[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 25 of about 25
1. Hori T, Kondo T, Kanamori M, Tabuchi Y, Ogawa R, Zhao QL, Ahmed K, Yasuda T, Seki S, Suzuki K, Kimura T: Ionizing radiation enhances tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis through up-regulations of death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5) in human osteosarcoma cells. J Orthop Res; 2010 Jun;28(6):739-45
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ionizing radiation enhances tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis through up-regulations of death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5) in human osteosarcoma cells.
  • Despite improvements in chemotherapy and surgery in the treatment of osteosarcoma (OS), satisfactory results are still difficult to achieve.
  • Novel therapeutic modalities need to be developed for osteosarcoma treatment.
  • The combined effects of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and ionizing radiation (IR) on human OS cells were investigated.
  • IR and TRAIL treatment synergistically decreased the cell viability and enhanced apoptosis in OS cell lines.
  • These results can become the basic lines of evidence for the future treatment of OS using TRAIL with IR.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / radiation effects. Osteosarcoma / radiotherapy. Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand / genetics. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / genetics. TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cell Survival / radiation effects. Humans. Promoter Regions, Genetic. RNA, Messenger / analysis. Up-Regulation

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Osteosarcoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] (c) 2009 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  • (PMID = 20041491.001).
  • [ISSN] 1554-527X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Orthop. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; 0 / TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / TNFRSF10A protein, human
  •  go-up   go-down


2. Dickerson ME, Page RL, LaDue TA, Hauck ML, Thrall DE, Stebbins ME, Price GS: Retrospective analysis of axial skeleton osteosarcoma in 22 large-breed dogs. J Vet Intern Med; 2001 Mar-Apr;15(2):120-4
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Retrospective analysis of axial skeleton osteosarcoma in 22 large-breed dogs.
  • Medical-records of 22 large-breed dogs (>15 kg) with osteosarcoma (OSA) of the axial skeleton were reviewed to determine prevalence of metastasis and survival associated with this neoplasm.
  • All dogs were treated with more than 1 mode of therapy including palliative radiation (n = 12), definitive radiation (n = 8), surgery (n = 7), chemotherapy (n = 12), or some combination of these therapies.
  • Breed (retriever versus purebred versus mixed-breed survival was 100, 182, and 264 days, respectively) and radiation therapy protocol (survival in dogs treated with palliative radiation therapy versus those treated with definitive radiation therapy was 79 and 265 days, respectively) were significantly related to survival (P < .05).
  • Definitive radiation therapy may have a role in the treatment of axial skeleton osteosarcoma.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11300594.001).
  • [ISSN] 0891-6640
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of veterinary internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Vet. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Minard-Colin V, Kalifa C, Guinebretiere JM, Brugieres L, Dubousset J, Habrand JL, Vassal G, Hartmann O: Outcome of flat bone sarcomas (other than Ewing's) in children and adolescents: a study of 25 cases. Br J Cancer; 2004 Feb 9;90(3):613-9
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We analysed the clinical features and outcome of young patients with non-Ewing's flat bone sarcoma treated during the era of contemporary chemotherapy.
  • The characteristics and outcome of 25 patients (15 males and 10 females) with primary or radiation-related flat bone sarcoma treated in the Pediatrics Department at the Institut Gustave Roussy from 1981 to 1999 were reviewed.
  • In all, 20 patients had osteosarcoma, four chondrosarcoma and one malignant fibrous histiocytoma.
  • Radiation-associated flat bone osteosarcoma was diagnosed in 10 out of 25 cases.
  • The aim of treatment was curative for 24 patients, 23 of whom were treated with intensive chemotherapy regimens and 19 with surgery.
  • Significant adverse prognostic factors on survival included incomplete surgical resection (P=0.001) and use of regimens without pre- and postoperative chemotherapy (P=0.007).
  • Nine of the 25 patients were treated with pre- and postoperative chemotherapy and complete surgical resection.
  • Nevertheless, our results suggest a more favourable outcome since the advent of intensive chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Chondrosarcoma / drug therapy. Chondrosarcoma / pathology. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / drug therapy. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / pathology. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / pathology. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Osteosarcoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age of Onset. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 1993;29A(16):2284-91 [8110500.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1992 Nov;10(11):1737-42 [1403056.001]
  • [Cites] Med Pediatr Oncol. 1996 Mar;26(3):180-5 [8544800.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Oncol. 1996;35 Suppl 8:129-34 [9073059.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1997 Apr;(337):226-39 [9137194.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1997 Sep 15;80(6):1171-7 [9305720.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 1997 Sep;33(10):1611-8; discussion 1618-9 [9389923.001]
  • [Cites] Med Pediatr Oncol. 1998 Mar;30(3):170-4 [9434826.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1998 Feb;16(2):658-63 [9469355.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1998 Mar 1;82(5):851-9 [9486573.001]
  • [Cites] J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1999 Mar;81(3):326-38 [10199270.001]
  • [Cites] J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1999 Sep;81(5):796-802 [10530839.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Apr;17(4):1164 [10561175.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Sep;17(9):2789-95 [10561354.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2000 Jan 15;88(2):324-32 [10640964.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2000 May 1;88(9):2172-80 [10813731.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2001 Jan 1;19(1):171-82 [11134210.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2001 Feb 1;91(3):598-605 [11169944.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2001 Apr 1;91(7):1201-12 [11283918.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2001 May;(386):186-96 [11347833.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2001 Aug-Sep;23(6):340-8 [11563767.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2002 Feb 15;94(4):1069-77 [11920477.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr. 1975 Feb;86(2):254-8 [1111694.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Pathol Lab Med. 1977 Jan;101(1):14-8 [299812.001]
  • [Cites] Mayo Clin Proc. 1981 May;56(5):294-306 [6939953.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1982 Mar 15;49(6):1221-30 [6174200.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Radiol. 1982 Mar;33(2):205-21 [6279350.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1985 Mar 15;55(6):1244-55 [3855683.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1986 Mar;(204):130-4 [3006959.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1986 Mar;(204):9-24 [3456859.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1986 Jun 19;314(25):1600-6 [3520317.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1987 Jan;5(1):21-6 [3543236.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1987 Sep 3;317(10):588-93 [3475572.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1987 Aug;5(8):1178-84 [3476688.001]
  • [Cites] Rev Chir Orthop Reparatrice Appar Mot. 1987;73(4):301-6 [3477842.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Diagn Pathol. 1987 Aug;4(3):212-36 [3313606.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1987 Dec;13(12):1797-805 [3679916.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Surg Pathol. 1987 Dec;11(12):930-42 [3688300.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1990 Feb 15;65(4):1011-6 [2297650.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1990 Oct 1;66(7):1641-8 [2208016.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1991 Oct;9(10):1766-75 [1717666.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1992 Jan;10(1):5-15 [1370176.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Pathol. 1995;15(3):226-7 [7639864.001]
  • (PMID = 14760373.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2409588
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. Shaheen M, Deheshi BM, Riad S, Werier J, Holt GE, Ferguson PC, Wunder JS: Prognosis of radiation-induced bone sarcoma is similar to primary osteosarcoma. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2006 Sep;450:76-81
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognosis of radiation-induced bone sarcoma is similar to primary osteosarcoma.
  • Radiation-induced sarcoma of bone (RISB) is thought to be associated with a poor prognosis.
  • Twenty-four patients had a mean latency of 16 years between radiation for their index cancer and RISB diagnosis.
  • The most common tumor was osteosarcoma (n = 17).
  • Ten patients with localized disease treated aggressively with chemotherapy and surgical resection had estimated 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates of 58% and 69% respectively.
  • Patients who received a complete course of chemotherapy demonstrated better histologic tumor response and improved survival.
  • Functional outcome following limb sparing surgery for 10 patients with RISB was similar to a matched cohort treated for primary osteosarcoma.
  • An aggressive treatment approach for patients with RISB may provide similar rates of local recurrence and metastasis and functional outcomes compared to patients with primary osteosarcoma.
  • LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic study, level IV-1.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / mortality. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / mortality. Osteosarcoma / mortality. Sarcoma / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Osteosarcoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Soft Tissue Sarcoma.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2007 Sep;462:255; author reply 255-6 [17804967.001]
  • (PMID = 16906097.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Machak GN, Tkachev SI, Solovyev YN, Sinyukov PA, Ivanov SM, Kochergina NV, Ryjkov AD, Tepliakov VV, Bokhian BY, Glebovskaya VV: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and local radiotherapy for high-grade osteosarcoma of the extremities. Mayo Clin Proc; 2003 Feb;78(2):147-55
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and local radiotherapy for high-grade osteosarcoma of the extremities.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of radiation therapy for local control of nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of the extremities after induction chemotherapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Of 187 patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of the extremities treated with induction chemotherapy since 1986, 31 refused surgery and underwent standard, fractionated external beam radiotherapy for local control.
  • The median radiation dose to the limb was 60 Gy (range 40-68 Gy).
  • Local control was also related to response after induction chemotherapy.
  • Of 22 patients surviving without local disease progression, 19 (86%) had excellent limb function (Enneking score between 90% and 100%) at the time of most recent evaluation.
  • CONCLUSION: When used after effective induction chemotherapy for osteosarcoma of the extremities, radiation therapy can be a reliable modality to control local disease and preserve limb function.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Osteosarcoma / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Chi-Square Distribution. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Extremities. Female. Humans. Male. Radiotherapy Dosage. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Osteosarcoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] Mayo Clin Proc. 2003 Feb;78(2):145-6 [12583524.001]
  • (PMID = 12583525.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-6196
  • [Journal-full-title] Mayo Clinic proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mayo Clin. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Lewis VO, Raymond K, Mirza AN, Lin P, Yasko AW: Outcome of postradiation osteosarcoma does not correlate with chemotherapy response. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2006 Sep;450:60-6
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcome of postradiation osteosarcoma does not correlate with chemotherapy response.
  • Postradiation osteosarcoma is a rare tumor with a historically poor prognosis.
  • We ascertained the long-term outcome of patients with this disease treated in the era of contemporary chemotherapy.
  • Twenty-seven patients diagnosed with postradiation osteosarcoma and treated with chemotherapy and surgical resection from 1980-2003 were identified.
  • Demographics, anatomic location, stage, chemo- therapy, necrosis rate, recurrence and metastatic rates were recorded; Kaplan-Meier survival rates were estimated.
  • Twenty-two patients received induction chemotherapy for a mean of four cycles (range, 2-6 cycles).
  • Histologic response to chemotherapy did not correlate with survival.
  • Patients who had a latency of greater than 10 years after radiation had a better prognosis.
  • Unlike conventional osteosarcoma, response to chemotherapy (necrosis) did not have prognostic significance.
  • Current chemotherapy regimens fail to impact survival in postradiation osteosarcoma.
  • LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic study, level IV (retrospective comparative study).
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / mortality. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / mortality. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Osteosarcoma / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Osteosarcoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16906104.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Grewal S, Merchant T, Reymond R, McInerney M, Hodge C, Shearer P: Auditory late effects of childhood cancer therapy: a report from the Children's Oncology Group. Pediatrics; 2010 Apr;125(4):e938-50
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Auditory late effects of childhood cancer therapy: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.
  • Survivors at particular risk include those treated with platinum compounds (cisplatin and/or carboplatin) for neuroblastoma, hepatoblastoma, osteosarcoma, or germ-cell tumors and/or those treated with radiation that affects the ear at doses of >30 Gy for pediatric head and neck tumors.
  • The aims of the Auditory/Hearing Late Effects Task Force of the Children's Oncology Group in this report were to (1) review ototoxicity resulting from childhood cancer therapy including platinum compounds (cisplatin and carboplatin) and radiation, (2) describe briefly cochlear pathophysiology and genetics of cisplatin-related hearing loss, (3) explain the impact of hearing loss resulting from chemotherapy and radiation, and (4) offer recommendations regarding evaluation and management of pediatric patients who are at risk for treatment-related hearing loss.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Childhood Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer in Children.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Hearing Disorders and Deafness.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Hearing Problems in Children.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Science. 1984 Mar 23;223(4642):1315-7 [6701524.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1983;1(4):293-7 [6687235.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 1985 Jul;95(7 Pt 1):818-28 [4010422.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Otolaryngol. 1985 Sep-Oct;100(3-4):266-72 [4061077.001]
  • [Cites] J Laryngol Otol. 1986 Dec;100(12):1375-83 [3805877.001]
  • [Cites] Med Pediatr Oncol. 1989;17(1):48-52 [2913475.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1989 Jun;7(6):754-60 [2715805.001]
  • [Cites] Med Pediatr Oncol. 1991;19(4):295-300 [2056973.001]
  • [Cites] BMJ. 2007 Oct 20;335(7624):784-5 [17947747.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatrics. 2007 Nov;120(5):e1229-36 [17974716.001]
  • [Cites] Ear Hear. 2007 Dec;28(6):740-53 [17982362.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2007 Dec 6;357(23):2380-7 [18057340.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2008 Feb;50(2):223-6 [17278120.001]
  • [Cites] Trends Amplif. 2008 Mar;12(1):7-15 [18270174.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2008 Feb;30(2):130-4 [18376265.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2008 Jul;51(1):110-7 [18306274.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2008 Nov 1;72(3):892-9 [18395355.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2009 Jan;45(1):99-106 [18996004.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2009 May;52(5):637-43 [19148943.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Rev. 2009 Jun;30(6):207-15; quiz 216 [19487429.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2009 Aug 1;27(22):3691-7 [19581535.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 2009 Nov;119(11):2205-10 [19507225.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 2010 Jan;120(1):139-43 [19693928.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2000 Sep 15;18(18):3280-7 [10986061.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatrics. 2001 Jul;108(1):40-3 [11433052.001]
  • [Cites] Dev Med Child Neurol. 2002 Feb;44(2):123-9 [11848109.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2002 Mar 1;52(3):599-605 [11849779.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Pharmacother. 2002 Mar;36(3):446-51 [11895059.001]
  • [Cites] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2002 Jun;126(6):683-9 [12087338.001]
  • [Cites] J Cell Physiol. 2002 Jul;192(1):1-15 [12115731.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatrics. 2003 Feb;111(2):436-40 [12563074.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 1991 Sep;101(9):917-24 [1886439.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer Suppl. 1992 Aug;18:S36-40 [1323992.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Fr Pediatr. 1993 Apr;50(4):353-9 [8379826.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1994 Nov;81(5):690-8 [7931615.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 1994 Oct;21(5 Suppl 12):65-76 [7992069.001]
  • [Cites] Pharmacol Toxicol. 1995 Jun;76(6):386-94 [7479581.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Otol. 1995 Nov;16(6):793-6 [8572144.001]
  • [Cites] Med Pediatr Oncol. 1996 Jul;27(1):26-31 [8614387.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1996 Jul;14(7):2101-12 [8683243.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1997;529:90-4 [9288280.001]
  • [Cites] Oncology (Williston Park). 1997 Nov;11(11A):25-32 [9430176.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1998 Apr;77(8):1355-62 [9579846.001]
  • [Cites] Ear Hear. 1998 Oct;19(5):339-54 [9796643.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 1998 Oct;22(7):669-74 [9818694.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Oncol. 1999 Jun;22(3):305-8 [10362343.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2004 Nov;40(16):2445-51 [15519518.001]
  • [Cites] Hear Res. 2004 Dec;198(1-2):137-43 [15567610.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 Dec 15;22(24):4979-90 [15576413.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2005 Jul;45(1):32-6 [15768383.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2005 Sep;45(3):324-32 [15714447.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2005 Aug 15;104(4):841-7 [15999362.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Clin Pract Oncol. 2004 Dec;1(2):97-103; quiz 1 p following 111 [16264827.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Dec 1;23(34):8588-96 [16314621.001]
  • [Cites] Ear Hear. 2005 Dec;26(6):619-29 [16377997.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 2006 Feb;37(3):271-6 [16400336.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2006 Feb;28(2):91-4 [16462581.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2006 Mar;42(4):492-500 [16376542.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2006 Apr 20;24(12):1904-9 [16622266.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2006 May 18;354(20):2131-41 [16707750.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2006 Aug;47(2):174-82 [16086410.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2006 Sep;263(9):798-803 [16758221.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2006 Jul 15;107(2):417-22 [16779793.001]
  • [Cites] Am Ann Deaf. 2006 Summer;151(3):327-35 [17087443.001]
  • [Cites] Anticancer Drugs. 2007 Feb;18(2):161-70 [17159602.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Feb 1;67(2):469-79 [17236969.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Cancer Ther. 2007 Jan;6(1):31-6 [17237264.001]
  • [Cites] Hear Res. 2007 Apr;226(1-2):157-67 [17113254.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2007 Sep;24(6):403-8 [17710657.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatrics. 2007 Oct;120(4):898-921 [17908777.001]
  • [Cites] Kidney Int. 2007 Oct;72(8):931-5 [17653135.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Biol Cell. 2003 Jul;14(7):2876-89 [12857871.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2004 Mar 15;58(4):1194-207 [15001264.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 2004 Mar;114(3):538-42 [15091231.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2004 Jun;42(7):598-603 [15127414.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2004 Jun 15;64(12):4353-6 [15205351.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 Jul 1;22(13):2691-700 [15226336.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2004 Sep-Oct;21(5):271-80 [15381795.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2004 Oct;26(10):649-55 [15454836.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Otolaryngol. 1968 Aug;88(2):156-61 [5301997.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Otolaryngol. 1969 Jul-Aug;68(1):98-117 [4908185.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Invest. 1973 Oct;52(10):2517-21 [4729045.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Chemother Rep. 1975 May-Jun;59(3):467-80 [812603.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2000 Jan 15;46(2):269-79 [10661332.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Otolaryngol. 1982;93(1-6):227-32 [7199807.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr. 1983 Feb;102(2):314-7 [6681630.001]
  • [Cites] J Acoust Soc Am. 1983 Jul;74(1):104-8 [6886192.001]
  • (PMID = 20194279.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-4275
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatrics
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098543; None / None / / U10 CA098543-07; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098543-07; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10CA98543
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  • [Number-of-references] 96
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS182811; NLM/ PMC3106205
  •  go-up   go-down


8. Arizono Y, Yoshikawa H, Naganuma H, Hamada Y, Nakajima Y, Tasaka K: A mechanism of resistance to TRAIL/Apo2L-induced apoptosis of newly established glioma cell line and sensitisation to TRAIL by genotoxic agents. Br J Cancer; 2003 Jan 27;88(2):298-306
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Most tumour cells are sensitive to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, but not normal cells; thus, cancer therapy using TRAIL is expected clinically.
  • In addition, this tumour cell line had wild-type p53 tumour-suppressive gene, suggesting new mechanisms for tumour cells to expand and escape from immune surveillance.
  • We show that genotoxic agents such as cisplatin, doxorubicin and camptothecin, in addition to UV radiation, can induce TRAIL-R2 on the cell surface of TRAIL receptor-negative tumour cells.
  • Taken together, these findings suggest that resistance to TRAIL by lack of TRAIL receptors on glioma is restored by genotoxic agents, which support the new strategies for tumour killing by TRAIL-bearing cytotoxic cells in combination with genotoxic treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / toxicity. Apoptosis / drug effects. DNA, Neoplasm / drug effects. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / pathology. Membrane Glycoproteins / pharmacology. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins. Blotting, Western. Camptothecin / pharmacology. Cell Survival. Cisplatin / pharmacology. Doxorubicin / pharmacology. Fibrosarcoma / metabolism. Fibrosarcoma / pathology. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Osteosarcoma / metabolism. Osteosarcoma / pathology. Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / metabolism. TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand. Transfection. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / genetics. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / metabolism

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Glioma.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Exp Med. 1997 Oct 6;186(7):1165-70 [9314565.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Biol. 1997 Sep 1;7(9):693-6 [9285725.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Genet. 1997 Oct;17(2):141-3 [9326928.001]
  • [Cites] FEBS Lett. 1997 Oct 27;416(3):329-34 [9373179.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Biol. 1997 Dec 1;7(12):1003-6 [9382840.001]
  • [Cites] Immunity. 1997 Dec;7(6):813-20 [9430226.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1998 Apr 15;58(8):1593-8 [9563466.001]
  • [Cites] J Immunol. 1998 Sep 15;161(6):2833-40 [9743343.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Med. 1999 Feb;5(2):157-63 [9930862.001]
  • [Cites] J Exp Med. 1999 Apr 19;189(8):1343-54 [10209050.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Opin Cell Biol. 1999 Apr;11(2):255-60 [10209153.001]
  • [Cites] J Exp Med. 1999 May 3;189(9):1451-60 [10224285.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Invest. 1999 Jul;104(2):155-62 [10411544.001]
  • [Cites] J Exp Med. 1999 Oct 18;190(8):1155-64 [10523613.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Med. 2000 May;6(5):564-7 [10802713.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2000 Sep 2;356(9232):827-8 [11022932.001]
  • [Cites] FEBS Lett. 2000 Oct 6;482(3):193-9 [11024459.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2001 Feb 1;61(3):1162-70 [11221847.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2001 Feb 15;61(4):1645-51 [11245478.001]
  • [Cites] J Exp Med. 2001 Mar 19;193(6):661-70 [11257133.001]
  • [Cites] J Immunol. 2001 May 1;166(9):5407-15 [11313377.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2001 Jun 15;61(12):4892-900 [11406568.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2001 May 3;20(20):2559-69 [11420666.001]
  • [Cites] Cell Death Differ. 2001 May;8(5):506-14 [11423911.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2001 Jul 1;61(13):4942-6 [11431320.001]
  • [Cites] J Invest Dermatol. 2001 Jul;117(1):59-66 [11442750.001]
  • [Cites] J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2001 Oct;299(1):31-8 [11561060.001]
  • [Cites] J Immunol. 2002 Feb 1;168(3):1356-61 [11801676.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Med. 2002 Mar;8(3):274-81 [11875499.001]
  • [Cites] Immunity. 1995 Dec;3(6):673-82 [8777713.001]
  • [Cites] J Biol Chem. 1996 May 31;271(22):12687-90 [8663110.001]
  • [Cites] J Immunol. 1997 Mar 1;158(5):2303-9 [9036978.001]
  • [Cites] Science. 1997 Apr 4;276(5309):111-3 [9082980.001]
  • [Cites] Science. 1997 Aug 8;277(5327):815-8 [9242610.001]
  • [Cites] Science. 1997 Aug 8;277(5327):818-21 [9242611.001]
  • [Cites] J Biol Chem. 1997 Oct 10;272(41):25417-20 [9325248.001]
  • (PMID = 12610517.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; 0 / TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / TNFRSF10B protein, human; 0 / TNFSF10 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2377044
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Lee JA, Kim MS, Koh JS, Kim MS, Kim DH, Lim JS, Kong CB, Song WS, Cho WH, Lee SY, Jeon DG: Osteosarcoma of the flat bone. Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2010 Jan;40(1):47-53
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Osteosarcoma of the flat bone.
  • OBJECTIVE: We aimed to understand the biology of osteosarcoma of the flat bone, which is a rare tumor entity.
  • METHODS: Cases with osteosarcoma of the flat bone were compared with those of the extremity in order to evaluate their clinicopathologic characteristics.
  • And the influences of heterogeneous treatment modalities on outcome were analyzed.
  • RESULTS: Tumors of the flat bone comprised 91 (11.3%) of 806 osteosarcoma cases.
  • Eight cases were secondary osteosarcoma associated with previous radiotherapy.
  • Although age and histologic response to pre-operative chemotherapy were not related to outcome of flat bone tumors, treatment modality influenced the survival.
  • Radiation therapy did not appear to be an effective local control measure as surgery.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Treatment outcome of the tumor of the flat bone was worse than extremity tumors.
  • Further studies are needed to identify effective local control measures that can substitute for surgery and to determine the biologic characteristics of osteosarcoma of the flat bone.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Osteosarcoma / surgery

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Osteosarcoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19892781.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-3621
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Subbiah V, Madsen VS, Raymond AK, Benjamin RS, Ludwig JA: Of mice and men: divergent risks of teriparatide-induced osteosarcoma. Osteoporos Int; 2010 Jun;21(6):1041-5
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Of mice and men: divergent risks of teriparatide-induced osteosarcoma.
  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in December 2002, teriparatide (recombinant 1-34 PTH; Forteo) has been safely used by more than 430,000 patients.
  • Prior to FDA approval, however, there was concern that teriparatide might increase the risk for patients to develop osteosarcoma, as almost 45% of the rats treated with this drug at the highest-tested dose level developed this aggressive form of bone cancer.
  • Balancing the proven benefits of teriparatide shown by clinical trials with the theoretical risk for teriparatide-induced human osteosarcoma, the FDA mandated both a 'black-box' warning of this potential side-effect and a company-sponsored postmarketing surveillance program.
  • As a participating institute of that surveillance program, we report upon the second person with potential teriparatide-induced osteosarcoma, in this case, complicated by a history of pelvic radiation.
  • INTRODUCTION: Given the theoretic risk of the drug teriparatide and the known risk of radiation in inducing osteosarcoma, we raise the issue of whether teriparatide magnified the risk of radiation-induced osteosarcoma in our patient and try to determine which factor played the predominant role in the development of his disease.
  • METHODS: We analyzed preclinical rat data, human clinical experience with teriparatide, and our patient's clinical history to assess the human risk of teriparatide and radiation exposure.
  • RESULTS: After the first case of suspected osteosarcoma was reported in December 2005, we encountered a second possible teriparatide-induced osteosarcoma less than a year later.
  • Given the location of the sarcoma within the field of radiation and the limited exposure to teriparatide before diagnosis, it is unlikely that teriparatide played the predominant role in the emergence of this patient's osteosarcoma.
  • We cannot, however, exclude the possibility that teriparatide magnified the carcinogenic effect of radiation therapy to induce the osteosarcoma.
  • CONCLUSION: Of more than 430,000 persons who have received teriparatide for treatment of severe osteoporosis, we report the second patient to develop osteosarcoma.
  • Although teriparatide reduces osteoporosis-related fractures in select patient populations, important contraindications, such as prior radiation exposure, should be considered before use.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Density Conservation Agents / adverse effects. Bone Neoplasms / chemically induced. Osteosarcoma / chemically induced. Teriparatide / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Animals. Cocarcinogenesis. Humans. Male. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / chemically induced. Osteoporosis / drug therapy. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Rats

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Osteosarcoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. TERIPARATIDE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Bone Miner Res. 2007 Feb;22(2):334 [17129179.001]
  • [Cites] Endocr Rev. 1993 Dec;14(6):690-709 [8119233.001]
  • [Cites] Toxicol Pathol. 2002 May-Jun;30(3):312-21 [12051548.001]
  • [Cites] J Bone Miner Res. 2001 Jan;16(1):157-65 [11149480.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1983 Oct 15;52(8):1489-95 [6577936.001]
  • [Cites] J Bone Miner Res. 2006 Mar;21(3):354-65 [16491282.001]
  • [Cites] Endocrinology. 2005 Apr;146(4):1863-70 [15625242.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Med Res Opin. 2006 Oct;22(10):1927 [17022851.001]
  • [Cites] J Radiol Prot. 2002 Sep;22(3A):A113-6 [12400958.001]
  • [Cites] Toxicol Pathol. 2004 Jul-Aug;32(4):426-38 [15204966.001]
  • [Cites] Toxicol Pathol. 2006;34(7):929-40 [17178693.001]
  • [Cites] CA Cancer J Clin. 2007 Jan-Feb;57(1):43-66 [17237035.001]
  • (PMID = 19597911.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-2965
  • [Journal-full-title] Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Osteoporos Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bone Density Conservation Agents; 10T9CSU89I / Teriparatide
  •  go-up   go-down


11. Withrow SJ, Wilkins RM: Cross talk from pets to people: translational osteosarcoma treatments. ILAR J; 2010;51(3):208-13
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cross talk from pets to people: translational osteosarcoma treatments.
  • Osteosarcoma is almost identical in companion animals and in people, so research in basic cancer biology and treatment is readily translational across the species.
  • Dogs in particular provide a relevant osteosarcoma model that is 10 times more prevalent than the corresponding human condition and offers a unique opportunity to answer questions related to local tumor control and metastasis.
  • We describe several cross-species treatment strategies for osteosarcoma--chemotherapy, limb-sparing techniques, and radiation--as well as surprising impacts of infection and immunology.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Osteosarcoma.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 21131721.001).
  • [ISSN] 1930-6180
  • [Journal-full-title] ILAR journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ILAR J
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  •  go-up   go-down


12. Anderson PM, Wiseman GA, Dispenzieri A, Arndt CA, Hartmann LC, Smithson WA, Mullan BP, Bruland OS: High-dose samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate: low toxicity of skeletal irradiation in patients with osteosarcoma and bone metastases. J Clin Oncol; 2002 Jan 01;20(1):189-96
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] High-dose samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate: low toxicity of skeletal irradiation in patients with osteosarcoma and bone metastases.
  • PURPOSE: Samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate ((153)Sm-EDTMP), a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical, provides therapeutic irradiation to osteoblastic bone metastases.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with locally recurrent or metastatic osteosarcoma or skeletal metastases avid on bone scan were treated with 1, 3, 4.5, 6, 12, 19, or 30 mCi/kg of (153)Sm-EDTMP.
  • Estimates of radioisotope bound to bone surfaces and marrow radiation dose were linear with injected amount of (153)Sm-EDTMP.
  • Cytopenias also occurred in all subjects and were dose-related.
  • CONCLUSION: (153)Sm-EDTMP with PBPC support can provide bone-specific therapeutic irradiation (estimates of 39 to 241 Gy).
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Organometallic Compounds / therapeutic use. Organophosphorus Compounds / therapeutic use. Osteosarcoma / radiotherapy. Palliative Care / methods. Radioisotopes / therapeutic use. Samarium / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Hematologic Diseases / etiology. Hematologic Diseases / therapy. Humans. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged. Tissue Distribution


13. Gadwal SR, Gannon FH, Fanburg-Smith JC, Becoskie EM, Thompson LD: Primary osteosarcoma of the head and neck in pediatric patients: a clinicopathologic study of 22 cases with a review of the literature. Cancer; 2001 Feb 1;91(3):598-605
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Primary osteosarcoma of the head and neck in pediatric patients: a clinicopathologic study of 22 cases with a review of the literature.
  • No secondary sarcomas (radiation-induced or those arising after chemotherapy) or those associated with known syndromes were included.
  • Patient symptoms related to tumor location were painless swelling, loss of teeth, headaches, or a mass lesion, present for an average of 5.9 months.
  • All cases, except one chondroblastic osteosarcoma, were osteoblastic osteosarcomas.
  • Thirteen patients underwent initial surgical resection with (n = 5) or without (n = 9) additional radiation and/or chemotherapy.
  • The remaining 9 patients had an initial biopsy for diagnosis followed by surgery (n = 4) or surgery and radiation and/or chemotherapy (n = 5).
  • The 3 patients with high-grade osteosarcoma were alive without disease (mean, 20.0 yrs).
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Osteosarcoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Male. Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Osteosarcoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 11169944.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 52
  •  go-up   go-down


14. Pourtsidis AG, Doganis D, Baka M, Bouhoutsou D, Varvoutsi M, Servitzoglou M, Kosmidis S, Synodinou M, Strantzia C, Kosmidis H: Successful treatment with minimal chemotherapy followed by low-dose involved field radiotherapy in children with Hodgkin's disease: A 20-year experience in a single institution in Greece. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10052

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Successful treatment with minimal chemotherapy followed by low-dose involved field radiotherapy in children with Hodgkin's disease: A 20-year experience in a single institution in Greece.
  • The purpose of our retrospective study was to report the outcome and prognostic factors of patients (pts) less than 15 years of age with HD treated with chemotherapy (CT) followed by low dose radiation from 1987 to 2006.
  • METHODS: We studied 58 children analyzing the following data: age, sex, stage, histology, therapy correlating these with the outcome of pts.
  • All pts had a good response (more than a 70% reduction) after initial CT and received 20 Gy of RT to initially involved fields.
  • Chemo- and radio-therapy were well tolerated.
  • All received salvage treatment in combination with high dose CT and autologous stem-cell transplantation (SCT).
  • Second (thyroid cancer) plus third malignancy in one (osteosarcoma) was detected in 3 pts and all are alive.
  • No factors related to the outcome were detected.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion combined-modality therapy remains the standard of care for children with HD.
  • However, there may be a significant number who can be cured with chemotherapy alone.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 27962448.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


15. Petty JC, Lana SE, Thamm DH, Charles JB, Bachand AM, Bush JM, Ehrhart EJ: Glucose transporter 1 expression in canine osteosarcoma. Vet Comp Oncol; 2008 Jun;6(2):133-40
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Glucose transporter 1 expression in canine osteosarcoma.
  • Hypoxia in tumours has been associated with an increased resistance to radiation and chemotherapy, and increased metastatic potential.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine if GLUT-1 is expressed in canine osteosarcomas (OSAs) and if the expression is related to tumour necrosis and outcome.
  • Immunohistochemistry was performed on 44 histologically confirmed OSA tissue samples to assess expression of GLUT-1.
  • There was no statistical correlation between GLUT-1 and disease-free interval, survival time or percentage of necrosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / veterinary. Dog Diseases / metabolism. Glucose Transporter Type 1 / metabolism. Osteosarcoma / veterinary
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Disease-Free Survival. Dogs. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit. Immunohistochemistry / veterinary. Male. Necrosis. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19178673.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5829
  • [Journal-full-title] Veterinary and comparative oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vet Comp Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Glucose Transporter Type 1; 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit
  •  go-up   go-down


16. Okada K, Hasegawa T, Nishida J, Ogose A, Tajino T, Osanai T, Yanagisawa M, Hatori M: Osteosarcomas after the age of 50: a clinicopathologic study of 64 cases--an experience in northern Japan. Ann Surg Oncol; 2004 Nov;11(11):998-1004
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: Clinicopathologic features were analyzed in 645 patients with osteosarcoma who were registered at the Tohoku Musculoskeletal Tumor Society and National Cancer Center in Tokyo between 1972 and 2002.
  • The most common location was the distal femur (n = 13), followed by the pelvis (n = 10), proximal femur (n = 9), and proximal fibula (n = 6).
  • Fourteen cases (22%) were secondary; postradiation osteosarcoma was most common in these patients, but there was no Paget's sarcoma.
  • Preoperative chemotherapy was given to 22 patients, but the effect was poor in 18 cases (82%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In northern Japan, most patients with osteosarcoma after the age of 50 had primary osteosarcoma.
  • Current systemic chemotherapy is not effective for this age group.
  • Alternative treatment strategies should be considered.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Osteosarcoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Age of Onset. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Japan. Male. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Metastasis. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15525829.001).
  • [ISSN] 1068-9265
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


17. Zachos TA, Aiken SW, DiResta GR, Healey JH: Interstitial fluid pressure and blood flow in canine osteosarcoma and other tumors. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2001 Apr;(385):230-6
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Interstitial fluid pressure and blood flow in canine osteosarcoma and other tumors.
  • This study aims to characterize interstitial fluid pressure and blood flow in naturally occurring appendicular bone tumors in dogs because high pressure may influence the response of tumors to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
  • At the time of surgical biopsy, interstitial fluid pressure and blood flow were measured using wick-in-needle probes and laser Doppler flowmetry, respectively, within the soft tissue and bony components of the lesions and in normal muscle.
  • Interstitial fluid pressure within the bony and soft tissue components of the tumors was significantly higher than interstitial fluid pressure in normal muscle.
  • There was no significant difference between blood flow in the soft tissue component of the tumors compared with that in normal muscle.
  • Appendicular bone tumors in dogs have significantly higher interstitial fluid pressure and lower blood flow than do adjacent, unaffected soft tissues.
  • The higher interstitial fluid pressure and lower blood flow may reduce tissue oxygenation and impede drug delivery.
  • The effects of increased interstitial fluid pressure and decreased blood flow should be considered in the formulation of treatment strategies for the clinical management of appendicular bone tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Body Fluids. Bone Neoplasms / blood supply. Osteosarcoma / blood supply

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11302319.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1R01 CA78494-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


18. Asavamongkolkul A, Waikakul S, Phimolsarnti R, Kiatisevi P, Wangsaturaka P: Endoprosthetic reconstruction for malignant bone and soft-tissue tumors. J Med Assoc Thai; 2007 Apr;90(4):706-17
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Endoprosthetic reconstruction for malignant bone and soft-tissue tumors.
  • BACKGROUND: Nowadays, the results of the management of malignant bone and soft-tissue tumors have been dramatically improved because of the advance in imaging, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgical techniques.
  • Patients can have longer survival times with limb-salvage surgery.
  • OBJECTIVE: To report the preliminary results of 32 endoprosthetic reconstructions following malignant bone and soft-tissue tumor resection.
  • MATERIAL AND METHOD: Since September 1988, the authors have performed 188 limb-salvage surgical operations for the treatment of musculoskeletal tumors at Siriraj Hospital.
  • From March 1994 to July 2006, 32 endoprosthetic reconstructions were performed on 30 patients following malignant bone or soft-tissue tumor removal.
  • The diagnosis was conventional osteosarcoma in 16 patients, parosteal osteosarcoma in two patients, chondrosarcoma in two patients, leiomyosarcoma in two patients, failed allograft in two patients and one patient each of periosteal osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, Gorham's disease, synovial sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and prosthetic loosening.
  • Five proximal femurs, 17 distal femurs, 1 total femur 3 proximal tibias, 1 intercalary tibia, 4 proximal humerus and 1 distal humerus were used for reconstruction.
  • RESULTS: The mean follow-up time was 26 months (range 6-128.7).
  • Revision due to aseptic loosening was performed in one patient (3.3%) and one hip disarticulation was done related to local recurrence (3.3%).
  • CONCLUSION: Endoprosthetic reconstruction could yield satisfactory results as a wide excision and limb-salvage for patients with malignant bone and soft-tissue tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Limb Salvage. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Sarcoma, Ewing / surgery. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17487125.001).
  • [ISSN] 0125-2208
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Assoc Thai
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Thailand
  •  go-up   go-down


19. Hornicek FJ, Gebhardt MC, Tomford WW, Sorger JI, Zavatta M, Menzner JP, Mankin HJ: Factors affecting nonunion of the allograft-host junction. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2001 Jan;(382):87-98
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Nonunion of allograft-host junction after bone transplantation is not uncommon, and its treatment frequently is problematic.
  • Of these 945 patients, 558 did not receive adjuvant therapy.
  • Chemotherapy was administered to 354 patients and only 33 patients received radiation therapy alone.
  • Seventy-one patients had radiation treatment and chemotherapy.
  • In 108 patients, treatment was successful resulting in union of the allograft-host junction.
  • Forty-nine patients did not respond to multiple surgical treatment attempts.
  • The rate of nonunions increased to 27% for the patients who received chemotherapy as compared with 11% for the patients who did not receive chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Arthrodesis. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Chi-Square Distribution. Child. Child, Preschool. Chondrosarcoma / surgery. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Fractures, Bone / etiology. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / surgery. Graft Survival. Humans. Joints / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Proportional Hazards Models. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Reoperation. Retrospective Studies. Sarcoma, Ewing / surgery. Surgical Wound Infection / etiology. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome. Wound Healing

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Grafts.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11154010.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


20. Sturgis EM, Potter BO: Sarcomas of the head and neck region. Curr Opin Oncol; 2003 May;15(3):239-52
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses the classification, etiology, diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and prognosis of sarcoma of the head and neck region.
  • Occasionally, these tumors are associated with genetic syndromes or previous radiation exposures, but, most commonly, no clear etiology exists.
  • Pathologic classification is critical to the ultimate treatment and prognosis of sarcoma of the head and neck.
  • Osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, and angiosarcoma are the most common types of sarcoma to occur in the head and neck region; however, up to 20% of head and neck sarcomas will remain unclassified.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy is being utilized and/or studied for most high-grade sarcomas and adjuvant radiotherapy is important for disease control in high-grade soft-tissue sarcomas.
  • Prognosis is clearly related to tumor grade and margin status.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Sarcoma / pathology. Sarcoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Hemangiosarcoma / mortality. Hemangiosarcoma / pathology. Hemangiosarcoma / therapy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Osteosarcoma / mortality. Osteosarcoma / pathology. Osteosarcoma / therapy. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Rhabdomyosarcoma / mortality. Rhabdomyosarcoma / pathology. Rhabdomyosarcoma / therapy. Risk Assessment. Surgical Procedures, Operative / methods. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Soft Tissue Sarcoma.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12778019.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-8746
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 157
  •  go-up   go-down


21. DiResta GR, Aiken SW, Healey J: Dog osteogenic sarcoma microvasculature observed with a Spälteholz technique. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2004 Sep;(426):39-43
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • A well-distributed, patent microvascular network is essential for adequate, uniform delivery of chemotherapy into solid tumors.
  • Spälteholz tissue clarification was used to observe the microvasculature of canine humeri bearing osteogenic sarcoma.
  • Freshly amputated limbs, obtained from therapeutic amputation, were infused with a micron-sized carbon particle solution, frozen, and then cut into sagittal and axial 0.5-mm thick sections.
  • They were photographed, then radiographed using high resolution Faxitron xray, chemically treated to clarify the tissue, and then rephotographed.
  • Clarified section photographs were digitized to gray scale levels and analyzed using IMAGE software; levels are directly related to capillary density.
  • Faxitron and original images were registered to the clarified images to identify tissue regions.
  • These findings suggest that insufficient microvascular density and distribution may provide additional explanation for the poor response of solid tumors to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / blood supply. Osteosarcoma / blood supply

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15346049.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA78494-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


22. Martín-Duque P, Quintanilla M, McNeish I, Lopes R, Romero J, Romero D, Lemoine NR, Ramón y Cajal S, Vassaux G: Caspase-1 as a radio- and chemo-sensitiser in vitro and in vivo. Int J Mol Med; 2006 May;17(5):841-7
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs has been shown to involve induction of apoptosis.
  • This observation raises the possibility that factors affecting caspase activation might be important determinants of anticancer drug sensitivity.
  • In patients, high levels of caspase-1 expression may be associated with spontaneous regression in neuroblastomas and with a good clinical response to chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia and osteosarcoma.
  • In experimental therapeutics for cancer, caspase-1 has been related to some anticancer activity.
  • These observations led us to examine the effect of over-expression on the response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in vitro and in vivo.
  • Caspase-1 expression mediated by an adenoviral vector was able to kill directly cells and to sensitise the remaining cells to cisplatin or gamma-radiation in vitro.
  • Caspase-1 mediated sensitisation to cisplatin and gamma-radiation was also observed in vivo.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoviridae / genetics. Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cell Survival / genetics. Cell Survival / radiation effects. Cisplatin / pharmacology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Female. Gamma Rays. Genetic Vectors / genetics. HeLa Cells. Humans. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Mitochondria / drug effects. Mitochondria / metabolism. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Transfection

  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16596269.001).
  • [ISSN] 1107-3756
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of molecular medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Mol. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; EC 3.4.22.36 / Caspase 1; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  •  go-up   go-down


23. Aljassir F, Beadel GP, Turcotte RE, Griffin AM, Bell RS, Wunder JS, Isler MH: Outcome after pelvic sarcoma resection reconstructed with saddle prosthesis. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2005 Sep;438:36-41
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Seven (26%) patients had Type II (periacetabular) pelvic resection and 20 had Types II and III (periacetabular and pubis) pelvic resection.
  • Eleven patients had chemotherapy treatment.
  • None received radiation therapy.
  • Five patients were retired, five had full-time employment, and six were disabled.
  • LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic study, Level IV-1 (case series without control group).
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Hip Prosthesis. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Pelvic Bones / surgery. Postoperative Complications. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Evidence-Based Medicine. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - After Surgery.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16131867.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


24. Wolff JE, Mölenkamp G, Westphal S, Pietsch T, Gnekow A, Kortmann RD, Kuehl J: Oral trofosfamide and etoposide in pediatric patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Cancer; 2000 Nov 15;89(10):2131-7
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Adjuvant treatment consisted of oral chemotherapy with trofosfamide, 100 mg/m(2), and etoposide, 25 mg/m(2), daily or for 21-day cycles interrupted by 1-week rests.
  • Standard fractionated radiation (54 grays) was started concurrently with the first cycle.
  • RESULTS: The chemotherapy was well tolerated, with no treatment-related deaths and only minor side effects.
  • Two patients are alive after tumor progression: One patient was diagnosed with a medulloblastoma, and one patient was diagnosed with an osteosarcoma as second malignancies.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This chemotherapy will not be used in a randomized trial of patients with glioblastoma; however, it may be evaluated for patients with tumors that have more chemoresponsive histologies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Stem Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Glioblastoma / drug therapy. Supratentorial Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Male. Pilot Projects. Postoperative Care. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Glioblastoma.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ETOPOSIDE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 11066055.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; H64JRU6GJ0 / trofosfamide
  •  go-up   go-down


25. Guo W, Li D, Tang X, Yang Y, Ji T: Reconstruction with modular hemipelvic prostheses for periacetabular tumor. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2007 Aug;461:180-8
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Sixteen (57.1%) patients had Types II and III (periacetabular and pubis) pelvic resections, seven had Types I and II (periacetabular and ilium) pelvic resections, and five had Type II (periacetabular) pelvic resection.
  • Six patients with osteosarcoma had chemotherapy.
  • None received radiation therapy.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Soft Tissue Sarcoma.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17452921.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement