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1. Lansigan F, Stearns DM, Foss F: Role of denileukin diftitox in the treatment of persistent or recurrent cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Cancer Manag Res; 2010;2:53-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Role of denileukin diftitox in the treatment of persistent or recurrent cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • Denileukin diftitox (Ontak(®)) is indicated for the treatment of patients with persistent or recurrent cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of the skin.
  • Denileukin diftitox was the first fusion protein toxin approved for the treatment of a human disease.
  • This fusion protein toxin combines the IL2 protein with diphtheria toxin, and targets the CD25 subunit of the IL2 receptor, resulting in the unique delivery of a cytocidal agent to CD-25 bearing T-cells.
  • This review will summarize the development of denileukin diftitox, its proposed mechanism of action, the pivotal clinical trials that led to its FDA approval, the improvements in quality of life, and the common toxicities experienced during the treatment of patients with CTCL.
  • CTCL is often a chronic progressive lymphoma requiring the sequential use of treatments such as retinoids, traditional chemotherapy, or biological response modifiers.
  • The incorporation of the immunotoxin denileukin diftitox into the sequential or combinatorial treatment of CTCL will also be addressed.

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  • (PMID = 21188096.001).
  • [ISSN] 1179-1322
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer management and research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Manag Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3004568
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; cutaneous T-cell lymphoma / denileukin diftitox / fusion protein toxin
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2. Woo S, Gardner ER, Chen X, Ockers SB, Baum CE, Sissung TM, Price DK, Frye R, Piekarz RL, Bates SE, Figg WD: Population pharmacokinetics of romidepsin in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and relapsed peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Clin Cancer Res; 2009 Feb 15;15(4):1496-503
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Population pharmacokinetics of romidepsin in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and relapsed peripheral T-cell lymphoma.
  • The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of demographic, clinical, and pharmacogenetic covariates on the pharmacokinetics of romidepsin in patients with T-cell lymphoma.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Pharmacokinetic assessment was done in 98 patients enrolled in a phase II study who received 14 or 18 mg/m2 of romidepsin as a 4-hour infusion on day 1 during their first treatment cycle.
  • ABCB1 2677G>T/A variant alleles tended toward a reduced clearance and lower volume of tissue distribution, but this was not supported by a statistical significance.

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  • (PMID = 19228751.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z01 BC010621-04; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / NIH0011335962; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z01 BC010548-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / N01CO12400; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CO / N01-CO-12400
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ABCB1 protein, human; 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Depsipeptides; 0 / P-Glycoprotein; 0 / P-Glycoproteins; CX3T89XQBK / romidepsin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS96612; NLM/ PMC2707030
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3. Tambaro FP, Dell'aversana C, Carafa V, Nebbioso A, Radic B, Ferrara F, Altucci L: Histone deacetylase inhibitors: clinical implications for hematological malignancies. Clin Epigenetics; 2010 Sep;1(1-2):25-44
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  • Histone modifications have widely been implicated in cancer development and progression and are potentially reversible by drug treatments.
  • The N-terminal tails of each histone extend outward through the DNA strand containing amino acid residues modified by posttranslational acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation.
  • A large number of HDAC inhibitors have been synthesized in the last few years, most being effective in vitro, inducing cancer cells differentiation or cell death.
  • The majority of the inhibitors are in clinical trials, unlike the suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a pan-HDACi, and Romidepsin (FK 228), a class I-selective HDACi, which are only approved in the second line treatment of refractory, persistent or relapsed cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and active in approximately 150 clinical trials, in monotherapy or in association.
  • Preclinical studies investigated the use of these drugs in clinical practice, as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, hypomethylating agents, proteasome inhibitors, and MTOR inhibitors, showing a significant effect mostly in hematological malignancies.
  • The aim of this review is to focus on the biological features of these drugs, analyzing the possible mechanism(s) of action and outline an overview on the current use in the clinical practice.

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  • (PMID = 22704087.001).
  • [ISSN] 1868-7083
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical epigenetics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Epigenetics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3365365
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4. Wong BY, Gregory SA, Dang NH: Denileukin diftitox as novel targeted therapy for lymphoid malignancies. Cancer Invest; 2007 Sep;25(6):495-501
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  • [Title] Denileukin diftitox as novel targeted therapy for lymphoid malignancies.
  • It has been approved for treatment of patients with persistent or recurrent cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) whose malignant cells express the CD25 component of the IL-2 receptor, but more recent data indicate activity in the setting of not only T-cell but also B-cell malignancies.
  • This review will update the experience to date of denileukin diftitox in T- and B-cell malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Diphtheria Toxin / therapeutic use. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Male. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 17882663.001).
  • [ISSN] 0735-7907
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Diphtheria Toxin; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 25E79B5CTM / denileukin diftitox
  • [Number-of-references] 41
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5. Inoue D, Kimura T, Shimoji S, Mori M, Nagai Y, Tabata S, Kurata M, Matsushita A, Nagai K, Maruoka H, Yamashita E, Takahashi T: [Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma complicated by recurrent drug-induced agranulocytosis]. Rinsho Ketsueki; 2009 Feb;50(2):87-91
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  • [Title] [Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma complicated by recurrent drug-induced agranulocytosis].
  • Hematologic examination demonstrated a white blood cell count of 1,400/microl with 0% neutrophils, and 18% abnormal lymphocytes.
  • A diagnosis of drug-induced agranulocytosis was made.
  • Although neutrophil counts immediately returned to normal levels in response to filgrastim, fever, skin rash and systemic lymphadenopathy were all persistent.
  • He also developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a second episode of agranulocytosis.
  • The histologic picture of a biopsied lymph node showed diffuse infiltration of polymorphous lymphoid cells with clear cytoplasm and proliferation of arborizing capillary vessels.
  • Based on the histologic findings, PCR, and immunohistologic analyses, he was diagnosed with angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AILT) in leukemic state.
  • The response of the lymphoma to conventional chemotherapy (CHOP and ESHAP) was poor.
  • We next performed an immunomodulatory therapy using cyclosporine A to suppress cytokine production by neoplastic T cells.
  • The treatment resulted in a partial remission of AILT including disappearance of circulating lymphoma cells.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first published report of AILT complicated by drug-induced agranulocytosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Acetaminophen / adverse effects. Agranulocytosis / chemically induced. Analgesics, Non-Narcotic / adverse effects. Immunoblastic Lymphadenopathy / etiology. Lymphoma, T-Cell / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cyclosporine / therapeutic use. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Male. Recurrence

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  • (PMID = 19265300.001).
  • [ISSN] 0485-1439
  • [Journal-full-title] [Rinshō ketsueki] The Japanese journal of clinical hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rinsho Ketsueki
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Non-Narcotic; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 362O9ITL9D / Acetaminophen; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine
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6. Sarris AH, Phan A, Duvic M, Romaguera J, McLaughlin P, Mesina O, King K, Medeiros LJ, Rassidakis GZ, Samuels B, Cabanillas F: Trimetrexate in relapsed T-cell lymphoma with skin involvement. J Clin Oncol; 2002 Jun 15;20(12):2876-80
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  • [Title] Trimetrexate in relapsed T-cell lymphoma with skin involvement.
  • Because trimetrexate (TMTX) enters cells by passive diffusion and is not polyglutamylated, its activity in relapsed T-cell lymphoma was investigated.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eligible patients had histologically confirmed relapsed T-cell lymphoma involving the skin, had received more than one previous regimen, were older than 16 years, had normal organ function, and had no CNS disease or serious infections, including human immunodeficiency virus.
  • Three patients had anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, 15 had mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome (14 with large-cell transformation), and two had peripheral T-cell lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Trimetrexate / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12065565.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-16672
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; UPN4ITI8T4 / Trimetrexate
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7. Mann BS, Johnson JR, Cohen MH, Justice R, Pazdur R: FDA approval summary: vorinostat for treatment of advanced primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Oncologist; 2007 Oct;12(10):1247-52
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  • [Title] FDA approval summary: vorinostat for treatment of advanced primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • Food and Drug Administration granted regular approval to vorinostat (Zolinza(R); Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, for the treatment of cutaneous manifestations of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) in patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease on or following two systemic therapies.
  • The pivotal study supporting approval was a single-arm open-label phase II trial that enrolled 74 patients with stage IB and higher CTCL who had failed two systemic therapies (one of which must have contained bexarotene).
  • The median duration of protocol treatment was 118 days.
  • The objective response rate was 30% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19.7%-41.5%), the estimated median response duration was 168 days, and the median time to tumor progression was 202 days.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Hydroxamic Acids / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Approval. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors. Humans. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Salvage Therapy. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. United States. United States Food and Drug Administration


8. Go RS, Wester SM: Immunophenotypic and molecular features, clinical outcomes, treatments, and prognostic factors associated with subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma: a systematic analysis of 156 patients reported in the literature. Cancer; 2004 Sep 15;101(6):1404-13
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  • [Title] Immunophenotypic and molecular features, clinical outcomes, treatments, and prognostic factors associated with subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma: a systematic analysis of 156 patients reported in the literature.
  • BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is an uncommon type of skin lymphoma.
  • The natural history, optimal treatment strategy, and prognostic factors associated with this malignancy are not well defined.
  • METHODS: The authors performed a systematic analysis of all patients with SPTCL reported on in the English-language medical literature, with emphasis on specific clinical features, experiences involving the use of radiotherapy and systemic agents, and prognostic factors predictive of treatment response and clinical outcome.
  • Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) was a presenting feature in 37% of patients, and > 90% of patients required treatment at diagnosis.
  • Prednisone was used frequently as initial therapy in patients who had less aggressive disease at presentation; however, durable complete remissions (CR) were infrequent.
  • Anthracycline-based chemotherapy regimens were the most commonly used and most effective systemic treatment options, producing long-term CR in approximately 30% of patients.
  • Among patients who received high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation (HDT-SCT) for refractory or recurrent disease, 92% achieved CR, with a median response duration of > or = 14 months.
  • The presence of HPS at diagnosis and expression of the gamma/delta T-cell receptor (TCR) by tumor cells were associated with poor survival, whereas age was not.
  • Nonetheless, a subgroup of patients with SPTCL can have long-term disease remission following anthracycline-based initial therapy or subsequent HDT-SCT.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, T-Cell / therapy. Skin Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Infant. Male. Middle Aged. Panniculitis / pathology. Prognosis. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 15368328.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 74
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9. Asagoe K, Fujimoto W, Yoshino T, Mannami T, Liu Y, Kanzaki H, Arata J: Intravascular lymphomatosis of the skin as a manifestation of recurrent B-cell lymphoma. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2003 Feb;48(2 Suppl):S1-4
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  • [Title] Intravascular lymphomatosis of the skin as a manifestation of recurrent B-cell lymphoma.
  • Intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL) is a rare type of lymphoma with a poor prognosis.
  • We describe a patient with IVL of the skin as a manifestation of a recurrent diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of ureteral origin.
  • Lymphoma cells were located both within the vessels and the parenchyma in an early cutaneous lesion.
  • After recurrence in the skin, lymphoma cells gradually located only in the vascular lumina.
  • This transition suggests that cells localized within the vessels were selected as a consequence of chemotherapy.
  • Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the expression of surface adhesion molecules of lymphoma cells did not significantly change.
  • The results of polymerase chain reaction revealed that the ureteral and cutaneous tumors were identical in clonality.
  • Our findings suggest that conventional diffuse large B-cell lymphoma can change into IVL.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, B-Cell / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Second Primary / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis. Ureteral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Vascular Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Fatal Outcome. Female. Gene Rearrangement. Humans. Membrane Glycoproteins / analysis. Recurrence

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  • (PMID = 12582370.001).
  • [ISSN] 0190-9622
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins
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10. Yung A, Snow J, Jarrett P: Subcutaneous panniculitic T-cell lymphoma and cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis. Australas J Dermatol; 2001 Aug;42(3):183-7
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  • [Title] Subcutaneous panniculitic T-cell lymphoma and cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis.
  • A 43-year-old Maori man presented with a 1 month history of malaise, weight loss, anorexia, arthralgia, recurrent fever and tender erythematous subcutaneous skin lesions.
  • Histological examination of an incisional biopsy of a lesion revealed a lobular panniculitis with an inflammatory infiltrate of atypical lymphocytes and evidence of cytophagocytosis consistent with a diagnosis of subcutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • The systemic symptoms and skin lesions resolved spontaneously within 3 weeks, only to recur 2 months later, requiring treatment with oral prednisolone.
  • T-cell gene rearrangement studies demonstrated a monoclonal T-cell receptor (gamma-chain) gene rearrangement, further supporting the diagnosis of subcutaneous panniculitic T-cell lymphoma.
  • Treatment with chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) led to remission of symptoms.
  • Four months after completing chemotherapy, the patient remained asymptomatic with a few indurated subcutaneous plaques on the chest.
  • Biopsy of these areas revealed lobular panniculitis, lymphocytic infiltrate without cytological atypia, abundant lipophages and fibrosis and sclerosis consistent with a healing response.
  • He remains well 24 months following chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / diagnosis. Panniculitis / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Diagnosis, Differential. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Humans. Leg. Male. Middle Aged. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Thorax. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 11488712.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-8380
  • [Journal-full-title] The Australasian journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Australas. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
  • [Number-of-references] 22
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11. Gardner RV, Velez MC, Ode DL, Lee JW, Correa H: Gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma as a recurrent complication after transplantation. Leuk Lymphoma; 2004 Nov;45(11):2355-9
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  • [Title] Gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma as a recurrent complication after transplantation.
  • We present a case of gamma-delta (gammadelta) T-cell lymphoma as a recurrent event in a pediatric liver transplant recipient.
  • Five years after transplantation, the patient was found to have a gammadelta T-cell lymphoma located in retroperitoneal nodes.
  • She received chemotherapy and did well, remaining disease-free for 6 years.
  • She remained only on prednisone for prevention of graft rejection, but was noted to have a non-tender skin nodule that upon biopsy proved to be again a gammadelta T-cell lymphoma.
  • However, comparison of tissue from both tumors revealed that the second occurrence of this malignancy was a de novo event, differing from the first by immunophenotypic and immunohistochemical characteristics, and TCR rearrangement.
  • The patient continues to do well, without evidence of disease recurrence, after being treated again with chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Liver Transplantation / adverse effects. Lymphoma, T-Cell / etiology. Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Cyclosporine / pharmacology. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Immunoglobulins / metabolism. Immunohistochemistry. Immunophenotyping. Immunosuppressive Agents / pharmacology. Infant. Prednisone / pharmacology. Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell / immunology. Recurrence. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15512831.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunoglobulins; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell; 0 / Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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12. Su LD, Duncan LM: Lymphoma- and leukemia-associated cutaneous atypical CD30+ T-cell reactions. J Cutan Pathol; 2000 May;27(5):249-54
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  • [Title] Lymphoma- and leukemia-associated cutaneous atypical CD30+ T-cell reactions.
  • Cutaneous CD30+ lymphoid infiltrates appear cytologically atypical and occasionally may be misinterpreted as recurrent disease when they occur in patients treated for other primary hematologic malignancies.
  • One patient with B-cell lymphoma and another with myeloid leukemia developed cutaneous eruptions after chemotherapy displaying highly atypical perivascular lymphoid cells on histology that mimicked recurrent disease.
  • The skin lesions spontaneously resolved and have not recurred.
  • Because one case was initially misinterpreted as recurrent leukemia, we conclude that close clinical correlation and immunophenotypic confirmation should be done for atypical cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates in patients with primary hematologic malignancies.
  • We discuss the differential diagnosis of atypical CD30+ infiltrates in this setting, which include recurrent lymphoma or myeloid leukemia, primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP), carbamazepine-induced CD30+ pseudolymphoma, viral infection and an atypical eruption of lymphocyte recovery.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD30 / metabolism. Leukemia, Myeloid / pathology. Leukemic Infiltration / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell / pathology. Skin / pathology. T-Lymphocytes / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Carbamazepine / adverse effects. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / diagnosis. Lymphomatoid Papulosis / diagnosis. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Pseudolymphoma / chemically induced. Pseudolymphoma / diagnosis. Skin Diseases, Viral / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 10847550.001).
  • [ISSN] 0303-6987
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cutaneous pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cutan. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] DENMARK
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD30; 33CM23913M / Carbamazepine
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13. Piekarz R, Frye R, Turner M, Wright J, Leonard J, Allen S, Bates S, for all collaborators: Update on the phase II trial and correlative studies of depsipeptide in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and relapsed peripheral T-cell lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):3028

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Update on the phase II trial and correlative studies of depsipeptide in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and relapsed peripheral T-cell lymphoma.
  • : 3028 Background: Depsipeptide, FK228 (Fujisawa Pharmaceuticals), is the first of a new generation of histone deacetylase inhibitors to demonstrate consistent clinical activity in a specific tumor type.
  • As a result, we are currently conducting a multi-institutional phase II trial in patients with CTCL, PTCL, or other mature T cell lymphomas.
  • METHODS: This trial is accruing patients into 4 separate arms based on histology and prior therapy.
  • Depsipeptide is administered as a 4 hr infusion on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28 d cycle.
  • In Arm 1, comprised of patients with CTCL who had not previously received more than 2 cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens, objective responses were observed in 7 of 14 patients, including 3 patients with complete response and 4 patients with partial response, for a response rate of 50%.
  • Overall the drug is well tolerated, with observed toxicities including nausea, vomiting, fatigue, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and hypocalcemia.
  • Non-specific ST-T wave changes are noted by ECG, without changes in cardiac function.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that histone deacetylase inhibitors such as depsipeptide are active in patients with T cell lymphoma.

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  • (PMID = 28015193.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Link MP, Devidas M, Murphy SB, Behm FG, Hutchison R: Favorable treatment outcome of children with early stage large B-cell and anaplastic large cell lymphomas. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8500

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  • [Title] Favorable treatment outcome of children with early stage large B-cell and anaplastic large cell lymphomas.
  • : 8500 Background: The non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) of childhood are heterogeneous.
  • Large cell lymphomas (LCL) are relatively rare in children and sub-divided among diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL), anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), peripheral T (PT) and other rare subtypes.
  • One hundred fifty-six (40%) had large cell lymphoma.
  • All patients received nine weeks of chemotherapy including vincristine 1.5mg/m2 weekly for seven doses; doxorubicin 40mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 750mg/m2 on days 1, 22 and 43; and prednisone 40mg/m2 daily for 28 days during the first 4 weeks and on days 43-47.
  • Among children with ALCL, primary sites included lymph node (36), skin (11), bone (6), and other (5).
  • Only one patient with DLBCL developed recurrent disease and died.
  • At 5 years, the projected event-free survival (EFS) is 98 % (SE 3%), and the overall survival (OS), 98 % (SE 3%).
  • Thirty-five children with ALCL (60%) had T cell markers, and the remainder had null cell markers.
  • Nine patients with ALCL (T=5; null=4) failed treatment: three failed induction, and six relapsed from complete remission, but were effectively salvaged.
  • The projected 5 year EFS for early stage ALCL is 84 % (SE 7%) (DLBCL versus ALCL, p-value 0.02); the OS, 100%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Nine weeks of modest intensity chemotherapy are sufficient for children with early stage DLBCL.

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  • (PMID = 28014540.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Olsen EA, Kim YH, Kuzel TM, Pacheco TR, Foss FM, Parker S, Frankel SR, Chen C, Ricker JL, Arduino JM, Duvic M: Phase IIb multicenter trial of vorinostat in patients with persistent, progressive, or treatment refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2007 Jul 20;25(21):3109-15
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  • [Title] Phase IIb multicenter trial of vorinostat in patients with persistent, progressive, or treatment refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the activity and safety of the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) in persistent, progressive, or recurrent mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) cutaneous t-cell lymphoma (CTCL) subtypes.
  • Patients must have received at least two prior systemic therapies at least one of which included bexarotene unless intolerable.
  • The primary end point was the objective response rate (ORR) measured by the modified severity weighted assessment tool and secondary end points were time to response (TTR), time to progression (TTP), duration of response (DOR), and pruritus relief ( > or = 3-point improvement on a 10-point visual analog scale).
  • The most common drug-related adverse experiences (AE) were diarrhea (49%), fatigue (46%), nausea (43%), and anorexia (26%); most were grade 2 or lower but those grade 3 or higher included fatigue (5%), pulmonary embolism (5%), thrombocytopenia (5%), and nausea (4%).
  • CONCLUSION: Oral vorinostat was effective in treatment refractory MF/SS with an acceptable safety profile.
  • [MeSH-major] Hydroxamic Acids / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Salvage Therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Confidence Intervals. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Probability. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome


18. May SA, Jones D, Medeiros LJ, Duvic M, Prieto VG, Lazar AJ: Oral-cutaneous CD4-positive T-cell lymphoma: a study of two patients. Am J Dermatopathol; 2007 Feb;29(1):62-7
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  • [Title] Oral-cutaneous CD4-positive T-cell lymphoma: a study of two patients.
  • We describe two slowly progressive cases of T-cell lymphoma that involved both acral skin and oral cavity.
  • One patient presented with a tongue nodule, completely responded to chemotherapy and then developed recurrent lymphoma involving tongue and skin a few months later that also responded to therapy.
  • The second patient presented with a skin nodule that spontaneously resolved without therapy, and subsequently recurred in tongue and skin a few years later.
  • In both cases, the neoplasms were composed of atypical lymphoid cells with epidermotropism and were of T-helper cell lineage (CD4+).
  • Identical T-cell receptor gene rearrangements were detected in the initial and recurrent lesions of one case.
  • Although these neoplasms were classified as unspecified peripheral T-cell lymphoma because of the unusual distribution of disease, both cases also had histopathologic features of mycosis fungoides.
  • These cases are strikingly similar, and may represent an unusual clinicopathologic type of T-cell lymphoma that can hone to cutaneous and oral mucosal sites with a slowly progressive natural history.
  • [MeSH-major] CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / pathology. Lymphoma, T-Cell / pathology. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / pathology. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Progression. Female. Fingers / pathology. Humans. Male. Mouth Mucosa / pathology. Mycosis Fungoides / diagnosis. Mycosis Fungoides / pathology. Skin / pathology. Tongue / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17284964.001).
  • [ISSN] 0193-1091
  • [Journal-full-title] The American Journal of dermatopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Dermatopathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Jidar K, Ingen-Housz-Oro S, Beylot-Barry M, Paul C, Chaoui D, Sigal-Grinberg M, Morel P, Dubertret L, Bachelez H: Gemcitabine treatment in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: a multicentre study of 23 cases. Br J Dermatol; 2009 Sep;161(3):660-3
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  • [Title] Gemcitabine treatment in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: a multicentre study of 23 cases.
  • BACKGROUND: Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are malignancies characterized by a clonal T-cell infiltrate involving the skin.
  • CTCLs often show resistance to conventional antineoplastic chemotherapy.
  • Response was evaluated after three and six cycles of chemotherapy.
  • Only five patients reached the sixth cycle of treatment and four still had a favourable response.
  • Other serious adverse events were observed in six cases (26%): one haemolytic-uraemic syndrome, one severe capillary leak syndrome, one acute heart failure related to cardiac arrhythmia, two bullous and erosive dermatitis, and one recurrent influenza-like syndrome with altered general condition.
  • However, our results contradict the safety profile of gemcitabine previously reported and underline the high incidence of severe complications including visceral and cutaneous involvement.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Vinblastine / administration & dosage. Vinblastine / analogs & derivatives

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  • (PMID = 19438862.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2133
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; Q6C979R91Y / vinorelbine
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20. Scheinfeld N: A brief primer on treatments of cutaneous T cell lymphoma, newly approved or late in development. J Drugs Dermatol; 2007 Jul;6(7):757-60
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  • [Title] A brief primer on treatments of cutaneous T cell lymphoma, newly approved or late in development.
  • Dermatologists use a variety of treatments for cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) or mycosis fungoides, in particular topical corticosteroids, psoralen and ultraviolet A phototherapy (PUVA) or ultraviolet B (UVB) phototherapy.
  • Metastatic disease has been treated with radiotherapy, extracorporeal photophoresis, and old line chemotherapy agents such as methotrexate, chlorambucil, purine analogues, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydoxorubicin, oncovin, prednisone (CHOP), and interferon-alpha-2a.
  • Zanolimumab is a human monoclonal antibody that acts as a CD4 antagonist and has been granted orphan drug status in the US and Europe.
  • Vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) is a histone deacetylases inhibitor that has recently been approved by the FDA for the treatment of progressive, persistent, or recurrent CTCL on or after 2 systemic therapies have failed.
  • Bexarotene is indicated in CTCL patients who are refractory to at least one prior systemic therapy.
  • Denileukin diftitox is indicated for the treatment of patients with persistent or recurrent CTCL whose malignant cells express the CD25 component of the interleukin-2 receptor.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Diphtheria Toxin / therapeutic use. Drug Approval. Humans. Hydroxamic Acids / therapeutic use. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / therapeutic use. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17763605.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-9616
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of drugs in dermatology : JDD
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Drugs Dermatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Diphtheria Toxin; 0 / Hydroxamic Acids; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; 0 / zanolimumab; 25E79B5CTM / denileukin diftitox; 58IFB293JI / vorinostat; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene
  • [Number-of-references] 18
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21. Duvic M, Kuzel TM, Olsen EA, Martin AG, Foss FM, Kim YH, Heald PW, Bacha P, Nichols J, Liepa A: Quality-of-life improvements in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma patients treated with denileukin diftitox (ONTAK). Clin Lymphoma; 2002 Mar;2(4):222-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Quality-of-life improvements in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma patients treated with denileukin diftitox (ONTAK).
  • Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) can be associated with painful, pruritic, disfiguring lesions.
  • As part of a multicenter, randomized phase III trial in patients with heavily pretreated advanced and/or recurrent CTCL, the effects of an interleukin-2 receptor-targeted fusion protein, denileukin diftitox (DAB389IL-2, ONTAK), on patient-rated overall quality of life (QOL), skin appearance, and pruritus severity were evaluated.
  • Prior to each treatment cycle, patients were evaluated for disease response and were asked to self-rate their overall QOL via the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) questionnaire, skin appearance (7-point scale), and pruritus severity (10-cm visual analogue scale).
  • Additionally for responders, assessments of skin severity and pruritus severity showed significant (P < or = 0.05) improvements at study endpoint compared with baseline.
  • Heavily pretreated patients with advanced and/or recurrent CTCL who responded to denileukin diftitox therapy showed significant improvements in self-rated overall QOL, skin appearance, and pruritus severity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Diphtheria Toxin / therapeutic use. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Quality of Life. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / therapeutic use. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Patient Satisfaction. Probability. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Reference Values. Risk Assessment. Statistics, Nonparametric. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11970761.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-9655
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Diphtheria Toxin; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 25E79B5CTM / denileukin diftitox
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22. Guizzardi M, Hendrickx IA, Mancini LL, Monti M: Cytotoxic gamma/delta subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma: report of a case with pulmonary involvement unresponsive to therapy. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol; 2003 Mar;17(2):219-22
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  • [Title] Cytotoxic gamma/delta subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma: report of a case with pulmonary involvement unresponsive to therapy.
  • Peripheral subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (PSPTCL) is a rare form of cutaneous lymphoma recently proposed as a distinct clinicopathological entity.
  • Finding of TIA-1+ and perforin + cytolytic granules in atypical pleomorphic lymphocytes suggests PSPTCL origin from granular cells of T-cell or natural killer cell phenotype.
  • Cells have a CD3+ CD4+ CD8- or CD3+ CD4- CD8+ T-cell phenotype.
  • Moreover, these lymphomas can express natural killer cell associated antigens, such as CD56, especially in gamma/delta variants.
  • PSPTCL following an indolent clinical course with recurrent self-healing lesions have been described.
  • The prognosis of most PSPTCL is poor even when treated with aggressive chemotherapy.
  • This paper reports a case of PCTCL in a young woman with T-cytotoxic differentiation, with rapid progression unresponsive to several treatments.
  • [MeSH-major] Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / pathology. Panniculitis / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Cyclophosphamide. Doxorubicin. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Killer Cells, Natural / pathology. Prednisone. Vincristine


23. Duvic M, Olsen EA, Breneman D, Pacheco TR, Parker S, Vonderheid EC, Abuav R, Ricker JL, Rizvi S, Chen C, Boileau K, Gunchenko A, Sanz-Rodriguez C, Geskin LJ: Evaluation of the long-term tolerability and clinical benefit of vorinostat in patients with advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Clin Lymphoma Myeloma; 2009 Dec;9(6):412-6
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  • [Title] Evaluation of the long-term tolerability and clinical benefit of vorinostat in patients with advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • INTRODUCTION: Vorinostat, an orally active histone deacetylase inhibitor, was approved in October 2006 by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of cutaneous manifestations of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) in patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease during or after treatment with 2 systemic therapies.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A multicenter, open-label phase IIb trial evaluated the activity and safety of vorinostat 400 mg orally daily in patients with > or = stage IB, persistent, progressive, or treatment-refractory mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome CTCL subtypes.
  • We report the safety and tolerability of long-term vorinostat therapy in patients who experienced clinical benefit in the previous phase IIb study.
  • RESULTS: As of December 11, 2008, 6 of 74 patients enrolled in the original study had received vorinostat for > or = 2 years: median age, 65 years; median number of previous therapies, 2.5; median time from diagnosis to enrollment, 1.8 years.
  • During the follow-up study, the most common drug-related grade 1-4 adverse events (AEs) were diarrhea, nausea, fatigue, and alopecia (6, 5, 4, and 3 patients, respectively).
  • Five patients have discontinued the study drug, and 1 patient is continuing therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: This post hoc subset analysis provides evidence for the long-term safety and clinical benefit of vorinostat in heavily pretreated patients with CTCL, regardless of previous treatment failures.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Hydroxamic Acids / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19951879.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-0712
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lymphoma & myeloma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lymphoma Myeloma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors; 0 / Hydroxamic Acids; 58IFB293JI / vorinostat
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24. Laube S, Shah F, Marsden J: Consequences of misdiagnosis of lymphomatoid papulosis. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl); 2006 May;15(2):194-8
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  • We report two patients with lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP), who were initially diagnosed as systemic T-cell lymphoma.
  • The patients presented with recurrent self-healing cutaneous lesions and skin biopsies showed a lymphocytic infiltrate with malignant features.
  • Consequently, both patients were unnecessarily treated with multi-agent chemotherapy, radiotherapy and stem cell/bone marrow transplants and sustained long-term adverse effects.
  • Factors leading to the unnecessary treatment of both patients are examined and several learning points highlighted such as the importance of a multidisciplinary approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Diagnostic Errors. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / diagnosis. Lymphomatoid Papulosis / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 16643267.001).
  • [ISSN] 0961-5423
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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25. Loureiro P, Southern SO, Southern PJ, Pombo-de-Oliveira MS: Clinicopathological studies of a patient with adult T-cell leukemia and pseudogynecomasty. Am J Hematol; 2000 Nov;65(3):256-9

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  • [Title] Clinicopathological studies of a patient with adult T-cell leukemia and pseudogynecomasty.
  • We present a rare case of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) in which leukemic T cells expressed CD4 and CD25 surface antigens and infiltrated mammary glands during clinical course of the disease.
  • A 40-year-old male was admitted with long-standing skin lesions and leukocytosis.
  • The patient proved to be seropositive for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) antibodies.
  • Monoclonal expansion of lymphoid cells integrated with HTLV-I genome was observed, and the diagnosis of ATL chronic type was made.
  • He underwent a chemotherapy regimen, and skin lesions and leukocytosis improved markedly.
  • He progressed with an indolent clinical course of ATL, when he was admitted with bilateral hyperplasia of breast, recurrent skin lesions, and leukocytosis.
  • This is the first report describing invasion of the mammary tissue with HTLV-I-transformed T-cells and HTLV-I-associated breast disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Gynecomastia / pathology. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11074545.001).
  • [ISSN] 0361-8609
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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26. Al Zolibani AA, Al Robaee AA, Qureshi MG, Al Nosian H: Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma with hemophagocytic syndrome successfully treated with cyclosporin A. Skinmed; 2006 Jul-Aug;5(4):195-7
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  • [Title] Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma with hemophagocytic syndrome successfully treated with cyclosporin A.
  • A 17-year-old girl previously in good health presented with a 2-month history of recurrent, high-grade fever; general fatigue; anorexia; a 10-kg weight loss; and multiple, painful, reddish skin lesions on the lower abdomen.
  • Local skin examination revealed multiple erythematous, tender, and firm subcutaneous nodules of variable size (1-2 cm) on the lower abdomen.
  • Prolonged prothrombin time, 26 seconds (normal range 13-16 seconds); prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, 61 seconds (normal range 26-38 seconds); positive disseminated intravascular coagulation studies evidenced by low fibrinogen, 74 mg/dL (normal range 160-350 mg/dL); and positive fibrinogen degradation products were also noted.
  • CT showed enlarged lymph nodes in the axillary and inguinal areas, bilateral small pleural effusion, moderate hepatosplenomegaly, severe fatty infiltration of the liver, and thickening of lower abdominal subcutaneous tissue.
  • A deep punch biopsy of a nodule from the right lower abdomen revealed lobular panniculitis with atypical lymphocytes and large macrophages with cytophagocytosis ("beanbag" cells) (Figures 3 and 4).
  • T-cell gene rearrangement studies on skin lesions revealed a monoclonal T-cell receptor (gamma-chain) gene rearrangement, supporting the diagnosis of subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma.
  • On presentation, the initial treatment included 6 U of fresh frozen plasma, 2 U of packed red blood cells, and 2 g IV fibrinogen for 3 consecutive days.
  • The fever and other systemic symptoms and skin lesions resolved within 2 weeks after the treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclosporine / therapeutic use. Dermatologic Agents / therapeutic use. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic / complications. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Female. Humans. Panniculitis / drug therapy. Panniculitis / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16855414.001).
  • [ISSN] 1540-9740
  • [Journal-full-title] Skinmed
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Skinmed
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dermatologic Agents; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine
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27. Dierks C, Adrian F, Fisch P, Ma H, Maurer H, Herchenbach D, Forster CU, Sprissler C, Liu G, Rottmann S, Guo GR, Katja Z, Veelken H, Warmuth M: The ITK-SYK fusion oncogene induces a T-cell lymphoproliferative disease in mice mimicking human disease. Cancer Res; 2010 Aug 1;70(15):6193-204
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  • [Title] The ITK-SYK fusion oncogene induces a T-cell lymphoproliferative disease in mice mimicking human disease.
  • Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) constitute a major treatment problem with high mortality rates due to the minimal effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy.
  • Recent findings identified ITK-SYK as the first recurrent translocation in 17% of unspecified PTCLs and showed the overexpression of SYK in more than 90% of PTCLs.
  • Here, we show that the expression of ITK-SYK in the bone marrow of BALB/c mice causes a T-cell lymphoproliferative disease in all transplanted mice within 8 weeks after transplantation.
  • The disease was characterized by the infiltration of spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and skin with CD3+CD4+CD8- and CD3+CD4-CD8- ITK-SYK-positive T-cells accompanied by a systemic inflammatory reaction with upregulation of interleukin 5 and INF-gamma.
  • The disease was serially transplantable, inducing clonal T-cell expansion in secondary recipients.
  • The action of ITK-SYK in vivo was dependent on SYK kinase activity and disease development could be inhibited by the treatment of mice with SYK inhibitors.
  • Our results show that ITK-SYK causes a T-cell lymphoproliferative disease in mice, supporting its role in T-cell lymphoma development in humans.
  • Therefore, pharmacologic inhibition of SYK in patients with U-PTCLs carrying the ITK-SYK fusion protein might be an effective treatment strategy.
  • [MeSH-major] Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / immunology. Lymphoma, T-Cell / immunology. Lymphoproliferative Disorders / immunology. Oncogene Proteins, Fusion / immunology. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / immunology

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  • (PMID = 20670954.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7445
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Oncogene Proteins, Fusion; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Syk kinase; EC 2.7.10.2 / emt protein-tyrosine kinase; EC 6.3.2.- / Cbl protein, mouse; EC 6.3.2.- / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-cbl
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28. Jones D, Vega F, Sarris AH, Medeiros LJ: CD4-CD8-"Double-negative" cutaneous T-cell lymphomas share common histologic features and an aggressive clinical course. Am J Surg Pathol; 2002 Feb;26(2):225-31
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] CD4-CD8-"Double-negative" cutaneous T-cell lymphomas share common histologic features and an aggressive clinical course.
  • We report 15 patients with CD4-CD8-"double-negative" T-cell lymphoma arising in skin.
  • There were seven women and eight men with a mean age at diagnosis of 53 years (range 19-77 years).
  • All but two patients presented with solitary or multiple cutaneous nodule(s).
  • Initial and recurrent biopsy specimens showed a dense infiltrate centered in the mid-dermis (extending into subcutis when sampled) of small to intermediate-sized lymphocytes with indistinct nucleoli and frequently irregular nuclear contours.
  • All cases were negative for CD30 and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase; one showed expression of CD56, and six of eight tested cases were positive for T-cell receptor-delta expression.
  • Despite systemic chemotherapy, all 12 patients with clinical follow-up showed recurrent or progressive disease with widespread cutaneous dissemination in 10 of 12.
  • Eventual dissemination to lymph nodes or bone marrow occurred in two patients each, with at least nine patients dead of disease or treatment complications.
  • CD4-CD8-"double-negative" CTCL has distinctive histologic features and cytomorphology with a marked propensity for rapid multifocal cutaneous dissemination.
  • [MeSH-major] CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Female. Gene Rearrangement, gamma-Chain T-Cell Antigen Receptor. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Immunophenotyping. Male. Middle Aged. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta / immunology. Sequence Analysis, DNA

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  • (PMID = 11812944.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta
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29. Li N, Kim JH, Glusac EJ: Brainstem involvement by mycosis fungoides in a patient with large-cell transformation: a case report and review of literature. J Cutan Pathol; 2003 May;30(5):326-31
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  • [Title] Brainstem involvement by mycosis fungoides in a patient with large-cell transformation: a case report and review of literature.
  • However, CNS involvement in the absence of progressive skin lesions or other extracutaneous involvement has been reported rarely in patients with transformed MF.
  • RESULTS: A 71-year-old female with long-standing MF developed lymphomatous CNS involvement 10 years after the diagnosis of tumor stage MF.
  • At this time, the patient presented with a transient episode of garbled speech followed by generalized weakness.
  • Computerized tomography scan (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI scan) of the head revealed a subcortical lesion in the left temporo-frontal lobe.
  • Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed atypical T cells, and brain biopsy confirmed parenchymal involvement by T-cell lymphoma.
  • Meanwhile, a biopsy of a skin lesion showed large-cell transformation.
  • No lymph node or other systemic involvement was noted at this time, and the patient was treated with chemotherapy.
  • Twelve months later, the patient developed recurrent CNS lymphoma with multiple organ involvement and expired soon thereafter.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / pathology. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology. Mycosis Fungoides / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 12753174.001).
  • [ISSN] 0303-6987
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cutaneous pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cutan. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
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30. Lemoine M, Younes A: Histone deacetylase inhibitors in the treatment of lymphoma. Discov Med; 2010 Nov;10(54):462-70
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  • [Title] Histone deacetylase inhibitors in the treatment of lymphoma.
  • In addition to histones, HDACs can modulate the function of many other proteins involved in the regulation of cell survival and proliferation, angiogenesis, inflammation, and immunity.
  • Deregulated HDACs have been shown to be commonly associated with many types of cancer, and are considered promising targets for cancer therapy.
  • Several HDAC inhibitors are in clinical trials as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer agents, but only two such inhibitors -- vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) and romidepsin (depsipeptide) -- have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treating relapsed cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
  • This review focuses on the use of HDAC inhibitors in the treatment of relapsed lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Lymphoma / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 21122478.001).
  • [ISSN] 1944-7930
  • [Journal-full-title] Discovery medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Discov Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors; EC 3.5.1.98 / Histone Deacetylases
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31. Carver JR, Nasta S, Chong EA, Stonecypher M, Wheeler JE, Ahmadi T, Schuster SJ: Myocarditis during lenalidomide therapy. Ann Pharmacother; 2010 Nov;44(11):1840-3
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  • [Title] Myocarditis during lenalidomide therapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: To report the first case of pathologically confirmed myocarditis in a patient receiving treatment with lenalidomide for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • CASE SUMMARY: An 85-year-old woman with recurrent follicular lymphoma was treated with lenalidomide 10 mg daily and low-dose dexamethasone 8 mg once weekly in a clinical trial.
  • Within 17 days of starting lenalidomide and dexamethasone, she developed symptoms and signs of congestive heart failure.
  • DISCUSSION: Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent derived from thalidomide and is approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndromes.
  • The efficacy of lenalidomide has been reported in B-cell malignancies.
  • Common toxicities are myelosuppression, fatigue, diarrhea, skin rash, venous thromboembolism, peripheral neuropathy, and tumor flare reaction.
  • We propose an immunological mechanism for myocarditis based on the predominantly T-cell infiltration of the myocardium.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that lenalidomide may be a cause of drug-induced myocarditis.
  • A reasonable management approach is drug discontinuation and early institution of corticosteroid therapy.
  • An objective causality assessment, using the Naranjo probability scale, revealed that the adverse drug event was probable.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged, 80 and over. Autopsy. Dexamethasone / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Multiple Organ Failure / etiology. T-Lymphocytes / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20876827.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-6270
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 4Z8R6ORS6L / Thalidomide; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; F0P408N6V4 / lenalidomide
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32. Bittencourt AL, de Oliveira Mde F: Cutaneous manifestations associated with HTLV-1 infection. Int J Dermatol; 2010 Oct;49(10):1099-110
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cutaneous manifestations associated with HTLV-1 infection.
  • Skin lesions are frequent in human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection and may constitute an alert for the diagnosis of this condition.
  • The most severe skin diseases related to this virus are adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive form of leukemia/lymphoma that fails to respond to chemotherapy, and infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH), a severe and recurrent form of eczema occurring in childhood.
  • ATLL affects the skin in 43-72% of cases.
  • In this review, the clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical aspects of ATLL and IDH will be discussed, as well as the differential diagnoses, giving particular focus to the primary cutaneous ATLL.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, T-Cell / pathology. Lymphoma, T-Cell / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Carrier State. Diagnosis, Differential. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. HTLV-I Infections. Human T-lymphotropic virus 1. Humans. Ichthyosis / diagnosis. Ichthyosis / virology. Immunohistochemistry. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Scabies / diagnosis. Skin / pathology. Skin Diseases, Viral / diagnosis. Treponemal Infections / diagnosis. Zidovudine / therapeutic use

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  • [Copyright] © 2010 The International Society of Dermatology.
  • (PMID = 20883400.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-4632
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 4B9XT59T7S / Zidovudine
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33. Ma YC, Shyur SD, Ho TY, Huang LH, Wu JY, Liang DC, Chien YH: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome complicated by an atypical lymphoproliferative disorder: a case report. J Microbiol Immunol Infect; 2005 Aug;38(4):289-92
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  • Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked syndrome consisting of eczema, recurrent pyogenic infection, and thrombocytopenia with decreased platelet volume.
  • Immunologic studies reveal normal immunoglobulin G (IgG), decreased IgM, elevated IgA and IgE levels, and decreased T-cell function.
  • We report a 3-year-old boy who had persistent thrombocytopenia with bleeding, recurrent infections, and chronic eczema with frequent skin infections since birth.
  • T-cell dysfunction was detected on the multitest for cell-mediated immunity.
  • However, about 2 weeks after splenectomy, he developed generalized lymphadenopathy and lymphoma was misdiagnosed based on lymph node biopsy at another hospital where he was admitted for urgent care.
  • The lymphadenopathy regressed spontaneously 1 month later without chemotherapy.
  • Early and correct diagnosis of WAS complicated with ALPD is important to avoid unnecessary chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 16118678.001).
  • [ISSN] 1684-1182
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of microbiology, immunology, and infection = Wei mian yu gan ran za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Microbiol Immunol Infect
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China (Republic : 1949- )
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34. Orozco CV, Velásquez LH, Méndez NH, Augusto B, Salazar T: [Hyper IgE syndrome. Opportune diagnosis and management]. Rev Alerg Mex; 2008 Jan-Feb;55(1):38-45
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Transliterated title] Sindrome de hiper IgE. Diagnóstico y manejo oportunos.
  • There are two types: dominant autosomal and recessive autosomal.
  • It is a primary, rare and complex immunodeficiency, characterized clinically by recurrent skin abscesses for Staphylococcus aureus, recurrent pneumonia, and pneumatoceles, hypereosinophylia, high serum levels of immunoglobulin E (> 2,000 Ul/mL), early eczema and late loss of primary dentition.
  • The diagnosis is done with the Grimbacher criteria and the prognosis depends on the opportune diagnosis and treatment.
  • The differential diagnosis is with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, chronic granullomatose disease, T cell lymphoma, and atopic dermatitis.
  • The treatment is with prophylactic antibiotic, intravenous immunoglobulin or recombinant INF gamma.
  • [MeSH-major] Job Syndrome / diagnosis. Job Syndrome / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 18697452.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-5151
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista alergia Mexico (Tecamachalco, Puebla, Mexico : 1993)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Alerg Mex
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Mexico
  • [Number-of-references] 12
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35. Matsubara H, Makimoto A, Takayama J, Higa T, Saito T, Kanda Y, Tanosaki R, Mineishi S, Ohira M, Takaue Y: Possible clinical benefits of the use of peripheral blood stem cells over bone marrow in the allogeneic transplantation setting for the treatment of childhood leukemia. Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2001 Jan;31(1):30-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Possible clinical benefits of the use of peripheral blood stem cells over bone marrow in the allogeneic transplantation setting for the treatment of childhood leukemia.
  • BACKGROUND: The benefits of allogeneic peripheral blood stem/progenitor cell transplantation (PBSCT) over bone marrow transplantation (BMT), if any, have not been seriously evaluated in a pediatric population.
  • We report here our experience with this procedure and demonstrate rapid engraftment to reduce procedure-related complications and enhanced allogeneic immune reaction to reduce leukemic relapse.
  • Four patients (2 AML and 2 ALL, aged 8-18 years) underwent allogeneic PBSCT for relapsed leukemia after primary allogeneic BMT (n = 2), for active hepatosplenic fungal abscess (n = 1) or for refractory relapse with conventional chemotherapy (n = 1).
  • RESULTS: No significant toxicities were observed in normal donors on G-CSF treatment or at collection of PBSC.
  • Although none of our patients developed acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), two developed chronic GVHD involving the liver and skin.
  • Among those who developed chronic GVHD, one died of recurrent disease and another died of pneumonia 235 days after PBSCT.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Allogeneic PBSCT can be a safe procedure in a pediatric population with fewer acute complications, although the potential risk of G-CSF treatment in normal donors should be seriously weighed against the existing risks of marrow aspiration under general anesthesia.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Transplantation. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Feasibility Studies. Female. Graft Survival. Graft vs Host Disease. Graft vs Leukemia Effect / immunology. HLA Antigens / immunology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11256838.001).
  • [ISSN] 0368-2811
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / HLA Antigens
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36. Nashan D, Luger TA: [Cytokines: current status and prospects in the treatment of skin tumors]. Hautarzt; 2001 Aug;52(8):691-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Cytokines: current status and prospects in the treatment of skin tumors].
  • Various therapeutic options using cytokines have been described in the treatment of melanoma, T cell lymphoma, B cell lymphoma, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and Merkel cell carcinoma.
  • The treatment regimens include cytokine substitution, cytokine induction, cytokine transfection and therapeutic cytokine constructs.
  • In the adjuvant treatment of melanomas, IFN-alpha has become well established.
  • IL-2 has a role in the therapy of advanced melanomas as well as in vaccination strategies.
  • Further possible therapeutic immune modulations, which have been evaluated in experimental approaches and pilot studies, include treatment with IL-4, IL-7 and GM-CSF.
  • Treatment with IL-12 promises to open new perspectives.
  • A well established regimen in the treatment of T cell lymphoma stages Ia-IIb is the combination of PUVA and IFN-alpha.
  • IL-2, IFN-gamma, and the fused cytokine-toxin molecules DAB389IL-2 offer further therapeutic alternatives.
  • B cell lymphomas are treated with antibody-IL-2 fusion proteins.
  • Advanced or inoperable squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma may be treated with local IFN-alpha injections.
  • IFN-alpha or TNF-alpha may be considered for the treatment of recurrent or advanced Merkel cell carcinoma.
  • In dermatological oncology cytokine treatment focuses on melanome an T cell lymphome.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Merkel Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Cytokines / therapeutic use. Lymphoma / drug therapy. Melanoma / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Combined Modality Therapy. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Humans. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Interleukins / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, T-Cell / drug therapy. Melanoma, Experimental / drug therapy. Mice. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. PUVA Therapy. Palliative Care. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11544938.001).
  • [ISSN] 0017-8470
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Hautarzt; Zeitschrift für Dermatologie, Venerologie, und verwandte Gebiete
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hautarzt
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Interleukins; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
  • [Number-of-references] 96
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