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1. Santeufemia DA, Piredda G, Fadda GM, Cossu Rocca P, Costantino S, Sanna G, Sarobba MG, Pinna MA, Putzu C, Farris A: Successful outcome after combined chemotherapeutic and surgical management in a case of esophageal cancer with breast and brain relapse. World J Gastroenterol; 2006 Sep 14;12(34):5565-8
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  • Approximately 50% of patients present with metastatic EC and most patients with localized EC will have local recurrence or develop metastases, despite potentially curative local therapy.
  • The most common sites of distant recurrence are represented by lung, liver and bone while brain and breast metastases are rare.
  • We report a woman patient who developed breast and brain metastases after curative surgery.
  • We think that in super selected patients with more than one metastasis, when functional status is good and metastases are technically resectable, a surgical excision may be considered as a salvage option and chemotherapy should be delivered to allow a systemic control.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis / therapy. Recurrence. Treatment Outcome


2. Mulder K, Koski S, Scarfe A, Chu Q, King K, Spratlin J: Antiangiogenic agents in advanced gastrointestinal malignancies: past, present and a novel future. Oncotarget; 2010 Nov;1(7):515-29
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  • Advanced gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies are varied in presentation, prognosis, and treatment options.
  • With the exception of resectable recurrent colorectal cancer, metastatic GI malignancies are incurable.
  • Cytotoxic chemotherapies have been the mainstay of therapy for decades but limited extension of survival or clinical benefit has been achieved in non-colorectal GI cancers.
  • Clear benefits have been identified with bevacizumab and sorafenib in colorectal cancer and hepatocellular cancer, respectively; other GI tumor sites have lacked impressive results with antiangiogenic agents.
  • In this review, we will present the benefits, or lack thereof, of clinically tested antiangiogenic compounds in GI malignancies and explore some potential new therapeutic anti-angiogenesis options for these diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Medical Oncology / trends
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Biliary Tract Neoplasms / drug therapy. Biliary Tract Neoplasms / pathology. Disease Progression. Drugs, Investigational / therapeutic use. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / pathology. Models, Biological. Pancreatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / pathology. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 21317448.001).
  • [ISSN] 1949-2553
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncotarget
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncotarget
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Drugs, Investigational; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3248127
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3. Müller H, Hilger R: Curative and palliative aspects of regional chemotherapy in combination with surgery. Support Care Cancer; 2003 Jan;11(1):1-10
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  • [Title] Curative and palliative aspects of regional chemotherapy in combination with surgery.
  • In particular, combined-modality treatment strategies combining surgery with more localised therapies, e.g. radiotherapy, or systemic therapies such as chemotherapy have yielded promising data.
  • The aim of regional chemotherapy is to improve locoregional cytostatic drug concentrations by achieving greater local efficacy and to diminish systemic side effects by reducing plasma drug levels.
  • Highly qualified and experienced exponents of regional chemotherapy can complement surgical measures by applying multimodal strategies, because of their high efficacy in terms of tumour mass reduction without permanent tissue injuries, such as fibrosis or the damage to the vascular bed familiar from radiotherapeutic interventions.
  • During the last 15 years, several new and very effective methods of administration, such as isolated pelvic perfusion or isolated thoracic perfusion, have extended the therapeutic arsenal of regional chemotherapy.
  • The techniques needed for such transcutaneous and minimally invasive approaches as angiographically administered intra-arterial chemotherapy have been improved and side effects and the complication rate, dramatically reduced.
  • With this technique, it is possible to attain cytostatic drug concentrations twice as high as those attained with systemic high-dose therapy with the same drug (treosulfan), but with only a quarter of the dosage and without bone marrow transplantation.
  • Such techniques are now also available for the pelvic area, the thoracic region, the chest wall, the liver and the limbs.
  • Regional chemotherapy is a very effective tool for induction therapy when tumours are apparently inoperable, as it can lead to sufficient shrinkage to make such tumours resectable. of all cases In an unselected series of 131 patients with colorectal liver metastases liver surgery with curative intent was possible after two cycles of therapy in 21.4% when immuno-chemoembolisation plus intra-arterial infusion was used as an inductive treatment.
  • In 57.4% of these patients systemic chemotherapy had preceded surgery.
  • After a median follow-up of more than 3 years, median survival has not been reached in the resected group and was 30 months for the group treated by regional chemotherapy alone.
  • In about 55% of these cases, a second debulking procedure was possible, leading to a reduction in pain and symptoms and prolongation in survival, with a 1-year survival rate of 67%.
  • Regional chemotherapy also seems to be very effective as an induction treatment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in stages III A (bulky disease) and III B.
  • This technique paves the way for a more effective induction therapy in advanced NSCLC, followed by resection and adjuvant radiotherapy of the mediastinum.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion / methods. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / surgery. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / surgery. Palliative Care. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 12527948.001).
  • [ISSN] 0941-4355
  • [Journal-full-title] Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Support Care Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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4. Bellone G, Novarino A, Vizio B, Brondino G, Addeo A, Prati A, Giacobino A, Campra D, Fronda GR, Ciuffreda L: Impact of surgery and chemotherapy on cellular immunity in pancreatic carcinoma patients in view of an integration of standard cancer treatment with immunotherapy. Int J Oncol; 2009 Jun;34(6):1701-15
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  • [Title] Impact of surgery and chemotherapy on cellular immunity in pancreatic carcinoma patients in view of an integration of standard cancer treatment with immunotherapy.
  • As surgery and chemotherapy may act as adjuvants providing antitumor immunity benefits, we ran phenotypical and functional immunomonitoring in patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma and advanced metastatic disease receiving combined treatment (cisplatin, gemcitabine, 5-FU).
  • Blood was taken before/one month after resection; before/during chemotherapy.
  • Circulating lymphocyte, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cell (MDC and PDC) subsets were examined by flow cytometry; functional activity by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) for DC allostimulation, through 4-h 51Cr-release assay for Natural Killer (NK) and lymphokine-activated-killer (LAK) cell cytotoxicity; ELISA for spontaneous/activated cytokine release by PBMC and T cells.
  • In patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease, one and/or two combined drug cycles increased percentage of CD4+ cells and LAK cell cytotoxicity and decreased PDC frequency and spontaneous/LPS-stimulated IL-10 by PBMC.
  • Results suggest immunological changes induced by surgical resection/combined chemotherapy indicate specific precisely-timed windows of opportunity for introducing immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer, possibly improving survival in this highly lethal disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / immunology. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Immunotherapy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antigens, CD3 / immunology. Antigens, CD3 / metabolism. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / metabolism. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Cytotoxicity, Immunologic. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Female. Flow Cytometry. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Interferon-gamma / metabolism. Interleukin-12 Subunit p40 / immunology. Interleukin-12 Subunit p40 / metabolism. Killer Cells, Lymphokine-Activated / drug effects. Killer Cells, Lymphokine-Activated / immunology. Killer Cells, Lymphokine-Activated / metabolism. Lipopolysaccharides / pharmacology. Liver Neoplasms / immunology. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Liver Neoplasms / therapy. Lung Neoplasms / immunology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / therapy. Lymphocyte Activation. Male. Middle Aged. Peritoneal Neoplasms / immunology. Peritoneal Neoplasms / secondary. Peritoneal Neoplasms / therapy. Pilot Projects. Prognosis. Survival Rate. T-Lymphocytes / immunology. T-Lymphocytes / metabolism. T-Lymphocytes / pathology. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19424589.001).
  • [ISSN] 1019-6439
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD3; 0 / Interleukin-12 Subunit p40; 0 / Lipopolysaccharides; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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5. Ishii H, Yamamoto J, Ikari T: Adjuvant treatments for resectable hepatocellular carcinoma. J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg; 2008;15(5):459-62
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  • [Title] Adjuvant treatments for resectable hepatocellular carcinoma.
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma often recurs even after curative resection.
  • Although some encouraging data showing improvements in recurrence-free times have been reported with the use of intraarterial 131I-lipiodol infusion, retinoids, interferon, or immunotherapy after hepatectomy, there is no consensus regarding standard adjuvant therapy for resectable hepatocellular carcinoma.
  • In future trials, it will be important to identify appropriate target populations for each type of adjuvant approach; that is, an agent with definitive antitumor activity for high-risk patients, and one that shows chemoprevention for low-risk patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemoembolization, Therapeutic. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial

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  • (PMID = 18836796.001).
  • [ISSN] 0944-1166
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of hepato-biliary-pancreatic surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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6. Tsushima T, Tsuji Y, Abe S, Tamura F, Mizushima T, Nagashima H, Oura K, Kukitsu T, Sumiyoshi T, Yoshizaki N, Kondo H: [A case of metastatic gastric endocrine cell carcinoma which could be curably resected after chemotherapy with S-1/CDDP]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2008 May;35(5):817-20
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  • [Title] [A case of metastatic gastric endocrine cell carcinoma which could be curably resected after chemotherapy with S-1/CDDP].
  • Gastric endocrine cell carcinoma is known to be highly malignant with a poor prognosis, and no standard treatment has been established.
  • We experienced a case of endocrine cell carcinoma of the stomach with liver and lymph node metastases.
  • The lesions became resectable at curability B after chemotherapy with S-1/cisplatin (CDDP).
  • A 30-mm tumor was found at the greater curvature of the lower body of the stomach, and was histologically diagnosed as an endocrine cell carcinoma from the biopsy specimen.
  • A computed tomography (CT) scan and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed masses at S5 and S6 of the liver, and No. 4 lymph node enlargement.
  • Diagnosed as gastric endocrine cell carcinoma with liver and lymph node metastases, he was referred to our hospital.
  • We started chemotherapy with a daily dose of S-1 administered on days 1 to 14 and CDDP of 70 mg/m(2) on day 8, every 4 weeks.
  • After three courses of treatment, the primary lesion became a small scar and the metastatic lesions vanished from the CT and MRI.
  • Then we performed distal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection and partial liver resectomy.
  • Histological findings revealed no cancer cells, except for a few cells in the S5 liver lesion.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Small Cell / therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Drug Combinations. Gastrectomy. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lymphatic Metastasis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Oxonic Acid / administration & dosage. Tegafur / administration & dosage. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 18487920.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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7. Schwartz JD, Schwartz M, Mandeli J, Sung M: Neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy for resectable hepatocellular carcinoma: review of the randomised clinical trials. Lancet Oncol; 2002 Oct;3(10):593-603
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  • [Title] Neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy for resectable hepatocellular carcinoma: review of the randomised clinical trials.
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is common worldwide, and its incidence is increasing.
  • Liver resection or transplantation is potentially curative, although subsequent recurrence and death are common.
  • We reviewed randomised trials on the role of adjuvant therapy in resectable HCC.
  • Three studies involved predominantly systemic adjuvant chemotherapy; four involved predominantly hepatic-artery-based chemotherapy or embolisation; and six used other therapeutic modalities including immunological, radiation, and differentiation agents.
  • A therapeutic benefit in terms of disease-free or overall survival was noted in six trials, five of which involved modalities other than systemic or hepatic-artery chemotherapy or embolisation.
  • We conclude that systemic and hepatic-artery chemotherapy or chemoembolisation have not been shown to improve overall or disease-free survival after resection of HCC, although there has been no definitive trial comparing adjuvant systemic chemotherapy with no treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemoembolization, Therapeutic. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Humans. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Research Design. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 12372721.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-2045
  • [Journal-full-title] The Lancet. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 72
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8. Ohhinata R, Iwasaki Y, Ohashi M, Iwanaga T, Takahashi K, Yamaguchi T, Matsumoto H, Nakano D, Maeda Y, Sasaki E: [A case of gastric endocrine cell carcinoma with liver metastases treated with S-1/CDDP]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 Nov;37(12):2508-10
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  • [Title] [A case of gastric endocrine cell carcinoma with liver metastases treated with S-1/CDDP].
  • Gastric endocrine cell carcinoma is known to be highly malignant with a poor prognosis, and no standard treatment has been established.
  • We experienced a case of gastric endocrine cell carcinoma with liver and lymph node metastases.
  • The lesions became resectable after chemotherapy with S-1/cisplatin (CDDP).
  • The endoscopy findings showed that a type 3 gastric cancer on lesser curvature of ventricular angle of the stomach, and was histologically diagnosed as an endocrine cell carcinoma by the biopsy specimen.
  • A computed tomography (CT) scan showed metastatic lesions at S2 and S3 of the liver, and No.6 lymph node enlargement.
  • Thus he was diagnosed as gastric endocrine cell carcinoma with liver and lymph node metastases.
  • He was treated chemotherapy with S-1/CDDP every 5 weeks.
  • After these courses of treatment, liver and lymph node metastatic lesions had reduced in size, but the primary lesion was still remained.
  • Then he suffered from a drug induced eruption due to S-1.
  • We changed the chemotherapy to biweekly CPT-11/CDDP.
  • After 21 courses, he underwent distal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection and a partial liver resection.
  • He had treated 8 courses of CPT-11/CDDP therapy after the surgery, and survived for 5 years without recurrence.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Endocrine Gland Neoplasms / drug therapy. Endocrine Gland Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Camptothecin / administration & dosage. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Drug Combinations. Gastrectomy. Hepatectomy. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Oxonic Acid / administration & dosage. Tegafur / administration & dosage. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 21224622.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; 7673326042 / irinotecan; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
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9. Recchia F, Sica G, De Filippis S, Rosselli M, Saggio G, Guerriero G, Pompili P, Rea S: Cisplatin, vindesine, mitomycin-C and 13-cis retinoic acid in the treatment of advanced non small cell lung cancer. A phase II pilot study. Anticancer Res; 2000 May-Jun;20(3B):1985-90
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINDESINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cisplatin, vindesine, mitomycin-C and 13-cis retinoic acid in the treatment of advanced non small cell lung cancer. A phase II pilot study.
  • BACKGROUND: Thirteen-cis retinoic acid (RA) has been shown to have growth-inhibitory and differentiative activity on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in vitro.
  • This promoted the rationale for combining RA with three active drugs, cisplatin (CDDP) vindesine (VDS) and mitomycin-c (MMC) in the treatment of advanced NSCLC.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with a histologically confirmed non-resectable NSCLC, measurable lesion, performance status < or = 3, and informed consent were enrolled.
  • The chemotherapy schedule included cisplatin 60 mg/m2 and mitomycin-c 10 mg/m2 day 1 and vindesine 3 mg/m2 on days 1 and 5, every 4 weeks.
  • RESULTS: Thirty patients, receiving a total of 163 chemotherapy courses, were evaluated for response and toxicity.
  • Median time to progression was 8.6 months (range 3.9-45+).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The addition of RA to cisplatin, vindesine and mitomycin-c is feasible and shows some activity in the treatment of NSCLC, with manageable toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / adverse effects. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Fatty Liver / chemically induced. Female. Humans. Hypertriglyceridemia / chemically induced. Isotretinoin / administration & dosage. Isotretinoin / adverse effects. Leukopenia / chemically induced. Male. Middle Aged. Mitomycin / administration & dosage. Mitomycin / adverse effects. Nervous System Diseases / chemically induced. Pilot Projects. Remission Induction. Survival Analysis. Thrombocytopenia / chemically induced. Treatment Outcome. Vindesine / administration & dosage. Vindesine / adverse effects


10. Hlavatá Z, Pazderová N, Povinec P, Paulíny P, Majidi A, Fiala P, Martanovic P, Sálek T: The value of 18-FDG PET/CT imaging in a patient with atypical metastatic colorectal cancer--case report: 18-FDG PET/CT in colorectal cancer. Klin Onkol; 2009;22(6):284-7
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  • Lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma have been reported as the most frequent primary tumours.
  • CASE: In this paper we report a case of metastasis of colorectal cancer in a 44-year-old man who underwent left-sided hemicolectomy due to the tumour mass in his left colic flexure followed by liver metastasectomy and cryocautery of the non-resectable metastasis in the VII segment.
  • Subsequently, the patient was treated with two lines of chemotherapy.
  • However, shortly after initiation of the second chemotherapy line he started to suffer from unbearable pain in the lumbosacral region.
  • CONCLUSION: Thus, among the different imaging techniques, FDG PET/CT enables the detection of metabolically highly active tumour cells, undetectable by other conventional imaging means.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Muscle Neoplasms / diagnosis. Muscle Neoplasms / secondary. Positron-Emission Tomography. Radiopharmaceuticals. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 20099747.001).
  • [ISSN] 0862-495X
  • [Journal-full-title] Klinická onkologie : casopis Ceské a Slovenské onkologické spolecnosti
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Klin Onkol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Czech Republic
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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11. Fan XY, Uchida H, Iwaki K, Kai S, Shibata K, Ohta M, Kitano S: [Anti-tumor effects of various interferons-alpha +5-fluorouracil via downregulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase in hepatoma cells]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2007 Jun;34(6):957-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Anti-tumor effects of various interferons-alpha +5-fluorouracil via downregulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase in hepatoma cells].
  • BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Systemic chemotherapy has not seen widespread use in the treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).
  • Recently, it was reported that combination treatment of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and interferon (IFN)-alpha was effective for non-resectable HCC.
  • The effect of 5-FU treatment is influenced by the activities of pyrimidine catabolic enzymes.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate which IFN-alphais most effective in combination therapy via downregulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD).
  • METHODS: Cell proliferation assay in human hepatoma cells (HepG 2) was performed using 5-FU and/or various IFNs-alpha (C-IFN, Intron A, OIF).
  • At the same time,DPD mRNA levels were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction.
  • C-IFN +5-FU most effectively prevented cancer cell proliferation (p < 0.05).
  • C-IFN may be most effective in the combination therapy of IFN-alpha +5-FU for HCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / pathology. Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP) / metabolism. Fluorouracil / pharmacology. Interferon-alpha / pharmacology. Liver Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Division. Cell Line, Tumor. Down-Regulation. Humans

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  • (PMID = 17565266.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Interferon-alpha; EC 1.3.1.2 / Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP); U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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12. Shorter NA, Glick RD, Klimstra DS, Brennan MF, Laquaglia MP: Malignant pancreatic tumors in childhood and adolescence: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering experience, 1967 to present. J Pediatr Surg; 2002 Jun;37(6):887-92
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pancreatic Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant pancreatic tumors in childhood and adolescence: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering experience, 1967 to present.
  • BACKGROUND: Malignant tumors of the pancreas are uncommon in children and adolescents and only recently have the most common tumor types been well characterized.
  • As a result, the treatment approach to these patients has yet to be standardized, and much of the information available in the literature, particularly with regard to the role of chemotherapy and radiation, is anecdotal.
  • METHODS: A retrospective review was undertaken of all patients less than 21 years of age with malignant pancreatic tumors who were cared for at Memorial Sloan-Kettering since 1967.
  • The pathologic types were pancreatoblastoma, 5; solid pseudopapillary tumor, 7; acinar cell carcinoma, 1; nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine neoplasm, 1; malignant VIPoma, 1; and PNET, 2.
  • Chemotherapy or radiation were used in selected cases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Unlike malignant pancreatic tumors in adults, tumors in children and adolescents usually are resectable, and long-term survival is likely.
  • The roles of chemotherapy and radiation remain undefined.
  • [MeSH-major] Pancreatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Pancreatic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Carcinoma, Acinar Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Acinar Cell / therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Pancreatectomy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Treatment Outcome. Vipoma / pathology. Vipoma / therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 12037756.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Takemura M, Osugi H, Lee S, Taguchi S, Kaneko M, Tanaka Y, Fukuhara K, Fujiwara Y, Nishizawa S, Kinoshita H, Harada S: [A case of synchronous esophageal and gastric cancer successfully treated by combination TS-1/CDDP therapy with irradiation]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2004 Feb;31(2):251-4
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [A case of synchronous esophageal and gastric cancer successfully treated by combination TS-1/CDDP therapy with irradiation].
  • We report a case of synchronous esophageal and gastric cancer in a patient with severe liver dysfunction who was treated successfully using TS-1/CDDP therapy combined with irradiation therapy.
  • The preoperative diagnosis was T3N0M0, Stage II esophageal cancer and T1N0M0, Stage I A gastric cancer, both of which were diagnosed to be resectable.
  • However, surgery was contraindicated because of severe liver dysfunction, due to an ICG15 of 35%.
  • TS-1 (80 mg/day) and CDDP (3 mg/day) therapy was combined with irradiation, 60 Gy given in a T-pattern to the mediastinum.
  • The patient did not suffer any side-effects, and endoscopy performed 44 days after the start of treatment showed that the esophageal lesion was now only a scar.
  • Only a slight elevation of the esophagus was seen by endoscopy 219 days after the start of the therapy.
  • The patient is currently undergoing only TS-1 treatment as an outpatient and is under observation.
  • No metastasis to the liver or any other organ has been detected.
  • TS-1 and CDDP therapy combined with radiotherapy appears to be effective in treating thoracic esophageal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Esophageal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Esophageal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Administration, Oral. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Combinations. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Oxonic Acid / administration & dosage. Pyridines / administration & dosage. Radiotherapy Dosage. Tegafur / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 14997762.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Pyridines; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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14. Peschel C, Hartmann JT, Schmittel A, Bokemeyer C, Schneller F, Keilholz U, Buchheidt D, Millan S, Izquierdo MA, Hofheinz RD: Phase II study of plitidepsin in pretreated patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Lung Cancer; 2008 Jun;60(3):374-80
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II study of plitidepsin in pretreated patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the progression-free rate (PFR) at 3 months (13+/-1 weeks), antitumor response, time-to-event efficacy endpoints, and toxicity profile of plitidepsin administered as a 3-h continuous i.v. infusion at a dose of 5mg/m(2), every 2 weeks, to patients with chemotherapy pretreated advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • Treatment lasted until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, patient refusal or treatment delay for >2 weeks.
  • RESULTS: A total of 21 patients with a median age of 61 years and with locally advanced or metastatic non-resectable NSCLC, who had previously received only one line of chemotherapy in an advanced setting, received a total of 54 cycles of treatment (median of two cycles per patient; range: 1-8).
  • With a median follow-up of 12.3 months, the median time to progression (TTP) and the median overall survival (OS) were 1.2 months and 4.3 months, respectively.
  • The most common side effects were anemia, and asymptomatic and non-cumulative increases of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and liver transaminase levels.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / pathology. Depsipeptides / administration & dosage. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Urochordata






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