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1. Cohen MH, Gootenberg J, Keegan P, Pazdur R: FDA drug approval summary: bevacizumab (Avastin) plus Carboplatin and Paclitaxel as first-line treatment of advanced/metastatic recurrent nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer. Oncologist; 2007 Jun;12(6):713-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] FDA drug approval summary: bevacizumab (Avastin) plus Carboplatin and Paclitaxel as first-line treatment of advanced/metastatic recurrent nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer.
  • Food and Drug Administration granted approval for bevacizumab (Avastin; Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA), administered in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, for the initial treatment of patients with unresectable, locally advanced, recurrent, or metastatic, nonsquamous, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • A randomized, open label, multicenter clinical trial, conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG), in chemotherapy-naïve patients with stage IIIB/IV nonsquamous NSCLC, evaluated bevacizumab plus carboplatin and paclitaxel (BV/CP, n = 434) versus carboplatin and paclitaxel alone (CP, n = 444).
  • Among the 878 randomized patients, the median age was 63, 46% were female, 76% had stage IV disease, 12% had stage IIIB disease with malignant pleural effusion, 11% had recurrent disease, and 40% had an ECOG performance status score of 0.
  • Fatal, treatment-related adverse events in patients receiving bevacizumab were pulmonary hemorrhage (2.3% versus 0.5%), gastrointestinal hemorrhage, central nervous system infarction, gastrointestinal perforation, myocardial infarction, and neutropenic sepsis.
  • The most serious, and sometimes fatal, bevacizumab toxicities are gastrointestinal perforation, wound healing complications, hemorrhage, arterial thromboembolic events, hypertensive crisis, nephrotic syndrome, congestive heart failure, and neutropenic sepsis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal / adverse effects. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bevacizumab. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Carboplatin / adverse effects. Drug Approval. Headache / chemically induced. Humans. Middle Aged. Multicenter Studies as Topic. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Paclitaxel / adverse effects. Pain / chemically induced. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Treatment Outcome. United States. United States Food and Drug Administration. Vomiting / chemically induced


2. Hughes B, Yip D, Goldstein D, Waring P, Beshay V, Chong G: Cerebral relapse of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor during treatment with imatinib mesylate: case report. BMC Cancer; 2004 Oct 9;4:74
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. IMATINIB MESYLATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cerebral relapse of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor during treatment with imatinib mesylate: case report.
  • BACKGROUND: The management of unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) has previously been difficult as they are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation.
  • It is apparent that there are sanctuary sites such as the central nervous system where imatinib does not achieve adequate concentrations.
  • The jejunal primary was resected and after unsuccessful cytoreductive chemotherapy, the liver metastases were also resected in December 1999.
  • Biopsy confirmed recurrent GIST.
  • MRI and lumbar puncture excluded central nervous system involvement.
  • The symptoms improved with objective PET and CT scan response until December 2002 when the patient developed a right-sided foot drop.
  • Control of the systemic GIST was temporarily lost on reduction of the dose of imatinib (due to limited drug supply) but on increasing the dose back to 800 mg per day, systemic disease was stabilized for a period of time before generalised progression occurred.
  • CONCLUSION: This case illustrates that the brain can be a sanctuary site to treatment of GISTs with imatinib.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors / drug therapy. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors / pathology. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15473910.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC524360
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3. Quinn JA, Reardon DA, Friedman AH, Rich JN, Sampson JH, Vredenburgh J, Gururangan S, Provenzale JM, Walker A, Schweitzer H, Bigner DD, Tourt-Uhlig S, Herndon JE 2nd, Affronti ML, Jackson S, Allen D, Ziegler K, Bohlin C, Lentz C, Friedman HS: Phase 1 trial of irinotecan plus BCNU in patients with progressive or recurrent malignant glioma. Neuro Oncol; 2004 Apr;6(2):145-53
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase 1 trial of irinotecan plus BCNU in patients with progressive or recurrent malignant glioma.
  • Irinotecan is a topoisomerase I inhibitor previously shown to be active in the treatment of malignant glioma.
  • We now report the results of a phase 1 trial of irinotecan plus BCNU, or 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, for patients with recurrent or progressive MG.
  • Irinotecan dose escalation occurred independently within 2 strata: patients receiving enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and patients not receiving EIAEDs.
  • Treatment cycles consisted of 4 weekly administrations of irinotecan followed by a 2-week rest with dose escalation in cohorts of 3 to 6 patients.
  • Dose-limiting toxicity was evenly distributed among the following organ systems: pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, neurologic, infectious, and hematologic, without a clear predominance of toxicity involving any one organ system.
  • There was no evidence of increasing incidence of toxicity involving one organ system as irinotecan dose was escalated.

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  • (PMID = 15134629.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8517
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuro-oncology
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / NS20023; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR 30; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P50 NS020023; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA11898; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P20 CA096890; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R37 CA011898; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1 P20 CA096890
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 7673326042 / irinotecan; U68WG3173Y / Carmustine; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1871988
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4. Badreddine RJ, Prasad GA, Wang KK, Song LM, Buttar NS, Dunagan KT, Lutzke LS, Borkenhagen LS: Prevalence and predictors of recurrent neoplasia after ablation of Barrett's esophagus. Gastrointest Endosc; 2010 Apr;71(4):697-703
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prevalence and predictors of recurrent neoplasia after ablation of Barrett's esophagus.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the rate and predictors of dysplasia/neoplasia recurrence after photodynamic therapy (PDT) in BE.
  • Entry histology, demographics, length of BE, presence and length of diaphragmatic hernia, EMR, stricture formation, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, smoking, and the presence of nondysplastic BE or squamous epithelium were assessed for univariate associations.
  • Time-to-recurrence analysis was done by using Cox proportional hazards regression.
  • Indication for ablation was low-grade dysplasia (53 patients, 20%), high-grade dysplasia (152 patients, 58%), and intramucosal cancer (56 patients, 21%).
  • Median time to recurrence was 17 months (interquartile range 8-45 months).

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 19959164.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6779
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastrointest. Endosc.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K08 DK076845-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA097048-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA097048; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA111603; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R03 CA135991; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K08 DK076845-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK076845-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R03CA135991-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA111603-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K08 DK076845; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA097048-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA111603-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA097048; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK076845-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA111603-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS248054; NLM/ PMC2981349
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5. Stone RL, Sood AK, Coleman RL: Collateral damage: toxic effects of targeted antiangiogenic therapies in ovarian cancer. Lancet Oncol; 2010 May;11(5):465-75
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Collateral damage: toxic effects of targeted antiangiogenic therapies in ovarian cancer.
  • First-line chemotherapy fails in more than 20% of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer and about 40-50% of women who respond to initial treatment relapse within 2 years.
  • In the recurrent setting, second-line chemotherapeutic agents have a 15-20% response rate with no cures.
  • Fortunately, clinical investigations that have assessed the efficacy of new, biologically targeted therapies have reinvigorated therapeutic options for patients living with ovarian and other malignancies.
  • In view of the fact that ovarian cancer is one of the most angiogenic neoplasms, there is great hope that implementing targeted agents with antiangiogenic properties will improve outcomes.
  • However, as experience grows with the antitumour activity of these drugs, new toxic effects are emerging.
  • The effects of antiangiogenic agents on molecules and processes that also have physiologically important roles in healthy tissues are at the crux of these toxic effects, or "collateral damage".
  • This review discusses the leading toxic effects encountered and anticipated in clinical investigation and practice with antiangiogenic agents in patients with ovarian cancer, with particular focus on potential management strategies.

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  • [Copyright] 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20226736.001).
  • [ISSN] 1474-5488
  • [Journal-full-title] The Lancet. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA101642; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109298; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA110793; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA083639; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA 101642; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 109298; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50CA083639; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 110793
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 15C2VL427D / aflibercept; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor
  • [Number-of-references] 108
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS322143; NLM/ PMC3199129
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6. Stathopoulos GP, Boulikas T, Kourvetaris A, Stathopoulos J: Liposomal oxaliplatin in the treatment of advanced cancer: a phase I study. Anticancer Res; 2006 Mar-Apr;26(2B):1489-93
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  • [Title] Liposomal oxaliplatin in the treatment of advanced cancer: a phase I study.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with advanced disease of the gastrointestinal system were included in the study.
  • All patients had been pretreated with standard chemotherapy according to established guidelines.
  • At entry, all patients had recurrent or progressive disease (stage IV gastrointestinal cancers: colorectal, gastric and pancreatic).
  • The treatment was given once weekly for 8 weeks.
  • Lipoxal was well-tolerated and greatly reduced all the other side-effects of oxaliplatin, especially myelotoxicity and gastrointestinal tract toxicities.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Organoplatinum Compounds / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Animals. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Liposomes. Male. Middle Aged. Patient Compliance

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  • (PMID = 16619562.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Liposomes; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin
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7. Vredenburgh JJ, Desjardins A, Reardon DA, Friedman HS: Experience with irinotecan for the treatment of malignant glioma. Neuro Oncol; 2009 Feb;11(1):80-91
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  • [Title] Experience with irinotecan for the treatment of malignant glioma.
  • Chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgical excision are core components in the management of malignant glioma.
  • However, chemotherapy, even with the most active regimens currently available, achieves only modest improvement in overall survival.
  • Novel agents and new approaches to therapy are required to improve clinical outcomes.
  • Irinotecan, a first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer and an agent with high activity against solid tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, is an inhibitor of topoisomerase I, a critical enzyme needed for DNA transcription.
  • Irinotecan crosses the blood-brain barrier and, in preclinical investigations, has demonstrated cytotoxic activity against central nervous system tumor xenografts.
  • Studies in adult and pediatric patients with recurrent, intractable malignant glioma have evaluated irinotecan as monotherapy and in combination with other agents, including temozolomide, carmustine, thalidomide, and bevacizumab.
  • Studies of irinotecan in combination with other medications, particularly temozolomide and bevacizumab, have yielded promising results.
  • When administered concurrently with enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs, the dosage must be increased to compensate for enhanced cytochrome CY3A4/5 enzyme activity.
  • Irinotecan-based chemotherapy of malignant glioma merits further study.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Glioma / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 18784279.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8517
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuro-oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Topoisomerase I Inhibitors; 7673326042 / irinotecan; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
  • [Number-of-references] 80
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2718962
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8. Yagi M, Watanabe S, Yoshino S, Hazama S, Suga T, Nakazawa S: [Provision for adverse effect of S-1 containing chemotherapy in patients with advanced digestive cancer--combination with superfine dispersed lentinan]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 Mar;37(3):457-62

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Provision for adverse effect of S-1 containing chemotherapy in patients with advanced digestive cancer--combination with superfine dispersed lentinan].
  • PURPOSE: Recently, in drug therapy for patients with advanced digestive cancer, S-1 (tegafur x gimeracil x oteracil potassium) alone or S-1 combined with other chemotherapeutic agents (S-1+alpha) is prescribed.
  • However, many patients are often forced to give up long-term S-1 treatment owing to high incidence rates of adverse effects.
  • SUBJECTS AND METHOD: The subjects were 72 patients who had unresectable or recurrent advanced digestive cancer.
  • The subject group consisted of 45 men and 27 women, with a median age of 64 (31-85) years; 29 gastric, 25 colorectal, 10 pancreatic and 8 other digestive cancer patients.
  • Adverse events and overall survival time were evaluated according to the CTCAE ver 3.0 and the Kaplan-Meier method, respectively.
  • Adverse events associated with S-1 or S-1+ alpha were observed in 9 patients (12.5% ) (11 events) out of 72 patients.
  • In no gastrointestinal toxicity associated with S-1 or S-1+alpha was observed, which was estimated to be an effect of SDL combination.
  • Mean survival times in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer patients were 9.
  • CONCLUSIONS: From the results of the present study, SDL is considered completely free of anything harmful to advanced digestive cancer patients and is effective for the suppression of adverse effects of S-1 or S-1+alpha therapy.
  • It is suggested that SDL can prolong the administration period of S-1 and, as a result, contribute to prolongation of survival in patients with advanced digestive cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Digestive System Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lentinan / administration & dosage. Oxonic Acid / administration & dosage. Oxonic Acid / adverse effects. Tegafur / administration & dosage. Tegafur / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Drug Combinations. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pancreatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 20332683.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 37339-90-5 / Lentinan; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid
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9. Koizumi W, Akiya T, Sato A, Yamaguchi K, Sakuyama T, Nakayama N, Tanabe S, Higuchi K, Sasaki T, Sekikawa T, Tokyo Cooperative Oncology Group (TCOG GI Group): Second-line chemotherapy with biweekly paclitaxel after failure of fluoropyrimidine-based treatment in patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer: a report from the gastrointestinal oncology group of the Tokyo cooperative oncology group, TCOG GC-0501 trial. Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2009 Nov;39(11):713-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. TAXOL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Second-line chemotherapy with biweekly paclitaxel after failure of fluoropyrimidine-based treatment in patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer: a report from the gastrointestinal oncology group of the Tokyo cooperative oncology group, TCOG GC-0501 trial.
  • OBJECTIVE: A multicenter trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of paclitaxel every 2 weeks in patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer who had previously received fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: The subjects were patients with gastric cancer who had disease progression or recurrence while receiving fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy.
  • Previous treatment included S-1 (1 M tegafur-0.4 M gimestat-1 M otastat potassium) monotherapy in 32 patients and S-1-based combination therapy in 5.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Biweekly paclitaxel seemed to be one of the useful chemotherapies after failure of fluoropyrimidine-based treatment in patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Paclitaxel / adverse effects. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Anorexia / chemically induced. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Fatigue / chemically induced. Female. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases / chemically induced. Pyrimidines / administration & dosage. Tokyo. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19812061.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-3621
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Pyrimidines; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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10. Milani V, Pazos M, Issels RD, Buecklein V, Rahman S, Tschoep K, Schaffer P, Wilkowski R, Duehmke E, Schaffer M: Radiochemotherapy in combination with regional hyperthermia in preirradiated patients with recurrent rectal cancer. Strahlenther Onkol; 2008 Mar;184(3):163-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

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  • [Title] Radiochemotherapy in combination with regional hyperthermia in preirradiated patients with recurrent rectal cancer.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Encouraging results of phase II studies combining chemotherapy with radiotherapy have been published.
  • In this study, the results of a multimodal salvage therapy including radiochemotherapy (RCT) and regional hyperthermia (RHT) in preirradiated patients with recurrent rectal cancer are reported.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients enrolled had received previous pelvic irradiation (median dose 50.4 Gy).
  • The median time interval between prior radiotherapy and the onset of local recurrence was 34 months.
  • The combined treatment consisted of reirradiation with a median dose of 39.6 Gy (30.0-45.0 Gy), delivered in fractions of 1.8 Gy/day.
  • 5-fluorouracil was given as continuous infusion 350 mg/m(2)/day five times weekly, and RHT (BSD-2000 system) was applied twice a week within 1 h after radiotherapy.
  • RESULTS: 24 patients (median age 59 years) with a previously irradiated locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum were enrolled.
  • Grade 3 gastrointestinal acute toxicity was observed in 12.5% of the patients.
  • CONCLUSION: RCT combined with RHT is an efficient salvage therapy showing high efficacy with acceptable toxicity and can be recommended as treatment option for this unfavorable group of preirradiated patients with local recurrence of rectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Hyperthermia, Induced. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Rectal Neoplasms / therapy. Salvage Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Confidence Intervals. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Pain / etiology. Pain / prevention & control. Patient Selection. Radiotherapy Dosage. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Rectum / pathology. Survival Analysis. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 18330513.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-7158
  • [Journal-full-title] Strahlentherapie und Onkologie : Organ der Deutschen Röntgengesellschaft ... [et al]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Strahlenther Onkol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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11. Gu Y, Shu Y, Xu Q: A study of weekly paclitaxel plus 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin for patients with advanced or recurrent inoperable gastric cancer. Biomed Pharmacother; 2009 May;63(4):293-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A study of weekly paclitaxel plus 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin for patients with advanced or recurrent inoperable gastric cancer.
  • PURPOSE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of weekly paclitaxel plus 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin for patients with advanced or recurrent inoperable gastric cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: The eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed advanced gastric cancer or recurrent inoperable gastric cancer.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The combination chemotherapy consisting of weekly paclitaxel plus 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin was effective and well tolerated in patients with advanced and recurrent inoperable gastric cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Bone Marrow Diseases / chemically induced. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / adverse effects. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / adverse effects. Gastrointestinal Diseases / chemically induced. Humans. Infection / etiology. Infusions, Intravenous. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Paclitaxel / adverse effects. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases / chemically induced. Salvage Therapy

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  • (PMID = 18848761.001).
  • [ISSN] 1950-6007
  • [Journal-full-title] Biomedicine & pharmacotherapy = Biomédecine & pharmacothérapie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biomed. Pharmacother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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12. Tsujitani S, Fukuda K, Kaibara N: Combination chemotherapy of S-1 and low-dose cisplatin for advanced gastric cancer. Gastric Cancer; 2003;6 Suppl 1:50-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Combination chemotherapy of S-1 and low-dose cisplatin for advanced gastric cancer.
  • The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of this novel anticancer drug combined with low-dose cisplatin (CDDP).
  • METHODS: Fifteen patients with unresectable and recurrent gastric cancer were enrolled.
  • Five or 10 mg CDDP was infused three times each week (days 1, 3, 5) during S-1 administration on hospitalization, and once each week (day 1) at the outpatient clinic.
  • Patients' backgrounds, response rates, response durations, and time to progression were investigated.
  • The median response duration of the 8 responders was 4 months, and the time to progression was 3.3 months.
  • Although gastrointestinal adverse reactions appeared in 40% (6/15), all reactions were grades 1 and 2.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Combination chemotherapy of S-1 and low-dose CDDP is expected to be a useful chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Oxonic Acid / administration & dosage. Pyridines / administration & dosage. Stomach Neoplasms / therapy. Tegafur / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Digestive System Surgical Procedures. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Combinations. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Incidence. Japan. Liver Neoplasms / diagnosis. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Liver Neoplasms / therapy. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Peritoneal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Peritoneal Neoplasms / secondary. Peritoneal Neoplasms / therapy. Retrospective Studies. Severity of Illness Index. Time Factors. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Ultrasonography, Interventional

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  • (PMID = 12775021.001).
  • [ISSN] 1436-3291
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastric cancer : official journal of the International Gastric Cancer Association and the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastric Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Pyridines; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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13. Takahashi N, Kashiwagi H, Iwabuchi S, Yamazaki Y, Yanaga K: Phase I study of a weekly schedule of fixed-dose paclitaxel and escalating doses of cisplatin for recurrent or unresectable gastric cancer in Japan. Am J Clin Oncol; 2005 Jun;28(3):242-7
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  • [Title] Phase I study of a weekly schedule of fixed-dose paclitaxel and escalating doses of cisplatin for recurrent or unresectable gastric cancer in Japan.
  • The authors objective was to determine the toxicities and maximum tolerated dose of a dose-dense schedule of fixed-dose paclitaxel and escalating doses of cisplatin in patients with recurrent or unresectable carcinoma of the stomach.
  • At the dose of 80 mg/m2 paclitaxel and 25 mg/m2 cisplatin, all 3 patients developed dose-limiting toxicity of the gastrointestinal tract.
  • There were no treatment-related deaths.
  • Weekly paclitaxel at a dose of 80 mg/m2 infused over 1 hour, followed by an infusion of 20 mg/m2 cisplatin is recommended for further study in patients with recurrent or unresectable gastric cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Administration Schedule. Feasibility Studies. Female. Gastrectomy. Gastrointestinal Diseases / chemically induced. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Japan. Leukopenia / chemically induced. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Nervous System Diseases / chemically induced. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Paclitaxel / adverse effects. Peritoneal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Peritoneal Neoplasms / secondary. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15923795.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-453X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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14. Hurteau JA, Brady MF, Darcy KM, McGuire WP, Edmonds P, Pearl ML, Ivanov I, Tewari KS, Mannel RS, Zanotti K, Benbrook DM: Randomized phase III trial of tamoxifen versus thalidomide in women with biochemical-recurrent-only epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal carcinoma after a complete response to first-line platinum/taxane chemotherapy with an evaluation of serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF): A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study. Gynecol Oncol; 2010 Dec;119(3):444-50
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  • [Title] Randomized phase III trial of tamoxifen versus thalidomide in women with biochemical-recurrent-only epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal carcinoma after a complete response to first-line platinum/taxane chemotherapy with an evaluation of serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF): A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study.
  • PURPOSE: To compare progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicities of thalidomide versus tamoxifen and to evaluate serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in biochemical-recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer, primary peritoneal cancer or fallopian tube carcinoma (EOC/PPC/FTC).
  • Women with FIGO stages III and IV, histologically confirmed EOC/PPC/FTC who were free of disease following first-line chemotherapy were randomized to oral thalidomide 200mg daily with escalation to a maximum of 400 mg or tamoxifen 20mg orally twice daily for up to 1 year, progression or adverse effect prohibited further treatment.
  • VEGF was quantified by ELISA in pre and post-treatment serum.
  • The most common grades 3 and 4 toxicities were constitutional (12%), somnolence (12%), pulmonary (9%), venous thromboembolism (VTE) (6%) and peripheral neurologic (6%) for thalidomide, with VTE (1.4%) and gastrointestinal (1.4%) for tamoxifen.
  • Serum VEGF was not associated with clinical characteristics, treatment, PFS or OS.
  • [MeSH-major] Fallopian Tube Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Peritoneal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tamoxifen / therapeutic use. Thalidomide / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Angiogenesis Inhibitors / adverse effects. Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bridged Compounds / administration & dosage. CA-125 Antigen / blood. Disease-Free Survival. Endpoint Determination. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Taxoids / administration & dosage. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / blood

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20846715.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-6859
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Bridged Compounds; 0 / CA-125 Antigen; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 0 / Taxoids; 0 / VEGFA protein, human; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen; 1605-68-1 / taxane; 4Z8R6ORS6L / Thalidomide
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15. Shibata SI, Pezner R, Chu D, Doroshow JH, Chow WA, Leong LA, Margolin KA, McNamara MV, Morgan RJ Jr, Raschko JW, Somlo G, Tetef ML, Yen Y, Synold TW, Wagman L, Vora N, Carroll M, Lin S, Longmate J: A study of radiotherapy modalities combined with continuous 5-FU infusion for locally advanced gastrointestinal malignancies. Eur J Surg Oncol; 2004 Aug;30(6):650-7
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  • [Title] A study of radiotherapy modalities combined with continuous 5-FU infusion for locally advanced gastrointestinal malignancies.
  • AIM: We describe the feasibility of combining infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT).
  • METHODS: Patients with surgically resectable locally advanced gastrointestinal cancers were treated concurrently during surgery with IORT and a 72 h infusion of 5-FU.
  • Patients without previous external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) were subsequently treated with EBRT (40-50Gy) concurrent with a 21-day continuous infusion of 5-FU.
  • Pancreatic, gastric, duodenal, ampullary, recurrent colorectal, and recurrent anal cancer were included.
  • RESULTS: During IORT/5-FU, no chemotherapy-related grade III or IV hematologic or gastrointestinal toxicity was noted.
  • One of nine patients who received post-operative radiation required a treatment break.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with a combination of IORT and 5-FU followed by EBRT and 5-FU is feasible.
  • However, long-term complications may be increased in previously irradiated recurrent pelvic tumours.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Digestive System Surgical Procedures / methods. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / therapy. Radiotherapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Feasibility Studies. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Intraoperative Period. Male. Middle Aged. Pilot Projects. Radiotherapy, High-Energy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15256240.001).
  • [ISSN] 0748-7983
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of surgical oncology : the journal of the European Society of Surgical Oncology and the British Association of Surgical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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16. Randall-Whitis L, Helm CW, Toler CR, Martin RS, Metzinger DS, Edwards RP: Secondary surgical cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion (SSC-HIPEC) for recurrent gynecologic malignancies. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):5096

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  • [Title] Secondary surgical cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion (SSC-HIPEC) for recurrent gynecologic malignancies.
  • : 5096 Background: Survival of women with recurrent gynecologic cancers remains poor with traditional treatments.
  • Intraperitoneal hyperthermic chemotherapy following surgical surgical cytoreduction of intra-abdominal tumor (SSC-HIPEC) has not been widely used to treat gynecologic cancers despite promising results in recurrent gastrointestinal cancers.
  • Closed-system intraperitoneal perfusion of cisplatin (100 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) heated to a minimum of 40<sup>o</sup>C (104<sup>o</sup>) for 90 minutes was performed following cytoreductive surgery.
  • Mean operative time was 9.7 hours (6-14 hrs) and mean blood loss 1000cc (350-2400cc).
  • CONCLUSIONS: SSC-HIPEC is well tolerated by heavily pre-treated patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer, and has potential to significantly prolong survival.
  • This treatment warrants further investigation as a second-line therapy in a Phase II design.

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  • (PMID = 28015336.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Brüwer M, Hesselmann S, Schäfer U, Willich N, Senninger N: [Intraoperative radiotherapy as multimodal therapy approach in epithelial tumors of the gastrointestinal system]. Chirurg; 2000 Jun;71(6):682-91

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Intraoperative radiotherapy as multimodal therapy approach in epithelial tumors of the gastrointestinal system].
  • [Transliterated title] Die intraoperative Radiotherapie als Bestandteil multimodaler Therapiekonzepte bei epithelialen Tumoren des Gastrointestinaltrakts.
  • Surgery alone often fails to achieve local control in advanced gastrointestinal tumors.
  • With multimodal therapy approaches, both local tumor control and long-term survival appear to be improved.
  • Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is an attempt to achieve higher doses of irradiation while dose-limiting structures are surgically displaced.
  • It has been shown previously that both local tumor control and long-term survival are improved in patients undergoing surgery combined with IORT for both primary and recurrent rectal carcinoma.
  • In advanced gastric carcinoma, IORT has achieved optimistic survival results in a few studies.
  • In locally advanced pancreatic cancer, an apparent improvement in local control has been noted with IORT, but survival has not been prolonged because of a high incidence of both liver and peritoneal metastases.
  • The data concerning IORT for esophageal carcinoma are not yet sufficient to allow judgement.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / surgery. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Dogs. Humans. Intraoperative Period. Pancreatic Neoplasms / mortality. Pancreatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / surgery. Prospective Studies. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Rectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Rectal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Rectal Neoplasms / surgery. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Stomach Neoplasms / surgery. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 10948735.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-4722
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Chirurg; Zeitschrift für alle Gebiete der operativen Medizen
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chirurg
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Number-of-references] 70
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18. Hasegawa H, Minagawa R, Hamatsu T, Honbou T, Ushijima C, Ikebe M, Kitamura M, Miura N: [A case of duodenal penetration by indwelling catheter during hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2009 Nov;36(12):2082-4
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  • [Title] [A case of duodenal penetration by indwelling catheter during hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy].
  • We report a patient with hepatic metastasis of descending colon cancer who underwent hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and CDDP, with an indwelling catheter and port system by GDA coil method.
  • Considering the possibility of its recurrence, the catheter-port system remained in her.
  • Two and half years later, the recurrent hepatic metastasis was recognised and the hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy was fulfilled again.
  • The tumor obviously reduced and the same treatment was continued.
  • Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a projection around the splitting catheter in the duodenal bulb.
  • With this experience, special attention for the catheter port system must be taken if one considers a long-term treatment.
  • Thereby, we report on the complications of the catheter-port system.
  • [MeSH-major] Catheters, Indwelling / adverse effects. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Duodenum / injuries. Infusions, Intra-Arterial / methods. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans

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  • (PMID = 20037330.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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19. Treish I, Schwartz R, Lindley C: Pharmacology and therapeutic use of trastuzumab in breast cancer. Am J Health Syst Pharm; 2000 Nov 15;57(22):2063-76; quiz 2077-9
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  • [Title] Pharmacology and therapeutic use of trastuzumab in breast cancer.
  • The discovery of HER2 gene amplification in up to 30% of women with breast cancer led to the development of trastuzumab, a humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody directed against the HER2-receptor protein on breast cancer cells.
  • In large, multicenter trials of trastuzumab as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy as first-line or second-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer (MBC), response rates have ranged from 12% to 23% for single-agent trastuzumab and from 25% to 62% for trastuzumab plus chemotherapy.
  • Trastuzumab increased time to disease progression and survival time when administered in combination with chemotherapy.
  • The National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines for the treatment of breast cancer now include trastuzumab and paclitaxel as an option for patients with MBC or recurrent breast cancer in which the HER2-receptor protein is overexpressed.
  • Most clinical trials continued treatment until disease progression occurred.
  • Adverse effects include infusion-related reactions manifested by fever and chills, exacerbation of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal toxicity and myelosuppression, and cardiotoxicity.
  • Trastuzumab, either as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy, can be an effective therapeutic option for MBC patients who overexpress the HER2-receptor protein and has changed the standard of care.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 11098307.001).
  • [ISSN] 1079-2082
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of health-system pharmacy : AJHP : official journal of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Health Syst Pharm
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; P188ANX8CK / Trastuzumab
  • [Number-of-references] 85
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20. Jacobs NL, Que FG, Miller RC, Vege SS, Farnell MB, Jatoi A: Cumulative morbidity and late mortality in long-term survivors of exocrine pancreas cancer. J Gastrointest Cancer; 2009;40(1-2):46-50
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  • [Title] Cumulative morbidity and late mortality in long-term survivors of exocrine pancreas cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Less than 5% of patients diagnosed with exocrine pancreas cancer live to be long-term survivors (5+ years after diagnosis).
  • As a result, few studies have focused on these patients' cumulative, cancer-related morbidity and late mortality.
  • METHODS: One thousand eight hundred thirty consecutive patients who had exocrine pancreas cancer had been seen at the Mayo Clinic between 1995 and 2001 and who had well-documented evidence of having lived for 5+ years were the focus of this study.
  • Eighty-one (95%) were treated with surgery, 42 (49%) with chemotherapy, and 41 (48%) with radiation.
  • Twenty-nine patients were deceased at the time of this report; 15 (18%) died from recurrent pancreas cancer more than 5 years after their original diagnosis.
  • CONCLUSION: Long-term survivors of exocrine pancreas cancer confront notable rates of cumulative morbidity, which include subsequent major surgeries, major infections, diabetes, depression, and second malignancies, as well as late deaths from pancreas cancer itself.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Digestive System Surgical Procedures. Female. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Middle Aged. Morbidity. Radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 19728180.001).
  • [ISSN] 1941-6636
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastrointestinal cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gastrointest Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K24CA131099
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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21. Trujillo-Santos J, Nieto JA, Ruíz-Gamietea A, López-Jiménez L, García-Bragado F, Quintavalla R, Monreal M, RIETE Investigators: Bleeding complications associated with anticoagulant therapy in patients with cancer. Thromb Res; 2010 Apr;125 Suppl 2:S58-61
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  • [Title] Bleeding complications associated with anticoagulant therapy in patients with cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Cancer patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) have an increased incidence of bleeding complications while on anticoagulant therapy.
  • We tried to identify which cancer patients are at a higher risk for major bleeding.
  • RESULTS: Up to May 2009, 4,709 patients with active cancer had been enrolled in RIETE registry.
  • During the first 3 months of anticoagulant therapy, 200 (4.2%) patients developed major bleeding.
  • Then, 38 (0.8%) further patients bled beyond the first 90 days of therapy, 3 bled after withholding anticoagulant therapy.
  • The most common sites of bleeding were the gastrointestinal tract (118 patients, 49%), genitourinary system (43 patients, 18%) and the brain (27 patients, 11%).
  • In all, 160 patients (66%) died within 30 days after bleeding: 88 (55%) died of bleeding, 3 (1.9%) died of recurrent pulmonary embolism.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Major bleeding is a frequent and severe complication in cancer patients with VTE, even beyond the third month.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticoagulants / adverse effects. Hemorrhage / chemically induced. Neoplasms / complications. Venous Thromboembolism / complications. Venous Thromboembolism / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 20434007.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-2472
  • [Journal-full-title] Thrombosis research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Thromb. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticoagulants
  • [Investigator] Monreal M; Decousus H; Prandoni P; Brenner B; Barba R; Di Micco P; Guillot K; Anglés A; Alcalde A; Arcelus JI; Barba R; Blanco A; Barrón M; Bueso T; Càmara T; Casado I; Cisneros E; Delgado C; Duràn M; Falgà C; Fernàndez-Capitàn C; Font C; Gabriel F; Gallego P; García-Bragado F; Guijarro R; Gutiérrez J; Hermosa MJ; Hernàndez L; Hernàndez-Huerta D; Jiménez S; Jiménez-Gil M; Lecumberri R; Lobo JL; López L; Lorenzo A; Madridano O; Maestre A; Marchena PJ; Martín-Villasclaras JJ; Monreal M; Nauffal MD; Nieto JA; Núñez MJ; Ogea JL; Oribe M; Rabuñal R; Riera-Mestre A; Rodríguez EM; Romàn P; Rosa V; Rubio S; Ruiz-Gamietea A; Ruiz-Giménez N; Sahuquillo JC; Samperiz AL; Sànchez Muñoz-Torrero JF; Sànchez R; Soler S; Soler C; Tiberio G; Tirado R; Toda M; Todolí JA; Tolosa C; Trujillo J; Uresandi F; Valdés M; Valdés V; Valle R; Vela J; Villalta J; Boccalon H; Farge-Bancel D; Le Corvoisier P; Rivron-Guillot K; Brenner B; Zeltser D; Barillari G; Barillari A; Ciammaichella M; Dalla Valle F; Di Micco P; Duce R; Ferrari A; Pasca S; Poggio R; Prandoni P; Quintavalla R; Rota L; Schenone A; Tiraferri E; Visonà A
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22. Campos SM, Berlin ST, Parker LM, Chen WY, Bunnell CA, Atkinson T, Lee J, Matulonis U, Hirsch MS, Harris L, Krasner CN: Phase I trial of liposomal doxorubicin and ZD1839 in patients with refractory gynecological malignancies or metastatic breast cancer. Int J Clin Oncol; 2010 Aug;15(4):390-8
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  • [Title] Phase I trial of liposomal doxorubicin and ZD1839 in patients with refractory gynecological malignancies or metastatic breast cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin has activity in both breast and ovarian cancer.
  • Preclinical data noted that ZD1839 acts synergistically with chemotherapy.
  • Given the lack of cross-resistance between these two agents, a phase I trial was initiated examining the safety and efficacy of the combination of liposomal doxorubicin and ZD1839 in patients with recurrent gynecologic or metastatic breast cancer.
  • METHODS: Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined within the first two cycles of treatment.
  • Serious adverse events (SAEs) included one patient with mental status changes believed secondary to disease progression and two central nervous system (CNS) bleeds believed to be unrelated to the combination of study agents.
  • Toxicities were generally mild except for skin and gastrointestinal toxicity.
  • The best response to therapy included four partial responses and 20 patients with stable disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Liposomal doxorubicin with ZD1839 is an active regimen but is associated with increased skin toxicity in patients with advanced breast and gynecologic cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Genital Neoplasms, Female / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Boston. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Quinazolines / administration & dosage. Salvage Therapy. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20405155.001).
  • [ISSN] 1437-7772
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Quinazolines; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; S65743JHBS / gefitinib
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23. Ito S, Kodera Y, Mochizuki Y, Yamamura Y: [Feasibility study of weekly paclitaxel as second-line chemotherapy against 5-FU-refractory gastric carcinoma]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2005 Oct;32(10):1427-30
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

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  • [Title] [Feasibility study of weekly paclitaxel as second-line chemotherapy against 5-FU-refractory gastric carcinoma].
  • The present study investigated the efficacy and feasibility of weekly paclitaxel for advanced/recurrent gastric cancer.
  • Subjects comprised 23 patients with advanced/recurrent gastric cancer who had been treated using a 5-FU-containing regimen.
  • Paclitaxel was administered at a dose of 80 mg/m(2), 3 times every 4 weeks.
  • The mean number of treatment cycles was 6.4 (range, 1-28).
  • Among 13 patients without measurable lesions, 3 cases revealed improvements on colonography, 1 case displayed decreased ascites on abdominal computed tomography, and 1 case recovered from disseminated intravascular coagulopathy due to bone metastases.
  • Median survival time was 258 days, and median time to progression was 140 days.
  • All non-hematological toxicity was low-grade, including that involving the gastrointestinal system.
  • Weekly paclitaxel appears effective and safe for 5-FU-refractory gastric cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Fluorouracil / pharmacology. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Administration Schedule. Feasibility Studies. Humans. Leukopenia / chemically induced. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 16227742.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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24. Takahashi K, Mori T, Ohue M, Yamaguchi T: [The prevention of negative side effects in homeochemotherapy]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2002 Jul;29(7):1311-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

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  • We conducted continuous hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (CHAI) in 122 cases of unresectable hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer.
  • We continuously administered 5-FU at 250 mg/day for 7 days using a pump system.
  • We also conducted systemic chemotherapy (FP therapy) in 145 cases of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer in our outpatient clinic.
  • Because we had established an observation system for emergency cases, there were no fatal accidents.
  • With FP therapy, about 40% of patients had gastrointestinal discomfort, but the rate of those with higher than grade 3 was low (1-2%).
  • We conclude that it is very important to establish a hospital system to respond quickly to any negative effects of homeochemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Pain / etiology. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Home Care Services, Hospital-Based. Home Infusion Therapy / adverse effects. Infusion Pumps, Implantable / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 12146017.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; CF regimen
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25. Shirasaka T, Taguchi T: [Timeline from discovery of 5-FU to development of an oral anticancer agent S-1 and its drug concept]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2006 Jun;33 Suppl 1:4-18
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Timeline from discovery of 5-FU to development of an oral anticancer agent S-1 and its drug concept].
  • Approximately 50 years have elapsed since their discovery of 5-FU in 1957 before eventually elucidating the mechanisms by which the drug exerts its pharmacological actions and provokes its adverse reactions.
  • Namely, 5-FU is a typical antimetabolite with strong time dependency, and continuous venous infusion(CVI) is considered to be its optimal regimen.
  • The following facts may be mentioned to explain why such a long period of time has been spent to reach this level of research:.
  • For the last 30 years, we paid attention especially to 5-FU among chemotherapeutic agents for cancer and have sought for a long-lasting therapeutic modality which maintains quality of life of the patient and patient compliance by considering the balancing between its effects and adverse reactions.
  • Consequently, we concretized an innovative therapeutic drug, TS-1 (S-1).
  • To date, we took the initiative in the world to devise S-1, the first self-rescuing concept(SRC)-based anticancer agent with dual actions, i.e., enhancement of pharmacological actions of 5-FU and reduction of its adverse reactions, by making use of the biochemical and enzymological properties of 5-FU and by combining FT, which is gradually converted to 5-FU in the body, with a 5-FU's effect-enhancing substance and a 5-FU's adverse reaction-reducing substance.
  • S-1 is an oral anticancer agent in capsule, in which the following 2 modulators for 5-FU are combined to FT: one is CDHP(5-chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine) which increases blood concentrations and enhances pharmacological actions of 5-FU by potently inhibiting the degradation of 5-FU; and another is Oxo(potassium oxonate) which is localized in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract after oral administration and reduces GI toxicities provoked by 5-FU.
  • Our conception to develop an SRC-based therapeutic drug and the preclinical concepts validated by numerous basic studies were demonstrated also in the clinical trials.
  • In January 1999, S-1 was approved for the treatment of advanced and recurrent gastric cancers through the priority review system.
  • From 2001 to 2005, S-1 was approved for the treatment of head and neck cancer, colon cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer.
  • S-1 has been applied to acquire its expanded indications for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and biliary tract cancer.
  • We are confident that the combined regimen of S-1 with other anticancer agents and with other therapeutic modalities will contribute to the routine medical practice of cancer treatment in the future.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Combinations. Drug Synergism. Humans. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / metabolism. Pharmaceutical Preparations

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  • (PMID = 16897967.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Pharmaceutical Preparations; 0 / Prodrugs; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Number-of-references] 54
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26. Wang L, Wu WZ, Sun HC, Wu XF, Qin LX, Liu YK, Liu KD, Tang ZY: Mechanism of interferon alpha on inhibition of metastasis and angiogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection in nude mice. J Gastrointest Surg; 2003 Jul-Aug;7(5):587-94
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mechanism of interferon alpha on inhibition of metastasis and angiogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection in nude mice.
  • The aim of this study was to examine the mechanism of interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) on inhibition of metastasis and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).
  • The mice were killed 48 hours after the final treatment, and the parameters were evaluated.
  • The HCC intrahepatic recurrence rate, the size of the recurrent lesions, the rate of lung metastasis, the serum vascular endothelial growth factor level, and the microvessel density (immunohistochemistry) were as follows: 100%, 2136+/-794 mm(3)(mean+/-standard deviation), 100%, 265.7+/-154.7 pg/ml, and 144+/-37/HP, respectively, in the control mice, whereas these same values were 62.5%, 89+/-45 mm(3), 12.5%, 53.3+/-9.9 pg/ml, and 86+/-25/HP, respectively, in the IFN-alpha 1.5 x 10(7)U/kg treatment group (P<0.05) and 26.7%, 46+/-21 mm(3), 0%, 65.2+/-17.9 pg/ml, and 39+/-14/HP in the IFN-alpha 3 x 10(7)U/kg treatment group, respectively (P<0.05).
  • However, a significant difference was not found in the serum levels of basic fibroblast growth factor among the control and IFN-alpha treatment groups.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / drug therapy. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Liver Neoplasms, Experimental / drug therapy. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Awards and Prizes. Digestive System Surgical Procedures. Down-Regulation. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 / blood. Humans. Liver / blood supply. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Neoplasm Transplantation. Protein Isoforms / blood. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Societies, Medical. Transplantation, Heterologous. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / blood

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  • (PMID = 12850669.001).
  • [ISSN] 1091-255X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastrointestinal surgery : official journal of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gastrointest. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Protein Isoforms; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 103107-01-3 / Fibroblast Growth Factor 2
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27. Fadul CE, Kingman LS, Meyer LP, Cole BF, Eskey CJ, Rhodes CH, Roberts DW, Newton HB, Pipas JM: A phase II study of thalidomide and irinotecan for treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. J Neurooncol; 2008 Nov;90(2):229-35
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. THALIDOMIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase II study of thalidomide and irinotecan for treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.
  • Thalidomide, an antiangiogenic agent, may play a role in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).
  • To evaluate the combination of thalidomide and irinotecan, we conducted a phase II trial in adults with newly-diagnosed or recurrent GBM.
  • The intention to treat group with recurrent disease included 16 patients who had a 6-month PFS of 19% (95% CI: 4-46%) and with newly-diagnosed disease included 10 patients who had a 6-month PFS of 40% (95% CI: 12-74%).
  • Gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was mild, but six patients (23%) experienced a venous thromboembolic complication.
  • Two patients had Grade 4 treatment-related serious adverse events that required hospitalization.
  • There were no treatment-related deaths.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / drug therapy. Glioblastoma / drug therapy. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Thalidomide / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 18661102.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA023108
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 4Z8R6ORS6L / Thalidomide; 7673326042 / irinotecan; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS539769; NLM/ PMC3885231
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