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1. Chamberlain MC: Salvage chemotherapy for recurrent spinal cord ependymona. Cancer; 2002 Sep 1;95(5):997-1002
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Salvage chemotherapy for recurrent spinal cord ependymona.
  • BACKGROUND: Ependymomas are reported to constitute 4% of all primary central nervous system (CNS) malignancies in adults, 30% of which occur in the spinal cord.
  • A prospective Phase II study to determine toxicity and response to chronic oral etoposide in patients with recurrent low-grade intramedullary spinal cord ependymoma (SCE) was conducted.
  • METHODS: Ten patients (6 males and 4 females with a median age of 30 years) with recurrent SCE were treated with oral etoposide (50mg/m(2)/day given daily for 21 days followed by a 14-day break and then repeated constituted a cycle of therapy).
  • All patients had failed surgery and radiotherapy and four patients had failed one prior chemotherapy.
  • Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the spine was performed every 8 weeks after a cycle of etoposide and before the next cycle of chemotherapy was initiated.
  • RESULTS: Treatment-related complications included alopecia in 9 patients, nonbloody diarrhea in 6 patients, a baseline weight loss of > 10% in 5 patients, Grade (according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Scale) 3-4 neutropenia in 3 patients, Grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia in 3 patients, and Grade 3-4 anemia in 2 patients.
  • There were no treatment-related deaths reported.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Chronic oral etoposide appears to be well tolerated, has modest toxicity, and had apparent activity in the small cohort of adults in the current study with surgically and medically refractory, recurrent, intradural intramedullary SCE.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacology. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Etoposide / pharmacology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Alopecia / chemically induced. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Salvage Therapy. Thrombocytopenia / chemically induced. Treatment Outcome. Weight Loss

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 12209682.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide
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2. Chamberlain MC: Temozolomide for recurrent low-grade spinal cord gliomas in adults. Cancer; 2008 Sep 1;113(5):1019-24
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  • [Title] Temozolomide for recurrent low-grade spinal cord gliomas in adults.
  • BACKGROUND: There is no standard therapy for surgery- and radiotherapy-resistant, recurrent, low-grade spinal cord gliomas.
  • Therefore, a retrospective study of temozolomide (TMZ) in adults with recurrent low-grade spinal cord gliomas with a primary objective of determining progression-free survival (PFS) was performed.
  • METHODS: Twenty-two patients (11 men and 11 women) aged 20 years to 55 years (median, 35 years) with recurrent spinal cord gliomas (World Health Organization grade 2 astrocytoma in 19 patients and oligoastrocytoma in 3 patients) were treated.
  • All patients were chemotherapy-naive.
  • Time to tumor progression ranged from 2 months to 28 months (median, 14.5 months).
  • CONCLUSIONS: TMZ demonstrated modest efficacy with acceptable toxicity in this cohort of adult patients with recurrent low-grade spinal cord gliomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Glioma / drug therapy. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Retrospective Studies

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2008 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 18615600.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 85622-93-1 / temozolomide
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3. Tai SH, Hung YC, Chen JC, Jin YT, Lee EJ: A patient with two episodes of thoracic spinal cord compression caused by primary lymphoma and metastatic carcinoma of the prostate, 11 years apart. Kaohsiung J Med Sci; 2010 Sep;26(9):506-10
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  • [Title] A patient with two episodes of thoracic spinal cord compression caused by primary lymphoma and metastatic carcinoma of the prostate, 11 years apart.
  • We report a 75-year-old man with two spinal tumors, primary epidural lymphoma and metastatic carcinoma of the prostate, which caused thoracic spinal cord compression, with a long symptom free interval between episodes.
  • Eleven years earlier, he had a symptomatic T8-10 primary spinal epidural lymphoma that was treated successfully with surgery and he made a full recovery.
  • Extraosseous extension of a lesion at T1-4 resulted in severe spinal cord compression.
  • In consideration of recurrent lymphoma, emergent cord decompression was achieved via posterior T1-4 decompressive laminectomy, and the patient's neurological status improved rapidly after surgery.
  • After several courses of chemotherapy, the patient improved neurologically and could walk independently.
  • Three years after surgery, magnetic resonance imaging showed complete resolution of cord edema at T1-4 and T8-9, and the high signal intensity at unoperated levels largely regressed.
  • This report emphasizes that other newly developed lesions should be included in the differentiation of recurrent primary spinal epidural lymphoma, especially in patients who have long-term, disease-free intervals between episodes.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / complications. Lymphoma / complications. Prostatic Neoplasms / complications. Spinal Cord Compression / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Decompression, Surgical. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20837349.001).
  • [ISSN] 1607-551X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Kaohsiung journal of medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kaohsiung J. Med. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China (Republic : 1949- )
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4. Fakhrai N, Neophytou P, Dieckmann K, Nemeth A, Prayer D, Hainfellner J, Marosi C: Recurrent spinal ependymoma showing partial remission under Imatimib. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2004 Nov;146(11):1255-8
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  • [Title] Recurrent spinal ependymoma showing partial remission under Imatimib.
  • BACKGROUND: There are few treatment options for recurrent spinal ependymoma after surgery and radiation therapy.
  • CLINICAL PRESENTATION: We present a patient with recurrent spinal ependymoma who received radiation therapy after laminectomy and partial tumor resection.
  • Months later, the patient developed gait paresis.
  • MRT showed tumor recurrence and partial resection was again performed.
  • Oral cytotoxic chemotherapy with Temozolomide was initiated.
  • As the tumor had stained positively for platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor, treatment with Imatimib was initiated.
  • FINDINGS: The patient experienced improvement in neurological symptoms and the following MRT revealed slight tumor regression.
  • CONCLUSION: Imatimib should be considered a potential therapeutic option in recurrent ependymomas expressing PDGF receptor.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15365794.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6268
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptors, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor
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5. Morgan RJ, Synold T, Mamelak A, Lim D, Al-Kadhimi Z, Twardowski P, Leong L, Chow W, Margolin K, Shibata S, Somlo G, Yen Y, Frankel P, Doroshow JH: Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of topotecan in a phase I trial of topotecan, tamoxifen, and carboplatin, in the treatment of recurrent or refractory brain or spinal cord tumors. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2010 Oct;66(5):927-33
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  • [Title] Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of topotecan in a phase I trial of topotecan, tamoxifen, and carboplatin, in the treatment of recurrent or refractory brain or spinal cord tumors.
  • RESULTS: Seventeen patients received 39 cycles of treatment: median 2, (range 1-5).

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  • (PMID = 20107803.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0843
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA033572; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA033572-26; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 33572
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen; 7M7YKX2N15 / Topotecan; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS335377; NLM/ PMC3265324
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6. DeLaney TF, Liebsch NJ, Pedlow FX, Adams J, Dean S, Yeap BY, McManus P, Rosenberg AE, Nielsen GP, Harmon DC, Spiro IJ, Raskin KA, Suit HD, Yoon SS, Hornicek FJ: Phase II study of high-dose photon/proton radiotherapy in the management of spine sarcomas. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2009 Jul 1;74(3):732-9
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  • PURPOSE: Radiotherapy (XRT) for spine sarcomas is constrained by spinal cord, nerve, and viscera tolerance.
  • Negative surgical margins are uncommon; hence, doses of >or=66 Gy are recommended.
  • Treatment included pre- and/or postoperative photon/proton XRT with or without radical resection; patients with osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma received chemotherapy.
  • Shrinking fields delivered 50.4 cobalt Gray equivalent (Gy RBE) to subclinical disease, 70.2 Gy RBE to microscopic disease in the tumor bed, and 77.4 Gy RBE to gross disease at 1.8 Gy RBE qd.
  • Spinal cord dose was limited to 63/54 Gy RBE to surface/center.
  • Intraoperative boost doses of 7.5 to 10 Gy could be given by dural plaque.
  • Two of 36 (5.6%) patients treated for primary versus 7/14 (50%) for recurrent tumor developed local recurrence (p < 0.001).
  • Five patients developed late radiation-associated complications; no myelopathy developed but three sacral neuropathies appeared after 77.12 to 77.4 Gy RBE.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Local control with this treatment is high in patients radiated at the time of primary presentation.
  • Spinal cord dose constraints appear to be safe.
  • Sacral nerves receiving 77.12-77.4 Gy RBE are at risk for late toxicity.

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  • (PMID = 19095372.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA021239; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA021239-27; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA021239-28; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01CA021239; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA021239-27; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA021239-28
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protons
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS121640; NLM/ PMC2734911
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7. Dhermain F, de Crevoisier R, Parker F, Cioloca C, Kaliski A, Beaudre A, Lefkopoulos D, Armand JP, Haie-Meder C: [Role of radiotherapy in recurrent gliomas]. Bull Cancer; 2004 Nov;91(11):883-9
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  • [Title] [Role of radiotherapy in recurrent gliomas].
  • Their increasing incidence and the weak impact of treatments on the prognosis justify all the efforts expended to improve results.
  • Surgery, radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy are proposed as first-line therapy, according to indications and modalities that remain controversial.
  • Finally, after a very variable duration of local control depending on the histologic type, recurrence is virtually inevitable, with mainly local progression.
  • After or in the absence of surgery, different chemotherapy schedules are proposed according to the histologic type and the patient's general status and objective response rates are very limited, except in the case of oligodendrogliomas.
  • Re-irradiation has a rather bad reputation: even as first-line therapy, total doses never exceed 60 Gy in 30 fractions of 2 Gy over six weeks (conventional fractionation).
  • In addition, studies on primates demonstrated that the spinal cord was capable of repairing, at least partially, RT-induced injury.
  • Treatment efficacy and toxicity endpoints were very heterogeneous.
  • Nevertheless, with a clearly defined prospective assessment, re-irradiation seems possible without any unacceptable clinical neurotoxicity under the following conditions: a good general status (WHO 0-1); at least a one-year disease-free interval; an initial WHO grade 2 or 3 histology with a maximal tumor diameter not exceeding 3 cm.
  • In this very selective setting, re-irradiation is possible at a dose of 30 to 40 Gy, if possible in stereotactic mode, with a hypofractionated schedule (less than 4 Gy/fraction).
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Glioma / radiotherapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 15582893.001).
  • [ISSN] 1769-6917
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin du cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull Cancer
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 44
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8. Bouffet E, Capra M, Bartels U: Salvage chemotherapy for metastatic and recurrent ependymoma of childhood. Childs Nerv Syst; 2009 Oct;25(10):1293-301
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  • [Title] Salvage chemotherapy for metastatic and recurrent ependymoma of childhood.
  • INTRODUCTION: Chemotherapy has limited role in the up-front management of ependymoma.
  • At the time of recurrence, the role of chemotherapy is also ill defined and the choice of chemotherapeutic agents is often arbitrary, based on anecdotal data and personal experience.
  • METHODS: The purpose of this review is to describe and critically analyze the published literature on chemotherapy in patients with recurrent and metastatic ependymoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Ependymoma / drug therapy. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Salvage Therapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Child. Humans. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19360417.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-0350
  • [Journal-full-title] Child's nervous system : ChNS : official journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Childs Nerv Syst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 85
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9. Mohammadianpanah M, Vasei M, Mosalaei A, Omidvari S, Ahmadloo N: Malignant spinal cord compression in cancer patients may be mimicked by a primary spinal cord tumour. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl); 2006 Dec;15(5):497-500
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  • [Title] Malignant spinal cord compression in cancer patients may be mimicked by a primary spinal cord tumour.
  • Although it is quite rare, second primary neoplasms in cancer patients may present with the signs and symptoms of malignant spinal cord compression.
  • Primary spinal cord tumours in the cancer patients may be deceptive and considered as the recurrent first cancer.
  • We report such a case of intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord mimicking metatstatic recurrent lymphoma and causing cord compression.
  • A 50-year-old man developed intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord 1.5 years following chemoradiation for Waldeyer's ring lymphoma.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intramedullary expansive lesion extending from C4 to C6 levels of the cervical spinal cord.
  • [MeSH-major] Ependymoma / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Second Primary / diagnosis. Spinal Cord Compression / etiology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Cervical Vertebrae. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / radiotherapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Quadriplegia / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17177910.001).
  • [ISSN] 0961-5423
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 10
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10. Brass SD, Guiot MC, Albrecht S, Glikstein R, Mohr G: Metastatic hemangiopericytoma presenting as an epidural spinal cord lesion. Can J Neurol Sci; 2004 Nov;31(4):550-3
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  • [Title] Metastatic hemangiopericytoma presenting as an epidural spinal cord lesion.
  • OBJECTIVE: Hemangiopericytoma is an aggressive vascular tumour that rarely affects the central nervous system and is even more rarely spinal in presentation.
  • The clinical features of a patient with a recurrent extraspinal hemangiopericytoma presenting with an epidural spinal cord compression by local invasion are described, including a review of the literature on metastatic hemangiopericytoma to the spine.
  • METHODS: A case of a 53-year-old male, with a recurrent extraspinal hemangiopericytoma which metastasized to the thoracic spine five years after detection of the primary tumour is presented.
  • A Pub-Med search using the keyword "hemangiopericytoma" identified all reported cases documenting clinical features, treatment, recurrence and outcome with respect to metastatic hemangiopericytoma to the spine.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Hemangiopericytomas show a slow clinical evolution with a strong propensity to relapse long after previous treatment and thus, once identified, prolonged follow-up for recurrence is indicated.
  • Although overall uncommon, hemangiopericytoma should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of vascular epidural spinal cord tumours.
  • [MeSH-major] Epidural Neoplasms / diagnosis. Epidural Neoplasms / secondary. Hemangiopericytoma / diagnosis. Hemangiopericytoma / secondary. Muscle Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Thoracic Vertebrae
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Back. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Spinal Cord Compression / diagnosis. Spinal Cord Compression / etiology. Spinal Cord Compression / therapy. Spinal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Spinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Spinal Neoplasms / secondary. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15595265.001).
  • [ISSN] 0317-1671
  • [Journal-full-title] The Canadian journal of neurological sciences. Le journal canadien des sciences neurologiques
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can J Neurol Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
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11. Chamoun RB, Alaraj AM, Al Kutoubi AO, Abboud MR, Haddad GF: Role of temozolomide in spinal cord low grade astrocytomas: results in two paediatric patients. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2006 Feb;148(2):175-9; discussion 180
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  • [Title] Role of temozolomide in spinal cord low grade astrocytomas: results in two paediatric patients.
  • BACKGROUND: The optimal treatment of low grade intramedullary spinal cord tumours remains controversial.
  • Effective chemotherapy may be an important therapeutic adjunct in this setting.
  • Temozolomide is widely used for brain gliomas, yet its role in the management of spinal cord tumours has not been reported.
  • PROCEDURE: Two paediatric patients with low grade spinal cord astrocytomas were diagnosed to have progression of the tumour in spite of surgery and radiotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Stabilization of the spinal tumour in both patients was observed at 18 months of follow-up.
  • One of the patients developed haematological toxicity requiring platelet transfusion and dose reduction.
  • CONCLUSION: Based on our findings in two paediatric patients, temozolomide may be a useful agent in the management of progressive recurrent low grade spinal cord astrocytomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / administration & dosage. Astrocytoma / therapy. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Spinal Cord / pathology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Disease Progression. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Meningeal Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Metastasis / diagnosis. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Neoplasm Metastasis / physiopathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / physiopathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Neurosurgical Procedures. Radiotherapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16374565.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6268
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 85622-93-1 / temozolomide
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12. Abel TJ, Chowdhary A, Thapa M, Rutledge JC, Geyer JR, Ojemann J, Avellino AM: Spinal cord pilocytic astrocytoma with leptomeningeal dissemination to the brain. Case report and review of the literature. J Neurosurg; 2006 Dec;105(6 Suppl):508-14
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  • [Title] Spinal cord pilocytic astrocytoma with leptomeningeal dissemination to the brain. Case report and review of the literature.
  • Leptomeningeal dissemination of low-grade spinal cord gliomas is an uncommon event.
  • The authors report a unique case of leptomeningeal dissemination of a spinal cord pilocytic astrocytoma (PCA) to the intracranial cerebral subarachnoid spaces in a child.
  • An intradural intramedullary spinal cord tumor was identified, and the lesion was subtotally resected and diagnosed by the pathology department to be a PCA.
  • Subsequently, the patient had recurrences of the intradural intramedullary tumor at 6 months and 2 years after his original presentation.
  • He underwent a repeated resection of the recurrent tumor and fenestration of an associated syrinx on both occasions.
  • The pathological characteristics of the reresected tumor remained consistent with those of a PCA.
  • The patient then underwent chemotherapy, and total spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging 2 months later demonstrated stability in the size of the spinal cord tumor and a decrease in the associated syrinx.
  • However, an MR image of the head demonstrated two new areas of supratentorial subarachnoid leptomeningeal spread of the primary spinal cord tumor at the 2-month follow-up examination.
  • This case illustrates a unique instance of supratentorial leptomeningeal dissemination of an intramedullary spinal cord PCA in a child.
  • [MeSH-major] Astrocytoma / secondary. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Meningeal Neoplasms / secondary. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Child, Preschool. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery


13. Corapcioglu F, Dillioğlugil O, Sarper N, Akansel G, Calişkan M, Arisoy AE: Spinal cord compression and lung metastasis of Wilms' tumor in a pregnant adolescent. Urology; 2004 Oct;64(4):807-10
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  • [Title] Spinal cord compression and lung metastasis of Wilms' tumor in a pregnant adolescent.
  • Wilms' tumor in adults is rare, and no treatment guidelines have been established.
  • Spinal cord compression has also been rarely reported in all age groups.
  • In this case report, we present a 19-year-old adolescent with recurrent Wilms' tumor, a paraspinal dumbbell mass, metastatic involvement of the vertebral bodies, lung metastasis, and pregnancy.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first report of a pregnant patient with Wilms' tumor who had to undergo immediate chemotherapy with vincristine and actinomycin-D owing to spinal cord compression at 25 weeks of pregnancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / complications. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Polyradiculopathy / etiology. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / drug therapy. Spinal Cord Compression / etiology. Wilms Tumor / complications. Wilms Tumor / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdominal Pain / etiology. Adolescent. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dactinomycin / administration & dosage. Dactinomycin / adverse effects. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Fetus / drug effects. Humans. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Infant, Newborn. Lumbar Vertebrae. Patient Dropouts. Pregnancy. Remission Induction. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / adverse effects


14. Guiu S, Guiu B, Feutray S, Chauffert B: Direct intratumoral chemotherapy with carboplatin and epinephrine in a recurrent cervical chordoma: case report. Neurosurgery; 2009 Sep;65(3):E629-30; discussion E630
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  • [Title] Direct intratumoral chemotherapy with carboplatin and epinephrine in a recurrent cervical chordoma: case report.
  • OBJECTIVE: Chordomas are rare primary bone tumors for which surgery is classically the first-line treatment.
  • Because radiation therapy and systemic chemotherapy show limited effectiveness, we report the use of direct intratumoral chemotherapy (IC) to treat recurrent chordoma.
  • CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 46-year-old man presented with a recurrent cervical chordoma after surgery and radiation therapy.
  • This recurrence manifested as C4-C5 spinal cord compression.
  • TECHNIQUE: Three 22-gauge needles were inserted at the upper, middle, and lower parts of the tumor and advanced under computed tomographic guidance while injecting local anesthetic.
  • Eleven intratumoral treatments were performed during an 18-month period.
  • CONCLUSION: A marked clinical response with regression of the spinal cord compression was observed, without specific toxicity.
  • A good partial response was obtained with a 42% decrease in tumor volume (from 69 to 40 cm3).
  • Moreover, the central part of the tumor showed tumor necrosis, as confirmed by histological examination.
  • Thus, in patients with this rare tumor, intratumoral chemotherapy may be a valid treatment option when surgery and radiation therapy fail.
  • Furthermore, intratumoral chemotherapy in combination with surgical treatment should be considered to improve the local control rate.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carboplatin / therapeutic use. Chordoma / drug therapy. Epinephrine / therapeutic use. Spinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sympathomimetics / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19687674.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Sympathomimetics; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; YKH834O4BH / Epinephrine
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15. Kocak Z, Garipagaoglu M, Adli M, Uzal MC, Kurtman C: Spinal cord ependymomas in adults: analysis of 15 cases. J Exp Clin Cancer Res; 2004 Jun;23(2):201-6

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  • [Title] Spinal cord ependymomas in adults: analysis of 15 cases.
  • This retrospective analysis was performed to examine the outcome of patients with spinal cord ependymomas treated with surgery and postoperative radiation therapy between 1982 and 1998.
  • All patients received radiation therapy with a total dose of 40-56 Gy.
  • Of the 15 patients, 6 developed recurrent disease on follow-up.
  • The median time to recurrence was 45 months (range: 24-80 months).
  • Local failure within the initial irradiated volume occurred in 3 out of 6 patients who received less than 45 Gy and 2 out of 8 patients treated with more than 45 Gy.
  • Four out of the six failures were salvaged with additional treatment.
  • Re-irradiation was used as a part of salvage or sole treatment in 3 cases.
  • The patient who was salvaged with radiation therapy only died of disease progression 41 months following recurrence and the other two who received a combination of surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy were still alive 57 and 30 months following relapse.
  • The present study shows that surgery and post-operative radiation treatment for spinal ependymoma patients resulted in high survival rates.
  • Patients with residual disease after surgery should be treated with radiation therapy with a dose of more than 45 Gy.
  • Re-irradiation may be the treatment of choice for recurrent patients having less than complete resection or no surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Ependymoma / pathology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Radiotherapy Dosage. Retrospective Studies. Salvage Therapy. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15354403.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-9078
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of experimental & clinical cancer research : CR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Exp. Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Number-of-references] 22
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16. Ogawa K, Yoshii Y, Shikama N, Nakamura K, Uno T, Onishi H, Itami J, Shioyama Y, Iraha S, Hyodo A, Toita T, Kakinohana Y, Tamaki W, Ito H, Murayama S: Spinal recurrence from intracranial germinoma: risk factors and treatment outcome for spinal recurrence. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2008 Dec 1;72(5):1347-54
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  • [Title] Spinal recurrence from intracranial germinoma: risk factors and treatment outcome for spinal recurrence.
  • PURPOSE: To analyze retrospectively the risk factors of spinal recurrence in patients with intracranial germinoma and clinical outcomes of patients who developed spinal recurrence.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 1980 and 2007, 165 patients with no evidence of spinal metastases at diagnosis were treated with cranial radiotherapy without spinal irradiation.
  • RESULTS: After the initial treatment, 15 patients (9.1%) developed spinal recurrences.
  • Multivariate analysis revealed that large intracranial disease (>/=4 cm) and multifocal intracranial disease were independent risk factors for spinal recurrence.
  • Radiation field, total radiation dose, and the use of chemotherapy did not affect the occurrence of spinal recurrences.
  • Of the 15 patients who experienced spinal recurrence, the 3-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival (DFS) rates from the beginning of salvage treatments were 65% and 57%, respectively.
  • In the analysis, presence of intracranial recurrence and salvage treatment modality (radiotherapy with chemotherapy vs. radiotherapy alone) had a statistically significant impact on DFS.
  • The 3-year DFS rate in patients with no intracranial recurrence and treated with both spinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy was 100%, whereas only 17% in patients with intracranial recurrence or treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.001).
  • CONCLUSION: Large intracranial disease and multifocal intracranial disease were risk factors for spinal recurrence in patients with intracranial germinoma with no evidence of spinal metastases at diagnosis.
  • For patients who developed spinal recurrence alone, salvage treatment combined with spinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy was effective in controlling the recurrent disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Germinoma / pathology. Germinoma / radiotherapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / secondary. Spinal Neoplasms / secondary

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  • (PMID = 18513888.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chorionic Gonadotropin
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17. Wei F, Liu X, Liu Z, Jiang L, Dang G, Ma Q, Dang L: Interferon alfa-2b for recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumor of the spine: report of two cases. Spine (Phila Pa 1976); 2010 Nov 15;35(24):E1418-22
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  • [Title] Interferon alfa-2b for recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumor of the spine: report of two cases.
  • OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate that interferon alfa-2b is a therapeutic option for obtaining long-term control of recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumor of spine.
  • SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Interferon alfa served as angiogenesis inhibitor and has been successfully used to treat giant cell tumor of long bones and facial bones.
  • Up to date, no report is found with regard to the use of interferon as a stand-alone treatment for unresectable, recurrent, and metastatic giant cell tumor originated from the spine.
  • METHODS: A 29-year-old woman with C1 and C2 giant cell tumor was treated by radiotherapy, intralesional curet, and chemotherapy orderly.
  • Tumor recurred after 2 years.
  • Tumor recurred second time and caused severe spinal cord compression.
  • A 24-year-old man with recurrent giant cell tumor of T5 and T6 was treated by spondylectomy of T5 and T6.
  • Six months later, a giant metastatic lesion was found in sacrococcygeal region, which was excised and proved to be giant cell tumor of bone.
  • Four months later, 2 recurrent lesions were found beside the rectum.
  • CONCLUSION: Interferon therapy may be an effective and safe treatment for spine giant cell tumor recurrence and metastasis in soft tissue.
  • The effectiveness may be time and dosage dependent.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / drug therapy. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Spinal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biopsy. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Recombinant Proteins. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 21030898.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1159
  • [Journal-full-title] Spine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Spine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 99210-65-8 / interferon alfa-2b
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18. Bottke D, Bathe K, Wiegel T, Hinkelbein W: Phase I trial of radiochemotherapy with bendamustine in patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Strahlenther Onkol; 2007 Mar;183(3):128-32
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  • [Title] Phase I trial of radiochemotherapy with bendamustine in patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: After initial radiochemotherapy of head-and-neck cancers, therapeutic options are often limited for patients with progressive disease.
  • Reirradiation, with or without chemotherapy, appears to be the most potential treatment option.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: 13 patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck region after initial radiochemotherapy were treated.
  • Reirradiation of the recurrent region under protection of the spinal cord consisted of 1.8 Gy given five times per week, up to 30.6 Gy.
  • RESULTS: The therapy was well tolerated.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy. Nitrogen Mustard Compounds / therapeutic use. Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Bendamustine Hydrochloride. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 17340070.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-7158
  • [Journal-full-title] Strahlentherapie und Onkologie : Organ der Deutschen Röntgengesellschaft ... [et al]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Strahlenther Onkol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Nitrogen Mustard Compounds; 981Y8SX18M / Bendamustine Hydrochloride
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19. Hurwitz CA, Strauss LC, Kepner J, Kretschmar C, Harris MB, Friedman H, Kun L, Kadota R: Paclitaxel for the treatment of progressive or recurrent childhood brain tumors: a pediatric oncology phase II study. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2001 Jun-Jul;23(5):277-81
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  • [Title] Paclitaxel for the treatment of progressive or recurrent childhood brain tumors: a pediatric oncology phase II study.
  • PURPOSE: To assess the efficacy and define the toxicity of paclitaxel given at a dosage of 350 mg/m2 every 3 weeks as a 24-hour continuous infusion to children with recurrent or progressive primary brain tumors.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seventy-three eligible patients, ages 4 months to 19 years, with progressive or recurrent primary brain tumors were treated according to a Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) phase II protocol with paclitaxel (POG 9330).
  • Tumor histologic strata included: astrocytoma (n = 4), malignant glioma (n = 13), medulloblastoma (n = 16), brain stem glioma (n = 15), ependymoma (n = 13), and miscellaneous histologies (n = 12).
  • All patients had previous histologic confirmation of a primary intracranial or spinal cord tumor with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography documentation of unequivocally measurable progressive or recurrent disease.
  • All patients had received previous therapy including surgery, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy, but no patient had been previously treated on more than one phase II trial.
  • Patients were allowed to continue therapy for a total of 18 cycles in the absence of progressive disease or unacceptable toxicity.
  • RESULTS: Seventy-five patients were enrolled onto the POG 9330 protocol; two ineligible patients were removed from the study before receiving any therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: Paclitaxel is well tolerated in children with recurrent or progressive brain tumors at this dosage and schedule and may result in short-term disease stabilization in this patient population.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Astrocytoma / drug therapy. Astrocytoma / pathology. Child. Child, Preschool. Dexamethasone / therapeutic use. Disease Progression. Drug Hypersensitivity / prevention & control. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Ependymoma / pathology. Female. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / pathology. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Infant. Infratentorial Neoplasms / drug therapy. Infratentorial Neoplasms / pathology. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / pathology. Nausea / chemically induced. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Remission Induction. Salvage Therapy. Treatment Failure

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  • (PMID = 11464982.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA03161; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA07431; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA15525; etc
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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20. Zarovnaya EL, Pallatroni HF, Hug EB, Ball PA, Cromwell LD, Pipas JM, Fadul CE, Meyer LP, Park JP, Biegel JA, Perry A, Rhodes CH: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of the spine in an adult: case report and review of the literature. J Neurooncol; 2007 Aug;84(1):49-55
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  • [Title] Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of the spine in an adult: case report and review of the literature.
  • There have been only 17 cases of AT/RT in adults reported in the medical literature and the rarity of this tumor makes the diagnosis in adults difficult.
  • We describe a case of an AT/RT of the spinal cord in an adult.
  • An MRI demonstrated a mass lesion in the dorsal spinal cord extending from C4 to C6.
  • The patient underwent three additional surgical procedures for recurrent disease throughout the neuraxis secondary to leptomeningeal spread of the tumor.
  • Despite aggressive surgical resection, adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy, the patient succumbed to the disease two and a half years after her initial presentation.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first case of a spinal atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor in an adult fully documented with molecular, immunohistochemical, cytogenetic and autopsy findings.
  • [MeSH-major] Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22 / genetics. DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / pathology. Teratoma / pathology. Transcription Factors / genetics

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  • (PMID = 17377740.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA46274
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / SMARCB1 Protein; 0 / SMARCB1 protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factors
  • [Number-of-references] 34
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21. Raza SM, Anderson WS, Eberhart CG, Wolinsky JP, Gokaslan ZL: The application of surgical cordectomy in the management of an intramedullary-extramedullary atypical meningioma: case report and literature review. J Spinal Disord Tech; 2005 Oct;18(5):449-54
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  • Intraspinal meningiomas, typically extramedullary-intradural, require treatment in the form of resection with dural margin excision.
  • METHODS: The patient was a 65-year-old woman who presented with a recurrent thoracic meningioma status post three attempted resections, radiation therapy, and a trial of hydroxyurea chemotherapy.
  • Extension of abnormal T2 signal within the cord superiorly to C7 was noted with a 1-cm enhancing extra-axial lesion at T10 and an extradural mass posteriorly T12 also noted.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This case highlights the viability of surgical cordectomy in the treatment of varying intramedullary processes under appropriate indications.
  • [MeSH-major] Meningeal Neoplasms / surgery. Meningioma / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Spinal Cord / surgery

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  • (PMID = 16189459.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-0652
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of spinal disorders & techniques
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Spinal Disord Tech
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 19
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22. Arnold PM, Habib A, Newell K, Anderson KK: Esthesioneuroblastoma metastatic to the thoracic intradural and extradural space. Spine J; 2009 May;9(5):e1-5
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  • BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Ethesioneuroblastoma (ENB) is a rare tumor of the olfactory epithelium that has been shown to metastasize mostly to the cervical lymphatics, with only infrequent spread to other locations.
  • PURPOSE: To report a rare case of recurrent ENB metastatic to the thoracic intradural and extradural space.
  • METHODS: A 64-year-old man with recurrent ENB presented with chronic pain in the neck, shoulder, and back.
  • Computed tomography of the chest showed no pulmonary metastasis and a high-attenuation spinal canal mass at T8 was noted on magnetic resonance imaging.
  • A tumor was seen penetrating through the dura, and a midline durotomy was performed for resection of a large intradural mass.
  • RESULTS: The postoperative period was uneventful, and included pain management and physical therapy, followed by chemotherapy and radiation.
  • The patient remains free of spinal recurrence 2 years after surgery.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Metastasis of ENB to the spinal column is rare, and of those instances, 80% are localized to the cauda equina.
  • Recurrent ENB metastatic to the thoracic intradural and extradural space is extremely rare, and was successfully treated with surgical resection.
  • [MeSH-major] Epidural Space / pathology. Esthesioneuroblastoma, Olfactory / secondary. Nasal Cavity / pathology. Nose Neoplasms / pathology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Dura Mater / pathology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Thoracic Vertebrae

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  • (PMID = 18805062.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-1632
  • [Journal-full-title] The spine journal : official journal of the North American Spine Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Spine J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Poelen J, Bernsen HJ, Prick MJ: Metastatic medulloblastoma in an adult; treatment with temozolomide. Acta Neurol Belg; 2007 Jun;107(2):51-4
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  • [Title] Metastatic medulloblastoma in an adult; treatment with temozolomide.
  • Treatment of this tumour type usually consists of surgery followed by radiotherapy.
  • Relapses of medulloblastoma are sensitive to chemotherapy and treatment with chemotherapeutics in children has increased the survival rates.
  • A medulloblastoma at adult age is extremely rare, and there is no overall accepted treatment, especially not in the case of a relapse.
  • This observation encouraged us to decide to treat an adult patient with a recurrent medulloblastoma with temozolomide.
  • Treatment with temozolomide resulted in relief of clinical symptoms and stabilization of tumour growth for 8 months.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Cerebellar Neoplasms / drug therapy. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / drug therapy. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / secondary

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  • (PMID = 17710841.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-9009
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurologica Belgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurol Belg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Belgium
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 85622-93-1 / temozolomide
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24. Castadot P, Magné N, Roelandts M, Gastelblum P, Oulad Ben Taib N, Van Houtte P: [Metastasis of a lumbosacral ependymoma with very long disease-free survival: a case report and review of the literature]. Cancer Radiother; 2006 May;10(3):148-51
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  • The lumbosacral location of spinal ependymoma is the most common.
  • Six months later, the patient's symptoms reappeared and an external radiotherapy at curative doses and chemotherapy were delivered.
  • External radiotherapy was delivered on this site with a total dose of 50 Gy.
  • Ependymomas are often recurrent at the primary site, but can seed on the entire cerebrospinal axis.
  • [MeSH-major] Ependymoma / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / rehabilitation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Cervical Vertebrae. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Lumbar Vertebrae. Male. Sacrum. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 16581282.001).
  • [ISSN] 1278-3218
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer radiothérapie : journal de la Société française de radiothérapie oncologique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Radiother
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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25. Shono T, Natori Y, Morioka T, Torisu R, Mizoguchi M, Nagata S, Suzuki SO, Iwaki T, Inamura T, Fukui M, Oka K, Sasaki T: Results of a long-term follow-up after neuroendoscopic biopsy procedure and third ventriculostomy in patients with intracranial germinomas. J Neurosurg; 2007 Sep;107(3 Suppl):193-8
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  • [Title] Results of a long-term follow-up after neuroendoscopic biopsy procedure and third ventriculostomy in patients with intracranial germinomas.
  • OBJECT: The authors report the results of long-term follow-ups in 12 patients with intracranial germinomas who underwent neuroendoscopic procedures before chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and discuss the usefulness and safety of these procedures.
  • All patients received chemotherapy and radiotherapy postoperatively, according to the regimen promulgated by the Japanese Pediatric Brain Tumor Study Group.
  • A complete response to postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy was achieved in all cases.
  • Only one patient had a recurrent lesion in the spinal cord 6 years after the initial treatment; however, this patient had undergone only the neuroendoscopic biopsy procedure without ETV.
  • The risk of tumor dissemination due to the neuroendoscopic procedures appears to be minimal when the appropriate chemotherapy and radiotherapy are provided postoperatively.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy. Endoscopy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Hydrocephalus / pathology. Hydrocephalus / surgery. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm Seeding. Postoperative Complications. Retrospective Studies. Third Ventricle / pathology. Third Ventricle / surgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17918523.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Hukin J, Siffert J, Velasquez L, Zagzag D, Allen J: Leptomeningeal dissemination in children with progressive low-grade neuroepithelial tumors. Neuro Oncol; 2002 10;4(4):253-60
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  • Our purpose is to describe the incidence and clinical features of leptomeningeal dissemination (LM) in children with progressive low-grade neuroepithelial tumor (LGN).
  • Satisfactorily followed data were obtained on 427 of the 588 patients with localized LGN at diagnosis between 1986 and 1998, 177 (42%) of whom developed progressive or recurrent disease.
  • The primary tumor sites were diencephalon (6), brainstem (3), cerebellum (2), cerebrum (1), and spinal cord (1).
  • Management included chemotherapy (2) or radiotherapy (3) or both (7); 1 patient received only radical resections of symptomatic lesions.
  • We strongly urge that for optimum treatment planning all patients with recurrent LGN be staged with an enhanced spine and brain MRI before adjuvant therapy is initiated.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Infant. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12356355.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8517
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuro-oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1920666
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27. Rochet N, Jensen AD, Sterzing F, Munter MW, Eichbaum MH, Schneeweiss A, Sohn C, Debus J, Harms W: Adjuvant whole abdominal intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk stage FIGO III patients with ovarian cancer (OVAR-IMRT-01) - Pilot trial of a phase I/II study: study protocol. BMC Cancer; 2007 Dec 19;7:227
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  • BACKGROUND: The prognosis for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite aggressive surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy.
  • More than 60% of patients will develop recurrent disease, principally intraperitoneal, and die within 5 years.
  • The use of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) as consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy given its ability to sterilize small tumour volumes.
  • Despite the clinically proven efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation, the use of radiotherapy in ovarian cancer has profoundly decreased mainly due to high treatment-related toxicity.
  • Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could allow to spare kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose.
  • Patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III (R1 or R2< 1 cm) after surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy will be treated with whole abdomen irradiation as consolidation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions.
  • For treatment planning bone marrow, kidneys, liver, spinal cord, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones are defined as organs at risk.
  • The aim is to explore the potential of IMRT as a new method for WAI to decrease the dose to kidneys, liver, bone marrow while covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose, and to implement whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy into the adjuvant multimodal treatment concept of advanced ovarian cancer FIGO stage III.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Clinical Protocols. Dose Fractionation. Endpoint Determination. Feasibility Studies. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Organ Specificity. Patient Selection. Pilot Projects. Radiation Injuries / prevention & control. Research Design. Risk

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  • (PMID = 18093313.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2212657
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28. Chamberlain MC: Etoposide for recurrent spinal cord ependymoma. Neurology; 2002 Apr 23;58(8):1310-1
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ETOPOSIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Etoposide for recurrent spinal cord ependymoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Karnofsky Performance Status. Male. Middle Aged

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Ependymoma.
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  • (PMID = 11971113.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-3878
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide
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