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1. Dey BR, McAfee S, Sackstein R, Colby C, Saidman S, Weymouth D, Poliquin C, Vanderklish J, Sachs DH, Sykes M, Spitzer TR: Successful allogeneic stem cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancy following autologous stem cell transplantation. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2001;7(11):604-12
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Successful allogeneic stem cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancy following autologous stem cell transplantation.
  • The use of myeloablative preparative therapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) as salvage therapy for adult patients with relapsed hematologic malignancy after autologous stem cell transplantation (autoSCT) is generally unsuccessful due to very high treatment-related mortality rates.
  • We evaluated the outcome of HLA-matched related donor alloSCT following nonmyeloablative preparative therapy in 13 patients (median age, 38 years) with relapsed hematologic malignancies (Hodgkin's disease, n = 4; Hodgkin's disease and advanced myelodysplastic syndrome, n = 1; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, n = 6; multiple myeloma, n = 2) after initial autoSCT.
  • Median time from autoSCT to alloSCT was 12 months (range, 3-24 months); 6 patients had chemotherapy-refractory disease following autoSCT, 6 were in untreated relapse, and 1 had a partial response from salvage chemotherapy.
  • Preparative therapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, 150-200 mg/kg; peritransplantation anti-thymocyte globulin; thymic irradiation (in patients who had not received previous mediastinal irradiation); and a very short course of cyclosporine as GVHD prophylaxis.
  • The median survival time of the 13 patients is currently 10 months (range, 3-39 months), with an overall survival probability at 2 years of 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19%-73%) and a disease-free survival probability at 2 years of 37.5% (95% CI, 12%-65%).
  • Thus, this novel nonmyeloablative alloSCT strategy followed by prophylactic DLI was well tolerated and can result in durable disease-free survival among patients with advanced hematologic malignancies after a failed autoSCT.
  • Further follow-up and evaluation of additional patients are required to conclusively establish the role of this strategy in the treatment of hematologic malignancies after an autologous transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Immunosuppressive Agents / administration & dosage. Salvage Therapy / methods. Transplantation Conditioning / methods

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  • (PMID = 11760148.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-8791
  • [Journal-full-title] Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1 RO1 CA79986-O1A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1 RO1 CA79988-O1A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
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2. Szotkowski T, Szotkowska R, Pikalova Z, Tichy T, Flodr P, Tichy M, Houserkova D, Benysek V, Zlamalova N, Ruzicka V, Indrak K: Spontaneous splenic rupture in two patients with hematologic malignancy. Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub; 2007 Jun;151(1):113-6

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Spontaneous splenic rupture in two patients with hematologic malignancy.
  • PATIENTS: The first patient was admitted to hospital because of planned chemotherapy for relapsed hairy cell leukemia.
  • The diagnose of hematologic malignancy (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) was determined subsequently on the basis of histological examination of the spleen.

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  • (PMID = 17690752.001).
  • [ISSN] 1213-8118
  • [Journal-full-title] Biomedical papers of the Medical Faculty of the University Palacký, Olomouc, Czechoslovakia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Czech Republic
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3. Fullmer A, O'Brien S, Kantarjian H, Jabbour E: Novel therapies for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2009 Jul;4(3):148-56
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Novel therapies for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor.
  • Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL.
  • Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease.
  • For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated.
  • The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromo some-positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to available tyrosine kinase inhibitors.
  • Nelarabine demonstrates activity as monotherapy in T-cell ALL and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.
  • Development of new drugs and agents tailored to subset-specific cytogenetic-molecular characteristics remains vital to success in treating adult ALL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20425428.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 50
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS674650; NLM/ PMC4572835
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4. Armand JP, Burnett AK, Drach J, Harousseau JL, Löwenberg B, San Miguel J: The emerging role of targeted therapy for hematologic malignancies: update on bortezomib and tipifarnib. Oncologist; 2007 Mar;12(3):281-90
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The emerging role of targeted therapy for hematologic malignancies: update on bortezomib and tipifarnib.
  • As therapy for hematologic malignancy evolves, new regimens and novel agents that target specific cellular processes allow a more optimistic prognosis for many patients.
  • Bortezomib and tipifarnib are two new, targeted treatments for hematologic malignancies.
  • Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, has shown impressive efficacy in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma and as initial treatment, including before autologous stem cell transplantation.
  • It has been studied as monotherapy and in combination with standard treatments such as dexamethasone, and with newer agents such as the immunomodulators thalidomide and lenalidomide; response is encouraging, even in patients who have relapsed after previously receiving components of a regimen as single agents.
  • Continued investigation with these new, targeted treatments will further define their use as treatment options in patients with hematologic cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Boronic Acids / therapeutic use. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pyrazines / therapeutic use. Quinolones / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bortezomib. Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic. Humans

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  • (PMID = 17405892.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-7159
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Pyrazines; 0 / Quinolones; 192185-72-1 / tipifarnib; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib
  • [Number-of-references] 70
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5. Sauer S, Erba PA, Petrini M, Menrad A, Giovannoni L, Grana C, Hirsch B, Zardi L, Paganelli G, Mariani G, Neri D, Dürkop H, Menssen HD: Expression of the oncofetal ED-B-containing fibronectin isoform in hematologic tumors enables ED-B-targeted 131I-L19SIP radioimmunotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Blood; 2009 Mar 5;113(10):2265-74
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  • [Title] Expression of the oncofetal ED-B-containing fibronectin isoform in hematologic tumors enables ED-B-targeted 131I-L19SIP radioimmunotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma patients.
  • Current treatment of hematologic malignancies involves rather unspecific chemotherapy, frequently resulting in severe adverse events.
  • Thus, modern clinical research focuses on compounds able to discriminate malignant from normal tissues.
  • Being expressed in newly formed blood vessels of solid cancers but not in normal mature tissues, the extradomain B of fibronectin (ED-B FN) is a promising target for selective cancer therapies.
  • Using immunohistology with a new epitope retrieval technique for paraffin-embedded tissues, ED-B FN expression was found in biopsies from more than 200 Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients of nearly all entities, and in patients with myeloproliferative diseases.
  • The extent of vascular ED-B FN expression in lymphoma tissues was positively correlated with grade of malignancy.
  • In 2 relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma patients(131)I-L19SIP radioimmunotherapy induced a sustained partial response, qualifying ED-B FN as a promising target for antibody-based lymphoma therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies / therapeutic use. Fibronectins / biosynthesis. Hodgkin Disease / radiotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy / methods. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Fluorescent Antibody Technique. Glucose-6-Phosphate / analogs & derivatives. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Mice. Mice, Nude. Positron-Emission Tomography. Protein Isoforms / biosynthesis. Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon

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  • [CommentIn] Blood. 2009 Mar 5;113(10):2121-2 [19264922.001]
  • (PMID = 19131554.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0020
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies; 0 / FN1 protein, human; 0 / Fibronectins; 0 / Protein Isoforms; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 0 / SIP(L19) fusion protein; 40871-47-4 / 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate; 56-73-5 / Glucose-6-Phosphate
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6. O'Connor OA, Horwitz S, Hamlin P, Portlock C, Moskowitz CH, Sarasohn D, Neylon E, Mastrella J, Hamelers R, Macgregor-Cortelli B, Patterson M, Seshan VE, Sirotnak F, Fleisher M, Mould DR, Saunders M, Zelenetz AD: Phase II-I-II study of two different doses and schedules of pralatrexate, a high-affinity substrate for the reduced folate carrier, in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma reveals marked activity in T-cell malignancies. J Clin Oncol; 2009 Sep 10;27(26):4357-64
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II-I-II study of two different doses and schedules of pralatrexate, a high-affinity substrate for the reduced folate carrier, in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma reveals marked activity in T-cell malignancies.
  • Patients were required to have relapsed/refractory disease, an absolute neutrophil greater than 1,000/microL, and a platelet count greater than 50,000/microL for the first dose of any cycle.
  • RESULTS: The every-other-week, phase II experience was associated with an increased risk of stomatitis and hematologic toxicity.
  • This schedule modification resulted in a 50% reduction in the major hematologic toxicities and abrogation of the grades 3 to 4 stomatitis.
  • All eight patients who experienced CR had T-cell lymphoma, and four of the six patients with a partial remission were positron emission tomography negative.
  • CONCLUSION: Pralatrexate has significant single-agent activity in patients with relapsed/refractory T-cell lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminopterin / analogs & derivatives. Lymphoma, T-Cell / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Constipation / chemically induced. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Fatigue / chemically induced. Female. Folic Acid Antagonists / administration & dosage. Folic Acid Antagonists / adverse effects. Folic Acid Antagonists / therapeutic use. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Recurrence. Remission Induction. Stomatitis / chemically induced. Treatment Outcome. Weight Loss / drug effects. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19652067.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00052442
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 10-propargyl-10-deazaaminopterin; 0 / Folic Acid Antagonists; JYB41CTM2Q / Aminopterin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3651599
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7. Geddes M, Kangarloo SB, Naveed F, Quinlan D, Chaudhry MA, Stewart D, Savoie ML, Bahlis NJ, Brown C, Storek J, Andersson BS, Russell JA: High busulfan exposure is associated with worse outcomes in a daily i.v. busulfan and fludarabine allogeneic transplant regimen. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2008 Feb;14(2):220-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VIDARABINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Low plasma busulfan (Bu) area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) is associated with graft failure and relapsed leukemias, and high AUC with toxicities when Bu is used orally or i.v.
  • 4 times daily combined with cyclophosphamide in myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) conditioning regimens.
  • We report Bu AUC and its association with clinical outcomes in 130 patients with hematologic malignancies given a once-daily i.v.
  • These data support a role for therapeutic dose monitoring and dose adjustment with daily i.v. busulfan.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Area Under Curve. Drug Monitoring / methods. Graft Survival. Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Humans. Middle Aged. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome. Whole-Body Irradiation

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  • (PMID = 18215782.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-6536
  • [Journal-full-title] Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] FA2DM6879K / Vidarabine; G1LN9045DK / Busulfan; P2K93U8740 / fludarabine
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8. Gürman G, Arat M, Ilhan O, Konuk N, Beksaç M, Celebi H, Ozcan M, Arslan O, Ustün C, Akan H, Uysal A, Koç H: Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation without myeloablative conditioning for patients with advanced hematologic malignancies. Cytotherapy; 2001;3(4):253-60
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation without myeloablative conditioning for patients with advanced hematologic malignancies.
  • BACKGROUND: The effect of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) on hematologic malignancies is based on the graft-versus-malignancy effect.
  • Once mixed chimeric status, and host versus graft with graft versus host tolerance are achieved, further strengthening of chimerism and graft-versus-malignancy effect can be obtained by donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) when needed.
  • METHODS: The patient group consisted of 13 patients with advanced hematological malignancies: seven had CML, four of them in blastic-, two in chronic- and the remainder in accelerated-phase; four patients with AML, refractory or in second remission state; one patient with primary refractory secondary AML; and one patient with ALL relapsed after alloHCT.
  • Two CML patients in blastic phase (CML-BP), and the primary refractory secondary AML patient did not respond to procedure.
  • In four patients, drug therapy in conventional doses was added to post-transplant DLIs for their relapsed or refractory diseases.
  • Two patients with AML in second CR, and another CML-BP patient, relapsed or progressed after transplantation.
  • A patient with CML-BP achieved CR and full donor chimerism after transplantation, but developed refractory post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in the 19th month.
  • Two patients with refractory AML, one patient with relapsed ALL and two patients with CML in chronic phase were in complete chimeric status and free of disease signs.
  • Acute GvHD, Grade II-III, was observed in five patients, and two of them developed secondary progressive chronic GvHD subsequently.
  • Procedure-related severe toxicity was not observed, either in standard-risk patients or stem-cell donors.
  • The second step, which was the result of the graft-versus-malignancy effect, could be seen in most of the patients, but was not sustained in all of them because of the aggressiveness of their malignancy.
  • The role of NMA conditioning, and of the treatment in standard disease indications, remains to be determined in further studies.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft Survival / immunology. Graft vs Tumor Effect / immunology. Hematologic Neoplasms / immunology. Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / immunology. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Transplantation Conditioning / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Bone Marrow Purging / adverse effects. Female. Graft vs Host Disease / immunology. Graft vs Host Disease / physiopathology. Host vs Graft Reaction / immunology. Humans. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / immunology. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / physiopathology. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / therapy. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / immunology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / physiopathology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Myeloablative Agonists / therapeutic use. Postoperative Complications / etiology. Postoperative Complications / physiopathology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / immunology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / physiopathology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy. Remission Induction / methods. Secondary Prevention. Transplantation Chimera / immunology. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Failure

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  • (PMID = 12171713.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-3249
  • [Journal-full-title] Cytotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cytotherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Myeloablative Agonists
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9. Kaufman J, Gleason C, Lonial S: Treatment of relapsed and refractory myeloma. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2009 Apr;4(2):99-107
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  • [Title] Treatment of relapsed and refractory myeloma.
  • Treatment options for patients with relapsed and refractory myeloma have dramatically changed as a result of the approval of bortezomib, thalidomide, lenalidomide, and bortezomib/liposomal doxorubicin by the US Food and Drug Administration.
  • These changes have resulted in improved responses to salvage therapy and, in many cases, improved overall survival.
  • The challenge for clinicians is choosing which agent to use and deciding whether a single agent or combination therapy is the optimal treatment option for each patient.
  • This article outlines some of the data underpinning the use of bortezomib, thalidomide, lenalidomide, or combinations of these agents in the setting of relapsed myeloma, as well as a number of potential future agents or combinations that may improve outcomes for patients with relapsed and refractory disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Multiple Myeloma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Boronic Acids / administration & dosage. Boronic Acids / therapeutic use. Bortezomib. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Dexamethasone / therapeutic use. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Pyrazines / administration & dosage. Pyrazines / therapeutic use. Thalidomide / administration & dosage. Thalidomide / analogs & derivatives. Thalidomide / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 20425421.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Pyrazines; 4Z8R6ORS6L / Thalidomide; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; F0P408N6V4 / lenalidomide
  • [Number-of-references] 77
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10. Wakabayashi S, Ohashi K: [Oral molecular targeting agents in hematological malignancy]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 Jul;37(7):1214-8
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  • [Title] [Oral molecular targeting agents in hematological malignancy].
  • Molecular target therapy is progressive and promising in various hematological malignancies.
  • Imatinib is now the treatment of choice for chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia.
  • Eight-year data from the pivotal trial of imatinib, the IRIS trial, showed high long-term response rates and favorable tolerability profile compared with previous therapies.
  • For patients with primary resistance to imatinib, hematologic disease recurrence, or emergent BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations, the potent second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors dasatinib and nilotinib are now available.
  • Since the introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in the 1980s, the strategy for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has shifted from conventional chemotherapy to cell differentiation.
  • The combination of ATRA and anthracycline-based chemotherapy is currently the standard approach to treat newly-diagnosed APL.
  • Multiple myeloma (MM) is also one of the major therapeutic targets in using molecular based technology.
  • The recent availability of clinical data regarding thalidomide and lenalidomide has provided effective treatment options for patients with both newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory MM.
  • Overall, this paper focuses on a comprehensive review of the current literature and provides data supporting molecular target therapy for patients with CML, APL, or MM.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hematologic Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20647701.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 14
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11. Lackner H, Moser A, Deutsch J, Kessler HH, Benesch M, Kerbl R, Schwinger W, Dornbusch HJ, Preisegger KH, Urban C: Interferon-alpha and ribavirin in treating children and young adults with chronic hepatitis C after malignancy. Pediatrics; 2000 Oct;106(4):E53
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. RIBAVIRIN .

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  • [Title] Interferon-alpha and ribavirin in treating children and young adults with chronic hepatitis C after malignancy.
  • OBJECTIVE: Chronic hepatitis C is a major long-term problem for children who survive cancer.
  • The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a combined virostatic treatment with IFN-alpha and RBV in a small cohort of children and adolescents with chronic hepatitis C and previous malignancy.
  • METHODS: Twelve patients with a history of a hematooncologic disease (median follow-up: 13.5 years; range: 7-14.7 years) and chronic hepatitis C were treated with recombinant IFN-alpha-2a (6 megaunits/m(2) body surface area, 3 times a week, subcutaneously) combined with RBV (15 mg/kg body weight/day, orally) for 12 months.
  • RESULTS: At the end of the treatment, hepatitis C virus RNA could not be detected in the serum of 8 of the 12 patients; 2 of these patients relapsed soon after therapy withdrawal, whereas 6 patients maintained in sustained virologic and biochemical remission (follow-up: 12 months).
  • Treatment-induced toxicity was moderate and reversible with influenza-like symptoms and a decrease in blood counts in all 12 patients, alopecia in 5 of the 12, hemolysis in 4 of the 12, and weight loss of >10% in 2 of the 12.
  • CONCLUSIONS: As demonstrated in adults with chronic hepatitis C, treatment with IFN-alpha and RBV also seems to be an effective and safe therapeutic option for children and adolescents with chronic hepatitis C after malignancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Hematologic Neoplasms / complications. Hepatitis C, Chronic / drug therapy. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Ribavirin / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Hepacivirus / genetics. Hepacivirus / isolation & purification. Humans. Male. Pilot Projects. RNA, Viral / blood. Recombinant Proteins. Transaminases / blood

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  • (PMID = 11015548.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-4275
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatrics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / RNA, Viral; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 49717AWG6K / Ribavirin; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a; EC 2.6.1.- / Transaminases
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12. Coiffier B, Ribrag V: Exploring mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition for treatment of mantle cell lymphoma and other hematologic malignancies. Leuk Lymphoma; 2009 Dec;50(12):1916-30
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  • [Title] Exploring mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition for treatment of mantle cell lymphoma and other hematologic malignancies.
  • The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates translation of key proteins that contribute to the pathogenesis of advanced hematologic malignancies.
  • Inhibitors of mTOR (temsirolimus, everolimus, and deforolimus) constitute a new class of antitumor agents, with potential for treatment of relapsed and/or refractory hematologic malignancies.
  • Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) was the first hematologic malignancy in which mTOR inhibition was explored as a treatment strategy, owing to its characteristic overexpression of cyclin D1, a G1 cyclin regulated by mTOR signaling.
  • Temsirolimus and everolimus exhibited antitumor activity against relapsed, refractory disease in phase II studies.
  • In a randomized phase III trial, once-weekly intravenous temsirolimus 175 mg for 3 weeks followed by 75 mg once weekly was recently shown to improve progression-free survival (p=0.0009) and objective response rate (p=0.0019) versus investigator's choice of therapy in relapsed or refractory MCL.
  • Overall, the clinical findings to date strengthen mTOR inhibition as a novel and promising strategy for the treatment of certain hematologic malignancies, particularly for MCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell / drug therapy. Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Cyclin D1 / metabolism. Everolimus. Humans. Models, Biological. Sirolimus / analogs & derivatives. Sirolimus / therapeutic use. TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases

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  • (PMID = 19757306.001).
  • [ISSN] 1029-2403
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 136601-57-5 / Cyclin D1; 48Z35KB15K / ridaforolimus; 624KN6GM2T / temsirolimus; 9HW64Q8G6G / Everolimus; EC 2.7.1.1 / MTOR protein, human; EC 2.7.1.1 / TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
  • [Number-of-references] 85
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13. White CA, Weaver RL, Grillo-López AJ: Antibody-targeted immunotherapy for treatment of malignancy. Annu Rev Med; 2001;52:125-45
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  • [Title] Antibody-targeted immunotherapy for treatment of malignancy.
  • Despite testing since the mid-1900s, only in the past three years have some monoclonal antibodies provided sufficient efficacy and safety data to support regulatory approval as cancer therapy.
  • Adjuvant-edrecolomab monoclonal antibody was approved in Germany after demonstration of a statistically significant 32% improvement over observation alone in the seven-year mortality rate for patients with colorectal cancer.
  • Similarly, trastuzumab monoclonal antibody combined with chemotherapy prolonged the median time to the progression of breast cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
  • Unconjugated monoclonal antibodies investigated for the treatment of hematologic malignancies include anti-idiotype, CAMPATH-1, and rituximab.
  • Rituximab was the first such therapy approved in the United States for relapsed or refractory low-grade or follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after demonstration of an overall response rate of 48% and a duration of response of 11.7 months.
  • The radioisotope-conjugated monoclonal antibodies tested as therapy include anti-B1, LYM-1, LL2, anti-CD33, and ibritumomab tiuxetan.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Immunotherapy / methods. Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Progression. Humans. Rituximab. Trastuzumab. Treatment Outcome

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  • [ErratumIn] Annu Rev Med 2002;53:xi
  • (PMID = 11160771.001).
  • [ISSN] 0066-4219
  • [Journal-full-title] Annual review of medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Annu. Rev. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Edrecolomab; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; P188ANX8CK / Trastuzumab
  • [Number-of-references] 108
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14. Crawford LJ, Walker B, Irvine AE: Proteasome inhibitors: a therapeutic strategy for haematological malignancy. Front Biosci; 2008;13:4285-96
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  • [Title] Proteasome inhibitors: a therapeutic strategy for haematological malignancy.
  • In recent years, inhibition of proteasome function has emerged as a novel anti-cancer therapy.
  • Proteasome inhibition is now established as an effective treatment for relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma and offers great promise for the treatment of other haematological malignancies, when used in combination with conventional therapeutic agents.
  • Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor to be used clinically and a second generation of proteasome inhibitors with differential pharmacological properties are currently in early clinical trials.
  • This review summarises the development of proteasome inhibitors as therapeutic agents and describes how novel assays for measuring proteasome activity and inhibition may help to further delineate the mechanisms of action of different proteasome inhibitors.
  • This will allow for the optimized use of proteasome inhibitors in combination therapies and provide the opportunity to design more potent and therapeutically efficacious proteasome inhibitors.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protease Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Proteasome Inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Boronic Acids / therapeutic use. Bortezomib. Cell Nucleus / enzymology. Cytoplasm / enzymology. Humans. Leukemia / drug therapy. Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex. Pyrazines / therapeutic use. Ubiquitin / antagonists & inhibitors. Ubiquitin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18508511.001).
  • [ISSN] 1093-9946
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front. Biosci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Protease Inhibitors; 0 / Proteasome Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrazines; 0 / Ubiquitin; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib; EC 3.4.25.1 / Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex; EC 3.4.99.- / ATP dependent 26S protease
  • [Number-of-references] 77
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15. Thomas X: The role of timed sequential chemotherapy in adult acute myelogenous leukemia. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2008 Apr;3(2):89-95
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  • [Title] The role of timed sequential chemotherapy in adult acute myelogenous leukemia.
  • Consecutive trials of timed sequential chemotherapy (TSC) have been conducted in adults with acute myelogenous leukemia.
  • The rationale for TSC was based on the observation that leukemic cells can be recruited synchronously into the cell cycle after initial intensive therapy, at which time they may become more susceptible to killing by chemotherapeutic agents.
  • This article reviews the results of important trials in which TSC was used as an induction regimen in de novo, relapsed, or refractory acute myelogenous leukemia or as postremission therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans

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  • (PMID = 20425452.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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16. Jackson G, Einsele H, Moreau P, Miguel JS: Bortezomib, a novel proteasome inhibitor, in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. Cancer Treat Rev; 2005 Dec;31(8):591-602
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  • [Title] Bortezomib, a novel proteasome inhibitor, in the treatment of hematologic malignancies.
  • Proteasome inhibition is a novel approach to treating malignancy, and bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor in this class to be approved for clinical use.
  • In preclinical studies, bortezomib caused cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma and lymphoma cell lines as well as in other neoplastic cell types.
  • Cyclical thrombocytopenia and peripheral neuropathy, which generally abate after cessation of treatment, are the most clinically significant toxicities.
  • Two phase II trials, SUMMIT and CREST, demonstrated impressive activity with bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 monotherapy in relapsed and refractory myeloma, with an impressive 35% response rate (complete+partial+minimal responses) in SUMMIT and a 50% response rate in CREST, using the rigorous European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation criteria.
  • A recently completed phase III trial showed the significant clinical benefits of bortezomib over high-dose dexamethasone in patients with relapsed myeloma.
  • Results of ongoing trials with bortezomib in the first-line treatment of myeloma have been extremely encouraging and have demonstrated the benefit of using bortezomib as part of an induction regimen prior to stem cell transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Boronic Acids / therapeutic use. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pyrazines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis / drug effects. Bortezomib. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Clinical Trials as Topic. Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16298074.001).
  • [ISSN] 0305-7372
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer treatment reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Treat. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Pyrazines; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib
  • [Number-of-references] 70
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17. el-Sayed MH, Shanab G, Karim AM, el-Tawil A, Black A, Dixon JS: Lamivudine facilitates optimal chemotherapy in hepatitis B virus-infected children with hematological malignancies: a preliminary report. Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2004 Mar;21(2):145-56
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LAMIVUDINE .

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  • [Title] Lamivudine facilitates optimal chemotherapy in hepatitis B virus-infected children with hematological malignancies: a preliminary report.
  • Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation is well documented in infected patients who have hematologic malignancies, precluding appropriate chemotherapy courses and, therefore, increasing the possibility of relapse of malignancies.
  • The objective of this study was to evaluate lamivudine treatment to prevent hepatitis B reactivation in children with cancer who acquired infection with HBV and so allow completion of optimal chemotherapy.
  • Ten children (7:3 M:F; median age: 9.8 years), undergoing chemotherapy for hematological malignancies and suffering from immunosuppressive-induced hepatitis B virus reactivation, were treated concurrently with lamivudine (3 mg/kg bw, od) for up to 18 months.
  • Histological assessments were performed pre- and 18 months post-lamivudine therapy.
  • During lamivudine therapy chemotherapy courses were completed for all children, and none of the patients suffered reactivation of hepatitis.
  • After a median follow-up of 10 months, remission of malignancy was maintained in 7/10 patients while 3 patients relapsed.
  • After 9 months of therapy, 8/10 were HBV-DNA-ve.
  • Six out of 7 children with histological evidence of chronic hepatitis showed marked improvement post-therapy.
  • Lamivudine therapy for up to 18 months in children receiving chemotherapy helped prevent recurrence of hepatitis B exacerbations and improved the underlying chronic hepatitis, while facilitating completion of appropriate chemotherapy regimens without compromise.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Hematologic Neoplasms / complications. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hepatitis B / prevention & control. Lamivudine / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antiviral Agents / administration & dosage. Child. Child, Preschool. Drug Synergism. Female. Humans. Immunosuppression / adverse effects. Male. Remission Induction. Treatment Outcome. Virus Activation / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 15160513.001).
  • [ISSN] 0888-0018
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric hematology and oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Hematol Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Antiviral Agents; 2T8Q726O95 / Lamivudine
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18. Iguchi A, Kobayashi R, Sato TZ, Naito H, Shikano T, Ishikawa Y, Kobayashi K: High susceptibility to severe infectious complications at reinduction chemotherapy in patients who relapse after stem cell transplantation. Transplant Proc; 2010 Jun;42(5):1857-61
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  • [Title] High susceptibility to severe infectious complications at reinduction chemotherapy in patients who relapse after stem cell transplantation.
  • Patients who relapse after stem cell transplantation (SCT) usually appear to be liable to severe infectious complications at reinduction chemotherapy compared to patients at the first induction therapy, though this is not statistically substantiated.
  • The aim of this study was to analyze episodes of infectious complications during reinduction chemotherapy among patients who relapsed after SCT compared with those at the first induction chemotherapy.
  • Between February 1988 and March 2004, 145 children received SCT, and 17 (12 with hematologic malignancies and 5 with solid tumors) were enrolled as eligible subjects for this study.
  • Positive blood cultures (sepsis) were present in six patients exclusively at the reinduction therapy but none at the first induction (P = .009).
  • Moreover, all patients positive for blood cultures were those with hematologic malignancy (P = .007), and every patient with septic shock had received allogenic transplantation.
  • Our results showed that reinduction chemotherapy needs attention for severe infectious complications, particularly among patients with hematologic malignancies receiving allogenic transplantations.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematologic Neoplasms / surgery. Infection / epidemiology. Neoplasms / surgery. Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Bacterial Infections / epidemiology. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease Susceptibility. Female. Graft vs Host Disease / epidemiology. Humans. Infant. Male. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Neutropenia / epidemiology. Recurrence. Transplantation Conditioning / methods

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  • (PMID = 20620537.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2623
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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19. Romaguera JE: Mantle cell lymphoma: Frontline and salvage therapy. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2008 Oct;3(4):204-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mantle cell lymphoma: Frontline and salvage therapy.
  • Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a therapeutic challenge because of its lower cure rate when compared with other lymphomas such as diffuse large cell lymphoma.
  • The current emphasis in the treatment of newly diagnosed MCL has been on intensifying chemotherapy, but there is no consensus on the need to consolidate with autologous stem cell transplantation.
  • Newer strategies include the use of models to aid in tailoring therapy.
  • Likewise, autologous stem cell consolidation does not cure relapsed disease.
  • Because of its known graft-versus-lymphoma effect, allogeneic stem cell transplantation offers a potentially curative option for relapsed MCL.
  • New insights into resistance pathways and new drugs created to inhibit them offer great promise in the treatment of newly diagnosed and previously treated MCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell / therapy. Salvage Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Neoplasm, Residual. Recurrence. Stem Cell Transplantation. Transplantation, Autologous. Transplantation, Homologous

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  • (PMID = 20425467.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Naparstek E: The role of rituximab in autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2006 Dec;1(4):220-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. RITUXIMAB .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The addition of rituximab to chemotherapy has substantially changed the treatment strategies for patients with B-cell lymphomas.
  • Rituximab, combined with standard chemotherapy regimens, shows consistently improved results compared with chemotherapy alone and has been extensively employed in both newly diagnosed and relapsed patients with B-cell lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow Purging / methods. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / surgery. Transplantation Conditioning / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Epstein-Barr Virus Infections / drug therapy. Epstein-Barr Virus Infections / prevention & control. Graft vs Host Disease / drug therapy. Humans. Lymphoproliferative Disorders / drug therapy. Lymphoproliferative Disorders / prevention & control. Lymphoproliferative Disorders / virology. Multicenter Studies as Topic. Rituximab. Salvage Therapy. Transplantation, Autologous. Transplantation, Homologous

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  • (PMID = 20425317.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
  • [Number-of-references] 74
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21. DeAngelo DJ, Stone RM: New agents for the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2008 Jul;3(3):135-43
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] New agents for the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Although all patients are treated with similar intensive chemotherapy regimens, good outcomes have occurred more frequently in children than adults.
  • Current adult treatment regimens result in CR rates approaching 80%, with EFS at 5 years of only 30% to 40%.
  • Regardless of age, patients with relapsed or refractory ALL have extremely poor outcomes, because CR rates are low and seldom durable.
  • Clearly, new agents are required to improve the outcome of patients with relapsed or refractory ALL.
  • [MeSH-major] Nucleosides / chemistry. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Asparaginase / chemistry. Asparaginase / therapeutic use. Disease-Free Survival. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins / metabolism. Humans. Liposomes / chemistry. Liposomes / therapeutic use. Methotrexate / analogs & derivatives. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Receptors, Notch / antagonists & inhibitors. Receptors, Notch / metabolism. Recurrence

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  • (PMID = 20425458.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins; 0 / Liposomes; 0 / Nucleosides; 0 / Receptors, Notch; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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22. Williams ME, Densmore JJ: Biology and therapy of mantle cell lymphoma. Curr Opin Oncol; 2005 Sep;17(5):425-31
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Biology and therapy of mantle cell lymphoma.
  • Standard and effective treatment approaches have yet to be established.
  • Clinical trials using chemotherapy plus rituximab have shown improved response rates, including complete remissions, but without cure in most cases, indicating a clear need for new treatment approaches.
  • Novel therapies for relapsed disease using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, thalidomide plus rituximab, the cyclin inhibitor flavopiridol, or inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have shown encouraging clinical responses.
  • Stem cell transplantation, including nonmyeloablative approaches, are being incorporated into therapeutic regimens and show promise in both the front-line and relapsed/refractory settings.
  • SUMMARY: This review summarizes recent advances in the biology, pathogenesis, and therapy of mantle cell lymphoma and identifies ongoing areas of clinical investigation and new treatment approaches.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor. Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell / physiopathology. Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Humans. Immunotherapy. Prognosis


23. Ohno R: Changing paradigm of the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2010 Oct;5(4):213-21
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINCRISTINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Changing paradigm of the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • In the pre-imatinib era, the treatment outcome of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+) ALL) was dismal.
  • Imatinib has changed the situation dramatically, however, in combination with conventional chemotherapy or with corticosteroid alone, producing about 95% complete remission and thus increasing the number of patients undergoing allo-HSCT.
  • Thus, improvement of postremission therapy is crucial.
  • Whether intensive chemotherapy with currently available cytotoxic drugs contributes to the prevention of relapse is questionable, because intensive chemotherapy alone in the pre-imatinib era nearly always failed to cure this disease.
  • New TKIs such as dasatinib should be incorporated into the early phase of postremission therapy.
  • Recognizing the small number of patients with Ph(+) ALL, intergroup or international studies are necessary to develop the best postremission therapy.
  • In the near future, it is hoped that Ph(+) ALL will become one of the leukemias for which allo-HSCT is offered only for relapsed or extremely high-risk patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzamides. Combined Modality Therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 20652453.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrimidines; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate
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24. Molnár I, Powell BL: What role does gemtuzumab ozogamicin have in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia? Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2007 May;2(2):104-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] What role does gemtuzumab ozogamicin have in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia?
  • Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) is a novel, targeted chemotherapy designed to treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • It has been approved in the United States since 2000 to treat CD33+ AML in first relapse in older adults who are not candidates for cytotoxic therapy.
  • Incorporation of GO into standard induction treatment in de novo and relapsed AML is feasible.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminoglycosides / therapeutic use. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Immunotoxins / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antigens, CD / immunology. Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic / immunology. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease / chemically induced. Humans. Middle Aged. Remission Induction. Salvage Therapy. Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 3

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  • (PMID = 20425358.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aminoglycosides; 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic; 0 / CD33 protein, human; 0 / Immunotoxins; 0 / Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 3; 93NS566KF7 / gemtuzumab
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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25. Foyil KV, Bartlett NL: Anti-CD30 Antibodies for Hodgkin lymphoma. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2010 Jul;5(3):140-7
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Treatment of refractory or relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) remains challenging, but targeted immunotherapy has recently emerged as a potential treatment option for these patients.
  • Although first-generation monoclonal anti-CD30 antibodies proved disappointing, current efforts to modify anti-CD30 antibodies to improve binding of effector cells and enhance activity appears more promising, as does the development of novel antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs).
  • ADCs offer the potential to deliver potent therapies with minimal toxicity.
  • Initial phase 1 studies of brentuximab vedotin showed a 52% overall response rate in relapsed HL, with minimal toxicity.
  • This article highlights the development of anti-CD30 antibodies and ADCs for relapsed or refractory classical HL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antigens, CD30 / immunology. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Humans. Immunoconjugates / therapeutic use. Immunotherapy. Oligopeptides / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 20446121.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD30; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Immunoconjugates; 0 / Oligopeptides; 0 / monomethyl auristatin E; 7XL5ISS668 / brentuximab vedotin
  • [Number-of-references] 58
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26. Peggs KS, Mackinnon S: Exploiting graft-versus-tumour responses using donor leukocyte infusions. Best Pract Res Clin Haematol; 2001 Dec;14(4):723-39

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) has become the treatment of choice for some patients with haematological malignancies, allowing dose escalation of chemo-radiotherapy beyond the limits imposed by bone marrow toxicity.
  • However, it is now apparent that dose escalation alone does not eradicate the malignancy in many cases and that an associated immune-mediated graft-versus-malignancy effect may be equally important.
  • Its presence is supported by the following observations: anecdotal reports that patients with relapsed leukaemia following SCT may re-enter remission after withdrawal of immunosuppressive drugs; the lower risk of relapse associated with the development of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD); and an increased risk of relapse in patients receiving syngeneic transplants or T-cell depleted allogeneic marrow grafts.
  • More directly compelling evidence has been provided by the efficacy of donor lymphocyte infusions, particularly for relapsed chronic-phase CML.
  • Issues that remain to be resolved include the precise nature of the effector cells and their target antigens, the best strategies for separating graft-versus-malignancy from GVHD, the role of adjuvant chemotherapy/cytokines, and the role of non-myeloablative transplantation.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, Neoplasm / immunology. Hematologic Neoplasms / immunology. Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Humans. Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects. Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. T-Lymphocyte Subsets / immunology. Transplantation, Homologous / adverse effects. Transplantation, Homologous / immunology. Transplantation, Homologous / methods

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  • (PMID = 11924918.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-6926
  • [Journal-full-title] Best practice & research. Clinical haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Best Pract Res Clin Haematol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm
  • [Number-of-references] 108
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27. Advani AS: Targeting the c-kit receptor in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2006 Jun;1(2):101-7
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeting the c-kit receptor in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia.
  • Novel treatment strategies, including molecular targeted therapy, are being explored.
  • The c-kit receptor represents a potential therapeutic target for AML.
  • The receptor is expressed on more than 10% of blasts in 64% of patients with de novo AML and 95% of those with relapsed AML.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / drug therapy. Neoplasm Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis / physiology. Cell Division / drug effects. Cell Division / physiology. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Delivery Systems. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / genetics. Hematopoiesis / drug effects. Hematopoiesis / physiology. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / drug effects. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / enzymology. Humans. Middle Aged. Multicenter Studies as Topic. Neoplastic Stem Cells / drug effects. Neoplastic Stem Cells / enzymology

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  • (PMID = 20425339.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit
  • [Number-of-references] 55
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28. Sweetenham JW: Lymphoblastic lymphoma in adults. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2006 Dec;1(4):241-7
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Optimal treatment strategies for adult lymphoblastic lymphoma are uncertain, although current evidence supports the use of regimens similar to those used in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with intensive induction therapy, central nervous system prophylaxis, and prolonged consolidation maintenance therapy.
  • Current studies do not demonstrate a benefit from stem cell transplantation in first remission, although this approach is probably beneficial in relapsed disease.
  • Identification of new therapeutic targets by further molecular studies is required.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. B-Lymphocytes / pathology. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Gene Rearrangement. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Mediastinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mediastinal Neoplasms / pathology. Mediastinal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Multicenter Studies as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Prognosis. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Remission Induction. Salvage Therapy. T-Lymphocytes / pathology. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20425319.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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29. Cavo M: Current status of bortezomib in the treatment of multiple myeloma. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2007 May;2(2):128-37
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. BORTEZOMIB .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Current status of bortezomib in the treatment of multiple myeloma.
  • Bortezomib (formerly PS-341) has been the first proteasome inhibitor to enter clinical trials in cancer patients.
  • Preclinical studies showing that this novel agent directly inhibits the proliferation of myeloma cells, induces their apoptosis, and abrogates paracrine tumor growth through alteration of interactions of myeloma and stromal cells and through nuclear factor kappaB-dependent cytokine secretion prompted the design of large phase II and III studies of bortezomib in patients with advanced relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma.
  • Favorable results of these studies led to accelerated approval for use of bortezomib in patients with multiple myeloma who have progressed after at least their second therapy and, more recently, to expanded approval for second-line use in patients in whom one prior therapy has failed.
  • Combination studies of bortezomib with various agents, including dexamethasone, DNA-damaging drugs (such as melphalan, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin), thalidomide, and lenalidomide, are currently ongoing in patients with both relapsed/refractory and newly diagnosed disease.
  • Bortezomib may be the "backbone" for the development of more effective treatment strategies to improve patient outcome in multiple myeloma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Boronic Acids / therapeutic use. Multiple Myeloma / drug therapy. Neoplasm Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. Protease Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Proteasome Inhibitors. Pyrazines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Apoptosis / drug effects. Bortezomib. Cell Line, Tumor / drug effects. Clinical Trials as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Combined Modality Therapy. Cytokines / secretion. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Humans. Kidney Failure, Chronic / drug therapy. Kidney Failure, Chronic / etiology. Multicenter Studies as Topic / statistics & numerical data. NF-kappa B / metabolism. Salvage Therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation. Stromal Cells / pathology. Transplantation, Autologous

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  • (PMID = 20425361.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Protease Inhibitors; 0 / Proteasome Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrazines; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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30. Colson K, Doss DS, Swift R, Tariman J: Expanding role of bortezomib in multiple myeloma: nursing implications. Cancer Nurs; 2008 May-Jun;31(3):239-49
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic malignancy and remains incurable, despite advances in chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.
  • Bortezomib, a novel proteasome inhibitor, is approved for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least 1 prior therapy.
  • In the assessment of proteasome inhibition for extending remissions phase III trial of bortezomib versus high-dose dexamethasone, bortezomib led to significantly longer survival and time to progression and higher response rate in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma.
  • The side effect profile of bortezomib is extensively characterized, predictable, and generally manageable; retreatment or extended bortezomib therapy seems well tolerated.
  • Nurses play a unique role in bortezomib treatment: they are often closest to the patients and are most able to educate patients about side effects and, if necessary, take appropriate action, independently or collaboratively with healthcare team members.
  • In this review, we present the latest efficacy and safety data for bortezomib in relapsed multiple myeloma and characterize common side effects associated with bortezomib and the implications for nursing.
  • We also highlight practical strategies for preventing and managing side effects, thereby enhancing the clinical benefit of bortezomib-based therapies to patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Boronic Acids / therapeutic use. Multiple Myeloma / drug therapy. Pyrazines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Bortezomib. Dexamethasone / adverse effects. Dexamethasone / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Treatment Failure. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18453881.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-9804
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Pyrazines; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone
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31. Gaynon PS: Treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: progress achieved and challenges remaining. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2007 Jul;2(3):193-201
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: progress achieved and challenges remaining.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children.
  • Precise identification of the many patients who are unlikely to relapse with current effective regimens is required to avoid the morbidity of further intensification of therapy.
  • Progress is sorely lacking for relapsed patients.
  • Insight into the molecular mechanisms of treatment failure may provide guidance for future efforts.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Central Nervous System / pathology. Child. Child, Preschool. Clinical Trials as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Combined Modality Therapy. Cranial Irradiation / adverse effects. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Forecasting. Humans. Infant. Leukemic Infiltration. Male. Multicenter Studies as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Neoplasm, Residual. Recurrence. Salvage Therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20425369.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 87
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32. Roecker AM, Stockert A, Kisor DF: Nelarabine in the treatment of refractory T-cell malignancies. Clin Med Insights Oncol; 2010 Dec 01;4:133-41
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  • [Title] Nelarabine in the treatment of refractory T-cell malignancies.
  • Nelarabine is a nucleoside analog indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) or T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) that is refractory or has relapsed after treatment with at least two chemotherapy regimens.
  • After being first synthesized in the late 1970s and receiving FDA approval in 2005, the appropriate use of nelarabine for refractory hematologic malignancies is still being elucidated.
  • Dose-dependent toxicities, including neurotoxicity and myelosuppression, have been documented and may, in turn, limit the ability to appropriately treat the diagnosed malignancy.
  • This article will summarize the pharmacologic properties of nelarabine and will address the current place in therapy nelarabine holds based upon the results of the available clinical trials to date.

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  • (PMID = 21151585.001).
  • [ISSN] 1179-5549
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical Medicine Insights. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Med Insights Oncol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2999959
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Arranon / Atriance / T-cell / leukemia / lymphoma / nelarabine
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33. Wahl RL: Tositumomab and (131)I therapy in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. J Nucl Med; 2005 Jan;46 Suppl 1:128S-40S
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  • [Title] Tositumomab and (131)I therapy in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Currently, it is approved for use in patients whose disease has relapsed after chemotherapy and is refactory to rituximab, including patients whose tumors have transformed to a higher histologic grade.
  • This review outlines the current and evolving status of this therapeutic regimen at nonmyeloablative doses.
  • METHODS: Clinical data from multiple published studies and preliminary communications encompassing more than 1,000 patients were reviewed to describe the current status of tositumomab and (131)I-tositumomab therapy.
  • The therapy is delivered in 2 parts, a dosimetric dose and a therapeutic dose.
  • The therapeutic radioactivity millicurie dose is calculated on a patient-individualized ("tailored") basis.
  • A series of 3 total-body gamma-camera scans are used to determine the patient-specific pharmacokinetics (total-body residence time) of the radiolabeled antibody conjugate required to deliver the desired total-body radiation dose, typically 75 cGy.
  • RESULTS: In clinical trials, objective response rates in patients who had been extensively pretreated with chemotherapy ranged from 47% to 68%.
  • Tositumomab and (131)I-tositumomab therapy also was effective in patients who had failed to respond to or who had relapsed after rituximab therapy, with a 68% overall response rate.
  • Single-center trials using tositumomab and (131)I-tositumomab therapy alone or after chemotherapy in previously untreated patients have shown response rates in excess of 90%, with most responses complete.
  • Retreatment with tositumomab and (131)I-tositumomab and use of lower total-body radiation doses of tositumomab and (131)I-tositumomab to treat patients who have relapsed after stem cell transplantation have been shown feasible in limited clinical studies.
  • Toxicity is predominately hematologic; however, human antimouse antibodies, hypothyroidism, and myelodysplastic syndrome have been reported in a small fraction of patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Tositumomab and (131)I-tositumomab therapy at patient-specific, nonmyeloablative doses is safe and effective in treatment of relapsed and refractory follicular NHL.
  • Toxicity is mainly hematologic and reversible.
  • Tositumomab and (131)I-tositumomab therapy is assuming a growing role in this common malignancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / radiotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Humans. Immunotherapy / methods. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Practice Patterns, Physicians'. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15653661.001).
  • [ISSN] 0161-5505
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nucl. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / iodine-131 anti-B1 antibody
  • [Number-of-references] 49
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34. Gertz MA, Wolf RC, Micallef IN, Gastineau DA: Clinical impact and resource utilization after stem cell mobilization failure in patients with multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2010 Sep;45(9):1396-403
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  • High-dose chemotherapy in conjunction with auto-SCT is the preferred treatment of relapsed Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma and newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.
  • We retrospectively reviewed the natural history of stem cell mobilization attempts at our institution from 2001 to 2007 to determine the frequency of suboptimal mobilization in patients with hematologic malignancy undergoing autologous transplant and analyzed the subsequent resource utilization in patients with initially failed attempts.
  • In the 47% of collections that were less than optimal, increased resource consumption included increased use of growth factors and antibiotics, subsequent chemotherapy mobilization, increased transfusional support, more apheresis procedures, and more frequent hospitalization.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization / statistics & numerical data. Hodgkin Disease / therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Multiple Myeloma / therapy. Resource Allocation / utilization
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Databases, Factual. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Failure

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  • (PMID = 20062089.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5365
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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35. Richardson PG, Hideshima T, Anderson KC: Bortezomib (PS-341): a novel, first-in-class proteasome inhibitor for the treatment of multiple myeloma and other cancers. Cancer Control; 2003 Sep-Oct;10(5):361-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Bortezomib (PS-341): a novel, first-in-class proteasome inhibitor for the treatment of multiple myeloma and other cancers.
  • BACKGROUND: Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable malignancy that is diagnosed in approximately 15,000 people in the United States each year.
  • We also address the potential for bortezomib as a therapy for MM.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Proteasome inhibition is a promising new investigational avenue for cancer therapy.
  • Bortezomib is currently available for the treatment of relapsed and refractory MM.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Boronic Acids / therapeutic use. Multiple Myeloma / drug therapy. Protease Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Pyrazines / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 14581890.001).
  • [ISSN] 1073-2748
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer control : journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Control
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Protease Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrazines; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib
  • [Number-of-references] 48
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36. Ansell SM, Kyle RA, Reeder CB, Fonseca R, Mikhael JR, Morice WG, Bergsagel PL, Buadi FK, Colgan JP, Dingli D, Dispenzieri A, Greipp PR, Habermann TM, Hayman SR, Inwards DJ, Johnston PB, Kumar SK, Lacy MQ, Lust JA, Markovic SN, Micallef IN, Nowakowski GS, Porrata LF, Roy V, Russell SJ, Short KE, Stewart AK, Thompson CA, Witzig TE, Zeldenrust SR, Dalton RJ, Rajkumar SV, Gertz MA: Diagnosis and management of Waldenström macroglobulinemia: Mayo stratification of macroglobulinemia and risk-adapted therapy (mSMART) guidelines. Mayo Clin Proc; 2010 Sep;85(9):824-33
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  • [Title] Diagnosis and management of Waldenström macroglobulinemia: Mayo stratification of macroglobulinemia and risk-adapted therapy (mSMART) guidelines.
  • Waldenström macroglobulinemia is a B-cell malignancy with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the bone marrow or lymphatic tissue and a monoclonal immunoglobulin M protein (IgM) in the serum.
  • It is incurable with current therapy, and the decision to treat patients as well as the choice of treatment can be complex.
  • Using a risk-adapted approach, we provide recommendations on timing and choice of therapy.
  • Patients with smoldering or asymptomatic Waldenström macroglobulinemia and preserved hematologic function should be observed without therapy.
  • Symptomatic patients with modest hematologic compromise, IgM-related neuropathy that requires therapy, or hemolytic anemia unresponsive to corticosteroids should receive standard doses of rituximab alone without maintenance therapy.
  • Patients who have severe constitutional symptoms, profound hematologic compromise, symptomatic bulky disease, or hyperviscosity should be treated with the DRC (dexamethasone, rituximab, cyclophosphamide) regimen.
  • For patients who experience relapse after a response to initial therapy of more than 2 years' duration, the original therapy should be repeated.
  • For patients who had an inadequate response to initial therapy or a response of less than 2 years' duration, an alternative agent or combination should be used.
  • Autologous stem cell transplant should be considered in all eligible patients with relapsed disease.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Blood Viscosity. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Plasmapheresis. Prognosis. Recurrence. Risk Factors. Rituximab. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20702770.001).
  • [ISSN] 1942-5546
  • [Journal-full-title] Mayo Clinic proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mayo Clin. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA083724
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
  • [Number-of-references] 72
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2931618
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37. Devizzi L, Guidetti A, Tarella C, Magni M, Matteucci P, Seregni E, Chiesa C, Bombardieri E, Di Nicola M, Carlo-Stella C, Gianni AM: High-dose yttrium-90-ibritumomab tiuxetan with tandem stem-cell reinfusion: an outpatient preparative regimen for autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation. J Clin Oncol; 2008 Nov 10;26(32):5175-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • PURPOSE: To develop high-dose myeloablative therapy for CD20(+) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) as a safe and widely applicable regimen.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with relapsed/refractory (n = 25) or de novo high-risk (n = 5) NHL received one myeloablative dose of yttrium-90 ((90)Y)-ibritumomab tiuxetan after five chemotherapy courses, including three cycles of anthracycline- or platinum-containing regimens, one cycle of cyclophosphamide (4 to 7 g/m(2)), and one cycle of cytarabine (12 to 24 g/m(2)).
  • To minimize hematologic toxicity, stem cells were reinfused at days 7 and 14 after (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan.
  • Hematologic toxicity was mild to moderate and of short duration.
  • After a median observation time of 30 months (range, 22 to 48 months), no myeloid secondary malignancy or chromosomal abnormality was observed, the OS rate was 87%, and the EFS rate was 69%.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / radiotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Ambulatory Care. Antigens, CD20 / analysis. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cytogenetic Analysis. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Time Factors. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2009 Mar 1;27(7):1145-6; author reply 1146 [19171699.001]
  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2008 Nov 10;26(32):5147-50 [18854559.001]
  • (PMID = 18854569.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD20; 0 / ibritumomab tiuxetan
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38. Richardson P, Mitsiades C, Laubach J, Schlossman R, Ghobrial I, Hideshima T, Munshi N, Anderson K: Lenalidomide in multiple myeloma: an evidence-based review of its role in therapy. Core Evid; 2009;4:215-45

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Lenalidomide in multiple myeloma: an evidence-based review of its role in therapy.
  • INTRODUCTION: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a relatively common and incurable hematological malignancy.
  • Currently, there is no single standard therapy, with choice of treatment dependent on individual patient factors.
  • Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug with potent antitumor, antiangiogenic, immunomodulatory, and proapoptotic activity in MM.
  • AIMS: To evaluate the evidence for the use of lenalidomide in its current indication in relapsed or refractory MM, and additionally its investigational use for the treatment of newly diagnosed MM.
  • EVIDENCE REVIEW: In patients with relapsed and refractory MM, adding lenalidomide to high-dose dexamethasone significantly improves response rates and time-to-progression, relative to high-dose dexamethasone alone.
  • Outcome is independent of patient age, number of previous therapies, type of previous therapy (including thalidomide or autologous stem cell transplantation), renal impairment, and beta(2)-microglobulin level.
  • Myelosuppression is the predominant toxicity observed, although some studies have shown high incidences of venous thromboembolism in the absence of prophylactic antithrombotic anticoagulation therapy.
  • ROLE IN THERAPY: The encouraging results obtained with lenalidomide alone and in combination with dexamethasone in patients with relapsed or refractory MM have led to its adoption as a recommended therapy in patients who have received at least one prior treatment.
  • Emerging evidence supports the ongoing investigation of lenalidomide in combination with low-dose dexamethasone, and in other combinations including bortezomib, for use both in relapsed, refractory, and newly diagnosed MM.

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  • (PMID = 20694078.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-175X
  • [Journal-full-title] Core evidence
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Core Evid
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2899783
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; evidence / lenalidomide / multiple myeloma / outcomes / treatment
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39. Hoelzer D, Gökbuget N, Ottmann OG: Targeted therapies in the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Semin Hematol; 2002 Oct;39(4 Suppl 3):32-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeted therapies in the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp, East Hanover, NJ; Glivec, Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland), a signal transduction inhibitor with preferential effects against the tyrosine kinase activity of the protein product of the ABL proto-oncogene, induced hematologic responses in >or=90% of patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).
  • In Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the BCR-ABL translocation is the main transforming event, making it another hematologic malignancy targeted by this ABL-tyrosine kinase inhibitor.
  • In an international multicenter phase II trial, imatinib-induced hematologic responses (typically brief) were achieved in 60% of patients with relapsed or refractory Ph(+) ALL.
  • Subsequently, the German Multicenter Study Group for Adult ALL (GMALL) analyzed 59 patients treated in two successive nonrandomized phase II trials of imatinib in patients with relapsed or refractory Ph(+) ALL.
  • However, in a significant proportion, blast counts subsequently increased 16 to 50 days after treatment onset.
  • Rapid development of resistance during treatment with imatinib mesylate remains a major problem.
  • Further research efforts should explore the mechanisms of resistance to imatinib mesylate; effectiveness of other targeted therapies (eg, farnesyl transferase inhibitors [FTIs]); combination therapies; and inclusion of strategies for immune response modification (eg, donor lymphocyte infusions, interferon-alpha) for Ph/BCR-ABL-positive leukemias.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Benzamides. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Neoplasm, Residual. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 12447850.001).
  • [ISSN] 0037-1963
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate
  • [Number-of-references] 23
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40. Baron F, Maris MB, Sandmaier BM, Storer BE, Sorror M, Diaconescu R, Woolfrey AE, Chauncey TR, Flowers ME, Mielcarek M, Maloney DG, Storb R: Graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning. J Clin Oncol; 2005 Mar 20;23(9):1993-2003
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • PURPOSE: We have used a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen consisting of total-body irradiation (2 Gy) with or without fludarabine (30 mg/m(2)/d for 3 days) for related and unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with hematologic malignancies who were not candidates for conventional HCT because of age, medical comorbidities, or preceding high-dose HCT.
  • This approach relied on graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects for control of malignancy.
  • One hundred eight patients (34%) relapsed or progressed.

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  • (PMID = 15774790.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA18029; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL36444; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA78902; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA92058; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK064715; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA15704; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA078902
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; FA2DM6879K / Vidarabine; P2K93U8740 / fludarabine
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41. Lancaster S: Bortezomib: the evidence of its clinical impact in multiple myeloma. Core Evid; 2006;1(4):265-77

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • INTRODUCTION: Multiple myeloma is a relatively common and incurable form of hematologic malignancy for which there is currently no single standard therapy.
  • Bortezomib inhibits the 20S proteasome involved in the degradation of intracellular proteins, induces apoptosis, reverses drug resistance in multiple myeloma cells, and influences their microenvironment by blocking cytokine circuits, cell adhesion and angiogenesis in vivo.
  • AIMS: The objective of this review is to evaluate the evidence for the use of bortezomib in the treatment of multiple myeloma.
  • EVIDENCE REVIEW: In patients with relapsed multiple myeloma bortezomib significantly prolongs overall survival and time to progression, and improves response rates, duration of response, and quality of life compared with oral high-dose dexamethasone.
  • CLINICAL VALUE: Bortezomib is a valuable treatment option in the management of relapsed multiple myeloma that improves survival and delays disease progression compared with oral high-dose dexamethasone treatment, albeit with an increased incidence of some adverse events such as grade 3 thrombocytopenia and neutropenia.

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  • (PMID = 22496681.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-1741
  • [Journal-full-title] Core evidence
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Core Evid
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3321668
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; bortezomib / evidence / multiple myeloma / outcomes / treatment
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42. Eckardt JR: Emerging role of weekly topotecan in recurrent small cell lung cancer. Oncologist; 2004;9 Suppl 6:25-32
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Emerging role of weekly topotecan in recurrent small cell lung cancer.
  • Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive tumor that often metastasizes before the primary cancer is diagnosed.
  • Patients with SCLC are typically elderly and often have comorbidities that may predispose them to adverse events during therapy.
  • Although topotecan (Hycamtin; GlaxoSmithKline; Philadelphia, PA), 1.5 mg/m(2)/day via a 30-minute i.v. infusion on days 1-5 of a 21-day cycle, is a standard therapy for relapsed SCLC, this regimen can result in significant neutropenia, especially in previously treated patients.
  • This hematologic toxicity is noncumulative and reversible, but its management can be challenging in this poor-prognosis population.
  • Therefore, alternate treatment regimens have been investigated.
  • Weekly topotecan (4.0 mg/m(2)) is currently investigational and has shown promising activity and favorable tolerability in patients with relapsed ovarian cancer, another aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis.
  • Preliminary results from a phase II trial of weekly bolus topotecan (4.0 mg/m(2)) in patients with recurrent SCLC were recently reported, and this regimen was generally well tolerated.
  • Furthermore, weekly topotecan has been successfully included in several combination therapy regimens in patients with a variety of solid tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Small Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Small Cell / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Topotecan / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local

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  • (PMID = 15616147.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-7159
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 7M7YKX2N15 / Topotecan
  • [Number-of-references] 39
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43. Fonseca R, Stewart AK: Targeted therapeutics for multiple myeloma: the arrival of a risk-stratified approach. Mol Cancer Ther; 2007 Mar;6(3):802-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeted therapeutics for multiple myeloma: the arrival of a risk-stratified approach.
  • Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable hematologic malignancy characterized by frequent early responses, inevitably followed by treatment relapse.
  • Until recently, few effective therapies existed.
  • Indeed, the use of alkylating agents and corticosteroids had remained the treatment of choice for almost four decades.
  • Several novel agents for MM have now become available, including the immunomodulatory drugs thalidomide and lenalidomide, as well as the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib.
  • Each of these agents is undergoing extensive clinical evaluation in combination with other therapies to produce unprecedented response rates in newly diagnosed and relapsed MM.
  • Nevertheless, relapse remains universal and further therapeutics with broad activity are required.
  • Importantly, it has become clear that pivotal genetic events are the primary harbingers of clinical outcome and novel targeted therapy approaches using existing approved drugs or novel agents, which address that disrupted signaling pathways are now in various stages of clinical testing.
  • It seems increasingly likely that novel drug combinations, which together turn off these critical Achilles heels, will become the standard of care and that treatment will become increasingly personalized and guided by genetic testing and prognostic factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Multiple Myeloma / therapy

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  • (PMID = 17363477.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-7163
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA 62242; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA 100707-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA 83724-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Myeloma Proteins
  • [Number-of-references] 98
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44. Kluin-Nelemans HC, Oldhoff JM, Van Doormaal JJ, Van 't Wout JW, Verhoef G, Gerrits WB, van Dobbenburgh OA, Pasmans SG, Fijnheer R: Cladribine therapy for systemic mastocytosis. Blood; 2003 Dec 15;102(13):4270-6
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cladribine therapy for systemic mastocytosis.
  • In the present absence of any curative therapy, a recent case report describing the efficacy of cladribine showed promising results.
  • Four patients were classified as having indolent or smoldering mastocytosis, 3 as having aggressive systemic mastocytosis, and 3 as having SM with an accompanying hematologic malignancy.
  • One patient relapsed within 11 months and showed a second response.
  • Single-agent cladribine is an effective and relatively safe treatment for severe systemic mastocytosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites / therapeutic use. Cladribine / therapeutic use. Mastocytosis, Systemic / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biomarkers / blood. Biomarkers / urine. Drug Eruptions / etiology. Female. Humans. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / complications. Male. Middle Aged. Myelodysplastic Syndromes / complications. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12933573.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites; 0 / Biomarkers; 47M74X9YT5 / Cladribine
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45. Duong HK, Kalaycio M: The role of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination chemotherapy regimens for primary resistant or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2009 Apr;4(2):55-6

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination chemotherapy regimens for primary resistant or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

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  • [CommentOn] J Clin Oncol. 2008 Nov 10;26(32):5192-7 [18854573.001]
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  • (PMID = 20425415.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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