • Interval between end of chemotherapy and beginning of cardiac symptoms was 5.71 +/- 4.6 years.
  • Mean age at DCM diagnosis was 19.2 +/- 19.7 (range 1-50 years).
  • Interval between start of chemotherapy and DCM ranged from 1 month to 10 years (mean 3.15 +/- 3.6 years).
  • Tumours were Ewing sarcoma (7-year-old boy), paratesticular rabdomyosarcoma (1-year-old boy), Wilms tumor with pulmonary metastasis (3-year-old girl), bilateral breast carcinoma (45-year-old woman), uterine leiomyosarcoma (44-year-old woman), acute myelocytic leukemia (1.5-year-old boy and 17-year-old girl), and chronic myelocytic leukemia (5-year-old boy).
  • At follow-up (mean, 80.4 +/- 69.3 months) two patients died: a 32-year-old woman (acute myelocytic leukemia) 1 year after HT for sepsis and a 68-year-old woman who had breast adenocarcinoma recurrence 81 months after HT.
  • Patients with end-stage postchemotherapy DCM without evidence of tumour recurrence can safely undergo HT.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / classification. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Treatment Outcome


36. Esses KM, Hagmaier RM, Blanchard SA, Lazarchick JJ, Riker AI: Carcinosarcoma of the breast: two case reports and review of the literature. Cases J; 2009;2(1):15
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  • Carcinosarcoma of the breast, often referred to as metaplastic carcinoma of the breast, is a rare malignancy with two distinct cell lines described as a breast carcinoma of ductal type with a sarcoma-like component.
  • Clinically, carcinosarcoma of the breast is an aggressive breast cancer.
  • The prognosis for carcinosarcoma of the breast is less favorable compared to more common types of breast cancer such as infiltrating ductal or lobular carcinoma.
  • Currently, the evaluation of breast carcinoma includes hormone receptor analysis of the tumor tissue, with those positive for estrogen or progesterone responding better to both hormonal and chemotherapy.Trastuzumab (Herceptin(R)) is available as an adjunct treatment for tumors which over-express the HER2/neu gene.
  • As a result of this "triple negative" phenotype, such tumors tend to be more aggressive and are unlikely to respond to targeted therapy with Herceptin.
  • The epidermal growth factor receptor HER-1/EGFR protein is expressed in the majority of metaplastic carcinomas and thus may serve as a potential therapeutic target for EGFR inhibitors such as gefitinib and cetuximab.
  • The two cases we describe exemplify the aggressive nature of carcinosarcoma of the breast and support the findings that this tumor type does not express the common receptors found in other breast carcinomas.
  • These case reports also emphasize the need for investigating the role for blockade of the HER-1/EGFR receptor with targeted therapies when found to be over-expressed in the primary tumor.


37. Rödl R, Gosheger G, Leidinger B, Lindner N, Winkelmann W, Ozaki T: Correction of leg-length discrepancy after hip transposition. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2003 Nov;(416):271-7
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  • Four patients were treated with limb lengthening to correct a leg-length discrepancy that developed after a hip transposition after pelvic resection for sacroma of the pelvis.
  • All patients received chemotherapy; radiotherapy also was administered to the three patients with Ewing's sacroma.
  • Femur lengthening was started at an average of 5.7 years (range, 4.4-6.8 years) after tumor surgery.
  • According to the classification of Paley, two problems and two minor complications were treated by additional interventions.
  • At the final followup, the average functional score was 22 (73%) according to the system of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society.
  • The problems of the lengthening procedure are similar to the general complication rate of bone lengthening.
  • Because the 5-year survival after resection of a pelvic sarcoma is only 20% to 30%, leg lengthening after hip transposition should be offered only to long-term survivors with at least 5 years event-free survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Femur / surgery. Leg Length Inequality / etiology. Leg Length Inequality / surgery. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Sarcoma, Ewing / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Female. Humans. Male. Pelvis. Treatment Outcome


38. Ferrari A, Casanova M, Collini P, Meazza C, Luksch R, Massimino M, Cefalo G, Terenziani M, Spreafico F, Catania S, Gandola L, Gronchi A, Mariani L, Fossati-Bellani F: Adult-type soft tissue sarcomas in pediatric-age patients: experience at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan. J Clin Oncol; 2005 Jun 20;23(18):4021-30
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  • [Title] Adult-type soft tissue sarcomas in pediatric-age patients: experience at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan.
  • PURPOSE: Nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors for which optimal treatment remains controversial.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this relatively homogeneous subgroup of adult-type histotypes, surgery was the mainstay of treatment; radiotherapy was administered to 73 patients, and chemotherapy was administered to 114 patients (70 received chemotherapy as adjuvant therapy).
  • RESULTS: Overall survival at 5 years was 89% in patients who underwent complete resection at diagnosis, 79% in patients who had marginal resection, 52% in initially unresected patients, and 17% in patients with metastases at onset.
  • Outcome was unsatisfactory in patients with large and high-grade tumors, even after gross resection; adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to improve the results in this group.
  • Initially unresected patients who responded well to chemotherapy and subsequently underwent complete resection had an event-free survival rate of approximately 70%.
  • The rate of response to chemotherapy was 58%.
  • CONCLUSION: The identification of prognostic variables should enable risk-adapted therapies to be planned.
  • Patients with initially unresectable disease and patients with resected large and high-grade tumors are at high risk of metastases and treatment failure.
  • Although the limits of this retrospective analysis are self-evident, our data would suggest that intensive chemotherapy (with an ifosfamide-doxorubicin regimen) might have a more significant role in these patients than what is generally assumed.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma / pathology. Sarcoma / therapy. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Chi-Square Distribution. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Italy / epidemiology. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2006 Apr 20;24(12):1958-9; author reply 1959-60 [16622276.001]
  • (PMID = 15767645.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Cheng C, Debefve E, Haouala A, Andrejevic-Blant S, Krueger T, Ballini JP, Peters S, Decosterd L, van den Bergh H, Wagnieres G, Perentes JY, Ris HB: Photodynamic therapy selectively enhances liposomal doxorubicin uptake in sarcoma tumors to rodent lungs. Lasers Surg Med; 2010 Jul;42(5):391-9
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  • [Title] Photodynamic therapy selectively enhances liposomal doxorubicin uptake in sarcoma tumors to rodent lungs.
  • BACKGROUND: In specific conditions, photodynamic therapy (PDT) can enhance the distribution of macromolecules across the endothelial barrier in solid tumors.
  • It was recently postulated that tumor neovessels were more responsive to PDT than the normal vasculature.
  • We hypothesized that Visudyne(R)-mediated PDT could selectively increase liposomal doxorubicin (Liporubicin) uptake in sarcoma tumors to rodent lungs while sparing the normal surrounding tissue.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sarcoma tumors were generated subpleurally in the left lower lung lobe of 66 Fischer rats.
  • Ten days following sarcoma implantation, tumors underwent different pre-treatment schemes: no PDT (controls), low-dose PDT (0.0625 mg/kg Visudyne(R), 10 J/cm(2) and 35 mW/cm(2)) and high-dose PDT (0.125 mg/kg Visudyne(R), 10 J/cm(2) and 35 mW/cm(2)).
  • At the end of each treatment scheme, we assessed the uptake of Liporubicin in tumor and lung tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence microscopy.
  • RESULTS: In all PDT-treated groups, there was a significant enhancement of Liporubicin uptake in tumors compared to controls after 3 and 6 hours of drug circulation.
  • In addition, Liporubicin distribution within the normal lung tissue was not affected by PDT.
  • Thus, PDT pre-treatment significantly enhanced the ratio of tumor-to-lung drug uptake compared to controls.
  • Finally, fluorescence microscopy revealed a well-detectable Liporubicin signaling throughout PDT-treated tumors but not in controls.
  • CONCLUSIONS: PDT is a tumor-specific enhancer of Liporubicin distribution in sarcoma lung tumors which may find a translation in clinics.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / metabolism. Doxorubicin / metabolism. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / metabolism. Photochemotherapy. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Sarcoma / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20583253.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-9101
  • [Journal-full-title] Lasers in surgery and medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lasers Surg Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Liposomes; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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40. Amritanand R, Venkatesh K, Premkumar AJ, Sundararaj GD: Pathological dislocation of the dorsal spine following granulocytic sarcoma in a non-leukaemic patient. Eur Spine J; 2010 Jul;19 Suppl 2:S114-7
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  • [Title] Pathological dislocation of the dorsal spine following granulocytic sarcoma in a non-leukaemic patient.
  • We describe a previously healthy, non-leukaemic young male presenting with neurological deficit and a pathological dislocation of D8 over D9 vertebra.
  • The magnetic resonance imaging showed an enhancing soft tissue tumour.
  • His basic laboratory workup as well as a bone marrow biopsy was normal.
  • Through a single midline posterior approach, he underwent a decompressive laminectomy of D8 and D9 vertebra, anterior column reconstruction with a meshed titanium cage and posterior pedicle screw instrumentation.
  • The histological diagnosis of granulocytic sarcoma was confirmed by appropriate immuno-histochemical studies.
  • He received postoperative radiotherapy following which his wound dehiscesed and the tumour fungated and spread to his left thigh.
  • He declined chemotherapy and unfortunately expired 9 months later.
  • This case is presented to draw attention to the unusual presentation and to stress that granulocytic sarcoma should be kept in mind when making the differential diagnosis in patients with signs of spinal cord compression even in non-leukaemic individuals.
  • [MeSH-major] Dislocations / pathology. Sarcoma, Myeloid / pathology. Spinal Cord Compression / pathology. Spinal Neoplasms / pathology. Thoracic Vertebrae / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Diagnosis, Differential. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Internal Fixators. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology. Neoplasm Metastasis / physiopathology. Neurosurgical Procedures. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19688354.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0932
  • [Journal-full-title] European spine journal : official publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Spine J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2899635
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41. Zhang Q, Cai Y, Niu X, Hao L, Ding Y, Yu F: [Telangiectatic osteosarcoma: report of 10 cases]. Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2000 Dec;38(12):903-5, 50
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  • OBJECTIVE: To raise the level of early diagnosis of telangiectatic osteosarcoma (TOS).
  • The lesions were located at the proximal femur (1 patient), distal femur metaphysis (2), femur shaft (1), proximal tibia metaphysis (2), distal tibia (1) and humerus shaft (3).
  • Preoperative pathologic examination showed two cases of TOS by open biopsy(negative by needle biopsy); the rest were found negative (2 patients), metastasis (1), and sarcoma (5) by needle biopsy.
  • Eight patients received preoperative chemotherapy.
  • All patients accepted postoperative chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: 10 Follow-up for a mean of 28 months (range 6 - 72 months) showed no local recurrences: disease-free in 4 patients and pulmonary metastasis in, 6, of whom 5 died and 1 is still alive with lung metastasis.
  • CONCLUSION: TOS is often misdiagnosed and needs early diagnosis and correct treatment under the cooperation of clinicians, radiologists and pathologists.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / diagnosis. Osteosarcoma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 11832192.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5815
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua wai ke za zhi [Chinese journal of surgery]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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42. Arbiser JL, Weiss SW, Arbiser ZK, Bravo F, Govindajaran B, Caceres-Rios H, Cotsonis G, Recavarren S, Swerlick RA, Cohen C: Differential expression of active mitogen-activated protein kinase in cutaneous endothelial neoplasms: implications for biologic behavior and response to therapy. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2001 Feb;44(2):193-7
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  • [Title] Differential expression of active mitogen-activated protein kinase in cutaneous endothelial neoplasms: implications for biologic behavior and response to therapy.
  • BACKGROUND: Tumors of endothelium range from benign hemangiomas of infancy to highly malignant angiosarcomas of the elderly.
  • Hemangiomas are the most common tumors in infants and may affect up to 10% of all children.
  • Although the clinical outcomes of these diseases are easily distinguished, the biologic basis for these differences is not well understood.
  • Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is an important signal transduction mechanism that may predict response of a tumor to chemotherapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to examine expression of phosphorylated (activated) MAPK in hemangiomas of infancy, pyogenic granulomas, hemangioendotheliomas, and angiosarcomas to determine whether phosphorylated MAPK was expressed in endothelial tumors.
  • In addition, we examined endothelial tumors of infectious origin, Kaposi's sarcoma, and verruga peruana.
  • METHODS: Skin sections from benign and malignant endothelial tumors, including hemangioma of infancy, angiosarcoma, and infectious endothelial lesions (Kaposi's sarcoma, verruga peruana) were stained with an antibody specific for phosphorylated MAPK.
  • RESULTS: We demonstrated strong expression of phosphorylated MAPK in benign endothelial tumors, including capillary hemangioma of infancy and pyogenic granuloma, and greatly decreased expression in angiosarcoma.
  • In addition, infectious endothelial tumors stained strongly with this antibody, similar to benign tumors.
  • CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that the use of antibodies specific for signal transduction pathways is feasible in paraffin-fixed tissue.
  • Thus the activity of a given signal transduction pathway can be ascertained in a biopsy specimen.
  • Immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated MAPK may help the pathologist distinguish benign from malignant endothelial processes and thus guide therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases / analysis. Neoplasms, Vascular Tissue / enzymology. Skin Neoplasms / enzymology
  • [MeSH-minor] Granuloma, Pyogenic / drug therapy. Granuloma, Pyogenic / enzymology. Granuloma, Pyogenic / pathology. Hemangioendothelioma / drug therapy. Hemangioendothelioma / enzymology. Hemangioendothelioma / pathology. Hemangioma / drug therapy. Hemangioma / enzymology. Hemangioma / pathology. Hemangiosarcoma / drug therapy. Hemangiosarcoma / enzymology. Hemangiosarcoma / pathology. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Sarcoma, Kaposi / drug therapy. Sarcoma, Kaposi / enzymology. Sarcoma, Kaposi / pathology. Skin Diseases / drug therapy. Skin Diseases / enzymology. Skin Diseases / pathology. Warts / drug therapy. Warts / enzymology. Warts / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11174372.001).
  • [ISSN] 0190-9622
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / KO8 AR02030; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / P30 AR 42687; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R03AR44947
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
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43. Ferrucci PF, Martinoni A, Cocorocchio E, Civelli M, Cinieri S, Cardinale D, Peccatori FA, Lamantia G, Agazzi A, Corsini C, Tealdo F, Fiorentini C, Cipolla CM, Martinelli G: Evaluation of acute toxicities associated with autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell reinfusion in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2000 Jan;25(2):173-7
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  • [Title] Evaluation of acute toxicities associated with autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell reinfusion in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy.
  • Peripheral blood progenitor cell reinfusion (PBPC) in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) for poor prognosis malignancies, has been described as causing possible acute gastrointestinal (nausea, vomiting), allergic (oedema, bronchospasm, anaphyl- axis), renal (proteinuria, haematuria) and/or cardiovascular (hypotension, arrhythmia, conduction disturbances, transient ischaemic phenomena) toxicities.
  • To establish the clinical relevance of these observations and the possible relationship with different HDC regimens used, we performed a clinical and instrumental evaluation on 33 patients with advanced breast cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, relapsed ovarian cancer, Ewing's sarcoma, extragonadal germinal tumour and small cell lung cancer.
  • They underwent at least one reinfusion each for a total of 51 studied procedures.
  • No patient had a previous history of cardiovascular disease or significant intercurrent illness such as diabetes or liver, renal or neurologic impairment.
  • To evaluate cardiovascular function, we continuously monitored 12-lead ECGs, with arterial pressure (AP) measurements every 5 min from the beginning of the procedure to 15 min after the reinfusion ended.
  • We did not observe any significant differences between basal and subsequent steps in AP, heart rate, PQ and QTc time, P wave and QRS complex duration or P wave and QRS electrical axes.
  • No patient showed any ST-T tract pathological abnormality, but one patient developed a transient ectopic atrial rhythm, without any haemodynamic disfunction and with spontaneous reversion to sinus rhythm.
  • In one patient a tonic-clonic seizure occurred during a vomiting episode, but no patient developed allergic or renal toxicities.
  • We conclude that PBPC reinfusion, if managed according to the procedure we propose in patients without organic impairment, is a safe procedure not associated either with increased risk of acute arrhythmias or ischaemic or significant systemic acute toxicities.
  • Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 173-177.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects. Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Blood Transfusion, Autologous / adverse effects. Cardiovascular Diseases / etiology. Cardiovascular Diseases / physiopathology. Catheterization, Central Venous. Electrocardiography. Female. Gastrointestinal Diseases / etiology. Hemodynamics. Humans. Kidney Diseases / etiology. Leukapheresis. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Factors

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  • [CommentIn] Bone Marrow Transplant. 2002 Mar;29(6):544 [11960281.001]
  • (PMID = 10673676.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
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44. Geryk-Hall M, Hughes DP: Critical signaling pathways in bone sarcoma: candidates for therapeutic interventions. Curr Oncol Rep; 2009 Nov;11(6):446-53
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  • [Title] Critical signaling pathways in bone sarcoma: candidates for therapeutic interventions.
  • Bone sarcomas cause disproportionate morbidity and mortality and desperately need new therapies as there has been little improvement in outcomes in 20 years.
  • Identification of critical signaling pathways, including type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) for Ewing sarcoma and possibly osteosarcoma, and the ERBB and the Wnt signaling pathways for osteosarcoma, have emerged as receptors mediating vital signals for bone sarcoma.
  • Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phosphoinositide 3-kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, and Ras pathway play key roles in at least some tumors, and inhibition of mTOR in particular will likely lead to improved survival, although clinical trials are still underway.
  • By defining vital signaling pathways in bone sarcomas, small molecule inhibitors can be applied rationally, leading to longer survival and reducing morbidity and late effects from intensive chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Receptors, Cell Surface / drug effects. Sarcoma / drug therapy


45. Wafa H, Grimer RJ: Surgical options and outcomes in bone sarcoma. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther; 2006 Feb;6(2):239-48
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  • [Title] Surgical options and outcomes in bone sarcoma.
  • Bone sarcomas are challenging to treat.
  • The primary goal of treatment is local control of the disease while, if possible, achieving salvage of the limb and its function.
  • There is no ideal method of reconstruction in limb-salvage surgery but the choice of the method of reconstruction should be individualized based upon many factors including the patient's age, the extent and location of the tumor, the wishes of the patient, and the availability of surgical facilities and expertise, as well as the cost of the procedure.
  • The surgical management of bone sarcomas is a real challenge to the orthopedic surgeon, owing to the diversity of sites in which tumors arise, combined with the extension of the tumor into adjacent soft tissues and their proximity, in many cases, to major neurovascular structures.
  • There have been dramatic improvements in survival for patients with osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma in the past 30 years owing to increasing effectiveness of chemotherapy.
  • This, along with developments in imaging techniques (magnetic resonance imaging in particular) has led to earlier diagnosis and more accurate preoperative staging.
  • Whilst traditional treatment for bone tumors used to be amputation, advances in surgical techniques have made limb-salvage procedures a valid alternative method of treatment to amputation in 80-85% of patients with primary bone sarcomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Limb Salvage. Osteosarcoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Amputation. Decision Making. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Prosthesis Implantation. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16445376.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8328
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of anticancer therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 73
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46. Son YI, Dallal RM, Lotze MT: Combined treatment with interleukin-18 and low-dose interleukin-2 induced regression of a murine sarcoma and memory response. J Immunother; 2003 May-Jun;26(3):234-40
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  • [Title] Combined treatment with interleukin-18 and low-dose interleukin-2 induced regression of a murine sarcoma and memory response.
  • Among cytokines applied for immunotherapy of cancer, one of the most successful approaches to date involves systemic delivery of high-dose interleukin (IL)-2.
  • Given this limitation, many attempts to decrease the dosage of IL-2 while maintaining its antitumor therapeutic effects are being made.
  • Furthermore, intratumoral injections of these two cytokines completely eradicated day-12 established subcutaneous tumor and induced CD4+-dependent memory in a MCA205 murine tumor model.
  • Fas-L pathway and interferon-gamma production were critical in tumor eradication.
  • These results indicate that combined administration of IL-18 and low-dose IL-2 could be a new model for cancer immunotherapy, which probably engages the activation of natural killer cells through interferon-gamma- and Fas-L-dependent pathways.
  • [MeSH-major] Immunologic Memory / drug effects. Interleukin-18 / administration & dosage. Interleukin-2 / administration & dosage. Sarcoma, Experimental / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cytotoxicity, Immunologic. Drug Therapy, Combination. Fas Ligand Protein. Female. Interferon-gamma / physiology. Killer Cells, Natural / immunology. Membrane Glycoproteins / physiology. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL

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  • (PMID = 12806277.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-9557
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of immunotherapy (Hagerstown, Md. : 1997)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Immunother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 68067
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fas Ligand Protein; 0 / Fasl protein, mouse; 0 / Interleukin-18; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma
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47. Kukreja M, Kamal M, Iyer VK, Mannan AA, Agarwal S: Anaplastic variant of clear cell sarcoma of the kidney: a rare case report. Gulf J Oncolog; 2010 Jul;(8):55-8
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  • [Title] Anaplastic variant of clear cell sarcoma of the kidney: a rare case report.
  • Clear cell sarcoma (CCSK) of the kidney is an uncommon but distinctive pediatric renal tumor with a characteristic histological pattern and marked propensity for bone metastasis.
  • The rare anaplastic variant constitutes about 3% of cases of CCSK and carries an unfavorable prognosis, with increased tumor recurrence and resistant to chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Sarcoma, Clear Cell / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20601342.001).
  • [ISSN] 2078-2101
  • [Journal-full-title] The Gulf journal of oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gulf J Oncolog
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Kuwait
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48. Vaporciyan A, Reardon MJ: Right heart sarcomas. Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J; 2010 Jul-Sep;6(3):44-8
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  • [Title] Right heart sarcomas.
  • Primary cardiac tumors are unusual, and primary cardiac sarcomas constitute a rare subset of these.
  • In cardiac sarcoma, unlike many malignancies, the histologic cell type does appear to affect the treatment options or prognosis in a significant way.
  • The presenting symptoms, treatment options and, indeed, prognosis are largely controlled by the tumor's anatomic location.
  • We have proposed a classification system based on anatomic location that divides cardiac sarcoma into left heart, right heart and pulmonary artery sarcomas.
  • In our experience, right heart sarcoma tends to be bulky, grow in a more exophitic manner, be more infiltrative, and metastasize earlier than left heart or pulmonary artery sarcoma.
  • Right heart sarcoma also presents less often in congestive heart failure or with compromised hemodynamic status than left heart and pulmonary artery sarcoma, which are usually highly symptomatic at presentation.
  • The prognosis for right heart sarcoma without surgery is dismal.
  • Complete surgical resection remains the goal of therapy and the only treatment modality shown to increase survival.
  • Complete surgical resection is complicated both by the bulky infiltrative nature of right heart sarcoma and the high incidence of metastatic disease at presentation.
  • The current approach of our cardiac sarcoma group to right heart sarcoma has been to begin neoadjuvant chemotherapy once a definitive tissue diagnosis of sarcoma is achieved.
  • After 4 to 6 rounds of chemotherapy, the patient is considered for surgical resection.
  • This standardized treatment has been approved in our IRB protocol: a clinical trial to assess the safety and Efficacy of a novel radical tumor reSection Procedure used in conjunction with nEoadjuvant chemotheRapy to treat malignant primary right heart cardiac tumOrs - the ESPERO trial.
  • This protocol is designed to compare our existing 24 index cases of surgical resection of right heart sarcoma using a nonstandardized treatment plan, with routine neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and a standardized treatment plan to see if the rate of microscopically complete resection can be improved from its current level of 33% and if this will improve patient survival.
  • In this reveiw, we will discuss the experience with right heart sarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms. Sarcoma
  • [MeSH-minor] Cardiac Surgical Procedures. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Diagnostic Imaging. Humans. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Predictive Value of Tests. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20834211.001).
  • [ISSN] 1947-6094
  • [Journal-full-title] Methodist DeBakey cardiovascular journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Portraits
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Shapeero LG, Vanel D, Verstraete KL, Bloem JL: Fast magnetic resonance imaging with contrast for soft tissue sarcoma viability. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2002 Apr;(397):212-27
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  • [Title] Fast magnetic resonance imaging with contrast for soft tissue sarcoma viability.
  • Because dynamic (fast) contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with its temporal resolution allows evaluation of contrast kinetics of soft tissue sarcomas, its efficacy for defining viable tumor in these neoplasms was studied for three applications: biopsy localization, chemotherapeutic response, and differentiation between recurrence and inflammation after treatment.
  • After conventional T1-weighted and T2-weighted magnetic resonance sequences to localize the lesion, patients had dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with fast and ultrafast sequences and postprocessing techniques (subtraction, time-intensity curves, and parametric color-encoding).
  • In 10 of 40 patients, dynamic imaging more precisely defined the most malignant foci of tumor for biopsy than conventional magnetic resonance imaging.
  • After chemotherapy, dynamic imaging distinguished 11 good responders from 21 poor responders.
  • In followup of 196 patients, dynamic imaging detected 42 early enhancing recurrences and excluded recurrent tumor in six late enhancing pseudotumors.
  • Dynamic imaging can differentiate viable tumor from nonviable tumor and inflammation by showing two temporally different phases of contrast enhancement: an early phase correlative with viable tumor at histologic examination, and a late phase when all tissues enhance simultaneously and may be indistinguishable.
  • By showing tumor viability, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can help define biopsy sites, chemotherapeutic response, and presence or absence of recurrences and therefore affect the initial evaluation, treatment, and followup of patients with soft tissue sarcomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Image Enhancement. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Sarcoma / diagnosis. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Humans. Image Processing, Computer-Assisted. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 11953613.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. Kanmogne GD: Noninfectious pulmonary complications of HIV/AIDS. Curr Opin Pulm Med; 2005 May;11(3):208-12
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  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews recent findings on noninfectious pulmonary complications of HIV/AIDS, with a focus on HIV/AIDS-related lung malignancies and pulmonary hypertension, and discusses their incidence in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era.
  • This is especially the case for HIV-related lung cancer and other non-AIDS-defining malignancies, which are now being diagnosed with increased frequency in HIV-infected patients.
  • The incidence of Kaposi sarcoma and AIDS-related lymphoma has decreased in the HAART era, but compared with the general population, the risk of these malignancies and pulmonary hypertension is still very high in HIV-infected patients.
  • Concurrent use of HAART and chemotherapy improves prognosis and survival of patients with AIDS-related lymphoma.
  • For patients with HIV-related pulmonary hypertension, some studies show no beneficial effect of HAART whereas other reports show that HAART improves patient survival and response to antihypertensive treatment.
  • SUMMARY: The beneficial effect of HAART and improved immune response on the treatment of Kaposi sarcoma and AIDS-related lymphoma suggests that HIV or viral-induced immunosuppression plays an important role in the development of these malignancies.
  • Evidence from current studies suggests that HAART does not protect against HIV-related lung cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / epidemiology. Hypertension, Pulmonary / epidemiology. Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / epidemiology. Sarcoma, Kaposi / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Comorbidity. Female. HIV Infections / diagnosis. HIV Infections / drug therapy. HIV Infections / epidemiology. Humans. Incidence. Male. Prognosis. Severity of Illness Index. Survival Analysis


51. Langer T, Stöhr W, Bielack S, Paulussen M, Treuner J, Beck JD, German Late Effects Working Group in the German Society of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology: Late effects surveillance system for sarcoma patients. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2004 Apr;42(4):373-9
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  • [Title] Late effects surveillance system for sarcoma patients.
  • BACKGROUND: In 1998, a prospective multicenter pilot study of the 'Late Effects Surveillance System' (LESS) was started to investigate late effects of patients with Ewing, osteo- or soft-tissue sarcoma.
  • PROCEDURE: Two hundred thirty patients were included in this pilot study.
  • The patients were treated between 1/1/1998 and 6/30/1999 according to the sarcoma protocols COSS-96, CWS-96, and EICESS-92, the median cumulative doses of the focussed drugs were for cisplatin: 360 mg/m(2), for doxorubicin: 270 mg/m(2), and for ifosfamide: 24 g/m(2).
  • We report on toxicities in the first year after cessation of therapy-the beginning of the patient follow-up-and the feasibility of LESS.
  • Altogether three patients required cardiac drug therapy.
  • Nephrotoxicity: 2 of 214 (1%) patients treated with ifosfamide suffered from a tubulopathy, which required supplementation therapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Some relevant impairments are noted in the first year after antineoplastic therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / toxicity. Population Surveillance. Sarcoma / complications. Sarcoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / toxicity. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / toxicity. Feasibility Studies. Hearing Disorders / chemically induced. Humans. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Ifosfamide / toxicity. Infant. Kidney Diseases / chemically induced. Magnesium / metabolism. Phosphates / metabolism. Pilot Projects. Ventricular Dysfunction, Left / chemically induced

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 14966836.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5009
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Phosphates; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
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52. Deng W, Sun HX, Chen FY, Yao ML: Immunomodulatory activity of 3beta,6beta-dihydroxyolean-12-en-27-oic acid in tumor-bearing mice. Chem Biodivers; 2009 Aug;6(8):1243-53
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  • [Title] Immunomodulatory activity of 3beta,6beta-dihydroxyolean-12-en-27-oic acid in tumor-bearing mice.
  • 3beta,6beta-dihydroxyolean-12-en-27-oic acid (1) is a pentacyclic triterpenoid isolated from the rhizomes of Astilbe chinensis.
  • To evaluate the in vivo antitumor potential and to elucidate its immunological mechanisms, effect of 1 on the growth of mouse-transplantable tumors, and the immune response in naive and tumor-bearing mice were investigated.
  • The mice inoculated with mouse tumor cell lines were orally treated with 1 at the doses of 40, 60, and 80 mg/kg for 10 days.
  • The effects of 1 on the growth of mouse-transplantable S180 sarcoma and H22 hepatoma, splenocyte proliferation, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity, natural killer (NK) cell activity, and production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) from splenocytes in S180-bearing mice were measured.
  • Furthermore, the effect of 1 on 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions and the sheep red blood cell (SRBC)-induced antibody response in naive mice were also studied.
  • Compound 1 could not only significantly inhibit the growth of mouse transplantable S180 sarcoma and H22 hepatoma, increase splenocytes proliferation, CTL and NK cell activity, and the level of IL-2 secreted by splenocytes in tumor-bearing mice, but also remarkably promote the DTH reaction and enhance anti-SRBC antibody titers in naive mice.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Oleanolic Acid / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Female. Hypersensitivity, Delayed / drug therapy. Interleukin-2 / secretion. Male. Mice. Sarcoma 180 / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19697343.001).
  • [ISSN] 1612-1880
  • [Journal-full-title] Chemistry & biodiversity
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chem. Biodivers.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 3beta,6beta-dihydroxyolean-12-en-27-oic acid; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 0 / Interleukin-2; 6SMK8R7TGJ / Oleanolic Acid
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53. de Visser M, Janssen PJ, Srinivasan A, Reubi JC, Waser B, Erion JL, Schmidt MA, Krenning EP, de Jong M: Stabilised 111In-labelled DTPA- and DOTA-conjugated neurotensin analogues for imaging and therapy of exocrine pancreatic cancer. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging; 2003 Aug;30(8):1134-9
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  • [Title] Stabilised 111In-labelled DTPA- and DOTA-conjugated neurotensin analogues for imaging and therapy of exocrine pancreatic cancer.
  • Neurotensin (NT) receptors are overexpressed in exocrine pancreatic cancer and Ewing's sarcoma.
  • The potential utility of native NT in cancer diagnosis and therapy is, however, limited by its rapid degradation in vivo.
  • All five NT analogues bound with high affinity to NT receptors on human exocrine pancreatic tumour sections.
  • The most promising analogue, peptide 2530 [DTPA-(Pip)Gly-Pro-(PipAm)Gly-Arg-Pro-Tyr-tBuGly-Leu-OH] was further tested in vivo in a biodistribution study using HT29 tumour-bearing nude mice.
  • The results of this study showed low percentages of injected dose per gram tissue of this (111)In-labelled 2530 analogue in receptor-negative organs like blood, spleen, pancreas, liver, muscle and femur.
  • Good uptake was found in the receptor-positive HT29 tumour and high uptake was present in the kidneys.
  • Co-injection of excess unlabelled NT significantly reduced tumour uptake, showing that tumour uptake is a receptor-mediated process.
  • With their enhanced stability, maintained high receptor affinity and rapid receptor-mediated internalisation, the (111)In-labelled DTPA- and DOTA-conjugated NT analogues are excellent candidates for imaging and therapy of exocrine pancreatic cancer, peptide 2530 being the most promising analogue.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Drug Stability. Isotope Labeling / methods. Metabolic Clearance Rate. Mice. Mice, Nude. Organ Specificity. Pancreas / diagnostic imaging. Pancreas / metabolism. Pancreas / radiation effects. Radionuclide Imaging. Radiopharmaceuticals / chemical synthesis. Radiopharmaceuticals / pharmacokinetics. Radiopharmaceuticals / therapeutic use. Tissue Distribution. Whole-Body Counting

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  • (PMID = 12768332.001).
  • [ISSN] 1619-7070
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Nucl. Med. Mol. Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Heterocyclic Compounds, 1-Ring; 0 / Indium Radioisotopes; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0 / Receptors, Neurotensin; 1HTE449DGZ / 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane- 1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid; 39379-15-2 / Neurotensin; 7A314HQM0I / Pentetic Acid
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54. Yoshida C, Takeuchi M: Histiocytic sarcoma: identification of its histiocytic origin using immunohistochemistry. Intern Med; 2008;47(3):165-9
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  • [Title] Histiocytic sarcoma: identification of its histiocytic origin using immunohistochemistry.
  • We describe a 56-year-old woman with histiocytic sarcoma involving the bone marrow.
  • Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were positive for CD68, lysozyme, CD4 and CD163, but negative for B- and T-cell markers, S100 protein and epithelial markers.
  • The patient received multi-agent chemotherapy and is living at 22 months after diagnosis without recurrence.
  • Histiocytic sarcoma is an exceedingly rare hematopoietic neoplasm and the prognosis is poor due to its rapid progression, widespread disease and poor response to therapy.
  • It is important to recognize this rare neoplasm and to confirm the diagnosis using specific immunohistochemical markers.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Neoplasms / diagnosis. Histiocytic Sarcoma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 18239326.001).
  • [ISSN] 1349-7235
  • [Journal-full-title] Internal medicine (Tokyo, Japan)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Intern. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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55. Chastagner P: [Malignant extraconal tumors of the orbit in childhood]. Neurochirurgie; 2010 Apr-Jun;56(2-3):281-6
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  • [Title] [Malignant extraconal tumors of the orbit in childhood].
  • [Transliterated title] Les tumeurs malignes extraconiques de l'orbite chez l'enfant.
  • Malignant extraconal orbital tumors are very rare during childhood and must be referred as soon as possible to a highly specialized center to be managed by a multidisciplinary team.
  • Both diagnosis and treatment must be undertaken as soon as possible.
  • The course of these malignant tumors can be acute and can jeopardize the function of the eye or be life-threatening, especially in the event of metastatic locations.
  • Sometimes diagnosis should be clear with the association of an orbital tumor and deterioration of the general health status favoring metastatic disease.
  • Today both CT and MRI are highly valuable in assessing the diagnosis and starting the management of these tumors.
  • Biopsy is mandatory to confirm the diagnosis.
  • Among the primitive tumors, soft tissue sarcomas, especially rhabdomyosarcomas, are the most frequent.
  • The diagnosis is suggested when the onset of the disease is acute and the course is rapid.
  • Most respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • In the event of a residual tumor, local treatment is indicated so that surgery and/or radiotherapy are used as second-line treatment.
  • It can be satisfactory (Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, lymphoma, meningioma, infantile fibrosarcoma) or poor (metastatic tumor, rhabdoid tumor).
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Exophthalmos / etiology. France. Humans. Incidence. Infant. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis. Prognosis. Rhabdomyosarcoma / epidemiology. Rhabdomyosarcoma / surgery. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20303550.001).
  • [ISSN] 1773-0619
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-Chirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurochirurgie
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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56. Kravtsov VG, Zaĭrat'iants OV: [Clinical and morphological characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumors]. Arkh Patol; 2007 Sep-Oct;69(5):54-61
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  • [Title] [Clinical and morphological characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumors].
  • GIST are stromal tumors and the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and some other organs of spindle-cell or epithelioid-cell structure expressing CD117 (C-kit, KIT), as well as those at different rates and in different combinations, CD34, smooth muscle and/or neurogenic differentiation antigens.
  • It should be taken into account that CD117 are also expressed by melanomas, vascular, and some other tumors.
  • The c-kit gene mutations leading to the expression and autoactivation of the tyrosine kinase receptor KIT underlie the oncogenesis of GIST, which results in enhanced proliferative activity and inhibited apoptosis.
  • This is supported by successful chemotherapy for GIST with a KIT receptor inhibitor.
  • Many GISTs behave like sarcomas and they are characterized by an infiltrating growth, hematogenic (mainly into the liver) and implantational (along the peritoneum) cancer spread.
  • [MeSH-major] Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors / metabolism. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors / pathology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD34 / biosynthesis. Antigens, CD34 / genetics. Apoptosis / genetics. Enzyme Activation / genetics. Epithelioid Cells / metabolism. Epithelioid Cells / pathology. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / genetics. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / genetics. Liver Neoplasms / metabolism. Liver Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Melanoma / genetics. Melanoma / metabolism. Melanoma / pathology. Mitosis / genetics. Mutation. Myocytes, Smooth Muscle / metabolism. Myocytes, Smooth Muscle / pathology. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplastic Stem Cells / metabolism. Neoplastic Stem Cells / pathology. Peritoneal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Peritoneal Neoplasms / genetics. Peritoneal Neoplasms / pathology. Peritoneal Neoplasms / secondary. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Sarcoma / genetics. Sarcoma / metabolism. Sarcoma / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18074824.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-1955
  • [Journal-full-title] Arkhiv patologii
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arkh. Patol.
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD34; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit
  • [Number-of-references] 44
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57. Bonifati DM, Ori C, Rossi CR, Caira S, Fanin M, Angelini C: Neuromuscular damage after hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion in patients with melanoma or sarcoma treated with chemotherapeutic agents. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2000;46(6):517-22
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  • [Title] Neuromuscular damage after hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion in patients with melanoma or sarcoma treated with chemotherapeutic agents.
  • METHODS: We collected muscle biopsies from eleven patients with lower limb sarcoma or melanoma immediately before and at a variable time after the chemotherapeutic procedure (mean = 49.4 days).
  • RESULTS: Clear neurogenic alterations were present in pre-HLP biopsies of seven patients related to age and previous therapy.
  • Reduction in type I or type II fiber diameter was present in nine patients, but no relation to doxorubicin or melphalan treatment was clear.
  • [MeSH-major] Hyperthermia, Induced / adverse effects. Leg. Melanoma / drug therapy. Muscle, Skeletal / drug effects. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases / etiology. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy. Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion / adverse effects. Creatine Kinase / drug effects. Creatine Kinase / metabolism. Desmin / analysis. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Muscle Fibers, Skeletal / drug effects. Muscle Fibers, Skeletal / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11138466.001).
  • [ISSN] 0344-5704
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Italy / Telethon / / C.41
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Desmin; EC 2.7.3.2 / Creatine Kinase
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58. Assi H, Missenard G, Terrier P, Le Pechoux C, Bonvalot S, Vanel D, Meric JB, Tursz T, Lecesne A: Intensive induction chemotherapy without methotrexate in adult patients with localized osteosarcoma: results of the Institut Gustave-Roussy phase II trial. Curr Oncol; 2010 Nov;17(6):23-31
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  • [Title] Intensive induction chemotherapy without methotrexate in adult patients with localized osteosarcoma: results of the Institut Gustave-Roussy phase II trial.
  • PURPOSE: To improve outcomes in localized osteosarcoma and to reduce the duration of preoperative chemotherapy, we conducted a phase ii trial assessing the efficacy of an intensive protracted regimen without methotrexate (api-ai regimen) in adolescent and adult patients with newly diagnosed disease.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Induction chemotherapy consisted of 2 cycles (4 courses) of doxorubicin 60 mg/m(2) (days 1 and 15), cisplatin 100 mg/m(2) (day 1), and ifosfamide 5 g/m(2) (days 2 and 15).
  • The primary endpoint was good histologic response [ghr (≤5% identifiable tumour cells)].
  • The median time between chemotherapy courses was 15 days (range: 12-32 days).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Despite hematologic toxicity, the results observed with the api-ai regimen compare favourably with those observed during previous induction chemotherapy containing methotrexate in adult patients and the pediatric population treated at our institution.
  • These promising results have to be validated by an ongoing national multicentre trial coordinated by the French Sarcoma Group.

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  • (PMID = 21151406.001).
  • [ISSN] 1718-7729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current oncology (Toronto, Ont.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2993436
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Induction chemotherapy / osteosarcoma
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59. Vanel D, Bonvalot S, Guinebretière JM, Petrow P, Dromain C, Caillet H: MR imaging in the evaluation of isolated limb perfusion: a prospective study of 18 cases. Skeletal Radiol; 2004 Mar;33(3):150-6
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  • PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate the use of MRI with dynamic sequences during isolated limb perfusion (ILP) for soft tissue sarcomas, an aggressive local treatment using very high-dose chemotherapy and tumor necrosis factor aimed at avoiding limb amputation.
  • DESIGN AND PATIENTS: Twenty-six patients were referred for ILP over one and a half years; eight were excluded as the lesions were either too proximal or suspicious inflammatory changes without tumor were found on the initial MRI, or the vascular status was poor.
  • The indications for ILP were: vessel nerve involvement (13), multiple lesions (8), tumor size (4) or the presence of pulmonary metastases (2).
  • The MR examinations included T1-weighted SE and fast SE T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences, as well as dynamic sequences (T1-weighted SE repeated six times every 40 s), displaying the maximum intensity slope in each pixel.
  • RESULTS: The tumor had disappeared in three patients.
  • One patient still had histologically proven isolated widespread tumor cells without a mass.
  • The tumor size had increased in two patients.
  • In six patients, the size of the tumor had not changed but it had become completely necrotic, with a thin wall.
  • In three patients, after an initially good result MRI demonstrated that the tumor wall had become thickened from 1 to 2 months after ILP.
  • Dynamic MRI was mainly useful during the initial examination, demonstrating two patients with inflammatory changes without tumor.
  • Three amputations and a second ILP were proposed based on poor results.
  • [MeSH-major] Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion. Extremities. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Sarcoma / diagnosis. Sarcoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Melphalan / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Salvage Therapy. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 14747961.001).
  • [ISSN] 0364-2348
  • [Journal-full-title] Skeletal radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Skeletal Radiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan
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60. Oonuma M, Hatori M, Hosaka M, Kokubun S: Extraskeletal osteosarcoma arising in the buttock. Ups J Med Sci; 2001;106(3):211-5
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  • Extraskeletal osteosarcoma is a rare sarcoma that accounts for about 1% of malignant soft tissue tumours.
  • We report an very unusual case of a small-size extraskeletal osteosarcoma arising in the superficial subcutaneous region of the buttock.
  • 10 mm mass in the subcutaneous tissue.
  • Microscopic examination of the removed tumour showed bizarre-looking spindle and giant cells with lace-like osteoid.
  • The tumour was diagnosed as extraskeletal osteosarcoma.
  • Chemotherapy with Rosen T-20 was administered to the patient.
  • Its superficial location, very small size, wide excision, and chemotherapy were thought to contribute to her long survival.

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  • (PMID = 12166514.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-9734
  • [Journal-full-title] Upsala journal of medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ups. J. Med. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Sweden
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61. Ahn JS, Yang DH, Kim YK, Cho SH, Kim IY, Lee JJ, Chung IJ, Kim HJ: Multiple intracranial tuberculomas mimicking granulocytic sarcomas in acute myeloid leukemia. J Korean Med Sci; 2007 Sep;22 Suppl:S171-3
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  • [Title] Multiple intracranial tuberculomas mimicking granulocytic sarcomas in acute myeloid leukemia.
  • The diagnosis of incracranial tuberculoma in immune-compromised hosts is often difficult because conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of tuberculoma reveals various findings and neurologic symptoms are not typical.
  • Here, we report a case of a 54-yr old man with multiple intracranial tuberculoma who was treated for acute myeloid leukemia.
  • He complained of right-side paresthesia after the third consolidation chemotherapy without leukemic relapse and fever.
  • The lesions appeared to mimic a metastatic tumor or abscess.
  • To confirm diagnosis, an open brain biopsy was performed.
  • He was treated with anti-tuberculosis medication and a high dose of steroid.
  • Paresthesia improved, and follow-up brain MR imaging showed the decreased size and numbers of ring-enhanced lesions and improvement of perilesional edema 1 month after treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / complications. Sarcoma, Myeloid / diagnosis. Tuberculoma, Intracranial / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antitubercular Agents / therapeutic use. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 17923749.001).
  • [ISSN] 1011-8934
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of Korean medical science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Korean Med. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antitubercular Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2694373
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62. Sabo D, Bernd L, Buchner M, Treiber M, Wannenmacher M, Ewerbeck V, Parsch D: [Intraoperative extracorporeal irradiation and replantation in local treatment of primary malignant bone tumors]. Orthopade; 2003 Nov;32(11):1003-12
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  • [Title] [Intraoperative extracorporeal irradiation and replantation in local treatment of primary malignant bone tumors].
  • [Transliterated title] Intraoperative extrakorporale Irradiation und Replantation (IEIR) in der lokalen Behandlung primär maligner Knochentumoren.
  • In 13 patients with primary malignant bone tumors (10 Ewing's sarcoma, 1 parosteal osteosarcoma, 1 adamantinoma recurrence, and 1 MFH) local therapy was performed as intraoperative extracorporeal irradiation and replantation (IEIR) of the involved bone segment (5 tibia, 2 femur, and 6 pelvis).
  • Of the 13 patients (69%), 9 are alive at the time of the follow-up (5 CDF, 4 AWM(treated)) and 4 patients died of disease (DOD).
  • Up to now during the follow-up of 32 months (6-57), no local recurrence was observed in the replanted bone segments.
  • In cases of mechanical failure, the replanted segment could mostly be preserved by surgical revision and autologous bone grafting.
  • IEIR must be seen as an extraordinary reconstruction procedure in cases where established procedures such as endoprosthesis, biological reconstructions, or rotationplasties cannot be used or are refused by the patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Amputation / methods. Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Brachytherapy / methods. Limb Salvage / methods. Replantation / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Ameloblastoma / drug therapy. Ameloblastoma / pathology. Ameloblastoma / radiotherapy. Ameloblastoma / surgery. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Femoral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Femoral Neoplasms / pathology. Femoral Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Femoral Neoplasms / surgery. Follow-Up Studies. Histiocytic Sarcoma / drug therapy. Histiocytic Sarcoma / pathology. Histiocytic Sarcoma / radiotherapy. Histiocytic Sarcoma / surgery. Humans. Male. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neoplasm Staging. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Osteosarcoma / pathology. Osteosarcoma / radiotherapy. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Radiotherapy Dosage. Sarcoma, Ewing / drug therapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / pathology. Sarcoma, Ewing / radiotherapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / surgery. Tibia / pathology. Tibia / surgery

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  • (PMID = 14615850.001).
  • [ISSN] 0085-4530
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Orthopade
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orthopade
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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63. Liao X, Xin X, Lü X: Primary Ewing's sarcoma-primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the vagina. Gynecol Oncol; 2004 Feb;92(2):684-8
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  • [Title] Primary Ewing's sarcoma-primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the vagina.
  • BACKGROUND: Only three cases of Ewing's sarcoma-primitive neuroectodermal tumor (ES-PNET) occurring in the vagina have been previously reported.
  • CASE: A 30-year-old Chinese woman presented with a vaginal mass measuring 5 cm in greatest dimension.
  • The tumor was composed of solid sheets of undifferentiated small round cells with numerous Homer-Wright rosettes.
  • Immunohistochemically, it was positive for CD99, FlI-1 protein, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, vimentin, and S-100 protein.
  • The patient underwent wide local excision of the tumor and subsequent total abdominal hysterectomy with postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • She is disease-free 36 months after the initial surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive, Peripheral / pathology. Sarcoma, Ewing / pathology. Vaginal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans

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  • (PMID = 14766267.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Ferrari A: Role of chemotherapy in pediatric nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcomas. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther; 2008 Jun;8(6):929-38
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  • [Title] Role of chemotherapy in pediatric nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcomas.
  • The definition of nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcomas includes a varied group of malignant soft part tumors that can occur in childhood, but the majority are entities typically observed in adult age.
  • Similar to their adult counterparts, pediatric nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcomas are usually considered scarcely sensitive to chemotherapy, but treatment strategies for these tumors have changed to some degree in recent years, and multiple-modality treatments that also include chemotherapy have increasingly been attempted.
  • Subsets of patients with specific histological subtypes and prognostic variables have been thought likely to benefit from chemotherapy.
  • The recent development of new molecular treatment approaches to specific tumor targets may enable the current limits of systemic therapies to be overcome in the near future, possibly identifying specific agents tailored to each histotype.
  • While awaiting these developments, however, a better use of standard chemotherapy may prove important in improving the cure rate for these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Child. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Delivery Systems. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Humans. Patient Selection. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 18533802.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8328
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of anticancer therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 71
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65. Collini P, Sorensen PH, Patel S, Blay JY, Issels RD, Maki RG, Eriksson M, del Muro XG: Sarcomas with spindle cell morphology. Semin Oncol; 2009 Aug;36(4):324-37
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  • [Title] Sarcomas with spindle cell morphology.
  • In the days before the term "high-grade undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma" came into use, one of the most common sarcoma diagnoses was "malignant fibrous histiocytoma," and before that, in an era before immunohistochemistry, "fibrosarcoma" was used to describe most sarcomas.
  • "Spindle cell" is a descriptive phrase that denotes the cellular shape of many of the sarcomas encountered in the adult population.
  • As a result, they are usually treated differently from small round cell sarcomas, and have different biological characteristics than those tumors and sarcomas with epithelioid morphology.
  • As a very broad generalization, sarcomas with a spindle cell microscopic morphology occur in adults and are treated primarily with surgery and often adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiation as primary therapy.
  • In comparison to small round cell sarcomas such as Ewing sarcoma, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial, and the sensitivity of these tumors to chemotherapy in the metastatic setting is highly variable.
  • In this article, we describe some of the clinical and biological characteristics of this group of sarcomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Fibrosarcoma / genetics. Fibrosarcoma / pathology. Gene Fusion. Heat-Shock Response. Humans. Hyperthermia, Induced. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Sarcoma, Synovial / genetics. Sarcoma, Synovial / pathology. Translocation, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 19664493.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA47179
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors
  • [Number-of-references] 62
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66. Mikuz G: [WHO classification of testicular tumors]. Verh Dtsch Ges Pathol; 2002;86:67-75
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  • [Title] [WHO classification of testicular tumors].
  • [Transliterated title] WHO-Klassifikation der Hodentumoren.
  • The revised classification was necessary because some clinically important new entities have been described in recent years.
  • The most important is obviously the precursor lesion of germ cell tumors, which has been called "intratubular malignant germ cells".
  • Such atypical cells appear in the tubules adjacent to the germ cell tumors, in some few cases (6%) also in the contra lateral healthy gonad and rarely in infertile men (1%).
  • The precursor lesion can progress to franc germ cell tumor starting probably with seminoma, which still maintain the capability of differentiation (pluripotente cells) in all other types of non-seminomatous germ cell tumors.
  • This lesion is missed in germ cell tumors of childhood and in spermatocytic seminomas, both seem to have a histogenetic history rather different from the other germ cell in adults.
  • The categories used in the first classification have been preserved and some new diagnoses added.
  • Most of the new diagnoses are subtypes--called "variants"--of well known tumors.
  • Spermatocytic seminomas are perfectly benign tumors but they become a life threatening disease when combined with sarcomas (new entity).
  • In the group of mature teratomas the "dermoid cyst" appears as a benign subtype mostly observed in children.
  • Unfortunately, however, the old term "teratoma with malignant transformation" was changed to "teratoma with malignant areas" in the 1998 classification.
  • This is a harmless name for an extremely dangerous tumor in which one tissue overgrows the other and gives rise to somatic type sarcomas or carcinomas.
  • Such tumors do not respond like germ cell tumors to the usual chemotherapy.
  • Treatment should be tailored according to that used in standard management of the respective sarcoma or carcinoma.
  • In the comments it is mentioned that the testis carcinoid could be a part of teratoma, but the diagnosis is listed in the group of "miscellaneous" tumors together with tumors of ovarian epithelial type.
  • This is a very questionable decision because the normal testis does not contain neuroendocrine cells from which carcinoids would have to be able to develop.
  • "Large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumour" has been recently described and can be sporadic or inherited.
  • This morphologically peculiar tumor can be part of the Swiss syndrome also called Carney's complex.
  • The patients have cardiac myxomas, spotty skin pigmentation, hormone active nodular hyperplasia of the adrenals and soft tissue myxomas.
  • In contrast to gonadoblastoma, however, these tumors occur in testes of genotypic and phenotypic normal males.
  • From the practical, diagnostic point of view the new classification does not contain dramatic changes.
  • For the therapy of germ cell tumor an assessment of risk factors found by the pathologists is extremely important.
  • The most important independent predictors of relapse are tumor invasion of blood or lymph-vessels, absence of yolk sac elements and the presence of an embryonal carcinoma component.
  • In the absence of such predictors a surveillance policy allows some patients to forgo chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Testicular Neoplasms / classification

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  • (PMID = 12647353.001).
  • [ISSN] 0070-4113
  • [Journal-full-title] Verhandlungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Pathologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Verh Dtsch Ges Pathol
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 48
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67. Gow KW, Murphy JJ 3rd, Wu JK, Desa DJ: Metastatic testicular rhabdomyosarcoma--a report of two cases. J Pediatr Surg; 2003 Aug;38(8):E1-3
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  • [Title] Metastatic testicular rhabdomyosarcoma--a report of two cases.
  • Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common type of soft tissue sarcoma in children.
  • The tumor spreads by local extension, to regional lymph nodes, or by distant metastases.
  • The authors describe 2 boys who were found to have intratesticular metastases after presenting with primary tumors in their extremities.
  • The first patient, an 11-year-old boy presented with primary disease in his left foot and an enlarged testicle.
  • Rhabdomyosarcoma was found histologically in both the foot and the testicle.
  • A second boy 17 years of age had a primary tumor involving the left upper extremity treated with amputation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy.
  • The authors discuss the implications and the management of this rare presentation of metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Rhabdomyosarcoma / secondary. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology. Testicular Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Fatal Outcome. Foot Diseases / pathology. Hand. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 12891513.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Fuchs B, Mahlum E, Halder C, Maran A, Yaszemski M, Bode B, Bolander M, Sarkar G: High expression of tumor endothelial marker 7 is associated with metastasis and poor survival of patients with osteogenic sarcoma. Gene; 2007 Sep 15;399(2):137-43
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  • [Title] High expression of tumor endothelial marker 7 is associated with metastasis and poor survival of patients with osteogenic sarcoma.
  • Our objective is to identify genes regulating metastasis of osteogenic sarcoma (OGS) since metastasis is the primary cause of mortality among patients with OGS.
  • To identify such genes, we first created a database of differentially expressed genes between six low-grade and six high-grade OGS tumors, and between a normal immortalized osteoblast cell line (FOB) and four commercially available OGS-derived cell lines.
  • We specifically searched for surface proteins over-expressed in high-grade OGS, since we hypothesize that tumor-cell specific surface markers are key to metastasis.
  • A gene encoding Tumor Endothelial Marker7 (TEM7) was selected as a candidate for further study.
  • Employing immunostaining of 92 human OGS specimens (50 high-grade and 42 low-grade) collected before chemotherapy show 97% (37 of 38) of high-grade OGS specimens with metastasis have high TEM7 staining.
  • Our results suggest TEM7 expression level closely parallels histology-based prognostication of OGS metastasis and, therefore, it is a therapeutic target.
  • This is the first demonstration of a link between TEM7 and cancer metastasis.

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  • (PMID = 17560052.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-1119
  • [Journal-full-title] Gene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gene
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR047974-01A1; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR047974-03; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR47974; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR047974-02; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR047974-05; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR047974-03; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR047974-05; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR047974-04; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR047974-02; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR047974; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR047974-01A1; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR047974-04
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / PLXDC1 protein, human; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 0 / Receptors, Cell Surface
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS29184; NLM/ PMC2066185
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69. Nielsen T, Murata R, Maxwell RJ, Stødkilde-Jørgensen H, Ostergaard L, Ley CD, Kristjansen PE, Horsman MR: Non-invasive imaging of combretastatin activity in two tumor models: Association with invasive estimates. Acta Oncol; 2010 Oct;49(7):906-13
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  • [Title] Non-invasive imaging of combretastatin activity in two tumor models: Association with invasive estimates.
  • INTRODUCTION: The efficacy of the vascular disrupting agent combretastatin A-4 phosphate (CA4P) depends on several factors including tumor size, nitric oxide level, interstitial fluid pressure, and vascular permeability.
  • These factors vary among tumor types.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate all these factors in two tumor models that respond differently to CA4P.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Mice bearing C3H mammary carcinomas or KHT sarcomas (200 to 800 mm(3)) were intraperitoneally injected with CA4P (100 mg/kg).
  • Tumor size and the effect of a nitric oxide inhibitor nitro-L-arginine (NLA) administered intravenously were evaluated by necrotic fraction histologically assessed at 24 hours.
  • RESULTS: Initial necrotic fraction was about 10% in both tumor models at 200 mm(3), but only increased significantly with tumor size in the C3H mammary carcinoma.
  • In this tumor, CA4P significantly induced further necrosis by about 15% at all sizes, but in the KHT tumor, the induced necrotic fraction depended on tumor size.
  • For both tumor types, NLA with CA4P significantly increased necrotic fraction above that for each drug alone.
  • CA4P significantly decreased IFP in all tumors except in the 800 mm(3) C3H tumor, which had an initially non-significant lower value.
  • Interstitial volume estimated by DCE-MRI increased in all groups, except the 800 mm(3) C3H tumors.
  • DCE-MRI vascular parameters showed different initial characteristics and general significant reductions following CA4P treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Both tumor models showed differences in all factors before treatment, and in their response to CA4P.
  • These factors may be of clinical value in the planning of CA4P treatments.
  • [MeSH-major] Diagnostic Imaging / methods. Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental / diagnosis. Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental / drug therapy. Stilbenes / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / diagnosis. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / pathology. Cell Line, Tumor. Contrast Media. Disease Models, Animal. Female. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Mice. Mice, Inbred C3H. Nitric Oxide / metabolism. Sarcoma / diagnosis. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Sarcoma / pathology. Statistics as Topic. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Burden / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 20831477.001).
  • [ISSN] 1651-226X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Contrast Media; 0 / Stilbenes; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; I5590ES2QZ / fosbretabulin
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70. Ramírez-Amador VA, Espinosa E, González-Ramírez I, Anaya-Saavedra G, Ormsby CE, Reyes-Terán G: Identification of oral candidosis, hairy leukoplakia and recurrent oral ulcers as distinct cases of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Int J STD AIDS; 2009 Apr;20(4):259-61
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  • To document oral manifestations attributable to immune reconstitution, we conducted a longitudinal follow-up of a cohort of HIV+ individuals starting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and completing oral pathology follow-up up to 12 weeks after treatment initiation.
  • Among individuals with satisfactory viral response and recovery of > or =50 CD4+ T-cell/microL, eight patients complied with strict IRIS criteria: two developed clinical signs of oral candidosis (OC), two oral ulcers, three HL and one Kaposi's sarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections / diagnosis. Candidiasis, Oral / diagnosis. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome / diagnosis. Leukoplakia, Hairy / diagnosis. Oral Ulcer / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anti-HIV Agents / therapeutic use. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Biomarkers / analysis. Cohort Studies. Diagnosis, Oral. HIV Infections / drug therapy. HIV Infections / immunology. Humans. Treatment Failure


71. Latz D, Nassar N, Frank R: Trofosfamide in the palliative treatment of cancer: a review of the literature. Onkologie; 2004 Dec;27(6):572-6
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  • [Title] Trofosfamide in the palliative treatment of cancer: a review of the literature.
  • The main indications for application were in the palliative situation and as maintenance therapy.
  • Good results were reported from the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and soft tissue sarcomas.
  • A lot of small studies and casuistic contributions are available giving treatment results of several solid carcinomas (malignant gliomas, ovarian, lung and prostate cancer, and others).
  • Due to its oral formulation and good tolerability trofosfamide is an attractive candidate for the palliative situation because treatment on an outpatient basis is possible.
  • Thus, evidence-based conclusions on the therapeutic value of the drug cannot be drawn.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cyclophosphamide / analogs & derivatives. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Lymphoma / drug therapy. Palliative Care / methods. Sarcoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Treatment Outcome


72. Burger AM, Hartung G, Stehle G, Sinn H, Fiebig HH: Pre-clinical evaluation of a methotrexate-albumin conjugate (MTX-HSA) in human tumor xenografts in vivo. Int J Cancer; 2001 Jun 1;92(5):718-24
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  • [Title] Pre-clinical evaluation of a methotrexate-albumin conjugate (MTX-HSA) in human tumor xenografts in vivo.
  • Methotrexate covalently bound to human serum albumin in a 1:1 molar ratio (MTX-HSA) is a new macromolecular drug which is currently being studied in phase I clinical trials by the German Association for Medical Oncology (AIO) Phase I/II study group.
  • Previous studies have shown that MTX-HSA differs favorably from unbound MTX in terms of plasma half-life time, tumor accumulation of albumin and uptake mechanisms into cancer cells.
  • To achieve optimal drug efficacy, repeated treatment cycles were necessary.
  • To evaluate the anti-tumor activity of MTX-HSA and MTX in pre-clinical in vivo models, we selected 7 solid human tumor xenografts growing s.c. in nude mice and administered drug either i.p. or i.v. weekly for 3 weeks.
  • In the soft tissue sarcoma SXF 1301, MTX-HSA effected complete remission/cure after a single injection, whereas free MTX resulted in short-lasting, partial tumor regression.
  • In the prostate-cancer model PRXF PC3M, MTX-HSA produced growth inhibition of 92.8% of control or an optimal test/control (T/C) of 7.2% compared to a T/C of 20.8% for MTX (p = 0.05).
  • In lung cancers LXFE 409 and LXFL 529, bladder cancer BXF 1258 and breast cancer MAXF 449, both compounds were inactive.
  • The improved therapeutic effects seen in 3 xenograft models under MTX-HSA treatment are promising and might be due to specific accumulation of the compound in solid tumors owing to their enhanced permeability and retention effect.
  • Thus, clinical development of MTX-HSA will continue and sarcomas as well as prostate cancers will be included as potential target tumors for upcoming clinical phase II trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Neoplasms, Experimental / drug therapy. Serum Albumin / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Animals. Drug Evaluation. Female. Humans. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Mice. Mice, Nude. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Transplantation. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Transplantation, Heterologous

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 11340578.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Serum Albumin; 0 / methotrexate-serum albumin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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73. Sharma H, MacDuff E, Jane MJ, Reid R: Sarcomatous change in the Pagetoid tibiae. Int Orthop; 2005 Oct;29(5):319-25
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  • We reviewed 13 cases of tibial Paget's sarcoma constituting 14% of all registered Paget's sarcoma cases of the Scottish Bone Tumour Registry between January 1947 and June 2004.
  • Eleven patients were male, and in ten patients the tumour involved the upper half of the tibia.
  • Histologically, there were three osteosarcomas and ten malignant fibrous histiocytomas.
  • Six patients received adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy.
  • Post-operative complications included stump revision in two cases, non-union of a pathological fracture of the tibial tuberosity and a stress fracture.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Osteitis Deformans / pathology. Osteitis Deformans / surgery. Osteosarcoma / pathology. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Tibia / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16094541.001).
  • [ISSN] 0341-2695
  • [Journal-full-title] International orthopaedics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Orthop
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3456639
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74. Maki R: Sarcoma. Oncologist; 2001;6(4):333-7
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  • [Title] Sarcoma.
  • ASCO 2001 was a banner year for innovative systemic therapy for sarcomas.
  • Imatinib mesylate (STI571, Gleevec) shows clear activity not only in chronic myelogenous leukemia, for which the drug received Food and Drug Administration approval, but also in gastrointestinal stromal tumors as well, by virtue of imatinib mesylate binding to the abl, kit, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases.
  • Ecteinascidin-743 (ET-743) demonstrates activity against a fraction of other soft-tissue sarcomas.
  • Gemcitabine-based regimens show at least some activity against a subset of soft-tissue sarcomas.
  • Given the lack of new agents for sarcoma therapy since the development of ifosfamide, these studies give hope that the term "effective systemic therapy for sarcoma" might become a reality.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sarcoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Humans

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  • (PMID = 11524551.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-7159
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 7
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75. Peyrí Rey E, Urban Ramón A, Martínez Fernández M, Sanmarti Da Silva B: [Dedifferentiated liposarcoma of spermatic cord: degeneration of lipoma previously resected]. Actas Urol Esp; 2003 May;27(5):383-6
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  • [Transliterated title] Liposarcoma dediferenciado del cordón espermático: degeneración de un lipoma previo resecado.
  • Spermatic cord sarcomas are rare tumours.
  • Dedifferentiated liposarcoma accounts for only 10% of all spermatic cord sarcomas.
  • These are usually large-sized tumours histologically characterised for being well-differentiated liposarcomas with some high grade sarcoma areas.
  • These are useful for post-treatment follow-up.
  • Value of adjuvant radio- and chemotherapy is uncertain.
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12891917.001).
  • [ISSN] 0210-4806
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas urologicas espanolas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Urol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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76. Hewish M, Chau I, Cunningham D: Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor targeted therapeutics: novel compounds and novel treatment strategies for cancer medicine. Recent Pat Anticancer Drug Discov; 2009 Jan;4(1):54-72
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  • [Title] Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor targeted therapeutics: novel compounds and novel treatment strategies for cancer medicine.
  • The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and its associated signalling system has provoked considerable interest over recent years as a novel therapeutic target in cancer.
  • A brief outline of the IGF-1R signalling system and the rationale for its use in cancer medicine is given.
  • This is followed by a discussion of the different possible targets within the IGF-1R system, and drugs developed to interact at each target.
  • The following tumour types are specifically discussed: lung, breast, colorectal, pancreatic, NETs, sarcoma, prostate, leukaemia, multiple myeloma.
  • Other tumour types are mentioned briefly: squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, melanoma, glioblastoma, ovary, gastric and mesothelioma.
  • Results of early stage clinical trials, involving recently patented drugs. are included where appropriate.
  • We then outline the current understanding of toxicity related to IGF-1R targeted therapy, and finally outline areas for further research.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Receptor, IGF Type 1 / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Pancreatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Receptor, Insulin / physiology. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 19149688.001).
  • [ISSN] 1574-8928
  • [Journal-full-title] Recent patents on anti-cancer drug discovery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Recent Pat Anticancer Drug Discov
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United Arab Emirates
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, IGF Type 1; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Insulin
  • [Number-of-references] 149
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77. Zhan M, Yu D, Lang A, Li L, Pollock RE: Wild type p53 sensitizes soft tissue sarcoma cells to doxorubicin by down-regulating multidrug resistance-1 expression. Cancer; 2001 Sep 15;92(6):1556-66
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  • [Title] Wild type p53 sensitizes soft tissue sarcoma cells to doxorubicin by down-regulating multidrug resistance-1 expression.
  • BACKGROUND: p53 mutations occur in almost half of all soft tissue sarcomas (STS) and may contribute to multidrug resistance (MDR) in patients with STS.
  • The effect of reintroducing wild type (wt) p53 into STS cells harboring p53 mutations on the cytotoxicity of DOX in vitro and in vivo was studied.
  • METHODS: The following cell lines were used in this study: SKLMS-1 STS cells, which do not express wt p53; two wt p53 stable transfectant cells derived from SKLMS-1 cells; and SKLMS-1 transfectant cells from a p53 temperature-sensitive mutant that expresses wt p53 at 32 degrees C and mutant p53 at 38 degrees C.
  • The cytotoxicity of Dox was examined by [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazzol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenltetrazolium] (MTT) and clonogenetic assay, and the effect of reintroducing wt p53 on tumor suppression by Dox was evaluated with a tumorigenicity assay.
  • Colony formation of SKLMS-1 cells after Dox treatment also was inhibited by wt p53 reintroduction.
  • The tumorigenicity of SKLMS-1 cells was inhibited by wt p53 reintroduction alone or by Dox treatment alone and was inhibited further when p53 introduction was combined with Dox treatment in severe combined immunodeficient mice.
  • Although no difference in DNA fragmentation, Bax expression, or Bcl-2 expression was detected among wt p53 transfectants and parental SKLMS-1 cells after Dox treatment, MDR-1 P-gp expression was decreased in wt p53 transfectants compared with parental SKLMS-1 cells.
  • Thus, the combination of p53 gene therapy and chemotherapy may increase the therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of patients with STS.
  • [MeSH-major] Doxorubicin / pharmacology. Genes, MDR / genetics. Sarcoma / genetics. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / genetics. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / genetics

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 11745235.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 60488; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 67802; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30-CA16672
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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78. Bien E, Stachowicz-Stencel T, Balcerska A, Godzinski J, Kazanowska B, Perek-Polnik M, Madziara W, Rybczynska A, Kurylak A, Zalewska-Szewczyk B, Peregud-Pogorzelski J: Angiosarcoma in children - still uncontrollable oncological problem. The report of the Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours Study. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl); 2009 Jul;18(4):411-20
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  • The report of the Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours StudyAngiosarcoma is a rare, highly malignant vascular neoplasm with little data available on its clinical course and management in children.
  • Ten children with angiosarcoma (M/F: 6/4; aged 2, 3-16 years) registered in Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours and Soft Tissue Sarcomas Studies between 1992 and 2006.
  • Primary tumour exceeded 5 cm in seven patients and affected mainly deep tissues (heart-2, head/neck, bladder, brain, liver and upper limb - one patient each).
  • Four patients had regional and two metastatic diseases (lungs and bones).
  • All patients received supplementing chemotherapy with no response in four.
  • Three of five secondary tumour resections proved complete.
  • Relapsed patients received chemotherapy +/- radiotherapy and surgery (three).
  • Nine patients died of disease (overall survival 6-66 months), and one child after mutilating secondary resection is alive.
  • The response to chemotherapy is poor and the large number of metastatic recurrences suggests a need for systemic therapy modifications.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemangiosarcoma / pathology. Hemangiosarcoma / therapy. Sarcoma / pathology. Sarcoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease Progression. Humans. Male. Poland / epidemiology. Prognosis. Radiotherapy. Recurrence. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 19490008.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2354
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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79. Chawla SP, Chua VS, Fernandez L, Quon D, Saralou A, Blackwelder WC, Hall FL, Gordon EM: Phase I/II and phase II studies of targeted gene delivery in vivo: intravenous Rexin-G for chemotherapy-resistant sarcoma and osteosarcoma. Mol Ther; 2009 Sep;17(9):1651-7
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  • [Title] Phase I/II and phase II studies of targeted gene delivery in vivo: intravenous Rexin-G for chemotherapy-resistant sarcoma and osteosarcoma.
  • Rexin-G, a pathotropic nanoparticle bearing a cytocidal cyclin G1 construct was tested in a phase I/II study for chemotherapy-resistant sarcomas and a phase II study for chemotherapy-resistant osteosarcoma.
  • Twenty sarcoma patients and 22 osteosarcoma patients received escalating doses of Rexin-G intravenously from 8 x 10(11) to 24 x 10(11) colony forming units (cfu)/cycle.
  • Treatment was continued if there was <or= grade 1 toxicity.
  • In the phase I/II study, 3/6 patients had stable disease (SD) at the lowest dose; median progression-free survival (PFS) was 1.2 months, and overall survival (OS), 3.3 months.
  • In this phase I/II study, a dose-response relationship with Rexin-G dosage was observed for progression-free and OS times (P = 0.02 and 0.005, respectively).
  • These studies suggest that Rexin-G is safe, may help control tumor growth, and may possibly improve survival in chemotherapy-resistant sarcoma and osteosarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Genetic Therapy / methods. Genetic Vectors / genetics. Osteosarcoma / therapy. Retroviridae / genetics. Sarcoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cyclin G. Cyclin G1. Cyclins / genetics. Cyclins / physiology. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19532136.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 91108
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CCNG1 protein, human; 0 / Cyclin G; 0 / Cyclin G1; 0 / Cyclins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2835268
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80. Salemis NS, Gourgiotis S, Tsiambas E, Panagiotopoulos N, Karameris A, Tsohataridis E: Primary intra-abdominal malignant fibrous histiocytoma: a highly aggressive tumor. J Gastrointest Cancer; 2010 Dec;41(4):238-42
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  • [Title] Primary intra-abdominal malignant fibrous histiocytoma: a highly aggressive tumor.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is the most common soft-tissue sarcoma of late adult life occurring predominantly in the extremities.
  • The aim of this study is to describe a very rare case of an intra-abdominal MFH with a highly aggressive clinical course.
  • METHODS: A 67-year-old male was referred to our department with a 2-week history of dull lower abdominal pain and a gradually enlarging right lower abdominal mass, which he first noticed 2 months prior to admission.
  • Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a mass in the right iliac fossa.
  • RESULTS: On exploratory laparotomy, a tumor was found in the right iliac fossa attached to the parietal lateral peritoneum without any evidence of invasion into the adjacent structures.
  • Complete excision of the tumor with clear margins was performed.
  • One month after surgery, while on adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient was readmitted with dyspnea and a slightly palpable mass in the area of the previous radical resection.
  • CT scan revealed local tumor recurrence along with multiple pulmonary metastatic deposits.
  • Unfortunately, despite treatment, the patient died of progressive disease 5 weeks later.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Primary intra-abdominal MFH is a very rare but aggressive malignancy with a high tendency of local recurrence and metastatic spread.
  • Early detection and complete surgical excision with clear margins is the treatment of choice.
  • In some cases, however, the tumor can exhibit a highly aggressive clinical course despite radical surgery and adjuvant therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdomen / pathology. Histiocytoma, Malignant Fibrous / secondary. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20419356.001).
  • [ISSN] 1941-6636
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastrointestinal cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gastrointest Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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81. Sadahiro S, Suzuki T, Ishikawa K, Nakamura T, Saguchi T, Kamijo A, Yasuda S, Makuuchi H, Murayama C: Preliminary study of the optimal dosing schedule for oral UFT/leucovorin chemotherapy. Anticancer Res; 2004 Mar-Apr;24(2B):625-30
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  • [Title] Preliminary study of the optimal dosing schedule for oral UFT/leucovorin chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: We evaluated the optimal dosage schedule for combined oral chemotherapy using uracil/tegafur (UFT) and leucovorin (LV) in Yoshida sarcoma-bearing rats.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The antitumor activity and survival effect were compared between two schedules, thrice daily administration on 5 days of the week followed by 2 drug-free days (schedule A) and twice daily on 7 days of the week (schedule B).
  • RESULTS: Significant tumor growth inhibition and improved survival rate were seen with both schedules of the UFT/LV group as compared to their respective control groups.
  • Tumor growth inhibition was significantly greater in schedule A than schedule B.
  • The number of survivors on day 60 after the tumor inoculation was higher in schedule A although the survival rate did not differ significantly.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Leucovorin / administration & dosage. Sarcoma, Yoshida / drug therapy. Tegafur / administration & dosage. Uracil / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Body Weight / drug effects. Drug Administration Schedule. Eating / drug effects. Male. Rats

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  • (PMID = 15161004.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 56HH86ZVCT / Uracil; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; 1-UFT protocol
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82. Segawa N, Hamada S, Takahara K, Azuma H, Tsuji M, Katsuoka Y: [Prostatic stromal sarcoma: a case report]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2008 Jan;54(1):29-34
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  • [Title] [Prostatic stromal sarcoma: a case report].
  • Prostatic stromal sarcoma (PSS) is an unusual lesion that is reported only occasionally.
  • Here we describe a case of prostatic stromal sarcoma in a 33-year-old man who had complained of perineal pain.
  • The serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was above the normal limit at 5.8 ng/ml, and abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a giant mass in the retrovesical region.
  • Specimens obtained by transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate suggested a mesenchymal tumor, but a precise diagnosis required a larger specimen.
  • Palliative transurethral resection (TUR-P) was performed because of obstruction of the urogenital tract, and the final diagnosis was made from this specimen.
  • The tumor contained yellowish gelatinous materials, and the stromal element appeared histologically malignant, with increased cellularity, mitotic figures and pleomorphism.
  • The histological diagnosis was PSS, and the patient received VIP (etoposide, ifosfamide, cisplatin) chemotherapy regimen.
  • Sarcoma of the prostate gland showing aggressive behavior is quite rare.
  • The detailed histological and immunohistochemical findings in this case are reported, together with a review of the literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Sarcoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Histocytochemistry. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Transurethral Resection of Prostate


83. Moureau-Zabotto L, Thomas L, Bui BN, Chevreau C, Stockle E, Martel P, Bonneviale P, Marques B, Coindre JM, Kantor G, Matsuda T, Delannes M: [Management of soft tissue sarcomas in first isolated local recurrence: a retrospective study of 83 cases]. Cancer Radiother; 2004 Oct;8(5):279-87
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  • [Title] [Management of soft tissue sarcomas in first isolated local recurrence: a retrospective study of 83 cases].
  • [Transliterated title] Prise en charge des sarcomes des tissus mous en première rechute locale isolée: étude rétrospective de 83 cas.
  • PURPOSE: To analyse the management and clinical outcome of patients treated for a first isolated local recurrence of soft tissue sarcoma (trunk or extremities) and to identify prognosis factors.
  • Mean tumor size was 6 cm.
  • Most sarcomas were located in extremities (N =74), were deep (N =60), and proximal (N =53).
  • Surgical treatment of recurrences consisted in wide excision (32 cases), marginal resection (46 cases), five patients requiring amputation.
  • Beside surgery, six patients received neoadjuvant and seven others adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Twenty-three patients received postoperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (mean dose 55 Gy) and 26 interstitial (192)Ir low dose rate brachytherapy (BCT) (mean dose 45 Gy for BCT alone, 22 Gy when associated with EBRT), 19 patients being re-irradiated.
  • Thirty-seven (45%) tumors relapsed, 62% locally as first event.
  • Nineteen patients developed secondary distant metastases.
  • Multivariate analysis showed only tumour depth (P =0.05) and re-resection for primary R1 resection for the recurrence (P =0.018) being independent prognosis factors for tumour control, radiotherapy (EBRT and/or BCT) being significant in univariate analysis (P =0.05).
  • Multivariate analysis showed trunk (P =0.0001) or inferior extremity locations (P =0.023), symptomatic (P =0.001), high grade (P =0.01), deep (P = 0.01) tumours, and the occurrence of a further local failure (P =0.004) as unfavourable characteristics for overall survival.
  • CONCLUSION: Because of the high relapse rate in this series, a first isolated local recurrence of STS increases mainly the risk of a subsequent local relapse.
  • Quality of local treatment for the first local relapse is decisive.
  • When a conservative treatment is feasible, it should combine surgical resection and radiotherapy, brachytherapy being the best suited in previously irradiated patients.
  • Efforts have to be pursued to increase quality of the treatment of primary tumours, at best performed in centers that have expertise in this field.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Sarcoma / therapy. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Brachytherapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Fibrosarcoma / radiotherapy. Fibrosarcoma / surgery. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Liposarcoma / radiotherapy. Liposarcoma / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Postoperative Care. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 15561593.001).
  • [ISSN] 1278-3218
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer radiothérapie : journal de la Société française de radiothérapie oncologique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Radiother
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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84. Bacher G, Nickel B, Emig P, Vanhoefer U, Seeber S, Shandra A, Klenner T, Beckers T: D-24851, a novel synthetic microtubule inhibitor, exerts curative antitumoral activity in vivo, shows efficacy toward multidrug-resistant tumor cells, and lacks neurotoxicity. Cancer Res; 2001 Jan 01;61(1):392-9
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  • [Title] D-24851, a novel synthetic microtubule inhibitor, exerts curative antitumoral activity in vivo, shows efficacy toward multidrug-resistant tumor cells, and lacks neurotoxicity.
  • N-(pyridin-4-yl)-[1-(4-chlorbenzyl)-indol-3-yl]-glyoxyl-amid (D-24851) is a novel synthetic compound that was identified in a cell-based screening assay to discover cytotoxic drugs.
  • The binding site of D-24851 does not overlap with the tubulin binding sites of known microtubule-destabilizing agents like vincristine or colchicine.
  • In vitro, D-24851 has potent cytotoxic activity toward a panel of established human tumor cell lines including SKOV3 ovarian cancer, U87 glioblastoma, and ASPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells.
  • In vivo, oral D-24851 treatment induced complete tumor regressions (cures) in rats bearing Yoshida AH13 sarcomas.
  • Of importance is that the administration of curative doses of D-24851 to the animals revealed no systemic toxicity in terms of body weight loss and neurotoxicity in contrast to the administration of paclitaxel or vincristine.
  • Because of its synthetic nature, its oral applicability, its potent in vitro and in vivo antitumoral activity, its efficacy against multidrug-resistant tumors, and the lack of neurotoxicity, D-24851 may have significant potential for the treatment of various malignancies.
  • [MeSH-minor] ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters / metabolism. ATP-Binding Cassette, Sub-Family B, Member 1 / metabolism. Animals. Binding Sites. Binding, Competitive. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Cell Division / drug effects. Colchicine / metabolism. Drug Resistance, Multiple. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Microtubules / drug effects. Motor Activity / drug effects. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins. Nervous System Diseases / chemically induced. Neural Conduction / drug effects. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Rats, Wistar. Sarcoma, Yoshida / drug therapy. Tubulin / metabolism. Tumor Cells, Cultured / drug effects. Vincristine / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 11196193.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters; 0 / ATP-Binding Cassette, Sub-Family B, Member 1; 0 / Acetamides; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins; 0 / Tubulin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80K4H2RB8P / indibulin; SML2Y3J35T / Colchicine
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85. Merimsky O, Issakov J, Bickels J, Kollender Y, Flusser G, Soyfer V, Schwartz I, Inbar M, Meller I: ErbB-4 expression in limb soft-tissue sarcoma: correlation with the results of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Eur J Cancer; 2002 Jul;38(10):1335-42
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  • [Title] ErbB-4 expression in limb soft-tissue sarcoma: correlation with the results of neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • In this study, we assessed the possible role of erbB-4 as a tissue marker for soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) and its correlation with the response to chemotherapy.
  • The histological specimen of 29 patients with STS of a limb who had received preoperative doxorubicin (ADR)-based chemotherapy were studied for the degree of necrosis and the expression of erbB-4 (by an avidin-biotin-peroxidase technique).
  • ErbB-4 expression in the preoperative tissue samples was compared with the expression in the postchemotherapy resected tumour.
  • The true objective response rate to preoperative chemotherapy was 34%.
  • Wide resection of the tumour was done in 12 patients, marginal in 14, amputation in 2 and no surgery in 1.
  • The tumour necrosis was above 90% in 9 patients, 60-90% in 12, and less than 60% in 7 patients.
  • An increase in erbB-4 expression was more common in cases with no response to chemotherapy, while no change or a decrease in erbB-4 was more common in responsive tumours (P=0.004).
  • The median disease-free survival (DFS) was longer for patients with a decrease or no change in expression of erbB-4 than for patients with increased expression.
  • It is believed that postchemotherapy new expression or no downregulation of the erbB-4 molecule represents tumour aggressiveness and increased capability of growth and spread.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism. Sarcoma. Soft Tissue Neoplasms
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Disease-Free Survival. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Receptor, ErbB-4


86. Pink D, Lindner T, Mrozek A, Kretzschmar A, Thuss-Patience PC, Dörken B, Reichardt P: Harm or benefit of hormonal treatment in metastatic low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma: single center experience with 10 cases and review of the literature. Gynecol Oncol; 2006 Jun;101(3):464-9
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  • [Title] Harm or benefit of hormonal treatment in metastatic low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma: single center experience with 10 cases and review of the literature.
  • Endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) is a rare disease with probably less than 700 new cases in the US or EU per year.
  • A higher risk in women receiving estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) or tamoxifen has been suspected, and remissions following treatment with progestins have been reported in case studies.
  • Aromatase inhibitors represent an interesting new treatment option.
  • Due to the rarity of the tumor, only few case series and no prospective studies are published.
  • We therefore conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the influence of hormonal treatment to ESS.
  • METHODS: Our institutional sarcoma data bank was screened for cases of ESS since 1999.
  • Diagnosis was established before or by hysterectomy in 6 patients, by local recurrence after previous hysterectomy for nonmalignant disease in 3 patients or by pulmonary metastases with no primary tumor found so far in 1 patient.
  • 5/10 patients were on ERT and 3/10 on tamoxifen at the time of diagnosis of metastatic disease.
  • Treatment strategies consisted of stopping ERT and tamoxifen, respectively, or initiation of the progestin MPA or letrozole.
  • Three patients achieved stable disease after stopping ERT.
  • 2/3 patients responded to MPA as first-line treatment (1 CR; 50+ months, 1 PR; 9 months).
  • 4/5 patients responded to letrozole as first-line therapy (3 PR;3+, 9+ and 10+ months) or second-line treatment after MPA (1 PR; 37+ months).
  • Survival since diagnosis of metastatic disease is 4 to 164 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with a previous history of low-grade ESS should not be treated with estrogens or tamoxifen.
  • If nevertheless present, withdrawal of ERT or tamoxifen is strongly advised, resulting in disease stabilization in some cases.
  • MPA and letrozole, in particular, are highly effective and lead to sustained disease control in most cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Endometrial Stromal Tumors / drug therapy. Estrogen Replacement Therapy / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Medroxyprogesterone Acetate / adverse effects. Medroxyprogesterone Acetate / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Nitriles / adverse effects. Nitriles / therapeutic use. Pelvic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pelvic Neoplasms / surgery. Peritoneal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Peritoneal Neoplasms / surgery. Retrospective Studies. Tamoxifen / adverse effects. Tamoxifen / therapeutic use. Triazoles / adverse effects. Triazoles / therapeutic use. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / surgery

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  • [CommentIn] Gynecol Oncol. 2006 Aug;102(2):413-4; author reply 414 [16712906.001]
  • (PMID = 16368128.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Nitriles; 0 / Triazoles; 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen; 7LKK855W8I / letrozole; C2QI4IOI2G / Medroxyprogesterone Acetate
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87. Zhan HW, Liu HB, Bao CK, Ye XJ, Zhang H, He GQ: Effect of carbogen on tumour oxygenation and 32P-colloid interstitial irradiation response. Med Sci Monit; 2010 Jan;16(1):BR11-6
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  • [Title] Effect of carbogen on tumour oxygenation and 32P-colloid interstitial irradiation response.
  • BACKGROUND: Interstitial irradiation therapy using radionuclides is a slow and continual process in which the effect is exerted gradually, thus improvement of the hypoxic status of the tumor will also take a long time.
  • It has been known that carbogen delivery of 5-15 min increases tumor oxygenation.
  • However, the long-term effect of carbogen breathing on hypoxic cells has not yet been determined, and little is know about the effect of carbogen breathing for sensitization to interstitial irradiation therapy.
  • MATERIAL/METHODS: 99mTc-HL91(99mTc 4,9-diaza-3,3,10,10-tetramethyldodecan-2,1-dione dioxime) hypoxic imaging was performed in 10 mice bearing sarcoma 180 (S180) before and after 2 h carbogen breathing.
  • Radioactivity ratios of tumor to contralateral limbs (T/L) of the 2 images were calculated and compared.
  • Tumor growth rate was observed in the S180-bearing mice.
  • RESULTS: T/L of 99mTc-HL91 uptake before and after carbogen breathing was 1.872+/-0.391 and 1.354+/-0.189, respectively (t=4.476, P<0.01).
  • In mice in the 32P-treated air breathing group and 32P-treated carbogen breathing group, tumor growth rate did not differ on day 12 after 32P-colloid treatment, and on day 24 the tumor volume was 2.728+/-0.469 and 2.237+/-0.603 cm3 (t=2.128, P<0.05), respectively, with tumor mass being 2.437+/-0.447 and 1.965+/-0.538 g (t=2.134, P<0.05), respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Long-term carbogen breathing can increase tumor oxygenation and continual carbogen breathing is necessary for enhancing the therapeutic effect of 32P-colloid interstitial irradiation.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachytherapy / methods. Carbon Dioxide / pharmacology. Oxygen / pharmacology. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / pharmacology. Sarcoma 180 / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Hypoxia / drug effects. Cell Hypoxia / physiology. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Organotechnetium Compounds. Oximes. Phosphorus Radioisotopes

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  • (PMID = 20037480.001).
  • [ISSN] 1643-3750
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Sci. Monit.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organotechnetium Compounds; 0 / Oximes; 0 / Phosphorus Radioisotopes; 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; 0 / technetium Tc 99m 4,9-diaza-3,3,10,10-tetramethyldodecan-2,11-dione dioxime; 142M471B3J / Carbon Dioxide; 8063-77-2 / carbogen; S88TT14065 / Oxygen
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88. Thall PF, Wathen JK: Covariate-adjusted adaptive randomization in a sarcoma trial with multi-stage treatments. Stat Med; 2005 Jul 15;24(13):1947-64
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  • [Title] Covariate-adjusted adaptive randomization in a sarcoma trial with multi-stage treatments.
  • We present a Bayesian design for a multi-centre, randomized clinical trial of two chemotherapy regimens for advanced or metastatic unresectable soft tissue sarcoma.
  • After randomization, each patient receives up to four stages of chemotherapy, with the patient's disease evaluated after each stage and categorized on a trinary scale of severity.
  • Therapy is continued to the next stage if the patient's disease is stable, and is discontinued if either tumour response or treatment failure is observed.
  • We assume a probability model that accounts for baseline covariates and the multi-stage treatment and disease evaluation structure.
  • The design uses covariate-adjusted adaptive randomization based on a score that combines the patient's probabilities of overall treatment success or failure.
  • The adaptive randomization procedure generalizes the method proposed by Thompson (1933) for two binomial distributions with beta priors.
  • A simulation study of the design in the context of the sarcoma trial is presented.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma / drug therapy. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Bayes Theorem. Humans. Probability. United States

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • (PMID = 15806621.001).
  • [ISSN] 0277-6715
  • [Journal-full-title] Statistics in medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stat Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA 83932
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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89. Kudawara I, Araki N, Myoui A, Uchida A, Fukuda H, Yoshikawa H: Synovial sarcoma after chemotherapy for osteosarcoma: a case report. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2004 Jan;(418):198-201
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  • [Title] Synovial sarcoma after chemotherapy for osteosarcoma: a case report.
  • A 23-year-old man had eight cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy including doxorubicin, cisplatin, methotrexate, and ifosfamide and radical surgery for biopsy-proved osteosarcoma of the right fibular shaft.
  • Two years after the initial diagnosis, he noticed a mass in the medial aspect of his right knee.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a soft tissue tumor measuring 2 x 2 cm in the pericapsular region of the right knee.
  • Histologically, this soft tissue tumor was composed of spindle cells with occasional atypical mitoses and without matrix formation.
  • Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for vimentin, cytokeratin, and epithelial membrane antigen, and negative for alpha smooth muscle actin.
  • From the results, the secondary tumor was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma.
  • The current case of double sarcomas is rare.
  • Both sarcomas were diagnosed accurately using immunohistochemical and molecular procedures.
  • This case suggests a positive association between a second tumor and chemotherapy including intraarterial perfusion of doxorubicin.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / diagnosis. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Fibula. Knee Joint. Neoplasms, Second Primary / diagnosis. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Sarcoma, Synovial / diagnosis


90. Bodner K, Bodner-Adler B, Obermair A, Windbichler G, Petru E, Mayerhofer S, Czerwenka K, Leodolter S, Kainz C, Mayerhofer K: Prognostic parameters in endometrial stromal sarcoma: a clinicopathologic study in 31 patients. Gynecol Oncol; 2001 May;81(2):160-5
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  • [Title] Prognostic parameters in endometrial stromal sarcoma: a clinicopathologic study in 31 patients.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESS) in relation to their clinical and pathologic features and to identify possible prognostic factors.
  • Endometrial stromal sarcoma is characterized by proliferations composed of cells with endometrial stromal cell differentiation.
  • A breakpoint of 10 mitoses per 10 high-power fields was used in the statistical analysis to distinguish between low-grade and high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma and to evaluate the prognostic value of mitotic count in patients with ESS.
  • RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 72 months (range 34-110).
  • Adjuvant therapy was administered to 25 patients; among those, 20 patients received postoperative radiotherapy and 5 patients received chemotherapy.
  • Ten of the irradiated patients and 3 patients undergoing chemotherapy developed disease recurrence.
  • Concerning the response rate to adjuvant chemotherapy, 1 patient showed a complete response, 1 patient a partial response, 1 patient stable disease, and 2 patients progressive disease.
  • Altogether, 14 patients developed recurrent disease with a median disease-free survival of 11 months (range 5-60).
  • Twelve patients died of the disease.
  • A univariate model revealed that early tumor stage (P < 0.0007), low myometrial invasion (P < 0.008), and low mitotic count (P < 0.005) were associated with a lengthened overall survival in patients with endometrial stromal sarcoma.
  • Age and adjuvant therapy did not influence overall survival of patients with ESS.
  • CONCLUSION: Early tumor stage, low myometrial invasion, and low mitotic count are associated with a lengthened overall survival in patients with ESS.
  • [MeSH-major] Endometrial Neoplasms / pathology. Sarcoma, Endometrial Stromal / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Analysis of Variance. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Hysterectomy. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Ovariectomy. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Salpingostomy. Survival Analysis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 Academic Press.
  • (PMID = 11330943.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
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91. Mahoney JA, Fisher JC, Snyder SA, Hauck ML: Feasibility of using gene expression analysis to study canine soft tissue sarcomas. Mamm Genome; 2010 Dec;21(11-12):577-82
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  • [Title] Feasibility of using gene expression analysis to study canine soft tissue sarcomas.
  • The prognosis given for canine soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) is based primarily on histopathologic grade.
  • The decision to administer adjuvant chemotherapy is difficult since less than half of patients with high-grade STSs develop metastatic disease.
  • We hypothesize that there is a gene signature that will improve our ability to predict development of metastatic disease in STS patients.
  • The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis to determine gene expression patterns in metastatic versus nonmetastatic canine STSs, given the inherent heterogeneity of this group of tumors.
  • Five STSs from dogs with metastatic disease were evaluated in comparison to eight STSs from dogs without metastasis.
  • Tumor RNA was extracted, processed, and labeled for application to the Affymetrix Canine Genechip 2.0 Array.
  • Differential gene expression was validated for five genes upregulated in metastatic tumors.
  • Further evaluation of the differences between gene expression in metastatic STSs and in nonmetastatic STSs is likely to identify genes that are important in the development of metastatic disease and improve our ability to prognosticate for individual patients.

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  • (PMID = 21076837.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1777
  • [Journal-full-title] Mammalian genome : official journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mamm. Genome
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA042745; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 2P01-CA42745
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Neoplasm
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS481587; NLM/ PMC3810003
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92. Attabib NA, West M, Rhodes RH: Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the cavernous sinus: case report. Neurosurgery; 2006 May;58(5):E992; discussion E992
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  • [Title] Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the cavernous sinus: case report.
  • OBJECTIVE: Ewing sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (pPNET family) are small, round, blue cell tumors that have a decided predilection for young patients and commonly arise in bone and soft tissue.
  • INTERVENTION: The patient underwent debulking of the tumor, and the diagnosis of a pPNET was made based on histological, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetics (EWS-FLI1 fusion gene) findings.
  • Bone scans, bone marrow aspiration, and biopsy and chest computed tomographic scans showed no evidence of systemic involvement.
  • The patient had adjuvant treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • After 14 months, the patient had no neurological deficits, and neuroimaging showed stable disease, although some chemotherapy complications occurred.
  • CONCLUSION: This is a case of cavernous sinus pPNET in a 48-year-old woman, in whom the diagnosis is supported by the presence of EWS-FLI1 fusion gene.
  • This seems to be the first reported case of a cavernous sinus pPNET confirmed by molecular genetic analysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Cavernous Sinus / pathology. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive, Peripheral / diagnosis. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive, Peripheral / genetics

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  • (PMID = 16639307.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / EWS-FLI fusion protein; 0 / Oncogene Proteins, Fusion; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Protein c-fli-1; 0 / RNA-Binding Protein EWS
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93. Cheng EY: Surgical management of sarcomas. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am; 2005 Jun;19(3):451-70, v
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  • [Title] Surgical management of sarcomas.
  • Nearly all bone and soft tissue sarcomas will require surgical management.
  • Early consultation with a surgeon who is experienced in sarcomas, before a biopsy is performed, will avoid potential errors that may complicate subsequent surgery.
  • Advances in imaging, neoadjuvant therapies, and reconstructive techniques have improved the ability to resect adequately most bone and soft tissue sarcomas.
  • The use of oncologic and functional outcomes assessment tools facilitates the development of improved treatments for sarcoma patients.
  • Results from major centers reveal that most patients who have a nonmetastatic bone or soft tissue sarcoma will survive 5 years after surgery when combined with either chemotherapy or radiation.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15939191.001).
  • [ISSN] 0889-8588
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology/oncology clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol. Oncol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 56
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94. Sethom A, Akkari K, Hachicha A, Bahri W, Miled I, Benzarti S, Kamel Chebbi M: [Ear nose sarcoma. Report of 3 cases]. Tunis Med; 2010 Jun;88(6):440-4
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  • [Title] [Ear nose sarcoma. Report of 3 cases].
  • [Transliterated title] Les Sarcomes à localisation ORL. (A propos de 3 Observations).
  • BACKGROUND: Head and neck sarcoma are very rare malignant tumors which can occur on any different ENT localization.
  • AIM: The authors report tree different variety of ENT sarcoma diagnosed and treated at the oto-rhino-laryngological department of military hospital of Tunis.
  • We intend to remind of clinical and histological particularities, therapeutic modalities and finally to evaluate the follow-up.
  • METHODS: From 2001 to 2007, three cases of head and neck sarcomas were diagnosed in ENT department of military hospital of Tunis.
  • It deals with an orbital rhabdomyosarcoma, a carcinosarcoma of submandibular gland and a maxillary chondrosarcoma.
  • In each case, diagnosis was validated by the immunohistochemistry.
  • All patients had surgical removal of their tumor.
  • External irradiation or/and chemotherapy was also indicated for all cases.
  • CONCLUSION: ENT sarcomas are aggressive neoplasm.
  • [MeSH-major] Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Sarcoma / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 20517859.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-4131
  • [Journal-full-title] La Tunisie médicale
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tunis Med
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Tunisia
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95. Spira AI, Ettinger DS: The use of chemotherapy in soft-tissue sarcomas. Oncologist; 2002;7(4):348-59
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  • [Title] The use of chemotherapy in soft-tissue sarcomas.
  • The treatment of advanced soft-tissue sarcomas is often palliative, although a subset of patients may be cured or have a long disease-free interval.
  • This paper reviews the historical data over 30 years of treatment that has led to the use of ifosfamide and doxorubicin as the mainstay in the treatment of metastatic disease.
  • These treatments have a high toxicity, relative to other chemotherapeutic regimens, with median response durations on the order of months.
  • Agents developed in the last few years, whose role in the treatment of sarcomas is still evolving, are discussed as well.
  • Finally, we discuss the role of chemotherapy in combination with surgery and radiation in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Elective Surgical Procedures. Humans. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12185297.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-7159
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 81
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96. Timmermann B, Schuck A, Niggli F, Weiss M, Lomax AJ, Pedroni E, Coray A, Jermann M, Rutz HP, Goitein G: Spot-scanning proton therapy for malignant soft tissue tumors in childhood: First experiences at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2007 Feb 1;67(2):497-504
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  • [Title] Spot-scanning proton therapy for malignant soft tissue tumors in childhood: First experiences at the Paul Scherrer Institute.
  • PURPOSE: Radiotherapy plays a major role in the treatment strategy of childhood sarcomas.
  • Consequences of treatment are likely to affect the survivor's quality of life significantly.
  • We investigated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy (PT) for soft tissue tumors in childhood.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Sixteen children with soft tissue sarcomas were included.
  • In 10 children the tumor histology was embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.
  • All tumors were located in the head or neck, parameningeal, or paraspinal, or pelvic region.
  • In the majority of children, the tumor was initially unresectable (Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study [IRS] Group III in 75%).
  • In 50% of children the tumors exceeded 5 cm.
  • Fourteen children had chemotherapy before and during PT.
  • All 16 children were treated with spot-scanning proton therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute, and in 3 children the PT was intensity-modulated (IMPT).
  • All 4 children died of tumor recurrence.
  • All 4 showed unfavorable characteristic either of site or histopathology of the tumor.
  • Acute toxicity was low, with Grade 3 or 4 side effects according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria occurring in the bone marrow only.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Proton therapy was feasible and well tolerated.
  • [MeSH-major] Protons / therapeutic use. Sarcoma / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Feasibility Studies. Female. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / mortality. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Humans. Infant. Male. Meningeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Meningeal Neoplasms / mortality. Meningeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Quality of Life. Radiation Injuries / pathology. Rhabdomyosarcoma, Embryonal / drug therapy. Rhabdomyosarcoma, Embryonal / mortality. Rhabdomyosarcoma, Embryonal / radiotherapy. Spinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Spinal Neoplasms / mortality. Spinal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Survivors

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  • (PMID = 17084557.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protons
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97. Osanai T, Tsuchiya T, Sugawara M: Rapid pain relief and marked sclerotic change of multiple bone metastases from a synovial sarcoma after treatment with intravenous pamidronate and chemotherapy. J Orthop Sci; 2009 Mar;14(2):224-7
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  • [Title] Rapid pain relief and marked sclerotic change of multiple bone metastases from a synovial sarcoma after treatment with intravenous pamidronate and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Bone Density Conservation Agents / administration & dosage. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Diphosphonates / administration & dosage. Muscle Neoplasms / pathology. Pain / drug therapy. Sarcoma, Synovial / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19337817.001).
  • [ISSN] 1436-2023
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of orthopaedic science : official journal of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Orthop Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bone Density Conservation Agents; 0 / Diphosphonates; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; OYY3447OMC / pamidronate; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
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98. Engellau J, Samuelsson V, Anderson H, Bjerkehagen B, Rissler P, Sundby-Hall K, Rydholm A: Identification of low-risk tumours in histological high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. Eur J Cancer; 2007 Sep;43(13):1927-34
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  • [Title] Identification of low-risk tumours in histological high-grade soft tissue sarcomas.
  • In more than one-third of patients with a histological high-grade malignant soft tissue sarcoma metastasis develops despite local control of the primary tumour.
  • Hence, adjuvant chemotherapy is increasingly used for these relatively chemoresistant tumours which requires improved prognostication to exclude low-risk patients from overtreatment.
  • Vascular invasion was used as the first discriminator whereafter the risk factors tumour necrosis, size (>8cm) and infiltrating growth pattern were used to discriminate high- and low-risk tumours.
  • We identified a high-risk group with a cumulative incidence of metastasis >0.4 at 5 years, and a low-risk group, comprising half of the tumours, with a cumulative incidence of metastasis <0.15.
  • This model improved prognostication in STS and is of value for identifying patients who probably should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Prognosis. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 17627813.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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99. Olsen RJ, Tarantolo SR, Hinrichs SH: Molecular approaches to sarcoma therapy. Sarcoma; 2002;6(1):27-42
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  • [Title] Molecular approaches to sarcoma therapy.
  • Soft tissue sarcomas comprise a heterogeneous group of aggressive tumors that have a relatively poor prognosis.
  • Although conventional therapeutic regimens can effectively cytoreduce the overall tumor mass, they fail to consistently achieve a curative outcome.
  • Alternative gene-based approaches that counteract the underlying neoplastic process by eliminating the clonal aberrations that potentiate malignant behavior have been proposed.
  • As compared to the accumulation of gene alterations associated with epithelial carcinomas, sarcomas are frequently characterized by the unique presence of a single chromosomal translocation in each histological subtype.
  • Secondary gene mutations may provide an additional growth advantage that further contributes to malignant progression.
  • The recent clinical success of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, STI571, suggests that therapeutic approaches specifically directed against essential survival factors in sarcoma cells may be effective.
  • (3) restoration of tumor suppressor function;.
  • The potential for improving outcomes in sarcoma patients and the conceptual obstacles to be overcome are discussed.

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