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1. Rauh-Hain JA, Del Carmen MG: Treatment for advanced and recurrent endometrial carcinoma: combined modalities. Oncologist; 2010;15(8):852-61

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment for advanced and recurrent endometrial carcinoma: combined modalities.
  • Women with recurrent or advanced endometrial cancer constitute a heterogeneous group of patients.
  • Depending on previous treatment, women with recurrent endometrial cancer may be appropriate candidates for surgery, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, or chemotherapy.
  • Women with advanced stage disease at presentation may also be appropriate candidates for systemic and local therapies.
  • We review the treatment options available to treat recurrent and locally advanced endometrial cancer.
  • Treatment choice depends largely on the localization of disease, the patient's performance status and previous treatment history, as well the tumor's hormonal receptor status.
  • Radiation therapy is appropriate for isolated vaginal recurrences in patients with no previous history of radiation therapy.
  • Patients with recurrent low-grade tumors overexpressing estrogen and progesterone receptors may be treated with progestin therapy.
  • Systemic therapy is appropriate for patients with disseminate recurrences or advanced stage disease at presentation, or for those with receptor-negative tumors.
  • We review all these different treatment strategies available to patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Endometrial Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 20660059.001).
  • [ISSN] 1549-490X
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3228028
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2. Suh DH, Kim JW, Kim K, Kang SB: Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2010. J Gynecol Oncol; 2010 Dec 30;21(4):209-18

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2010.
  • For ovarian cancer, bevacizumab as a leading molecular targeted agent, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in recurrent disease, the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in an advanced setting, an effective screening method, and ARID1A mutations as a clue to the origin of clear cell carcinoma are mentioned.
  • For cervical cancer, confirmation of the efficacy and the introduction of a self collection method of the human papillomavirus (HPV) test, and the association between the HPV vaccine and miscarriage are examined.
  • For endometrial cancer, the superiority of laparoscopy in staging operation, the role of vaginal brachytherapy in an adjuvant setting, and the effect of para-aortic lymph node dissection are reviewed.
  • In addition, the trend of geriatric oncology and chemotherapy in carcinosarcomas is also assessed.

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  • (PMID = 21278881.001).
  • [ISSN] 2005-0399
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gynecol Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3026298
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Bevacizumab / Geriatric oncology / Ovarian cancer screening
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3. Ferenschild FT, Vermaas M, Verhoef C, Ansink AC, Kirkels WJ, Eggermont AM, de Wilt JH: Total pelvic exenteration for primary and recurrent malignancies. World J Surg; 2009 Jul;33(7):1502-8
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Total pelvic exenteration for primary and recurrent malignancies.
  • In locally advanced and recurrent pelvic malignancies, radical margins are sometimes difficult to obtain because of close relation to or growth in adjacent organs/structures.
  • Total pelvic exenteration (TPE) is an exenterative operation for these advanced tumors and involves en bloc resection of the rectum, bladder, and internal genital organs (prostate/seminal vesicles or uterus, ovaries and/or vagina).
  • METHODS: Between 1994 and 2008, a TPE was performed in 69 patients with pelvic cancer; 48 with rectal cancer (32 primary and 16 recurrent), 14 with cervical cancer (1 primary and 13 recurrent), 5 with sarcoma (3 primary and 2 recurrent), 1 with primary vaginal, and 1 with recurrent endometrial carcinoma.
  • Ten patients were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 66 patients with preoperative radiotherapy to induce down-staging.
  • Five-year local control for primary locally advanced rectal cancer, recurrent rectal cancer, and cervical cancer was 89%, 38%, and 64%, respectively.
  • Overall survival after 5 years for primary locally advanced rectal cancer, recurrent rectal cancer, and cervical cancer was 66%, 8%, and 45%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Total pelvic exenteration is accompanied with considerable morbidity, but good local control and acceptable overall survival justifies the use of this extensive surgical technique in most patients, especially patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer and recurrent cervical cancer.

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  • (PMID = 19421811.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2323
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2691931
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4. Silver SA, Tavassoli FA: Glomus tumor arising in a mature teratoma of the ovary: report of a case simulating a metastasis from cervical squamous carcinoma. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2000 Sep;124(9):1373-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Glomus tumor arising in a mature teratoma of the ovary: report of a case simulating a metastasis from cervical squamous carcinoma.
  • This lesion represented an incidental finding in a 43-year-old woman who underwent bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy at the time of detection of locally recurrent squamous carcinoma of the cervix.
  • The glomus tumor was initially interpreted as a metastasis due to its superficial morphologic resemblance to the recurrent carcinoma in the vagina.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Glomus Tumor / pathology. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary. Ovarian Neoplasms / pathology. Teratoma / pathology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy. Immunohistochemistry. Lymph Node Excision. Microscopy, Electron. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Ovariectomy. Vaginal Neoplasms / pathology. Vaginal Neoplasms / surgery

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  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cervical Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Ovarian Cancer.
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  • (PMID = 10975942.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-9985
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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5. González Sánchez JL, Flores Murrieta G, Chávez Brambila J, Deolarte Manzano JM, Andrade Manzano AF: [Topical 5-fluorouracil for treatment of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasms]. Ginecol Obstet Mex; 2002 May;70:244-7
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  • [Title] [Topical 5-fluorouracil for treatment of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasms].
  • [Transliterated title] 5-fluorouracilo tópico en el tratamiento de la neoplasia intraepitelial vaginal.
  • OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine the effectiveness of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the treatment of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN).
  • Patients received intravaginal treatment with 5-FU, 1.5 g once weekly for 10 weeks and all patients were followed up for at least 2-years.
  • RESULTS: Twenty eight (93%) patients with VAIN had prior or concurrent anogenital squamous neoplasia, including 5 with invasive cervical carcinoma and 23 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.
  • In 23 of 30 treated patients (77%), VAIN went into remission after a single treatment; in 3, (10%), it went into remission after two treatment; 3 (10%) had recurrent VAIN 3; and in 1 (3%) it progressed to invasive vaginal cancer.
  • The treatment was well tolerated.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The 5-FU is an option choice for VAIN treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / drug therapy. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Vaginal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Papanicolaou Test. Papilloma / drug therapy. Papilloma / pathology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology. Vaginal Smears

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  • (PMID = 12148464.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-9041
  • [Journal-full-title] Ginecología y obstetricia de México
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ginecol Obstet Mex
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Mexico
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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6. Watari H, Mitamura T, Moriwaki M, Hosaka M, Ohba Y, Sudo S, Todo Y, Takeda M, Ebina Y, Sakuragi N: Survival and failure pattern of patients with endometrial cancer after extensive surgery including systematic pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2009 Dec;19(9):1585-90
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  • [Title] Survival and failure pattern of patients with endometrial cancer after extensive surgery including systematic pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • We investigated the survival and the failure pattern of 288 patients with endometrial cancer treated with extensive surgery including systematic pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy followed by cisplatin-based chemotherapy from 1982 to 2002.
  • Among patients with a low risk (n = 92) for recurrence who received no adjuvant chemotherapy, 2 (2.2%) showed recurrent disease.
  • Among those with intermediate (n = 98) and high (n = 98) risks for recurrence who received adjuvant chemotherapy, 9 (9.2%) and 20 (20.4%) showed recurrent disease, respectively.
  • The recurrence sites were described as follows: distant (n = 12), vaginal (n = 8), peritoneal (n = 7), pelvic (n = 2), and lymphatic (n = 2).
  • Cervical invasion and lymph node metastasis were predictors of vaginal failure.
  • For patients with stage I/II cancer, the architectural and nuclear grades were related to distant failure.
  • We conclude that we need to further test the efficacy of systemic adjuvant therapy using new chemotherapeutic regimens to prevent distant failure and to improve the survival of patients with endometrial cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Endometrioid / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Endometrioid / surgery. Endometrial Neoplasms / drug therapy. Endometrial Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aorta, Abdominal / surgery. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Gynecologic Surgical Procedures / methods. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Pelvis / surgery. Recurrence. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Failure

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  • (PMID = 19955942.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-1438
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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7. Monk BJ, Sill MW, Burger RA, Gray HJ, Buekers TE, Roman LD: Phase II trial of bevacizumab in the treatment of persistent or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix: a gynecologic oncology group study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 Mar 1;27(7):1069-74
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  • [Title] Phase II trial of bevacizumab in the treatment of persistent or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix: a gynecologic oncology group study.
  • PURPOSE: Vascular endothelial growth factor is a key promoter of tumor progression in cervical carcinoma.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eligible patients had recurrent cervical cancer, measurable disease, and GOG performance status < or = 2.
  • Treatment consisted of bevacizumab 15 mg/kg intravenously every 21 days until disease progression or prohibitive toxicity.
  • RESULTS: Forty-six patients were enrolled (median age, 46 years); 38 patients (82.6%) received prior radiation as well as either one (n = 34, 73.9%) or two (n = 12, 26.1%) prior cytotoxic regimens for recurrent disease.
  • Grade 3 or 4 adverse events at least possibly related to bevacizumab included hypertension (n = 7), thrombo-embolism (n = 5), GI (n = 4), anemia (n = 2), other cardiovascular (n = 2), vaginal bleeding (n = 1), neutropenia (n = 1), and fistula (n = 1).
  • The median PFS and overall survival times were 3.40 months (95% CI, 2.53 to 4.53 months) and 7.29 months (95% CI, 6.11 to 10.41 months), respectively.
  • CONCLUSION Bevacizumab seems to be well tolerated and active in the second- and third-line treatment of patients with recurrent cervical cancer and merits phase III investigation.

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  • (PMID = 19139430.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 27469; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA027469; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA037517; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 37517; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K23 CA087558; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 87558
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2667811
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8. Mundt AJ, McBride R, Rotmensch J, Waggoner SE, Yamada SD, Connell PP: Significant pelvic recurrence in high-risk pathologic stage I--IV endometrial carcinoma patients after adjuvant chemotherapy alone: implications for adjuvant radiation therapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2001 Aug 1;50(5):1145-53
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  • [Title] Significant pelvic recurrence in high-risk pathologic stage I--IV endometrial carcinoma patients after adjuvant chemotherapy alone: implications for adjuvant radiation therapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of pelvic recurrence (PVR) in high-risk pathologic Stage I--IV endometrial carcinoma patients after adjuvant chemotherapy alone.
  • METHODS: Between 1992 and 1998, 43 high-risk endometrial cancer patients received adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • No patients received preoperative radiation therapy (RT).
  • All patients received 4-6 cycles of chemotherapy as the sole adjuvant therapy, consisting primarily of cisplatin and doxorubicin.
  • Recurrent disease sites were divided into pelvic (vaginal, nonvaginal) and extrapelvic (para-aortic, upper abdomen, liver, and extra-abdominal).
  • RESULTS: Twenty-nine women (67.4%) relapsed.
  • Of the 17 women who developed a PVR, 8 relapsed in the vagina, 3 in the nonvaginal pelvis, and 6 in both.
  • The 3-year vaginal and nonvaginal PVR rates were 37.8% and 26%, respectively.
  • The most significant factor correlated with vaginal PVR was CI (p = 0.0007).
  • Nine of the 29 relapsed patients (31%) developed PVR as their only (6) or first site (3) of recurrence.
  • CONCLUSIONS: PVR is common in high-risk pathologic Stage I-IV endometrial cancer patients after adjuvant chemotherapy alone.
  • These results support the continued use of locoregional RT in patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Further studies are needed to test the addition of chemotherapy to locoregional RT.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Endometrial Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pelvic Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / epidemiology. Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / prevention & control. Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / secondary. Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / therapy. Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Adenosquamous / epidemiology. Carcinoma, Adenosquamous / prevention & control. Carcinoma, Adenosquamous / secondary. Carcinoma, Adenosquamous / therapy. Chicago / epidemiology. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Cystadenocarcinoma, Papillary / epidemiology. Cystadenocarcinoma, Papillary / prevention & control. Cystadenocarcinoma, Papillary / secondary. Cystadenocarcinoma, Papillary / therapy. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Hysterectomy. Life Tables. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Ovariectomy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Risk. Treatment Outcome. Vaginal Neoplasms / epidemiology. Vaginal Neoplasms / prevention & control. Vaginal Neoplasms / secondary

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  • (PMID = 11483323.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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9. Firat S, Erickson B: Selective irradiation for the treatment of recurrent ovarian carcinoma involving the vagina or rectum. Gynecol Oncol; 2001 Feb;80(2):213-20
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Selective irradiation for the treatment of recurrent ovarian carcinoma involving the vagina or rectum.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of selective irradiation in the management of recurrent or persistent ovarian carcinoma involving the vagina or rectum after initial surgery or surgery and chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with recurrent or persistent vaginal and/or perirectal disease from ovarian carcinoma received selective irradiation and were evaluated for local control, survival, and quality of life.
  • Seventy-nine percent had previously received various combinations of chemotherapy after initial surgery.
  • In addition, 50% of the patients received various combinations of chemotherapy before or after radiotherapy and 3 patients received additional surgery.
  • RESULTS: Vaginal bleeding was controlled in all patients and a complete symptomatic response was achieved in 79% of the symptomatic patients.
  • Survival after recurrence at 2 years was 57% for patients who had no liver or extra-abdominal metastasis at the time of radiotherapy (21 patients) and 0% for patients who had liver or extra-abdominal metastases (7 patients).
  • Median survival of 5 patients with abdominal and pelvic disease and 16 patients with no extrapelvic disease at the time of recurrence was 2.16 (0.16-10.67) and 2.08 (0.58-27) years, respectively, after recurrence.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Radiation can be considered an effective treatment option for patients with vaginal and/or perirectal recurrences of ovarian carcinoma.
  • This location may represent a sanctuary site from chemotherapy.
  • Pelvic irradiation alone may be effective salvage and the addition of brachytherapy may improve local control, particularly in patients with disease confined to the pelvis who undergo debulking or chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Rectal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Vaginal Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Brachytherapy. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Salvage Therapy. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11161862.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. Long HJ 3rd, Rayson S, Podratz KC, Abu-Ghazaleh S, Suman V, Hartmann LC, Levitt R, Nair S, Hatfield AK, Knost JA: Long-term survival of patients with advanced/recurrent carcinoma of cervix and vagina after neoadjuvant treatment with methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin with or without the addition of molgramostim, and review of the literature. Am J Clin Oncol; 2002 Dec;25(6):547-51
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINBLASTINE .

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  • [Title] Long-term survival of patients with advanced/recurrent carcinoma of cervix and vagina after neoadjuvant treatment with methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin with or without the addition of molgramostim, and review of the literature.
  • A randomized phase III study was conducted to assess the addition of molgramostim (GM-CSF) to the combination of methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (MVAC) in terms of response rate, progression-free survival, and survival in women with advanced, recurrent, or metastatic carcinoma of the cervix or vagina.
  • Those who were not surgical candidates were offered additional chemotherapy until progression or toxicity.
  • Although more than 40% of patients on each arm received fewer than four cycles of MVAC, the clinical response rate was 78% (95% CI: 52-94%) and 50% (95% CI: 26-74%) for MVAC and MVAC + GM-CSF, respectively; the median time to progression was 10.2 and 11.8 months, respectively; and median survival was 13.8 and 16.0 months, respectively.
  • MVAC with or without GM-CSF support achieves high response rates in patients with advanced, recurrent, or metastatic cervical carcinoma despite dose reductions and deletions.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Recombinant Proteins / therapeutic use. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Vaginal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Survival Analysis. Vinblastine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 12477995.001).
  • [ISSN] 0277-3732
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-15083; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-25224; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-35101; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-35103; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-35113; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-35195; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-35272; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-35448; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-37404; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-37417; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-63849
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor; 99283-10-0 / molgramostim; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; M-VAC protocol
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11. Boruta DM 2nd, Gehrig PA, Fader AN, Olawaiye AB: Management of women with uterine papillary serous cancer: a Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) review. Gynecol Oncol; 2009 Oct;115(1):142-53
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  • [Title] Management of women with uterine papillary serous cancer: a Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) review.
  • OBJECTIVE: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a clinically and pathologically distinct subtype of endometrial cancer.
  • Although less common than its endometrioid carcinoma (EEC) counterpart, UPSC accounts for a disproportionate number of endometrial cancer related deaths.
  • To date, limited prospective trials exist from which evidence-based management can be developed.
  • Women often present with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding, but may also present with abnormal cervical cytology, ascites, or a pelvic mass.
  • In some cases, the diagnosis may be made with endometrial biopsy, while in other cases it is not made until the time of definitive surgery.
  • Optimal cytoreduction and adjuvant platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy appear to improve survival, while adjuvant radiotherapy may contribute to loco-regional disease control.
  • Platinum/taxane-based adjuvant chemotherapy should be considered in the treatment of both early- and advanced-stage patients.
  • Prospective clinical trials of women with UPSC are necessary in order to delineate the optimal therapy for women with newly diagnosed and recurrent disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Papillary / therapy. Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous / therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans

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  • (PMID = 19592079.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-6859
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 147
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12. Güth U, Ella WA, Olaitan A, Hadwin RJ, Arora R, McCormack M: Total vaginal necrosis: a representative example of underreporting severe late toxic reaction after concomitant chemoradiation for cervical cancer. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2010 Jan;20(1):54-60
International Agency for Research on Cancer - Screening Group. diagnostics - A practical manual on visual screening for cervical neoplasia .

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  • [Title] Total vaginal necrosis: a representative example of underreporting severe late toxic reaction after concomitant chemoradiation for cervical cancer.
  • INTRODUCTION: There is paucity of information regarding a late toxic reaction after chemoradiation for locally advanced cervical cancer.
  • We discuss this problem with special consideration to total vaginal necrosis (TVN), an underreported severe late complication of chemoradiation.
  • METHODS: The records of 98 cervical cancer patients who received chemoradiation at the Department of Oncology of the University College London Hospital between January 2004 and May 2008 were reviewed.
  • RESULTS: Eight women (8.2%) developed a severe late toxic reaction.
  • From these, 3 patients (3.1% of the entire cohort and 37.5% of the patients with a severe late toxic reaction), who were 44 to 60 years old, developed a TVN 6 to 18 months after completion of chemoradiation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Total vaginal necrosis is an underreported but serious late complication after chemoradiation and leads to considerable chronic morbidity.
  • Radiologic examinations and biopsies are required to exclude recurrent disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / radiotherapy. Radiation Injuries / pathology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Vagina / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy / adverse effects. Delayed Diagnosis. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Necrosis / diagnosis. Necrosis / epidemiology. Necrosis / etiology. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Retrospective Studies. Severity of Illness Index. Time Factors. Vaginal Diseases / diagnosis. Vaginal Diseases / epidemiology. Vaginal Diseases / etiology. Vaginal Diseases / pathology


13. Yap OW, Kapp DS, Teng NN, Husain A: Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2005 Nov 15;63(4):1114-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT).
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted.
  • Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications.
  • Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2.
  • IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy).
  • The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis.
  • Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months.
  • Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT.
  • Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments.
  • CONCLUSION: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 15964710.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Kim HS, Park NH, Kang SB: Rare metastases of recurrent cervical cancer to the pericardium and abdominal muscle. Arch Gynecol Obstet; 2008 Nov;278(5):479-82
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  • [Title] Rare metastases of recurrent cervical cancer to the pericardium and abdominal muscle.
  • Pericardial metastasis from recurrent cervical cancer is very rare.
  • A 64-year-old woman with intermittent vaginal bleeding was referred under the clinical impression of cervical cancer.
  • Further investigation revealed a cervical cancer (FIGO stage Ib), and she underwent a radical hysterectomy followed by adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation.
  • During the post-operative follow-up period of 6 months, pericardial and abdominal muscular metastases were developed along with the symptoms of dry cough and dyspnea.
  • Although palliative radiation therapy and chemotherapy were performed for the control of the metastases, she expired due to cardiac failure 16 months after the operation.
  • The prognosis of patients with pericardial and abdominal wall metastases from recurrent cervical cancer is usually poor because of the systemic dissemination of the disease.
  • Aggressive local and systemic treatments may provide significant palliation of associated symptoms.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Muscles. Abdominal Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Pericardium. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology


15. Wax JR, Pinette MG, Blackstone J, Cartin A, McCrann DJ: Nonbilharzial bladder carcinoma complicating pregnancy: review of the literature. Obstet Gynecol Surv; 2002 Apr;57(4):236-44
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  • [Title] Nonbilharzial bladder carcinoma complicating pregnancy: review of the literature.
  • The purpose of this review is to evaluate tumor presentation and characteristics, and maternal-fetal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by nonbilharzial bladder carcinoma.
  • Presenting complaints included painless gross hematuria [N = 12 (50%)], vaginal bleeding [N = 7 (29%)], dysuria [N = 2 (8.4%)], abdominal pain [N = 2 (8.4%)], and 1 instance each of urgency, frequency, recurrent cystitis, and no symptoms.
  • Transitional cell carcinoma was found in 17 (74%), adenocarcinoma in 5 (22%), and squamous cell carcinoma in 1 (4.5%) patient.
  • Treatment was typically by transurethral resection (N = 18), but 3 women required radical cystectomy, 2 received radiation, 1 received chemotherapy, and 1 underwent partial cystectomy.
  • Three (14%) women died of their disease and 3 (14%) fetuses were lost because of complications of cancer or its treatment.
  • Bladder carcinoma in pregnancy can mimic cystitis or obstetric hemorrhage and should be considered when evaluations for these conditions are negative.
  • Pregnancy is not a contraindication to treating most forms of bladder cancer.
  • LEARNING OBJECTIVES: After completion of this article, the reader will be able to list the various types of bladder cancers, to describe the presenting symptoms in a patient with a bladder cancer, and to outline the work up and treatment strategies for bladder cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Hematuria. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Pregnancy. Pregnancy Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11961481.001).
  • [ISSN] 0029-7828
  • [Journal-full-title] Obstetrical & gynecological survey
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Obstet Gynecol Surv
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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16. Pearl ML, Johnston CM, McMeekin DS: A phase II study of weekly docetaxel for patients with advanced or recurrent cancer of the cervix. Gynecol Obstet Invest; 2007;64(4):193-8
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  • [Title] A phase II study of weekly docetaxel for patients with advanced or recurrent cancer of the cervix.
  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: A phase II study was conducted to assess the activity and toxicity of weekly docetaxel in patients with advanced or recurrent cancer of the cervix.
  • Patients were allowed to receive chemosensitization and not more than one prior chemotherapy regimen excluding taxanes.
  • Docetaxel 35 mg/m2 was administered intravenously weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week off until disease progression or adverse effects prohibited further therapy.
  • The most frequent drug-related toxicities were anemia and fatigue.
  • One patient died of exsanguination from a known vaginal metastasis after completing her second cycle.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Docetaxel has limited activity in patients with recurrent cancer of the cervix at the dose and schedule tested.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Taxoids / therapeutic use. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / mortality. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adult. Carcinoma, Adenosquamous / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Adenosquamous / mortality. Carcinoma, Adenosquamous / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Middle Aged. Oklahoma. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome


17. Leitao MM Jr, Chi DS: Recurrent cervical cancer. Curr Treat Options Oncol; 2002 Apr;3(2):105-11
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  • [Title] Recurrent cervical cancer.
  • There are limited treatment options for patients with recurrent cervical carcinoma.
  • Because of low response rates and a negligible impact on long-term survival, the use of chemotherapy in patients with unresectable recurrent disease should be considered palliative.
  • Generally, radiation therapy in previously irradiated patients is considered palliative.
  • For patients who develop recurrent disease after definitive surgery who have not received prior radiation therapy, salvage radiation therapy is the treatment of choice.
  • Similarly, patients who have received definitive primary radiation therapy are candidates for surgical resection of their recurrence.
  • Radical hysterectomy may be an option for the very rare patient with a small (<2 cm) centrally located recurrence in the cervix or vaginal fornices.
  • However, for most patients, pelvic exenteration remains the only therapeutic option that offers the possibility of long-term survival.
  • The introduction of high-dose-rate intraoperative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) combined with radical surgical resection has widened the scope of patients who may be offered surgery.
  • All patients who are surgically fit and have undergone previous radiation therapy should be considered for surgical resection for centrally located recurrences.
  • [MeSH-minor] Brachytherapy. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Intraoperative Care. Palliative Care. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Radiation Dosage


18. Vesna A, Neli B: Benefit and safety of 28-day transdermal estrogen regimen during vaginal hysterectomy (a controlled trial). Maturitas; 2006 Feb 20;53(3):282-98
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  • [Title] Benefit and safety of 28-day transdermal estrogen regimen during vaginal hysterectomy (a controlled trial).
  • OBJECTIVES: Assessment of benefit and safety of 28-day transdermal 17-beta estradiol regimen during vaginal hysterectomy.
  • METHODS: Two-hundred and sixty-nine postmenopausal women, undergoing vaginal hysterectomy were divided into: transdermal estrogen hormone replacement therapy (TEHRT) group (n=119) with 28-day transdermal 17-beta estradiol 50 mg/day, 14 days before and after operation; and vaginal estrogen hormone replacement therapy (VEHRT) group (n=150) with 14-day preoperative vaginal conjugated estrogen 0.625 mg/day.
  • The effect on: endometrium, wound healing, infection, recurrent organ prolapse were evaluated.
  • RESULTS: Pain symptoms, vaginal fetid discharge, swelling, crusting (p<0.001); visible wound opening on the 4 week control (p<0.01); patient assessment of outcome (p<0.001) were in favor of TEHRT.
  • Point C was higher and total vaginal length longer in TEHRT group (p<0.01; p<0.05).
  • In none of the patients from the both study groups complex hyperplasia, atypical hyperplasia or endometrial carcinoma were observed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The 28-day transdermal 17-beta estradiol regimen seems to be safe and effective procedure.
  • [MeSH-major] Estradiol / administration & dosage. Estrogen Replacement Therapy. Estrogens, Conjugated (USP) / administration & dosage. Hysterectomy, Vaginal. Wound Healing / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Cutaneous. Administration, Intravaginal. Chi-Square Distribution. Endometrium / drug effects. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Pain, Postoperative. Prolapse. Surgical Wound Infection / prevention & control. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16011883.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-5122
  • [Journal-full-title] Maturitas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Maturitas
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrogens, Conjugated (USP); 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol
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19. Akbulut M, Kelten C, Bir F, Soysal ME, Duzcan SE: Primary peritoneal serous psammocarcinoma with recurrent disease and metastasis: a case report and review of the literature. Gynecol Oncol; 2007 Apr;105(1):248-51

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  • [Title] Primary peritoneal serous psammocarcinoma with recurrent disease and metastasis: a case report and review of the literature.
  • BACKGROUND: Psammocarcinoma is a rare variant of serous carcinoma arising from either ovary or peritoneum.
  • CASE: A 67-year-old woman was admitted with an abnormal vaginal bleeding and abdomino-pelvic pain.
  • Computed tomography showed a heavily calcified rectovaginal mass that was histologically characterized by numerous psammoma bodies and low-grade cytological features.
  • Following the primary surgery, the patient received 9 cycles of chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSION: Although psammocarcinoma is known to behave in a more indolent course, clinicians should be aware that patients with this disease may have a clinically aggressive, recurrent, and metastatic tumor that necessitated systemic therapy.

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  • (PMID = 17222893.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Kyriazi MA, Stafyla VK, Kondi-Pafiti A, Arkadopoulos N, Dafnios N, Hasiakos D, Fotiou S, Mastorakos D, Smyrniotis V: A novel technique for surgical reconstruction of the perineal floor following anteroposterior exenteration of the pelvis--case report and review of the literature. Eur J Gynaecol Oncol; 2010;31(2):201-5
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  • Pelvic exenteration is the only potentially curative surgical procedure for patients with recurrent cervical, vaginal, vulvar or rectal cancers, especially following adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy.
  • We describe a novel reconstruction technique of the pelvic floor, involving a combination of an oblique rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap and a synthetic absorbable mesh as a pelvic sling for additional support, in a 63-year-old female patient with recurrent vulvar carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / surgery. Pelvic Exenteration / methods. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Vulvar Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 20527241.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-2936
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of gynaecological oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Gynaecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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21. Tinger A, Waldron T, Peluso N, Katin MJ, Dosoretz DE, Blitzer PH, Rubenstein JH, Garton GR, Nakfoor BA, Patrice SJ, Chuang L, Orr JW Jr: Effective palliative radiation therapy in advanced and recurrent ovarian carcinoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2001 Dec 1;51(5):1256-63
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  • [Title] Effective palliative radiation therapy in advanced and recurrent ovarian carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: To retrospectively review our experience using radiation therapy as a palliative treatment in ovarian carcinoma.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Eighty patients who received radiation therapy for ovarian carcinoma between 1983 and 1998 were reviewed.
  • The indications for radiation therapy, radiation therapy techniques, details, tolerance, and response were recorded.
  • The actuarial survival rates from initial diagnosis and from the completion of radiation therapy were calculated.
  • Zero to 20 cycles of a platinum-based chemotherapy regimen were delivered before irradiation (median = 6 cycles).
  • The reasons for palliative treatment were: pain (n = 22), mass (n = 23), obstruction of ureter, rectum, esophagus, or stomach (n = 12), a positive second-look laparotomy (n = 9), ascites (n = 8), vaginal bleeding (n = 6), rectal bleeding (n = 1), lymphedema (n = 3), skin involvement (n = 1), or brain metastases with symptoms (n = 11).
  • Some patients received treatment for more than one indication.
  • Treatment was directed to the abdomen or pelvis in 64 patients, to the brain in 11, and to other sites in 5.
  • Only 11% suffered progressive disease during therapy that required discontinuation of the treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this series of radiation therapy for advanced ovarian carcinoma, the response, survival, and tolerance rates compare favorably to those reported for current second- and third-line chemotherapy regimens.
  • Cooperative groups should consider evaluating prospectively the use of radiation therapy before nonplatinum and/or nonpaclitaxel chemotherapy in these patients.

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  • (PMID = 11728685.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Lilic V, Lilic G, Filipovic S, Milosevic J, Tasic M, Stojiljkovic M: Modern treatment of invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix. J BUON; 2009 Oct-Dec;14(4):587-92
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  • [Title] Modern treatment of invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix.
  • Treatment of invasive cervical carcinoma is determined by the clinical disease stage.
  • Microinvasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix, due to its limited metastatic potential, is usually curable with non-radical treatment.
  • There are no standard approaches to the treatment of stage Ib-IIa carcinoma of the uterine cervix.
  • Laparoscopically-assisted radical vaginal hysterectomy demonstrated similar efficacy and recurrence rates for this disease stage.
  • In cases where fertility is to be preserved, radical vaginal trachelectomy is a valid option for small cervical cancers.
  • Some oncologic centres prefer primary surgery with postoperative radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, while others prefer primary chemoradiotherapy.
  • Moreover, as a possible alternative, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical surgery is recommended for stage Ib2 disease.
  • Simultaneous chemoradiation is being introduced as a new standard for advanced cancer, since it has been clearly demonstrated that it can prolong disease-free and overall survival.
  • The treatment of recurrent carcinoma depends on the type of previous treatment, site and extent of recurrent disease, and on the disease-free period and general health of the patient.
  • In conclusion, the decision on the treatment approach for invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix should be individualized, based on numerous factors, such as disease stage, general health of the patient, cancer-related factors, in order to choose the best approach with minimal complications.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Hysterectomy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 20148447.001).
  • [ISSN] 1107-0625
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of B.U.ON. : official journal of the Balkan Union of Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J BUON
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 28
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23. Liu J, Li Y, Li S, Wang D, Hu T, Meng Y, Ma D, Cai H, Wang Z, Xiong C, Zhang H: Clinicopathological features and prognosis of small cell carcinoma of the cervix. J Huazhong Univ Sci Technolog Med Sci; 2010 Oct;30(5):626-30
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  • [Title] Clinicopathological features and prognosis of small cell carcinoma of the cervix.
  • Small cell carcinoma of cervix (SCCC) is a rare disease with highly aggressive behaviour and is pathologically hard to diagnose.
  • In this study, the clinicopathological features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of the condition were examined.
  • Our results showed that five non-recurrent cases initially presented irregular vaginal bleeding or increased apocenosis of varying degrees.
  • One case was accompanied with squamous cell cancer.
  • On the basis of their stages of condition, one subject with stage III b underwent chemotherapy, and one with stage Ib2 received extensive hysterectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy, while the other 5 cases were treated by extensive hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy in combination with pre- and/or post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • Early-stage patients should be treated by extensive hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy in combination with pre- and/or post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Small Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Small Cell / therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy / methods. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Radiotherapy. Retrospective Studies

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  • [Cites] Gynecol Oncol. 2004 Apr;93(1):27-33 [15047210.001]
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  • (PMID = 21063846.001).
  • [ISSN] 1672-0733
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Medical sciences = Hua zhong ke ji da xue xue bao. Yi xue Ying De wen ban = Huazhong keji daxue xuebao. Yixue Yingdewen ban
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Huazhong Univ. Sci. Technol. Med. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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24. Mehta N, Yamada SD, Rotmensch J, Mundt AJ: Outcome and pattern of failure in pathologic stage I-II papillary serous carcinoma of the endometrium: implications for adjuvant radiation therapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2003 Nov 15;57(4):1004-9
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  • [Title] Outcome and pattern of failure in pathologic stage I-II papillary serous carcinoma of the endometrium: implications for adjuvant radiation therapy.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the outcome and patterns of failure in women with pathologic Stage I-II papillary serous carcinoma of the uterus and to discuss the implications for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT).
  • METHODS: Twenty-three pathologic Stage I-II uterine papillary serous carcinoma patients were treated at our institution between 1980 and 2001.
  • Adjuvant therapies included the following: 9 none, 10 RT (6 pelvic, 1 vaginal brachytherapy, 3 both), 4 chemotherapy, and 1 hormonal therapy.
  • No patient received whole abdominal radiation therapy or para-aortic RT.
  • Nine patients developed recurrent disease.
  • Five failed in the pelvis, of which 4 relapsed in the vagina.
  • However, neither developed an isolated abdominal recurrence.
  • Contrary to traditional assumptions, however, abdominal recurrence was uncommon in our patients, despite the lack of whole abdominal radiation therapy.
  • Future studies should investigate the role of adjuvant chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 14575831.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Kecmanović D, Kovacević P, Pavlov M, Sepetkovski A, Ceranić M: [Cytoreductive procedures in advanced primary ovarian carcinoma]. Acta Chir Iugosl; 2001;48(1):71-5
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  • [Title] [Cytoreductive procedures in advanced primary ovarian carcinoma].
  • Female patient, 68, hospitalized due to vaginal bleeding, anaemia and defecation disorder.
  • Explorative curretage of uterus--PH findings: malignant tissue.
  • Irigography: spasticity and extraluminal compression to proximal third of rectum and distal sigmoid colon.
  • One month after the operation, systemic chemotherapy consisting of Endoxan and Karboblastin was administered, for the duration of 6 months, once monthly.
  • Twelve months after the operation NMR showed normal findings, patient was without evidents of recurrent disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / secondary. Carcinoma / surgery. Ovarian Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 11432258.001).
  • [ISSN] 0354-950X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta chirurgica Iugoslavica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Chir Iugosl
  • [Language] hrv
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Yugoslavia
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26. Xue DB, Ding LJ, Xia AL, Chen D, Xia HP, Teng XD, Xu ST, Zhang SJ, Ren XC: [Clinicopathologic study on 61 cases of uterine papillary serous carcinoma with or without adjuvant therapy]. Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi; 2010 Oct;39(10):671-4
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  • [Title] [Clinicopathologic study on 61 cases of uterine papillary serous carcinoma with or without adjuvant therapy].
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the clinicopathologic features of uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) and the roles of adjuvant therapy.
  • The clinical presentations included abnormal vaginal bleeding, abdominal symptoms and abnormal Pap smears.
  • Fifty-six patients received adjuvant therapy.
  • The number of patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy alone, adjuvant radiotherapy alone and combined adjuvant chemotherapy/radiotherapy were 42, 24 and 10, respectively.
  • The median survivals of the chemotherapy group and non-chemotherapy group (with or without radiotherapy) were 66.4 months and 32.8 months, respectively.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III/IV tumors or recurrent UPSC may have survival benefit.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Papillary. Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous. Uterine Neoplasms
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Menopause. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 21176532.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5807
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua bing li xue za zhi = Chinese journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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27. Petru E, Pasterk C, Reich O, Obermair A, Winter R, Breitenecker G: Small-cell carcinoma of the uterus and the vagina: experience with ten patients. Arch Gynecol Obstet; 2005 Apr;271(4):316-9
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  • [Title] Small-cell carcinoma of the uterus and the vagina: experience with ten patients.
  • Patients tend to develop distant metastasis early and thus are potential candidates for systemic therapy.
  • We reviewed the experience with small-CCs of the uterus and vagina at two Austrian University hospitals.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients (median age, 50 years; range, 18-92) with small-CC of the cervix (n=7), uterine corpus (n=2), and the vagina (n=1) were treated at the two centers between 1988 and 1998.
  • Eight patients underwent radical surgery, 7 of whom also received chemotherapy.
  • She had received six courses of dose-intensive platinum chemotherapy after radical surgery.
  • All three patients with small-CC of the uterine corpus or vagina developed recurrence within the first year after diagnosis.
  • Of the 7 patients who received chemotherapy, 5 developed progressive or recurrent disease in the paraaortic region (n=2), peritoneum (n=1), liver (n=1), or pelvis (n=1).
  • The optimal treatment for these patients most probably including concurrent chemo-radiotherapy remains to be defined.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Small Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Small Cell / therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / diagnosis. Uterine Neoplasms / therapy. Vaginal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Vaginal Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 15197564.001).
  • [ISSN] 0932-0067
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of gynecology and obstetrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Gynecol. Obstet.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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28. Chen P, Yang CC, Chen YJ, Wang PH: Tamoxifen-induced endometrial cancer. Eur J Gynaecol Oncol; 2003;24(2):135-7
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  • [Title] Tamoxifen-induced endometrial cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: Tamoxifen-induced endometrial changes in postmenopausal women with breast carcinoma are well-known.
  • Due to the popularity of postoperative chemotherapy for breast cancer, chemotherapy-induced early menopause in women with breast cancer on tamoxifen treatment needs more attention, because these women have higher risk for endometrial cancers than premenopausal women.
  • SUBJECT: From May 1995 to May 1997, three premenopausal women aged 46, 43, and 39 with breast cancer were treated in our center.
  • All patients received standard surgery for their breast cancers followed by six courses of adjuvant chemotherapy and 5-year tamoxifen treatment.
  • All patients were regularly followed-up at the Breast Cancer Center and evaluated annually at the gynecological clinics including pelvic examination, Pap smear and transvaginal sonography.
  • RESULTS: All patients became menopausal after six courses of chemotherapy ranging from three months to 14 months.
  • The endometrial cancers occurred at 36 months, 28 months, and 33 months, respectively, after initial treatment for the breast cancers.
  • Their last gynecologic examinations performed at six months, eight months and five months before the diagnosis of endometrial cancer showed nothing remarkable.
  • Only one patient complained of vaginal spotting before diagnosis and the other two patients only complained of increasing purulent vaginal discharge.
  • All patients received standard treatment for endometrial cancer and none of them died of their disease but one patient died of recurrent breast cancer 52 months later.
  • CONCLUSION: Women with breast cancer on tamoxifen treatment need more attention and frequent evaluation of their reproductive organs, especially postmenopausal (either spontaneous or chemotherapy induced) women, although the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) comments that no more than annual pelvic exams with Pap smears are needed in asymptomatic women.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / adverse effects. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Endometrial Neoplasms / chemically induced. Tamoxifen / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 12701962.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-2936
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of gynaecological oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Gynaecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen
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29. Fiorica JV, Brunetto VL, Hanjani P, Lentz SS, Mannel R, Andersen W, Gynecologic Oncology Group study: Phase II trial of alternating courses of megestrol acetate and tamoxifen in advanced endometrial carcinoma: a Gynecologic Oncology Group study. Gynecol Oncol; 2004 Jan;92(1):10-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II trial of alternating courses of megestrol acetate and tamoxifen in advanced endometrial carcinoma: a Gynecologic Oncology Group study.
  • OBJECTIVES: To estimate the objective response rate and toxicity associated with alternating megestrol acetate (MA) and tamoxifen citrate (T) in women with endometrial carcinoma.
  • METHODS: Consenting patients with measurable recurrent or advanced endometrial carcinoma were eligible if they had not received prior cytotoxic or hormonal treatment.
  • MA 80 mg BID x 3 weeks alternating with T 20 mg BID x 3 weeks orally was given.
  • The response rate in patients with extra pelvic disease (n = 42) was 31% as compared to 14% in those with strictly pelvic and/or vaginal disease (n = 14).
  • CONCLUSION: A regimen of alternating megestrol acetate and tamoxifen is active in treating endometrial cancer and may result in a prolonged complete response (CR) in some patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Endometrial Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / adverse effects. Apoptosis / drug effects. Carcinoma, Endometrioid / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Endometrioid / pathology. Cell Differentiation / drug effects. Down-Regulation / drug effects. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Megestrol Acetate / administration & dosage. Megestrol Acetate / adverse effects. Middle Aged. Receptors, Progesterone / metabolism. Tamoxifen / administration & dosage. Tamoxifen / adverse effects

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  • [CommentIn] Gynecol Oncol. 2004 Jan;92(1):1-3 [14751129.001]
  • (PMID = 14751131.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA27469; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA37517
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Receptors, Progesterone; 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen; TJ2M0FR8ES / Megestrol Acetate
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30. Kesic V: Management of cervical cancer. Eur J Surg Oncol; 2006 Oct;32(8):832-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of cervical cancer.
  • AIMS: The aim of the article was to review the current approach to management of cervical cancer.
  • METHODS: The relevant literature has served as a source for review of different options applied in the management of cervical cancer.
  • RESULTS: Treatment of invasive cervical cancer is affected by the stage of the disease, which is based on clinical evaluation.
  • Microinvasive carcinoma of the cervix has limited metastatic potential and therefore is most likely curable by non-radical treatment.
  • There is no standard management of stage Ib-IIa cervical carcinoma.
  • Most often, stage Ib1 cervical cancer is treated by radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy.
  • Laparoscopically assisted radical vaginal hysterectomy has shown similar efficacy and recurrence rates.
  • Radical vaginal trachelectomy with laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy may be an option in small cervical cancer where preservation of fertility is desired.
  • There is lot of conflicting published work regarding the treatment of bulky stage Ib-IIa cervical cancer.
  • While some centers are performing primary surgery as for Ib1 disease followed by tailored postoperative radiation with or without chemotherapy, the others are in favor of primary chemo-radiation therapy.
  • Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical surgery has emerged as a possible alternative, which may improve a survival in patients with stage Ib2 disease.
  • Concomitant chemoradiation is becoming a new standard in treatment of advanced disease, because it has been clearly shown to improve disease-free, progression-free and overall survival.
  • Management of recurrent disease depends on previous treatment, site and extent of recurrence, disease-free interval and patient's performance status.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Treatment decisions should be individualized and based on multiple factors including the stage of the disease, age, medical condition of the patient, tumor-related factors and treatment preferences, to yield the best cure with minimum complications.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Hysterectomy / methods. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16698223.001).
  • [ISSN] 0748-7983
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of surgical oncology : the journal of the European Society of Surgical Oncology and the British Association of Surgical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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31. Evans J: Weekly topotecan in a heavily pretreated patient with peritoneal papillary serous adenocarcinoma. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2004 May-Jun;14(3):540-2
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Peritoneal papillary serous adenocarcinoma is a rare müllerian tumor type that is histologically similar to ovarian serous carcinoma.
  • A 56-year-old woman, who had undergone an abdominal hysterectomy 25 years earlier, presented with a vaginal nodule and palpable pelvic mass.
  • This heavily pretreated patient then started topotecan therapy (1.0 mg/m(2)/day, x 5 days).
  • After 12 weekly cycles, she achieved a complete response, which was maintained for 25 weeks with weekly topotecan therapy with a subsequent recurrence.
  • Weekly topotecan demonstrated antitumor activity and was well tolerated in a patient with recurrent peritoneal papillary serous adenocarcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma, Papillary / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Peritoneal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Topotecan / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 15228430.001).
  • [ISSN] 1048-891X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 7M7YKX2N15 / Topotecan; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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