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1. Yamauchi H, Tsuka H, Muranaka K: [A case of primary urothelial carcinoma of the prostate]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2006 Dec;52(12):959-60
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  • [Title] [A case of primary urothelial carcinoma of the prostate].
  • A 42-year-old male diagnosed with primary urothelial carcinoma of the prostate (T4NOM0) underwent pelvic exenteration, and lymph node dissection.
  • Two courses of systemic chemotherapy (gemcitabine and carboplatin) were performed.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17252982.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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2. Gofrit ON, Pode D, Pizov G, Zorn KC, Katz R, Shapiro A: Prostatic urothelial carcinoma: is transurethral prostatectomy necessary before bacillus Calmette-Guérin immunotherapy? BJU Int; 2009 Apr;103(7):905-8
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  • [Title] Prostatic urothelial carcinoma: is transurethral prostatectomy necessary before bacillus Calmette-Guérin immunotherapy?
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of transurethral prostatectomy (TURP) followed by bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy in patients with prostatic urothelial carcinoma (PUC) and compare the results of studies using combined TURP and BCG with studies in which TURP was not performed.
  • Five patients (25%) died from urothelial carcinoma (UC) after a median period of 58.5 months (two from bladder cancer metastases and three from upper tract metastases).
  • CONCLUSION: In patients with PUC, TURP before BCG immunotherapy eliminates PUC in most cases, and is probably the preferred treatment for this disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. BCG Vaccine / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy. Transurethral Resection of Prostate / methods. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Intravesical. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19021623.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-410X
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / BCG Vaccine
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3. Ito Y, Nishiyama H, Higashi S, Kinoshita H, Ito N, Yamamoto S, Kamoto T, Ogawa O: [Transitional cell carcinoma in prostate after intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2004 May;50(5):335-8
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  • [Title] [Transitional cell carcinoma in prostate after intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin].
  • We report 3 cases of prostatic involvement of transitional cell carcinomas (TCCs).
  • TUR-biopsy demonstrated TCC in the prostate, although random biopsy failed to detect tumors in the bladder in all cases.
  • TUR-biopsy of prostatic urethra should be perfomed when patients present positive urinary cytology after BCG instillation therapy, because prostatic involvement of TCC associated with bladder carcinoma in situ is not rare.
  • [MeSH-major] BCG Vaccine / administration & dosage. Carcinoma in Situ / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / etiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / etiology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15237488.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / BCG Vaccine
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4. Palou J, Baniel J, Klotz L, Wood D, Cookson M, Lerner S, Horie S, Schoenberg M, Angulo J, Bassi P: Urothelial carcinoma of the prostate. Urology; 2007 Jan;69(1 Suppl):50-61
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  • [Title] Urothelial carcinoma of the prostate.
  • This study was conducted to explore the diagnosis and management of urothelial carcinoma of the prostate in superficial disease and carcinoma in situ, stromal invasion, primary urothelial carcinoma, and urethral recurrence after radical surgery.
  • A consensus conference convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) reviewed the diagnosis and management of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.
  • English-language literature about urothelial carcinoma of the prostate was identified and reviewed.
  • Evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of urothelial carcinoma were made.
  • Many recommendations were level 3 or 4 citations involving the diagnosis and management of superficial urothelial carcinoma; a few were level 2 citations.
  • Level 1 citations related only to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with stromal invasion, although these were not related specifically to invasive prostatic involvement.
  • Published reports on the diagnosis and treatment of superficial urothelial disease of the prostate primarily consist of short case series from individual centers.
  • In invasive disease of the prostate, the only large series were designed to investigate invasive bladder cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell. Prostatic Neoplasms

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  • (PMID = 17280908.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 65
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5. van der Heijden AG, Hulsbergen-Van de Kaa CA, Witjes JA: The influence of thermo-chemotherapy on bladder tumours: an immunohistochemical analysis. World J Urol; 2007 Jun;25(3):303-8
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  • [Title] The influence of thermo-chemotherapy on bladder tumours: an immunohistochemical analysis.
  • To study the influence of microwave induced thermo-chemotherapy on high-grade urothelial cell carcinomas.
  • Patients were treated 2 days prior to cystectomy with mitomycin-C (group 1), hyperthermia (group 2) or thermo-chemotherapy (group 3).
  • Group 4 patients had been treated with a cycle of six thermo-chemotherapy treatments prior to cystectomy and group 5 patients served as control (no treatment).
  • A decrease in proliferation activity and p53 activity illustrate the potential role of thermo-chemotherapy as a promising intravesical treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / therapy. Hyperthermia, Induced. Mitomycin / administration & dosage. Transurethral Resection of Prostate. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Intravesical. Aged. Cell Proliferation. Combined Modality Therapy. Cystectomy. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Ki-67 Antigen / metabolism. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17574492.001).
  • [ISSN] 0724-4983
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1913171
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6. Ohyama C, Takyu S, Yoshikawa K, Suzuki H, Tezuka F, Hasuda A, Inaba Y, Hoshi S, Orikasa S: Adenocarcinoma arising from the prostatic duct mimicking transitional cell carcinoma. Int J Urol; 2001 Jul;8(7):408-11
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  • [Title] Adenocarcinoma arising from the prostatic duct mimicking transitional cell carcinoma.
  • A 71-year-old man was first diagnosed with primary transitional cell carcinoma of the prostate with a skip lesion on the distal urethra.
  • The patient received three courses of intra-arterial chemotherapy of cisplatin (CDDP) and pirarubicin (THP-ADM) followed by a radical prostatectomy.
  • The clinical and histopathologic features of this case are entirely different from usual adenocarcinomas of the prostate.
  • This rare histopathologic feature should be recognized as 'ductal carcinoma of the prostate', to distinguish it from papillary adenocarcinoma or adenocarcinoma with endometrioid features.
  • CDDP-based chemotherapy followed by radical prostatectomy may be one of the promising therapeutic modalities for this rare entity.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11442666.001).
  • [ISSN] 0919-8172
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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7. Hour TC, Lai YL, Kuan CI, Chou CK, Wang JM, Tu HY, Hu HT, Lin CS, Wu WJ, Pu YS, Sterneck E, Huang AM: Transcriptional up-regulation of SOD1 by CEBPD: a potential target for cisplatin resistant human urothelial carcinoma cells. Biochem Pharmacol; 2010 Aug 1;80(3):325-34
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  • [Title] Transcriptional up-regulation of SOD1 by CEBPD: a potential target for cisplatin resistant human urothelial carcinoma cells.
  • Bladder cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in men (ninth in women) in the United States.
  • Cisplatin is an effective agent against the most common subtype, urothelial carcinoma.
  • However, the development of chemotherapy resistance is a severe clinical problem for the successful treatment of this and other cancers.
  • A better understanding of the cellular and molecular events in response to cisplatin treatment and the development of resistance are critical to improve the therapeutic options for patients.
  • Here, we report that expression of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein delta (CEBPD, C/EBPdelta, NF-IL6beta) is induced by cisplatin in the human bladder urothelial carcinoma NTUB1 cell line and is specifically elevated in a cisplatin resistant subline.
  • This study reveals a novel role for CEBPD in conferring drug resistance, suggesting that it can also be pro-oncogenic.
  • Furthermore, our data suggest that SOD inhibitors, which are already used as anti-angiogenic agents, may be suitable for combinatorial chemotherapy to prevent or treat cisplatin resistance in bladder and possibly other cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Protein-delta / physiology. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Drug Delivery Systems. Superoxide Dismutase / biosynthesis. Transcriptional Activation / physiology. Urologic Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis / genetics. Cell Line, Transformed. Cell Line, Tumor. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / genetics. Humans. Transcription, Genetic / drug effects. Transcription, Genetic / physiology. Up-Regulation / drug effects. Up-Regulation / physiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20385105.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2968
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / ZIA BC010307-08
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CEBPD protein, human; 142662-43-9 / CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Protein-delta; EC 1.15.1.- / superoxide dismutase 1; EC 1.15.1.1 / Superoxide Dismutase; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS417472; NLM/ PMC3586239
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8. Chuang AY, DeMarzo AM, Veltri RW, Sharma RB, Bieberich CJ, Epstein JI: Immunohistochemical differentiation of high-grade prostate carcinoma from urothelial carcinoma. Am J Surg Pathol; 2007 Aug;31(8):1246-55
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  • [Title] Immunohistochemical differentiation of high-grade prostate carcinoma from urothelial carcinoma.
  • The histologic distinction between high-grade prostate cancer and infiltrating high-grade urothelial cancer may be difficult, and has significant implications because each disease may be treated very differently (ie, hormone therapy for prostate cancer and chemotherapy for urothelial cancer).
  • Immunohistochemistry of novel and established prostatic and urothelial markers using tissue microarrays (TMAs) were studied.
  • Prostatic markers studied included: prostate-specific antigen (PSA), prostein (P501s), prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), NKX3.1 (an androgen-related tumor suppressor gene), and proPSA (pPSA) (precursor form of PSA).
  • "Urothelial markers" included high molecular weight cytokeratin (HMWCK), p63, thrombomodulin, and S100P (placental S100).
  • TMAs contained 38 poorly differentiated prostate cancers [Gleason score 8 (n=2), Gleason score 9 (n=18), Gleason score 10 (n=18)] and 35 high-grade invasive urothelial carcinomas from radical prostatectomy and cystectomy specimens, respectively.
  • Each case had 2 to 8 tissue spots (0.6-mm diameter).
  • The sensitivities for labeling prostate cancers were PSA (97.4%), P501S (100%), PSMA (92.1%), NKX3.1 (94.7%), and pPSA (94.7%).
  • Because of PSA's high sensitivity on the TMA, we chose 41 additional poorly differentiated primary (N=36) and metastatic (N=5) prostate carcinomas which showed variable PSA staining at the time of diagnosis and performed immunohistochemistry on routine tissue sections.
  • HMWCK, p63, thrombomodulin, and S100P showed lower sensitivities in labeling high-grade invasive urothelial cancer in the TMAs with 91.4%, 82.9%, 68.6%, and 71.4% staining, respectively.
  • These urothelial markers were relatively specific with only a few prostate cancers showing scattered (<or=2%) weak-moderate positive cells.
  • In summary, PSA can be used as the first screening marker for differentiating high-grade prostate adenocarcinoma from high-grade urothelial carcinoma.
  • Immunohistochemistry for P501S, PSMA, NKX3.1, and pPSA are useful when high-grade prostate cancer is suspected based on the morphology or clinical findings, yet shows negative or equivocal PSA staining.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / secondary. Immunoenzyme Techniques / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Male. Predictive Value of Tests. Tissue Array Analysis

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  • (PMID = 17667550.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
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9. Fayyad LM, Al-Jader KM, Al-Hawwari BA: Asynchronous adenoid cystic carcinoma of the prostate and transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. Saudi Med J; 2006 Jul;27(7):1060-2
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  • [Title] Asynchronous adenoid cystic carcinoma of the prostate and transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.
  • Histologic variants of prostatic carcinoma are readily recognized.
  • In this report, we describe a rare variant, adenoid cystic carcinoma, in a 75-year-old man previously diagnosed to have transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.
  • The diagnosis of adenoid cystic carcinoma was made by the characteristic microscopic features of the tumor morphologically and immunohistochemically.
  • The patient's treatment consisted of chemotherapy in combination with prednisone and hormonal therapy.
  • Making this case unique is the asynchronous occurrence of this variant with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, which has never been reported in the literature.
  • We discussed the histopathologic and immunohistochemical features of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the prostate with review of literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Adenoid Cystic / pathology. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology


10. Tamada S, Omachi T, Ito T, Kawashima H, Nakatani T: [Primary urothelial carcinoma with sarcomatous transformation of the prostate]. Nihon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi; 2010 Jul;101(5):698-702
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  • [Title] [Primary urothelial carcinoma with sarcomatous transformation of the prostate].
  • Right hydronephrosis and hypertrophy of the prostate were shown by DIP and MRI respectively.
  • Then, we performed transurethral resection of the tumor and trans-perineal needle biopsy of the prostate, and diagnosed him as primary urothelial carcinoma of the prostate.
  • Following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy(MVAC), the patient was treated with radical cystoprostatectomy.
  • The histopathological examination showed urothelial carcinoma with concomitant sarcomatous transformation.
  • He was treated with the second-line chemotherapy using paclitaxel and gemcitabin combined with the radiation therapy, resulting in the disappearance of the tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy. Sarcoma / pathology. Sarcoma / therapy. Urethral Neoplasms / pathology. Urethral Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Cystectomy. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Prostatectomy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20715503.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-5287
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Hinyōkika Gakkai zasshi. The japanese journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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11. Oliai BR, Kahane H, Epstein JI: A clinicopathologic analysis of urothelial carcinomas diagnosed on prostate needle biopsy. Am J Surg Pathol; 2001 Jun;25(6):794-801
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  • [Title] A clinicopathologic analysis of urothelial carcinomas diagnosed on prostate needle biopsy.
  • No data exist on urothelial carcinoma diagnosed on prostatic needle biopsy.
  • We reviewed 21 cases (19 consultations) of urothelial carcinoma diagnosed on prostate needle biopsy from 1991 to 1998.
  • In 13 of 21 (62%) cases, urothelial carcinoma showed in situ urothelial carcinoma involving prostatic ducts and acini (DCIS) only; 6 of 21 (29%) cases showed both DCIS and invasive carcinoma and 2 of 21 (9%) cases showed widespread stromal invasion without DCIS.
  • A total of 7 of 17 (41%) men had no prior or subsequent history of urothelial carcinoma outside the prostate, 6 of 17 (35%) had concurrent urothelial cell carcinomas of the bladder (1 with extensive carcinoma in situ [CIS] at cystoprostatectomy), 2 of 17 (12%) had a prior urothelial cell carcinoma, and 2 of 17 (12%) developed urothelial cell carcinomas outside the prostate subsequent to the needle biopsy diagnosis.
  • A total of 14 of 18 (78%) men had an elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA), abnormal digital rectal examination, or abnormal ultrasound suggestive of prostatic adenocarcinoma.
  • Six of nine (67%) patients with DCIS eventually died of disease (DOD) (2 with prior urothelial cell carcinoma, 1 with no prior or subsequent history, 3 without information), and 3 of 9 (33%) patients with DCIS were alive with residual disease (AWD).
  • All men who are alive were treated aggressively with surgery and often adjuvant chemotherapy-radiation.
  • The diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma on prostate needle biopsy is difficult because it is rare and clinically can mimic prostatic adenocarcinoma; often there is no history of urothelial carcinoma elsewhere.
  • Although the prognosis is poor even with only apparent DCIS, histologic recognition is essential because the only opportunity for improved outcome is early and aggressive treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Biopsy, Needle. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11395558.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA58236
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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12. Hamasaki T, Kondo Y, Ogata Y, Yoshida K, Kimura G, Shimizu H, Nishimura T: Advanced carcinoma of the prostatic urethra in a patient with marked response to chemotherapy, leading to preservation of the bladder. Int J Clin Oncol; 2010 Feb;15(1):109-11
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  • [Title] Advanced carcinoma of the prostatic urethra in a patient with marked response to chemotherapy, leading to preservation of the bladder.
  • We performed transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) for a 66-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia.
  • Pathological examination diagnosed poorly differentiated urothelial carcinoma of the urethra with broad prostatic permeation.
  • Random bladder biopsies showed no malignancy, but a second TUR-P revealed urothelial carcinoma in the prostate and bladder neck.
  • Computed tomography (CT) showed lymph node metastases from para-aortic to right/left external iliac and left obturator nodes, so clinical stage T3N2M0 carcinoma of the prostatic urethra was diagnosed.
  • Given the presence of lymph node metastases, neoadjuvant chemotherapy using cisplatin 70 mg/m(2), ifosfamide 1.2 g/m(2) and docetaxel 70 mg/m(2) (PIT) was considered.
  • After chemotherapy, CT showed complete response (CR) of all lymph nodes.
  • Pathological findings of surgical specimens showed no residual carcinoma in the prostatic urethra or lymph nodes, although prostatic adenocarcinoma was recognized.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / secondary. Urethral Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Hyperplasia / surgery

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  • [Cites] Urology. 1996 Nov;48(5):703-10 [8911513.001]
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  • (PMID = 20087614.001).
  • [ISSN] 1437-7772
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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13. Théodore C: [Chemotherapy indications in the treatment of metastases from urological malignancies]. Prog Urol; 2008 Nov;18 Suppl 7:S219-22

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  • [Title] [Chemotherapy indications in the treatment of metastases from urological malignancies].
  • [Transliterated title] Indications de la chimiothérapie dans le traitement des cancers urologiques métastatiques.
  • Chemotherapy is useful for many metastatic urological cancer treatments.
  • Efficacy is directly linked to the type of carcinoma and its chemosensitivity.
  • Very efficient for testis tumors, it is at present the best weapon against metastatic urothelial tumors, especially for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.
  • For prostate cancer, chemotherapy is used when metastatic adenocarcinoma has become refractory to hormonal treatment.
  • It is not useful for renal carcinoma.
  • New targeted therapies could soon modify the role of chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Urologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urologic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19070795.001).
  • [ISSN] 1166-7087
  • [Journal-full-title] Progrès en urologie : journal de l'Association française d'urologie et de la Société française d'urologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog. Urol.
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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14. Mackler NJ, Pienta KJ: Drug insight: Use of docetaxel in prostate and urothelial cancers. Nat Clin Pract Urol; 2005 Feb;2(2):92-100; quiz 1 p following 112
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  • [Title] Drug insight: Use of docetaxel in prostate and urothelial cancers.
  • Their mechanism of action against tumor cells is by alteration of microtubule dynamics, which causes cell-cycle arrest during mitosis.
  • Docetaxel binds to the microtubules with a higher affinity than paclitaxel, and over a broader range of cell-cycle activities.
  • In hormone-refractory prostate cancer, docetaxel has been studied as both a single agent and in combination with estramustine, and in different treatment schedules, with demonstrated efficacy.
  • Two phase III trials have confirmed a survival benefit, making docetaxel the first chemotherapy agent with proven efficacy against prostate cancer.
  • In urothelial cancer, docetaxel has demonstrated activity and has been investigated as a single agent and in combination regimens.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Taxoids / therapeutic use. Urologic Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 16474654.001).
  • [ISSN] 1743-4270
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature clinical practice. Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Clin Pract Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel
  • [Number-of-references] 39
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15. Nese N, Kesici G, Lekili M, Isisag A: Urachal urothelial carcinoma diagnosed at a radical prostatectomy operation: a case report. Anal Quant Cytol Histol; 2010 Jun;32(3):174-7
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  • [Title] Urachal urothelial carcinoma diagnosed at a radical prostatectomy operation: a case report.
  • Up to now, only 21 urachal urothelial carcinomas (UCas) have been reported.
  • Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was 5.46 ng/mL.
  • Six months after the diagnosis, an undifferentiated tumor was detected in a bladder transurethral resection specimen; thus, chemotherapy was given.
  • After 1 course of chemotherapy, the patient was doing well.
  • CONCLUSION: The origin of urachal carcinomas is usually obscured as it is a highly invasive carcinoma.
  • The treatment choice for urachal carcinomas is cystectomy.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy are controversial.

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  • (PMID = 20701072.001).
  • [ISSN] 0884-6812
  • [Journal-full-title] Analytical and quantitative cytology and histology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anal. Quant. Cytol. Histol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Montironi R, Mazzucchelli R: HER-2 expression and gene amplification in high-grade PIN and prostate cancer. Arch Ital Urol Androl; 2006 Dec;78(4):135-9
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  • [Title] HER-2 expression and gene amplification in high-grade PIN and prostate cancer.
  • The aim of the current study was to analyze HER-2 expression and gene amplification in prostate cancer and HGPIN incidentally detected in cystoprostatectomies.
  • Eighty prostate cases were used.
  • Group 1 (incidental): nineteen cystoprostatectomy specimens with prostate cancer and HGPIN and no residual urothelial carcinoma in the prostate.
  • Group 2 (untreated): twenty-five radical prostatectomy specimens with prostate cancer Group 3 (hormonally treated): nineteen radical prostatectomy specimens with prostate cancer.
  • All the patients were under total androgen ablation therapy for three months before surgery.
  • Group 4 (hormone-independent): nine TURP specimens with locally recurrent androgen independent prostate cancer Group 5 (normal reference): eight cystoprostatectomy specimens without HGPIN and without prostate cancer, and no residual urothelial carcinoma.
  • None of the patients belonging to Groups 1, 2, and 5 had received chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or radiation therapy before surgery.
  • Prostate cancer HER-2 overexpression was seen in 16% of cases in the CyP group, 36% in the untreated group and 47.5% in the treated group.

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  • (PMID = 17269616.001).
  • [ISSN] 1124-3562
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivio italiano di urologia, andrologia : organo ufficiale [di] Societa italiana di ecografia urologica e nefrologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Ital Urol Androl
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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17. Lane Z, Epstein JI: Pseudocarcinomatous epithelial hyperplasia in the bladder unassociated with prior irradiation or chemotherapy. Am J Surg Pathol; 2008 Jan;32(1):92-7
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  • [Title] Pseudocarcinomatous epithelial hyperplasia in the bladder unassociated with prior irradiation or chemotherapy.
  • Pseudocarcinomatous epithelial hyperplasia in the bladder is a little known phenomenon, recognized to be associated with prior irradiation and/or chemotherapy.
  • We identified 8 of these cases mimicking invasive urothelial carcinoma from our consultation files from 07/04 to 07/06 with no prior history of radiation or chemotherapy.
  • These included case 1: atrial fibrillation, hypertension, congestive heart failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, and coronary artery vascular disease; case 2: coronary angioplasty, atrial fibrillation, hyperlipidemia, and amputation of arm for ischemia; case 3: hypertension, uncontrolled diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and atrial fibrillation; case 4: underlying arteriovenous malformation of the bladder; cases 5 to 6: history of indwelling Foley catheter; and case 7: history of radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer but no radiation.
  • The original diagnosis included nested variant urothelial carcinoma (1 case), atypical suspicious for invasive carcinoma (5 cases), hemangioma (1 case), and eosinophilic cystitis (1 case).
  • Patients were followed for a mean of 16.5 months (range, 10 to 34 mo), and none developed bladder cancer.
  • As a rare response to ischemia and chronic irritation, pseudocarcinomatous epithelial proliferations in the bladder may be confused with invasive urothelial carcinoma.
  • Pathologists must be aware of the histologic changes mimicking cancer, and recognize that it can occur outside of the setting of prior irradiation or chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 18162775.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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18. Schöder H, Larson SM: Positron emission tomography for prostate, bladder, and renal cancer. Semin Nucl Med; 2004 Oct;34(4):274-92
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  • [Title] Positron emission tomography for prostate, bladder, and renal cancer.
  • Prostate cancer, renal cancer, bladder, and other urothelial malignancies make up the common tumors of the male genitourinary tract.
  • For prostate cancer, common clinical scenarios include managing the patient presenting with 1) low-risk primary cancer;.
  • 2) high-risk primary cancer;.
  • 3) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after apparently successful primary therapy;.
  • The role of positron emission tomography (PET) is still evolving but is likely to be most important in determining early spread of disease in patients with aggressive tumors and for monitoring response to therapy in more advanced patients.
  • Available PET tracers for assessment of prostate cancer include FDG, 11C or 18F choline and acetate, 11C methionine, 18F fluoride, and fluorodihydrotestosterone.
  • Proper staging of prostate cancer is particularly important in high-risk primary disease before embarking on radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy.
  • PSA relapse frequently is the first sign of recurrent or metastatic disease after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy.
  • However, essentially all studies have shown that the sensitivity for recurrent disease detection is higher with either acetate or choline as compared with FDG.
  • Although more data need to be gathered, it is likely that these two agents will become the PET tracers of choice for staging prostate cancer once metastatic disease is strongly suspected or documented.
  • Several studies suggest that FDG uptake in metastatic prostate cancer lesions reflects the biologic activity of the disease.
  • Accordingly, FDG can be used to monitor the response to chemotherapy and hormonal therapy.
  • Androgen receptor imaging agents like fluorodihydrotestosterone are being explored to predict the biology of treatment response for progressive tumor in late stage disease in castrated patients.
  • The assessment of renal masses and primary staging of renal cell carcinoma are the domain of helical CT.
  • The value of other PET tracers in renal cell carcinoma is under investigation.
  • Because of its renal excretion, FDG is not a useful tracer for the detection of primary bladder tumors.
  • The few studies that investigated its role in the detection of lymph node metastases at the time of primary staging were largely disappointing.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / radionuclide imaging. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Kidney Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Positron-Emission Tomography / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Radioisotopes. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radionuclide imaging. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Practice Patterns, Physicians'. Prognosis. Radiopharmaceuticals. Treatment Outcome


19. Hatae M, Nakamura T, Ohnishi Y: [Evidenced-based medicine and future direction of Taxol]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2000 Jul;27(8):1279-87
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  • Taxol was introduced for the clinical treatment of several solid tumor malignancies in the 1990s.
  • It has been established that primary chemotherapy based on Taxol is the standard for non-small cell lung cancer and epithelial ovarian cancer.
  • After initial chemotherapy containing doxorubicin, sequential administration of Taxol for advanced or metastatic breast cancer is recommended by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States.
  • Taxol-based chemotherapy and/or concurrent chemoradiation for head and neck cancer, esophageal carcinoma, urothelial and prostate cancer are under investigation, but these trials have not produced evidence showing that they are superior to the present standard treatment for these malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Evidence-Based Medicine. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease-Free Survival. Female. Forecasting. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 10945027.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
  • [Number-of-references] 47
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20. Anderson CR, McNiel EA, Gillette EL, Powers BE, LaRue SM: Late complications of pelvic irradiation in 16 dogs. Vet Radiol Ultrasound; 2002 Mar-Apr;43(2):187-92
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  • When external beam radiation therapy is administered to the pelvis, normal tissues irradiated may include the colon, small intestine, urethra, bladder, bone, and spinal cord.
  • Medical records of all dogs treated with curative intent external beam radiation therapy to the pelvic region between 1993 and 1999 were reviewed.
  • Patients with follow-up longer than 9 months or any patient that developed late complications earlier than 9 months were evaluated.
  • Diseases treated included transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, transitional cell carcinoma of the prostate, and anal sac apocrine gland adenocarcinoma.
  • Four dose/fractionation schemes were used: 49.5 Gy in 3.3 Gy fractions, 54 Gy in 3.0 Gy fractions, 54 Gy in 2.7 Gy fractions, and 18 Gy intraoperative radiation therapy followed by 43 Gy external beam radiation therapy in 2.9 Gy fractions.
  • Implantable chemotherapy in the form of an OPLA-Pt sponge was used in six dogs as a radiation potentiator.
  • All dogs with severe late effects received 3 or 3.3 Gy per fraction, and 80% received radiation potentiators.
  • In the seven dogs that received 2.7 Gy or 2.9 Gy per fraction, late effects were classified as none (n = 5), mild colitis (n = 1), and moderate colitis (n = 1).
  • Radiation therapy can be administered to the pelvic region with a minimal risk of late effects to the colon by giving smaller doses per fraction and avoiding systemic radiation potentiators.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / veterinary. Dog Diseases / radiotherapy. Neoplasms / veterinary. Radiation Injuries / veterinary

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  • (PMID = 11954816.001).
  • [ISSN] 1058-8183
  • [Journal-full-title] Veterinary radiology & ultrasound : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Radiology and the International Veterinary Radiology Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vet Radiol Ultrasound
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. DiPaola RS, Rubin E, Toppmeyer D, Eid J, Butzbach D, Dvorzhinski D, Capanna T, Cairdella M, Shih JW, Goodin S, Todd MB: Gemcitabine combined with sequential paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with urothelial cancers and other advanced malignancies. Med Sci Monit; 2003 Feb;9(2):PI5-11
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  • [Title] Gemcitabine combined with sequential paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with urothelial cancers and other advanced malignancies.
  • MATERIAL/METHODS: The effect of the P and C drug sequence on tumor cell viability was assessed with a tetrazolium assay on T24 bladder and DU145 prostate cancer cells.
  • Patients with transitional cell cancer (TCC) and other advanced malignancies were treated with G and P on days 1, 8, and 15 of each 28 day cycle.
  • Therapy was well tolerated; fever and neutropenia occurred in only one patient at the RPTD.
  • GCP should be compared to other combination regimens under investigation for the treatment of TCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carboplatin / therapeutic use. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Deoxycytidine / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Cell Survival. Cohort Studies. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Urothelium / pathology

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  • (PMID = 12601301.001).
  • [ISSN] 1234-1010
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Sci. Monit.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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22. Medvedev VL: [Hormone-resistant epithelial cancer of the prostate]. Urologiia; 2001 Jul-Aug;(4):29-33
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  • [Title] [Hormone-resistant epithelial cancer of the prostate].
  • Hormone-resistance is typical for tumors from urothelial, basal and neuroendocrine PC cells, glandular epithelium cells which lost androgen receptors (AR) and tumors consisting of cells which retain AR but simultaneously express Bcl-2 and/or p53 genes.
  • The development of hormone-resistant cancer 2.5-3 years after hormonal therapy is associated with changes in immunophenotype of tumor cells.
  • Thus, immunophenotype of tumor cells may serve a prognostic marker of hormonal resistance of the tumor and dictate the treatment policy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Androgen Antagonists / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Apoptosis. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Male. Middle Aged. Mutation. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / genetics. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / immunology. Prognosis. Receptors, Androgen / genetics. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 11569231.001).
  • [ISSN] 1728-2985
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologii︠a︡ (Moscow, Russia : 1999)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urologiia
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgen Antagonists; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Receptors, Androgen
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23. Uemura M, Imamura R, Inoue H, Nishimura K, Mizutani S, Miyoshi S, Mise T: [Primary transitional cell carcinoma of prostate: a case report]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2000 Jul;46(7):495-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Primary transitional cell carcinoma of prostate: a case report].
  • Prostate specific antigen remained within the normal limit.
  • Under the diagnosis of benign prostatic hypertrophy, transurethral resection of prostate was performed.
  • Pathological examination of the resected specimens of the prostate revealed transitional cell carcinoma.
  • Two courses of systemic M-VAC (methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, cisplatin) chemotherapy were performed, followed by cystoprostatourethrectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and ileal conduit construction.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Treatment Outcome. Urologic Surgical Procedures. Vinblastine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 10965459.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; M-VAC protocol
  • [Number-of-references] 17
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24. Boccardo F, Guglielmini P: Ifosfamide in urologic cancer. Oncology; 2003;65 Suppl 2:67-72
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  • The therapeutic activity of ifosfamide in urologic tumors has been reviewed.
  • Ifosfamide has definite activity in nephroblastoma, where it represents the treatment of choice for children who are not cured by front-line chemotherapy, and for the adults who are diagnosed with this uncommon disease.
  • Definite therapeutic activity has also been shown in patients with urothelial tract malignancies and it represents a major option for patients failing first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy.
  • A modest activity has been shown by ifosfamide in renal cancer (including the sarcomatoid variant) and in hormone-refractory prostate cancer, which unfortunately respond poorly to cytotoxic chemotherapy.
  • No results of ifosfamide in penile carcinoma are available so far.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Ifosfamide / therapeutic use. Urologic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 14586152.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-2414
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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25. Chen LM, Verity NJ, Chai KX: Loss of prostasin (PRSS8) in human bladder transitional cell carcinoma cell lines is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). BMC Cancer; 2009;9:377
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  • [Title] Loss of prostasin (PRSS8) in human bladder transitional cell carcinoma cell lines is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT).
  • BACKGROUND: The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored epithelial extracellular membrane serine protease prostasin (PRSS8) is expressed abundantly in normal epithelia and essential for terminal epithelial differentiation, but down-regulated in human prostate, breast, and gastric cancers and invasive cancer cell lines.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate prostasin expression states in the transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) of the human bladder and in human TCC cell lines.
  • METHODS: Normal human bladder tissues and TCC on a bladder cancer tissue microarray (TMA) were evaluated for prostasin expression by means of immunohistochemistry.
  • A panel of 16 urothelial and TCC cell lines were evaluated for prostasin and E-cadherin expression by western blot and quantitative PCR, and for prostasin gene promoter region CpG methylation by methylation-specific PCR (MSP).
  • RESULTS: Prostasin is expressed in the normal human urothelium and in a normal human urothelial cell line, but is significantly down-regulated in high-grade TCC and lost in 9 (of 15) TCC cell lines.
  • Loss of prostasin expression in the TCC cell lines correlated with loss of or reduced E-cadherin expression, loss of epithelial morphology, and promoter DNA hypermethylation.
  • CONCLUSION: Loss of prostasin expression in bladder transitional cell carcinomas is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and may have functional implications in tumor invasion and resistance to chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / enzymology. Cell Differentiation. Serine Endopeptidases / metabolism. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / enzymology. Urothelium / cytology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cadherins / genetics. Cadherins / metabolism. Cell Line. DNA Methylation. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Urinary Bladder / cytology. Urinary Bladder / metabolism


26. Lee DJ, Rothberg MB, McKiernan JM, Benson MC, Badani KK: Robot-assisted radical cystoprostatectomy in complex surgical patients: single institution report. Can J Urol; 2009 Jun;16(3):4664-9
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  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of robotic-assisted radical cystoprostatectomy (RRCP) in a salvage setting for patients with a history of radiation and chemotherapy treatment, complex pelvic anatomy, and significant comorbidities.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a 5 month period, six patients who met these criteria underwent RRCP for urothelial carcinoma.
  • Two of the patients had major cardiovascular disease and were previously denied an open procedure subsequently underwent chemotherapy with external beam radiation protocol.
  • One patient had brachytherapy for prior prostate cancer, and three additional patients had neoadjuvant chemotherapy with large diverticula, measuring up to 12 cm in size.
  • Four patients had pathologic pT3a disease, one patient had pT4a, and one patient had pT1 urethral squamous cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / surgery. Cystectomy / methods. Prostatectomy / methods. Robotics. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Salvage Therapy. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Can J Urol. 2009 Jun;16(3):4670 [19497176.001]
  • (PMID = 19497175.001).
  • [ISSN] 1195-9479
  • [Journal-full-title] The Canadian journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
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27. Gillitzer R, Hampel C, Wiesner C, Hadaschik B, Thüroff J: Single-institution experience with primary tumours of the male urethra. BJU Int; 2008 Apr;101(8):964-8

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Single-institution experience with primary tumours of the male urethra.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess primary tumours of the urethra in males.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our database from 1986 to 2006 for primary tumours of the male urethra; nine patients with primary tumours of the urethra were analysed and follow-up information was obtained.
  • RESULTS: Three patients had tumours of the prostatic urethra, two of which had proliferating focal inflammation and one a low-grade, superficial urothelial cancer.
  • Six patients had carcinoma of the bulbar or penile urethra, including two with previous local percutaneous radiotherapy for prostate cancer.
  • All had primary surgical excision that was adapted to tumour location and extension.
  • One patient had adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery.
  • CONCLUSION: Primary carcinoma of the male urethra is a rare entity.
  • Multimodal therapy might be required to obtain an optimum oncological outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Urethral Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Epidemiologic Methods. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 18070169.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-410X
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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28. Morikawa H, Cho M, Takada S, Fujimoto K, Uemura H, Ozono S, Hirao Y, Natsume O: [A case of primary transitional cell carcinoma of the prostate]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2003 Jun;49(6):357-60
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  • [Title] [A case of primary transitional cell carcinoma of the prostate].
  • Prostate cancer was strongly suspected by transrectal examination with prostate specific antigen (PSA) elevated to 77.8 ng/ml.
  • Pathological diagnosis of prostate biopsy specimen was transitional cell carcinoma with grade 3 malignancy and negative staining for PSA.
  • However, immunostaining for PSA revealed that the cervical lymph node specimen resected before was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of prostate.
  • Endocrine therapy (goserelin acetate depot, bicalutamide) and systemic chemotherapy (methotrexate, epirubicin, cisplatin) were performed combined with irradiation to right ischium metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Combined Modality Therapy. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Male. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12894737.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
  • [Number-of-references] 11
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29. Weissbach L: [Diagnostic work-up of bone metastases of genitourinary tumors and their treatment with bisphosphonates. Interdisciplinary consensus conference, Frankfurt, 2006]. Urologe A; 2006 Dec;45(12):1527-31
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  • [Title] [Diagnostic work-up of bone metastases of genitourinary tumors and their treatment with bisphosphonates. Interdisciplinary consensus conference, Frankfurt, 2006].
  • [Transliterated title] Diagnostik von Knochenmetastasen urologischer Tumoren und deren Behandlung mit Bisphosphonaten. Interdisziplinäre Konsensuskonferenz Frankfurt 2006.
  • Osseous metastases of hormone-refractory prostate cancer require treatment with zoledronic acid.
  • Bisphosphonates can be combined with radiation therapy and chemotherapy; additional administration of calcium and vitamin D is not mandatory.
  • It is recommended that patients with bone metastases of renal cell cancer be treated with bisphosphonates approved for this indication.
  • For urothelial carcinoma and other genitourinary tumors, the available data are not sufficient to give a recommendation.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms. Diphosphonates / therapeutic use. Patient Care Team / standards. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Practice Patterns, Physicians' / standards. Urogenital Neoplasms / diagnosis. Urogenital Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Germany. Humans

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  • (PMID = 17091278.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-2592
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Urologe. Ausg. A
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urologe A
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Consensus Development Conference; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Diphosphonates
  • [Number-of-references] 18
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30. Schröpfer E, Meyer T: Surgical aspects of pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis: two case reports. Cases J; 2009;2:6452
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The purpose of this paper is the development of an algorithm for the surgical therapy of PCI based one two case reports.
  • CASE PRESENTATIONS: A 17-year-old girl with Down syndrome and leucopenia due to chemotherapy for acute lymphatic leukemia was admitted with acute septic conditions and PCI.
  • The second patient, a 79 year old man, with urothelial carcinoma and carcinoma of the prostate presented a distended abdomen.

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31. Dovedi SJ, Davies BR: Emerging targeted therapies for bladder cancer: a disease waiting for a drug. Cancer Metastasis Rev; 2009 Dec;28(3-4):355-67
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Emerging targeted therapies for bladder cancer: a disease waiting for a drug.
  • Urothelial cell carcinoma is the fifth most common cancer and the costliest to treat.
  • The standard of care, intravesical chemo- and immunotherapy, while effective, is associated with a considerable side-effect profile and approximately 30% of patients either fail to respond to treatment or suffer recurrent disease within 5 years.
  • Although bladder cancer is fairly well-genetically characterized, clinical trials with molecularly targeted agents have, in comparison to other solid tumors such as lung, breast and prostate, been few in number and largely unsuccessful, with no new agents being registered in the last 20 years.
  • Hence, bladder cancer represents a considerable opportunity and challenge for molecularly targeted therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Drug Delivery Systems. Drugs, Investigational / therapeutic use. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Intravesical. Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. BCG Vaccine / administration & dosage. BCG Vaccine / therapeutic use. Carcinoma in Situ / drug therapy. Carcinoma in Situ / economics. Carcinoma in Situ / epidemiology. Carcinoma in Situ / immunology. Carcinoma in Situ / surgery. Carcinoma, Papillary / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Papillary / economics. Carcinoma, Papillary / epidemiology. Carcinoma, Papillary / immunology. Carcinoma, Papillary / surgery. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Cystectomy. Disease Management. Genetic Therapy. Humans. Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. Neoplasm Proteins / physiology. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 19997963.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7233
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer metastasis reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Metastasis Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / BCG Vaccine; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Drugs, Investigational; 0 / Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
  • [Number-of-references] 105
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32. Frank MB, Yang Q, Osban J, Azzarello JT, Saban MR, Saban R, Ashley RA, Welter JC, Fung KM, Lin HK: Frankincense oil derived from Boswellia carteri induces tumor cell specific cytotoxicity. BMC Complement Altern Med; 2009 Mar 18;9:6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Frankincense oil derived from Boswellia carteri induces tumor cell specific cytotoxicity.
  • METHODS: Frankincense oil-induced cell viability was investigated in human bladder cancer J82 cells and immortalized normal bladder urothelial UROtsa cells.
  • RESULTS: Within a range of concentration, frankincense oil suppressed cell viability in bladder transitional carcinoma J82 cells but not in UROtsa cells.
  • Comprehensive gene expression analysis confirmed that frankincense oil activates genes that are responsible for cell cycle arrest, cell growth suppression, and apoptosis in J82 cells.
  • However, frankincense oil-induced cell death in J82 cells did not result in DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis.
  • CONCLUSION: Frankincense oil appears to distinguish cancerous from normal bladder cells and suppress cancer cell viability.
  • Microarray and bioinformatics analysis proposed multiple pathways that can be activated by frankincense oil to induce bladder cancer cell death.
  • Frankincense oil might represent an alternative intravesical agent for bladder cancer treatment.

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  • (PMID = 19296830.001).
  • [ISSN] 1472-6882
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC complementary and alternative medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Complement Altern Med
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / RR 15577; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / P20 RR015577; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U2 AI 062629; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U19 AI062629; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / RR 16478; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / P20 RR016478; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / RR 03025
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Oils, Volatile; 0 / Plant Extracts; 0 / Resins, Plant; 0 / Transcription Factors
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2664784
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