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Items 1 to 62 of about 62
1. Riccio AI, Wodajo FM, Malawer M: Metastatic carcinoma of the long bones. Am Fam Physician; 2007 Nov 15;76(10):1489-94
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  • [Title] Metastatic carcinoma of the long bones.
  • Breast, prostate, renal, thyroid, and lung carcinomas commonly metastasize to bone.
  • Managing skeletal metastatic disease can be complex.
  • Patients who are not at risk for impending fracture can be treated with a combination of radiotherapy and adjuvant drug therapy.
  • Bisphosphonates diminish pain and prolong the time to significant skeletal complications.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms. Carcinoma. Femur
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Diagnostic Imaging. Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis

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  • (PMID = 18052014.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-838X
  • [Journal-full-title] American family physician
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am Fam Physician
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 24
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2. Watanabe M, Boyer JL, Crystal RG: AAVrh.10-mediated genetic delivery of bevacizumab to the pleura to provide local anti-VEGF to suppress growth of metastatic lung tumors. Gene Ther; 2010 Aug;17(8):1042-51
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  • [Title] AAVrh.10-mediated genetic delivery of bevacizumab to the pleura to provide local anti-VEGF to suppress growth of metastatic lung tumors.
  • Humanized monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab, Avastin), approved as a treatment for non-squamous, non-small cell lung cancer, requires administration every 3 weeks.
  • We hypothesized that an intrapleural administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing an anti-VEGF-A antibody equivalent of bevacizumab would result in sustained anti-VEGF-A localized expression within the lung and suppress metastatic tumor growth.
  • A metastatic lung tumor model was established in severe combined immunodeficient mice by intravenous administration of human DU145 prostate carcinoma cells.
  • Intrapleural administration of AAVrh.10alphaVEGF directed long-term expression of the anti-human VEGF-A antibody in lung, as shown by sustained, high-level anti-human VEGF titers in lung epithelial lining fluid for 40 weeks, which was the duration of the study.
  • Thus, intrapleural administration of an AAVrh.10 vector, encoding the murine monoclonal antibody equivalent of bevacizumab, effectively suppresses the growth of metastatic lung tumors, suggesting AAV-mediated gene transfer to the pleura to deliver bevacizumab locally to the lung as a novel alternative platform to conventional monoclonal antibody therapy.

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  • (PMID = 20596059.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5462
  • [Journal-full-title] Gene therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gene Ther.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL066952-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / U01 HL066952; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / U01 HL066952-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / U01 HL66952
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS165728; NLM/ PMC2921016
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3. Yildirim Y, Akcay Y, Ozyilkan O, Celasun B: Prostate small cell carcinoma and skin metastases: a rare entity. Med Princ Pract; 2008;17(3):250-2
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prostate small cell carcinoma and skin metastases: a rare entity.
  • OBJECTIVES: To report a rare case of small cell carcinoma of the prostate with unusual skin metastasis.
  • Abdominal computed tomography scans revealed a prostatic mass invading the surrounding tissues and multiple perirectal, periprostatic, para-aortic and pericaval lymph nodes.
  • Needle biopsy specimens showed both small cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma.
  • He was treated with combination chemotherapy: cisplatin and etoposide and bilateral orchiectomy.
  • After six cycles of the chemotherapy, disease progressed and the patient did not respond to salvage therapy; hence, palliative care was instituted.
  • During the follow-up, papillary lesions were observed in the scrotal skin; biopsy showed metastatic small cell carcinoma.
  • CONCLUSION: Small cell carcinoma of the prostate is an aggressive disease with a highly metastatic potential; but skin metastases are very uncommon.
  • It has poor prognosis despite therapy.
  • Management resembles that of small cell carcinoma of the lung.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Small Cell / secondary. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / secondary

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 18408396.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0151
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical principles and practice : international journal of the Kuwait University, Health Science Centre
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Princ Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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4. Rausch MP, Hahn T, Ramanathapuram L, Bradley-Dunlop D, Mahadevan D, Mercado-Pimentel ME, Runyan RB, Besselsen DG, Zhang X, Cheung HK, Lee WC, Ling LE, Akporiaye ET: An orally active small molecule TGF-beta receptor I antagonist inhibits the growth of metastatic murine breast cancer. Anticancer Res; 2009 Jun;29(6):2099-109
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  • [Title] An orally active small molecule TGF-beta receptor I antagonist inhibits the growth of metastatic murine breast cancer.
  • Initially functioning as a tumor suppressor, this cytokine later contributes to the progression of malignant cells by enhancing their invasive and metastatic potential as well as suppressing antitumor immunity.
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of SM16, a novel small molecule ALK5 kinase inhibitor, to treat a highly metastatic, TGF-beta-producing murine mammary carcinoma (4T1).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice bearing established 4T1 tumors were treated with SM16 intraperitoneally (i.p.) or orally, and primary and metastatic tumor growth was assessed.
  • RESULTS: SM16 inhibited Smad2 phosphorylation in cultured 4T1 tumor cells as well as primary and metastatic 4T1 tumor tissue.
  • When delivered via daily i.p. injection or orally through mouse chow, SM16 inhibited the growth of primary and metastatic 4T1 tumors.
  • CONCLUSION: Taken together, the data indicate that the antitumor efficacy of SM16 is dependent on an immune-mediated mechanism and that SM16 may represent a safe and effective treatment for metastatic breast cancer.

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  • (PMID = 19528470.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA023074; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA094111-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA094111; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1 RO1 CA94111-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30-CA23074; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA094111-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Azabicyclo Compounds; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta; 0 / SM16 compound; EC 2.7.1.11 / TGF-beta type I receptor; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS191316; NLM/ PMC2860108
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5. Candura SM, Fonte R, Cantale G, Paolotti D, Biscaldi G: [Small cell carcinoma of the prostate. Description of a case]. Recenti Prog Med; 2000 Nov;91(11):567-70
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  • [Title] [Small cell carcinoma of the prostate. Description of a case].
  • [Transliterated title] Carcinoma a piccole cellule della prostata. Descrizione di un caso.
  • The case of a 73-year-old man with metastatic small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate is described.
  • Seric neuron-specific enolase (NSE) was enhanced (75.4 ng/mL), while the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was in the normal range.
  • Therapy with etoposide and carboplatin induced a temporary partial remission, with fairly good quality of life and decrease of the NSE levels (down to 15.0 ng/mL).
  • Treatment is problematic, however chemotherapy may prolong survival allowing, at least temporarly, an acceptable life quality.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Small Cell / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Carcinoembryonic Antigen / blood. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Phosphopyruvate Hydratase / blood. Prognosis. Skin Neoplasms / secondary

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  • (PMID = 11125949.001).
  • [ISSN] 0034-1193
  • [Journal-full-title] Recenti progressi in medicina
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Recenti Prog Med
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen; EC 4.2.1.11 / Phosphopyruvate Hydratase
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6. van Golen KL, Bao L, Brewer GJ, Pienta KJ, Kamradt JM, Livant DL, Merajver SD: Suppression of tumor recurrence and metastasis by a combination of the PHSCN sequence and the antiangiogenic compound tetrathiomolybdate in prostate carcinoma. Neoplasia; 2002 Sep-Oct;4(5):373-9
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  • [Title] Suppression of tumor recurrence and metastasis by a combination of the PHSCN sequence and the antiangiogenic compound tetrathiomolybdate in prostate carcinoma.
  • Plasma fibronectin-mediated invasion of human DU145 prostate cancer cell line was efficaciously inhibited in a rat tumor model by treatment with Ac-PHSCN-NH(2) peptide.
  • We demonstrated that mice treated thrice weekly with intravenous Ac-PHSCN-NH(2) peptide survived tumor-free for more than 30 weeks post-primary tumor excision, whereas their untreated counterparts succumbed to recurrence and/or metastatic disease in significantly less time.
  • Because of the universal requirement for angiogenesis in solid tumor growth, we tested the efficacy of copper deficiency induced by tetrathiomolybdate (TM) to retard tumor growth in the Dunning prostate cancer model.
  • We sought to reduce tumor growth at the primary and metastatic sites by combining the anti-invasion Ac-PHSCN-NH(2) peptide with TM.
  • Improved survival, fewer metastatic lesions, and excellent tolerability were observed with the combination therapy.

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  • (PMID = 12192595.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8002
  • [Journal-full-title] Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neoplasia
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA069568; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA077612; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA69568; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA 77612
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Oligopeptides; 0 / acetyl-prolyl-histidyl-seryl-cysteinyl-asparaginamide; 789U1901C5 / Copper; 81AH48963U / Molybdenum; 91U3TGV99T / tetrathiomolybdate
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1564117
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7. Gilbert JA, Frederick LM, Ames MM: The aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa is selectively cytotoxic to human pulmonary carcinoid and small cell lung carcinoma cells. Clin Cancer Res; 2000 Nov;6(11):4365-72
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  • [Title] The aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa is selectively cytotoxic to human pulmonary carcinoid and small cell lung carcinoma cells.
  • Here, we report Western and Northern analyses detecting large quantities of AAAD polypeptide and mRNA in human carcinoid primary as well as metastatic tumors compared with normal surrounding tissues.
  • To assess the feasibility of targeting these high AAAD levels for chemotherapy, AAAD inhibitors carbidopa (alpha-methyl-dopahydrazine), alpha-monofluoromethyldopa (MFMD), and 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine (NSD-1015) were incubated (72 h) with NCI-H727 human lung carcinoid cells.
  • On exposure to other human tumor lines, carbidopa was lethal only to NCI-H146 and NCI-H209 small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) lines (IC50 = 12 +/- 1 microM and 22 +/- 5 microM, respectively).
  • Carbidopa (100 microM) decreased growth of (but did not kill) SK-N-SH neuroblastoma and A204 rhabdomyosarcoma cells and did not affect proliferation of DU 145 prostate, MCF7 breast, or NCI-H460 large cell lung carcinoma lines.
  • For lung tumor lines (carcinoid, two SCLC, and one large cell lung carcinoma), AAAD activity was correlated with the potency of carbidopa-induced cytotoxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase Inhibitors. Carbidopa / pharmacology. Carcinoid Tumor / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Small Cell / drug therapy. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Division / drug effects. Humans. Ileum / enzymology. Liver / enzymology. Microscopy, Electron. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 11106255.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 58450
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase Inhibitors; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; MNX7R8C5VO / Carbidopa
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8. Mack PC, Redman MW, Chansky K, Williamson SK, Farneth NC, Lara PN Jr, Franklin WA, Le QT, Crowley JJ, Gandara DR, SWOG: Lower osteopontin plasma levels are associated with superior outcomes in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy: SWOG Study S0003. J Clin Oncol; 2008 Oct 10;26(29):4771-6
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  • [Title] Lower osteopontin plasma levels are associated with superior outcomes in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy: SWOG Study S0003.
  • PURPOSE: S0003 was a phase III trial of carboplatin/paclitaxel with or without the hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • RESULTS: Patients with lower OPN levels (below the median) had a significantly superior overall survival compared with patients with higher levels, regardless of treatment arm (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.60, P = .002).
  • No differences were observed between treatment arms.
  • No associations were observed between patient outcomes and VEGF or PAI-1 levels; however, plasma concentrations of these markers were significantly interrelated (P < .0001) and significantly decreased after treatment (P = .0002 and P = .03, respectively).
  • CONCLUSION: Pretreatment plasma levels of OPN are significantly associated with patient response, progression-free survival, and overall survival in chemotherapy-treated patients with advanced NSCLC.

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  • (PMID = 18779603.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA180846; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5U10 CA32102; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA107228
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Triazines; 106441-73-0 / Osteopontin; 1UD32YR59G / tirapazamine; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2653139
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9. Tassi R, Muto A, Rangan S, Vannini A, Politi L, Neri B: Response and safety of sunitinib in a heavily pre-treated metastatic non-small cell lung carcinoma patient. Anticancer Res; 2010 Dec;30(12):5169-73
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  • [Title] Response and safety of sunitinib in a heavily pre-treated metastatic non-small cell lung carcinoma patient.
  • BACKGROUND: The activity of sunitinib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic and antitumor activities, has been explored in several solid malignancies such as breast, lung, prostate and pancreatic cancer.
  • Currently it is approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.
  • Non-small cell lung cancer usually presents at an advanced or metastatic stage at diagnosis.
  • Treatment options are limited for this disease, therefore symptom palliation and patient's quality of life are primary objectives of therapy.
  • CASE REPORT: We describe the case of a patient (male, 67 years old) with heavily pre-treated metastatic non-small cell lung carcinoma who received sunitinib according to the following 3-week schedule: 50 mg daily for 2 weeks followed by a 1-week rest.
  • The patient completed six months of therapy achieving a major disease response without high-grade toxicities.
  • CONCLUSION: In this case, sunitinib shows promising single-agent activity in pretreated non-small cell lung cancer, with a good toxicity profile and flexible administration schedule.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Indoles / administration & dosage. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pyrroles / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 21187507.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib
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10. Trivedi C, Redman B, Flaherty LE, Kucuk O, Du W, Heilbrun LK, Hussain M: Weekly 1-hour infusion of paclitaxel. Clinical feasibility and efficacy in patients with hormone-refractory prostate carcinoma. Cancer; 2000 Jul 15;89(2):431-6
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  • [Title] Weekly 1-hour infusion of paclitaxel. Clinical feasibility and efficacy in patients with hormone-refractory prostate carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Preclinically, paclitaxel given according to an intense bolus schedule has significant antitumor activity against human prostate carcinoma cell lines in SCID mice.
  • The authors evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of weekly 1-hour infusion of paclitaxel in patients with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate carcinoma (HRPC).
  • METHODS: A total of 18 patients with progressive metastatic HRPC were enrolled.
  • Patients had to have no prior chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Eighteen patients with a median age of 68.5 years and a median prostate specific antigen (PSA) level of 82 ng/mL (range, 2.17-3196 ng/mL) were enrolled.
  • The median number of prior hormone treatments was 2, and 12 patients on antiandrogens completed antiandrogen withdrawal.
  • Seventeen patients received a total of 31 cycles (157 courses) and 1 patient refused chemotherapy.
  • Of the 8 [corrected] patients with measurable disease, 4 achieved a major response, with 1 complete response (in the lung) and 3 partial responses (1 in the liver and 2 in the lymph nodes).
  • The minimal myelosuppressive effects make a modified schedule (lower doses on the same schedule or a shorter schedule of the same dose) attractive for future combination chemotherapy trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Androgens. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / immunology. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Survival Analysis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 American Cancer Society.
  • [ErratumIn] Cancer 2000 Sep 15;89(6):1412
  • (PMID = 10918176.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-22453
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgens; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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11. Jantscheff P, Ziroli V, Esser N, Graeser R, Kluth J, Sukolinskaya A, Taylor LA, Unger C, Massing U: Anti-metastatic effects of liposomal gemcitabine in a human orthotopic LNCaP prostate cancer xenograft model. Clin Exp Metastasis; 2009;26(8):981-92
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  • [Title] Anti-metastatic effects of liposomal gemcitabine in a human orthotopic LNCaP prostate cancer xenograft model.
  • Fatal outcomes of prostate carcinoma (PCa) mostly result from metastatic spread rather than from primary tumor burden.
  • Here, we monitored growth and metastatic spread of an orthotopic luciferase/GFP-expressing LNCaP PCa xenograft model in SCID mice by in vivo imaging and in vitro luciferase assay of tissues homogenates.
  • Although the metastatic spread generally shows a significant correlation to primary tumor volumes, the susceptibility of various tissues to metastatic invasion was different in the number of affected animals as well as in absolute metastatic burden in the individual tissues.
  • Using this xenograft model we showed that treatment with liposomal gemcitabine (GemLip) inhibited growth of the primary tumors (83.9 +/- 6.4%; P = 0.009) as well as metastatic burden in lymph nodes (95.6 +/- 24.0%; P = 0.047), lung (86.5 +/- 10.5%; P = 0.015), kidney (88.4 +/- 9.2%; P = 0.045) and stomach (79.5 +/- 6.6%; P = 0.036) already at very low efficient concentrations (8 mg/kg) as compared to conventional gemcitabine (360 mg/kg).
  • Our data show that this orthotopic LNCaP xenograft PCa model seems to reflect the clinical situation characterized by the fact that at time of diagnosis, prostate neoplasms are biologically heterogeneous and thus, it is a useful model to investigate new anti-metastatic therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Neoplasm Metastasis / prevention & control. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Capillary Permeability. Cell Line, Tumor. Cells, Cultured. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical / methods. Humans. Liposomes / pharmacology. Luciferases / analysis. Luciferases / genetics. Male. Mice. Mice, Nude. Mice, SCID. Neoplasm Transplantation. Transduction, Genetic. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 19784785.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7276
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & experimental metastasis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Exp. Metastasis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Liposomes; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; EC 1.13.12.- / Luciferases
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12. Hall WA, Djalilian HR, Nussbaum ES, Cho KH: Long-term survival with metastatic cancer to the brain. Med Oncol; 2000 Nov;17(4):279-86
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  • [Title] Long-term survival with metastatic cancer to the brain.
  • Metastatic cancer to the brain has a poor prognosis.
  • A retrospective review of 740 patients with brain metastases treated over a 20 y period identified 51 that survived 2 or more years from the time of diagnosis of the brain metastasis.
  • Prognostic variables that were examined included age, sex, histology, tumor number and location, and treatment.
  • For all tumor types (740 patients), the actuarial survival rate was 8.1% at 2 y, 4.8% at 3 y, and 2.4% at 5 y.
  • At 2 y, patients with ovarian carcinoma had the highest survival rate (23.9%) and patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) had the lowest survival rate (1.7%).
  • At 5y, survival rates were 7.8% for ovarian carcinoma, 2.9% for non-SCLC, 2.3% for melanoma and renal cell carcinoma, 1.3% for breast carcinoma and there were no survivors with SCLC, gastrointestinal, bladder, unknown primary, or prostate cancer.
  • Age, sex, histology, location for single tumors, systemic chemotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery did not significantly influence survival.
  • Multivariate analysis showed younger age (P< 0.05), single metastasis (P < 0.0001), surgical resection (P < 0.0001), whole brain radiation therapy (P < 0.0001), and chemotherapy (P = 0.0288) were associated with prolonged survival.
  • Patients with a single non-SCLC, breast, melanoma, renal cell, and ovarian carcinoma brain metastasis have the best chance for long-term survival if treated with surgical resection and WBRT.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Male. Melanoma / pathology. Middle Aged. Ovarian Neoplasms / pathology. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Survival Analysis. Survivors

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  • (PMID = 11114706.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-0560
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical oncology (Northwood, London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Bianciotto C, Demirci H, Shields CL, Eagle RC Jr, Shields JA: Metastatic tumors to the eyelid: report of 20 cases and review of the literature. Arch Ophthalmol; 2009 Aug;127(8):999-1005
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  • [Title] Metastatic tumors to the eyelid: report of 20 cases and review of the literature.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the primary sites, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of 20 patients with cancer metastatic to the eyelids.
  • RESULTS: The primary tumors included skin melanoma (4 [20%]), uveal melanoma (4 [20%]), breast carcinoma and conjunctival melanoma (3 [15%] each), renal cell carcinoma (2 [10%]), and medullary thyroid carcinoma, prostate carcinoma, lung carcinoma, and salivary gland carcinoma (1 [5%] each).
  • Primary treatment included excision alone in 6 patients (30%), external beam radiotherapy in 7 (35%), systemic chemotherapy in 4 (20%), and observation in 3 (15%).
  • The metastatic tumors regressed in 10 patients (50%), remained stable in 7 (35%), and showed progression in 3 (15%).
  • After a mean follow-up of 16 months, 9 patients (45%) were alive and 11 (55%) had died of systemic metastatic disease.
  • These patients usually have multiple metastatic sites, ocular and nonocular.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Eyelid Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures. Radiotherapy. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 19667336.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-3601
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Ophthalmol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 19
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14. Lissoni P, Fumagalli L, Brivio F, Rovelli F, Messina G, Di Fede G, Colciago M, Brera G: Cancer chemotherapy-induced lymphocytosis: a revolutionary discovery in the medical oncology. J Biol Regul Homeost Agents; 2006 Jan-Jun;20(1-2):29-35
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  • [Title] Cancer chemotherapy-induced lymphocytosis: a revolutionary discovery in the medical oncology.
  • The recent advances in the investigation of tumor immunobiology have suggested that cancer chemotherapy, in addition to its well known cytotoxic activity, may play modulatory effects on the endogenous production of cytokines involved in the control of both tumor angiogenesis and antitumor immunity.
  • Cancer chemotherapy constantly acts with inhibitory effects on anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti- mycotic immune responses, whereas its action on anticancer immunity, which is mainly mediated by lymphocytes, has still to be better investigated and defined.
  • The present study was carried out to evaluate the influence of chemotherapy on lymphocyte count and its relation to the clinical response in cancer patients suffering from the most commonly frequent tumor histotypes, including lung, colorectal, breast and prostate carcinomas.
  • The study included 144 consecutive metastatic solid tumor patients.
  • Lung cancer patients were treated with cisplatin plus gemcitabine, colorectal cancer patients received oxaliplatin plus 5-fluorouracil, while those affected by breast cancer or prostate carcinoma were treated with taxotere alone.
  • Independently of tumor histotype and chemotherapeutic regimen, a lymphocytosis occurred in patients who achieved an objective tumor regression in response to chemotherapy, and lymphocyte mean count observed at the end of the chemotherapeutic treatment was significantly higher with respect to the values seen before the onset of treatment.
  • On the contrary, lymphocyte mean number decreased on chemotherapy in patients with SD or PD, even though the decline was statistically significant with respect to the pretreatment values in the only patients who had a PD in response to chemotherapy.
  • This study would suggest that chemotherapy itself may paradoxically act, at least in part, as a cancer immunotherapy by inducing lymphocytosis, as well as previously demonstrated for the only immunotherapy with IL-2, probably by modulating the cytokine network and correcting the altered endogenous production of cytokines, responsible for cancer-related immunodeficiency.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Lymphocytosis / chemically induced. Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 18088552.001).
  • [ISSN] 0393-974X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of biological regulators and homeostatic agents
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biol. Regul. Homeost. Agents
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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15. Hirschfeld S: Is participation in oncology clinical trials using gene therapy products safe. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6076

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Is participation in oncology clinical trials using gene therapy products safe.
  • This is particularly true for newer types of products such as gene therapy.
  • METHODS: A database maintained in MS Access containing all adverse events obtained from spontaneous reports and annual summaries of clinical trials using gene therapy products is being developed at the Center for Biologics Research and Evaluation at the the Food and Drug Administration.
  • The most common diagnoses were metastatic melanoma, glioblastome multiforme, squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, metastatic renal cell carcinoma, disseminated neuroblastoma, metastatic breast cancer and prostate cancer.
  • Detailed analysis of the patients, events, and products did not reveal other risk factors in addition to primary cancer diagnosis Conclusions: Participation in oncology gene therapy studies does not appear to carry additional risks beyond those expected of patients with relapsed or refractory disease.

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  • (PMID = 28014995.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Braud AC, Joly F, Rios M, Felizot L, Fargeot P, Servent V, Laguerre B, Turpin F, Pein F: Preservation of Activities Daily Living (ADL) in a phase-II impact study of oral capecitabine and vinorelbine in the treatment of metastatic carcinomas in patients 70 and older: The GERICO-01 Study by the French FNCLCC Group. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8160

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preservation of Activities Daily Living (ADL) in a phase-II impact study of oral capecitabine and vinorelbine in the treatment of metastatic carcinomas in patients 70 and older: The GERICO-01 Study by the French FNCLCC Group.
  • METHODS: In Gerico-01, with pts 70 years or older, the primary endpoint of the study was the autonomy preservation as measured by the ADL in 6 item; 2nd objectives were toxicity (NCI-CTC v2), PK study of V, the serum PSA or CA 15-3 levels variation and the tumor targets evaluation (RECIST); the primary tumors were either metastatic disease from a primary Breast, or a lung or a prostate Ca.
  • The treatment was Q-3 weeks an oral combination chemotherapy (CT) with C day 1-14 at a starting dose of 750 mg/m<sup>2</sup> twice a day and oral V, days 1 and 8 at a starting dose of 45 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/d.
  • RESULTS: Between december 2002 and 2003, 65 pts were included in 8 different French centers and 12 are still under treatment.
  • The pts' median age was 75 yrs (70-86); the primary was a breast in 28, a prostate in 31 and a lung Ca in 6 pts.
  • Among breast carcinoma there were 5 partial remission, 1 in prostate and 1 in lung ca, stable disease was seen in 2 breast, 9 prostate, 1 lung; C+V was stopped in 9 progressive disease, 3 cases of toxicity, 1 pt. refusal.

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  • (PMID = 28015421.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Strada MR, Frascaroli M, Jedrychowska I, Palumbo R, Poggi G, Bernardo A, Villani G, Melazzini M, Bernardo G: Prospective phase II study of integrated rehabilitative treatment in oncologic patients with neuromotor damage from vertebral metastases. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8207

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prospective phase II study of integrated rehabilitative treatment in oncologic patients with neuromotor damage from vertebral metastases.
  • : 8207 Background: Breast, lung and prostate cancer are associated with a high incidence of bone and osteomedullar metastases, often responsible of a neuromotor damage.
  • METHODS: Treatment was performed throughout the following steps, with short-term objectives:.
  • Primary tumor was breast carcinoma in 21 pts (47%), lung cancer in 12 pts (27%), prostate carcinoma in 8 pts (18%), ependyma, testis, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma in each one of the remaining 4 pts.
  • Most pts (82%) had received combined chemo-radiotherapy; while radiotherapy and chemotherapy alone were given in 6 and 3 pts, respectively.
  • Treatment compliance was good, with no drop-out; improvement of QoL was observed in 93% of pts (43/45) by FACT-G.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that such an integrated rehabilitative program in metastatic pts with neuromotor damage from vertebral metastases produced a good clinical activity in both preventing the damages following neurological deficit and optimizing the residual motor potentialities, also improving patient QoL throughout the achievement of the best possible autonomy.

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  • (PMID = 28016814.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Ahmad SM, Esmaeli B: Metastatic tumors of the orbit and ocular adnexa. Curr Opin Ophthalmol; 2007 Sep;18(5):405-13

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Metastatic tumors of the orbit and ocular adnexa.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The management of cancer metastatic to the orbit and ocular adnexa (eyelid and periocular structures) has changed in recent decades.
  • The purpose of this article is to review the incidence, presentation, and clinical features of metastatic tumors of the orbit and ocular adnexa and discuss their multidisciplinary care.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: The improved survival of patients with common cancers such as breast cancer and prostate cancer, together with aging of the population has led to a higher incidence of patients living with metastatic disease in unusual sites such as the orbit and ocular adnexa.
  • Furthermore, vigilant surveillance and advances in diagnostics have led to increased detection of orbital metastases.
  • Treatment of metastatic lesions in the orbit and ocular adnexa is usually palliative and may include radiotherapy, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, surgery, or a combination of these modalities.
  • SUMMARY: Breast carcinoma continues to account for the majority of metastatic lesions of the orbit and ocular adnexa.
  • Although the overall prognosis for patients with such lesions remains poor, the longer survival time for patients with breast carcinoma, the availability of novel targeted treatment options and new investigational agents, and advances in radiotherapy techniques may lead to better quality of life and preservation of ocular function for patients with metastatic orbital tumors.
  • [MeSH-minor] Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 17700235.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-8738
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in ophthalmology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Ophthalmol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 33
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19. Bowater RJ, Bridge LJ, Lilford RJ: The relationship between progression-free and post-progression survival in treating four types of metastatic cancer. Cancer Lett; 2008 Apr 8;262(1):48-53
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  • [Title] The relationship between progression-free and post-progression survival in treating four types of metastatic cancer.
  • CONTEXT: A number of authors have found that there exists a positive relationship between progression-free survival and overall survival in clinical trials of cancer treatments for particular types of metastatic cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To test theories of this nature in relation to the use of chemotherapy in treating four different types of metastatic cancer by performing a systematic search of published clinical trials.
  • The four types of metastatic cancer are metastatic breast cancer, colorectal cancer, hormone-refractory prostate cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer.
  • For an RCT to be included in the study, chemotherapy had to be administered to both the treatment and control groups and the chemical composition of the chemotherapy had to be different between the two groups.
  • The median time to disease progression and the median overall survival time had to be reported in the data sources.
  • RESULTS: The trial data found through the systematic search shows much greater support for the theory that, for all four types of metastatic cancer being considered, changes in post-progression survival are uncorrelated with changes in time to disease progression than for the theory that gains in post-progression survival are proportional to gains in time to progression.
  • CONCLUSION: The theories about the relationship between progression-free and post-progression survival in cancer treatment that have been examined in this study are worthy of further investigation.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / mortality. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / mortality. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / pathology. Colorectal Neoplasms / mortality. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / mortality. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis. Prostatic Neoplasms / mortality. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic

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  • (PMID = 18171603.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-7980
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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20. Bréchot JM: [Management of carcinomatous metastatic pleurisy with unknown primary neoplasm]. Rev Pneumol Clin; 2001 Nov;57(5):339-43

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Management of carcinomatous metastatic pleurisy with unknown primary neoplasm].
  • [Transliterated title] Prise en charge des pleurésies carcinomateuses métastatiques de primitif inconnu.
  • The primary cancer remains unknown in about 7% of all cases of metastatic carcinomatous pleurisy.
  • The pathology examination, including immunohistochemistry using a panel of well-defined antibodies can provide the diagnosis of neoplastic pleurisy of malignant carcinomatous proliferation, and help search for differentiation and rule out an identifiable primary carcinoma.
  • When histology does not provide a satisfactory clue to the primary cancer, frequent origins include lung cancer, breast or ovary cancer in women, prostate cancer in men, and digestive tract cancer.
  • The possible contribution of positron emission tomography remains to be evaluated.
  • Several chemotherapy protocols can be proposed but the beneficial effect has been difficult to assess due to the heterogeneous nature of the histological forms treated.
  • The carboplatin-paclitaxel-etoposide protocol appears to be promising in cases with an unknown primary cancer but there has been no specific assessment of this chemotherapy schedule in a subgroups of patients with carcinomatous pleurisy with an unknown primary cancer.
  • Better understanding of the biological profile of highly metastatic cancers should be helpful in determining more targeted therapeutic schemes.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Unknown Primary. Pleurisy / etiology. Pleurisy / therapy

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  • (PMID = 11924229.001).
  • [ISSN] 0761-8417
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue de pneumologie clinique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Pneumol Clin
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 31
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21. Tamaskar I, Mekhail T, Dreicer R, Olencki T, Roman S, Elson P, Bukowski RM: Phase I trial of weekly docetaxel and daily temozolomide in patients with metastatic disease. Invest New Drugs; 2008 Dec;26(6):553-9
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  • [Title] Phase I trial of weekly docetaxel and daily temozolomide in patients with metastatic disease.
  • Docetaxel is second generation taxoid that has shown activity against a variety of cancers and has been approved for use in cancers of the breast, lung, head and neck, ovaries and prostate.
  • Temozolomide is an alkylating agent which crosses the blood brain barrier and has demonstrated antitumor activity against a broad range of tumor types, including malignant glioma, melanoma, non small cell lung cancer and carcinoma of the ovary and colon.
  • METHODS: Twenty five patients with metastatic cancers were enrolled in a Phase I dose escalation trial.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Survival Rate. Taxoids / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 18626572.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-6997
  • [Journal-full-title] Investigational new drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Invest New Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; YF1K15M17Y / temozolomide
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22. Barthomeuf C, Lim S, Iranshahi M, Chollet P: Umbelliprenin from Ferula szowitsiana inhibits the growth of human M4Beu metastatic pigmented malignant melanoma cells through cell-cycle arrest in G1 and induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Phytomedicine; 2008 Jan;15(1-2):103-11
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  • [Title] Umbelliprenin from Ferula szowitsiana inhibits the growth of human M4Beu metastatic pigmented malignant melanoma cells through cell-cycle arrest in G1 and induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis.
  • Metastatic malignant melanoma have a bad prognosis (median survival: 6-8 months) mainly due to the development of lung, hepatic and brain metastases.
  • We have observed that the cell susceptibility to umbelliprenin decreases in the order M4Beu (metastatic pigmented malignant melanoma)>A549 (nonsmall cell lung carcinoma) approximately PC3 (androgen-resistant prostate carcinoma)>PA1 (ovary teratocarcinoma)>human primary fibroblasts approximately MCF7 (breast adenocarcinoma)>DLD1 (colon adenocarcinoma).
  • The finding that the cytotoxic effect of umbelliprenin is markedly more pronounced in M4Beu cells than in primary fibroblasts, suggests a therapeutic margin.
  • As M4Beu cell proliferation is more potently inhibited by umbelliprenin (IC50 12.3 microM) than by the citrus coumarin auraptene (7-geranyloxycoumarin, IC50 17.1 microM) previously reported capable of inhibiting the prevalence of lung metastasis in mice bearing B16BL6 murine melanoma, our data suggest that umbelliprenin orally administered and foods and folk medicines containing this coumarin, may afford protection against the development and early recurrence of malignant melanoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Ferula / chemistry. G1 Phase / drug effects. Melanoma / drug therapy. Umbelliferones / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacology. Caspases / metabolism. Cell Line, Tumor. Cells, Cultured. Cisplatin / pharmacology. Coumarins / pharmacology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Fibroblasts / drug effects. Humans. Inhibitory Concentration 50. Plant Roots / chemistry

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  • (PMID = 17689942.001).
  • [ISSN] 0944-7113
  • [Journal-full-title] Phytomedicine : international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Phytomedicine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Coumarins; 0 / Umbelliferones; 495-02-3 / aurapten; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases; MSD8N8A1LQ / umbelliprenin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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23. Morgan K, Srinivas S, Freiha F: Synchronous solitary metastasis of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder to the testis. Urology; 2004 Oct;64(4):808-9
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  • [Title] Synchronous solitary metastasis of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder to the testis.
  • Primary tumors known to metastasize to the testis, in order of decreasing frequency, are prostate, lung, gastrointestinal tract, melanoma, and kidney tumors.
  • Metastasis from bladder cancer to the testis is extremely rare, occurs with advanced and metastatic disease, and is usually a finding at autopsy.
  • We report a rare, and probably the first, case of solitary and synchronous metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder to the testis, discovered on the preoperative workup.
  • An incidentally discovered testicular mass in a man with high-grade, invasive bladder cancer should be considered a metastatic lesion until proven otherwise.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / secondary. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Testicular Neoplasms / secondary. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cystectomy. Cystitis / complications. Cystitis / diagnosis. Hematuria / etiology. Humans. Incidental Findings. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neoplasms, Second Primary. Orchiectomy. Positron-Emission Tomography. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / secondary. Radiation Injuries / complications. Radiation Injuries / diagnosis. Transurethral Resection of Prostate. Urinary Diversion

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  • (PMID = 15491734.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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24. Van Brussel JP, Jan Van Steenbrugge G, Van Krimpen C, Bogdanowicz JF, Van Der Kwast TH, Schröder FH, Mickisch GH: Expression of multidrug resistance related proteins and proliferative activity is increased in advanced clinical prostate cancer. J Urol; 2001 Jan;165(1):130-5
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  • [Title] Expression of multidrug resistance related proteins and proliferative activity is increased in advanced clinical prostate cancer.
  • PURPOSE: Advanced disseminated prostate cancer is highly resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy.
  • We identified proteins that may be involved in multidrug resistance in clinical prostate cancer.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Paraffin embedded, formalin fixed prostate cancer specimens from archival sources of 3 distinct patient groups were examined.
  • These groups were clearly distinct with regard to pathological stage and responsiveness to antihormonal therapy.
  • Group 1 consisted of patients with organ confined prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (early pathological stage T2N0M0).
  • Group 2 patients had disseminated, early advanced prostate cancer and were treated with transurethral prostatic resection for urinary obstruction before receiving antihormonal therapy.
  • Group 3 patients had disseminated prostate cancer with relapse despite antihormonal treatment (late advanced prostate cancer) and they underwent transurethral prostatic resection to relieve the symptoms of urinary obstruction.
  • Immunohistochemical study was done to detect P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, lung resistance protein, glutathione-S-transferase pi, p53, Bcl-2, Bax, topoisomerase I, IIalpha and IIbeta, and Ki-67.
  • The number of cases expressing multidrug resistance associated protein, lung resistance protein, glutathione-S-transferase pi, p53, Bcl-2, topoisomerase IIalpha and Ki-67 was significantly increased in the group with advanced disseminated prostate cancer.
  • Topoisomerase I and IIbeta were homogeneously and highly expressed at all stages of prostate cancer progression, while P-glycoprotein was not expressed in any tumors regardless of the patient group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Up-regulation of the expression of the drug transporters multidrug resistance associated protein and lung resistance protein, detoxifying enzyme glutathione-S-transferase pi, and apoptosis inhibiting proteins Bcl-2 and p53 may be an explanation of the resistance of disseminated progressive prostate cancer to chemotherapy.
  • As shown by the up-regulation of Ki-67 and topoisomerase IIalpha, increased proliferation reflects the aggressiveness of metastatic prostate cancer.
  • Research on agents that counteract multidrug resistance mechanisms and may sensitize prostate carcinoma to cytotoxic chemotherapy may possibly lead to more effective treatment of progressive disseminated prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Case-Control Studies. Cell Division. Drug Resistance, Multiple. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins. Up-Regulation


25. Shields JA, Shields CL, Brotman HK, Carvalho C, Perez N, Eagle RC Jr: Cancer metastatic to the orbit: the 2000 Robert M. Curts Lecture. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg; 2001 Sep;17(5):346-54
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  • [Title] Cancer metastatic to the orbit: the 2000 Robert M. Curts Lecture.
  • RESULTS: Of 100 patients, the primary tumor site was breast in 53 (53%), prostate gland in 12 (12%), lung in 8 (8%), skin (melanoma) in 6 (6%), kidney in 5 (5%), gastrointestinal tract in 5 (5%), choroid (melanoma) in 2 (2%), parotid gland in 1 (1%), and adrenal gland (neuroblastoma) in 1 (1%).
  • Of patients in whom a detailed history was available, there was no history of cancer at the time of presentation in 19%.
  • Treatment included chemotherapy, hormone therapy, irradiation, surgical excision, or observation, depending on clinical circumstances.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The most common primary cancers that metastasize to the orbit are breast, prostate gland, and lung cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / secondary. Melanoma / secondary. Neoplasms / pathology. Neuroblastoma / secondary. Orbital Neoplasms / secondary. Sarcoma / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


26. Bunn PA Jr, Chan DC, Earle K, Zhao TL, Helfrich B, Kelly K, Piazza G, Whitehead CM, Pamukcu R, Thompson W, Alila H: Preclinical and clinical studies of docetaxel and exisulind in the treatment of human lung cancer. Semin Oncol; 2002 Feb;29(1 Suppl 4):87-94
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  • [Title] Preclinical and clinical studies of docetaxel and exisulind in the treatment of human lung cancer.
  • Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States.
  • The majority of patients with non-small cell lung cancers present with inoperable disease because of the presence of metastases to regional lymph nodes or other metastatic sites.
  • About one third of patients have stage IV disease with metastases to distant organs at the time of diagnosis.
  • Current chemotherapy combinations improve the survival and quality of life for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.
  • With two-drug combinations, median survival is increased to 8 months or more and 1-year survival is increased to 35% to 40%.
  • The improvements created by current therapies led to studies of chemotherapy in the second-line setting.
  • Docetaxel has been shown to improve survival of patients who failed platinum-based chemotherapy and was approved by the U.S.
  • Food and Drug Administration for therapy in this setting.
  • Therefore, new therapies are urgently needed.
  • Exisulind is a novel oral anticancer agent that holds promise for the treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.
  • Exisulind was originally developed as a chemoprevention agent for colorectal cancer.
  • Subsequent preclinical studies showed that exisulind also inhibited the growth of human breast, prostate, and lung cancers.
  • These observations lead to the studies of the combination of exisulind and docetaxel in preclinical and clinical studies in human lung cancer described in this article.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / analogs & derivatives. Sulindac / analogs & derivatives. Taxoids
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Animals. Cell Cycle. Disease Models, Animal. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Mice. Rats. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 11894018.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA46934; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA58187
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; 184SNS8VUH / Sulindac; K619IIG2R9 / sulindac sulfone; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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27. Kasper S, Smith JA Jr: Genetically modified mice and their use in developing therapeutic strategies for prostate cancer. J Urol; 2004 Jul;172(1):12-9
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  • [Title] Genetically modified mice and their use in developing therapeutic strategies for prostate cancer.
  • PURPOSE: At the National Cancer Institute a comprehensive program has been developed for accelerating prostate cancer research, especially in the area of mouse models for human cancers.
  • This review focuses on transgenic mouse models for elucidating the molecular and cellular processes that lead to prostate cancer initiation, progression and metastasis, and on their suitability for therapeutic and chemopreventive trials.
  • RESULTS: Currently no 1 mouse model displays the entire continuum of human prostate cancer initiation, development and metastasis.
  • To date the only models that develop lung, liver and occasionally bone metastasis are those that express SV40 large T antigen.
  • A number of models have been used to investigate the efficacy of androgen deprivation, lovastatin, vitamin D, the anti-inflammatory drug E-7869, genistein and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate as therapeutic or chemopreventive agents.
  • Noninvasive optical imaging technologies facilitate the detection of metastatic lesions and the effects of therapeutic agents on tumor regression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Integrating mouse studies with human clinical trials would ensure that mechanisms that promote prostate cancer are identified and potential therapeutic targets are validated.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine / therapy. Disease Models, Animal. Prostatic Neoplasms / physiopathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 15201729.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / 1 R01 DK59142; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / 1 R01 DK60957; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01-CA84239
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Polyomavirus Transforming
  • [Number-of-references] 73
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28. Jenkins DE, Yu SF, Hornig YS, Purchio T, Contag PR: In vivo monitoring of tumor relapse and metastasis using bioluminescent PC-3M-luc-C6 cells in murine models of human prostate cancer. Clin Exp Metastasis; 2003;20(8):745-56
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  • [Title] In vivo monitoring of tumor relapse and metastasis using bioluminescent PC-3M-luc-C6 cells in murine models of human prostate cancer.
  • We used the bioluminescent human prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3M-luc-C6 to non-invasively monitor in vivo growth and response of tumors and metastasis before, during and after treatments.
  • Our goal was to determine the utility of a luciferase-based prostate cancer animal model to specifically assess tumor and metastatic recurrence in vivo following chemotherapy.
  • Bioluminescent PC-3M-luc-C6 cells, constitutively expressing luciferase, were implanted into the prostate or under the skin of mice for primary tumor assessment.
  • Ex vivo imaging and/or histology was used to confirm and localize metastatic lesions in various tissues initially detected by images in vivo.
  • Our in vivo data detected and quantified early inhibition of subcutaneous and orthotopic prostate tumors in mice as well as significant tumor regrowth post-treatment.
  • Local and distal metastasis was observed within seven days following intracardiac injection of PC-3M-luc-C6 cells.
  • Differential drug responses and metastatic tumor relapse patterns were distinguished over time by in vivo imaging depending on the metastatic site.
  • The longitudinal evaluation of bioluminescent tumor and metastatic development within the same cohorts of animals permitted sensitive and quantitative assessment of both primary and metastatic prostate tumor response and recurrence in vivo.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cell Line, Tumor. Disease Models, Animal. Heart Neoplasms / drug therapy. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Humans. Injections, Subcutaneous. Lung Neoplasms / diet therapy. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local


29. Buxhofer V, Ruckser R, Kier P, Habertheuer KH, Zelenka P, Tatzreiter G, Dorner S, Vedovelli H, Sebesta C, Hinterberger W: [High dosage therapy with stem cell transplantation in neuroendocrine carcinoma]. Acta Med Austriaca Suppl; 2000;52:37-9
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  • [Title] [High dosage therapy with stem cell transplantation in neuroendocrine carcinoma].
  • [Transliterated title] Hochdosistherapie mit Stammzelltransplantation beim neuroendokrinen Karzinom.
  • Neuroendocrine carcinoma and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) are highly responsive to chemo- and radiotherapy.
  • At the 2nd department of medicine in the Donauspital, 4 pts. with neuroendocrine carcinomas of different primary sites underwent high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASTx). Pt.
  • 1 suffered from neuroendocrine lung cancer, pt.
  • 2 from a small-cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Pt.
  • 3 had a metastatic small-cell abdominal bulky tumor and pt.
  • 4 presented with neuroendocrine carcinoma of the prostate.
  • After 4-6 cycles induction chemotherapy pts. were consolidated with 1 cycle of HDCht and ASTx.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Small Cell / drug therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neuroendocrine Tumors / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11261277.001).
  • [ISSN] 0303-8181
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta medica Austriaca. Supplement
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Med Austriaca Suppl
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
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30. Fuster LM, Sandler AB: Select clinical trials of erlotinib (OSI-774) in non-small-cell lung cancer with emphasis on phase III outcomes. Clin Lung Cancer; 2004 Dec;6 Suppl 1:S24-9
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  • [Title] Select clinical trials of erlotinib (OSI-774) in non-small-cell lung cancer with emphasis on phase III outcomes.
  • Lung cancer is primarily diagnosed during the advanced stage of disease, at which stage treatment options are severely limited.
  • It is primarily for this reason that lung cancer carries a higher mortality rate than breast, prostate, and colon cancers combined.
  • Traditional treatments for metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) include chemotherapy; however, this approach, although the standard of care, is toxic and nonspecific, thereby rendering treatment inaccessible to those with a poor performance status.
  • Alternatively, there are recent emerging treatment options that involve inhibiting specific molecular targets.
  • This target is especially important because approximately 85% of all lung cancers are categorized as NSCLC, which expresses EGFR at a rate of 40%-85%.
  • In addition, newly developed EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been used in clinical trials with encouraging results.
  • To date, gefitinib and erlotinib (OSI-774; Tarceva) are the most studied of the EGFR TKIs for the treatment of NSCLC.
  • In this article we have focused on 3 recently completed trials involving erlotinib as monotherapy (BR.21 study) or in combination with standard chemotherapeutic regimens (TALENT and TRIBUTE trials) for the treatment of NSCLC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Quinazolines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Clinical Trials as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic. Erlotinib Hydrochloride. Humans. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 15638954.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-7304
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lung cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Quinazolines; DA87705X9K / Erlotinib Hydrochloride; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
  • [Number-of-references] 41
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31. Giaccone G, Zucali PA: Src as a potential therapeutic target in non-small-cell lung cancer. Ann Oncol; 2008 Jul;19(7):1219-23
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  • [Title] Src as a potential therapeutic target in non-small-cell lung cancer.
  • Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death, with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounting for 80%-85% of all cases.
  • For these patients, palliation and improvements in quality of life are the primary goals of therapy.
  • Although chemotherapeutic agents remain the cornerstone of first-line therapy, these agents have limited use in patients who have relapsed and have metastatic disease.
  • Increased levels of Src expression have been found in a range of cancers, especially breast, colorectal, prostate and lung.
  • Preliminary preclinical data and pharmacodynamic data suggest that Src inhibition is a viable therapeutic option in the treatment of advanced NSCLC.

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  • (PMID = 18388349.001).
  • [ISSN] 1569-8041
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.10.2 / src-Family Kinases
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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32. Cappuzzo F, Varella-Garcia M, Rossi E, Gajapathy S, Valente M, Drabkin H, Gemmill R: MYC and EIF3H Coamplification significantly improve response and survival of non-small cell lung cancer patients (NSCLC) treated with gefitinib. J Thorac Oncol; 2009 Apr;4(4):472-8
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  • [Title] MYC and EIF3H Coamplification significantly improve response and survival of non-small cell lung cancer patients (NSCLC) treated with gefitinib.
  • BACKGROUND: We investigated the incidence of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit H (EIF3H) and MYC amplification in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, and whether MYC/EIF3H increased gene copy number affected response to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.
  • METHODS: Metastatic NSCLC patients (n = 54) treated with gefitinib were analyzed for the genomic content of EIF3H and MYC genes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a custom-designed 3-color DNA probe set.
  • MYC FISH positive patients (MYC+, mean > or =2.8) had a significantly higher response rate (p = 0.003), longer time to progression (p = 0.01) and overall survival (OS: p = 0.02) than MYC- (mean <2.8).
  • Similarly, EIF3H FISH positive patients (EIF3H+, mean > or =2.75) had a significantly higher response rate (p = 0.002), longer time to progression (p = 0.01) and OS (p = 0.01) than EIF3H- (mean <2.75).

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  • (PMID = 19204574.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-1380
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of thoracic oncology : official publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Thorac Oncol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA058187; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA058187-12; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA58187; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA058187-12; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA046934
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-3; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Quinazolines; S65743JHBS / gefitinib
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS104048; NLM/ PMC2774779
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33. Saba N, Khuri F: The role of bisphosphonates in the management of advanced cancer with a focus on non-small-cell lung cancer. Part 1: Mechanisms of action, role of biomarkers and preclinical applications. Oncology; 2005;68(1):10-7
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  • [Title] The role of bisphosphonates in the management of advanced cancer with a focus on non-small-cell lung cancer. Part 1: Mechanisms of action, role of biomarkers and preclinical applications.
  • With recent advances in cancer management, patients with metastatic bone disease are likely to have a prolonged clinical course, with skeletal-related events such as pain, hypercalcemia, pathologic fractures, spinal cord and nerve compression.
  • Bisphosphonate use has resulted in the reduction of skeletal-related complications for a number of tumors including breast, prostate and myeloma, and improvements in the quality of life for patients.
  • There is now evidence that newer, highly potent, nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates reduce skeletal complications in patients with bone metastases from other solid tumors (including lung cancer).
  • In this article, we review the different mechanisms of bisphosphonates and the potential role of newer-generation bisphosphonates, such as zoledronic acid, in the management of advanced, metastatic bone disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Diphosphonates / pharmacology. Lung Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis / drug effects. Clodronic Acid / therapeutic use. Etidronic Acid / therapeutic use. False Negative Reactions. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Imidazoles / therapeutic use. Positron-Emission Tomography. Predictive Value of Tests. Therapeutic Equivalency

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  • (PMID = 15775688.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-2414
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Imidazoles; 0813BZ6866 / Clodronic Acid; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18; 114084-78-5 / ibandronic acid; 6PNS59HP4Y / tiludronic acid; 6XC1PAD3KF / zoledronic acid; M2F465ROXU / Etidronic Acid; OYY3447OMC / pamidronate
  • [Number-of-references] 53
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34. Tai CJ, Wu AT, Chiou JF, Jan HJ, Wei HJ, Hsu CH, Lin CT, Chiu WT, Wu CW, Lee HM, Deng WP: The investigation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 as a potential pharmacological target in non-small cell lung carcinomas, assisted by non-invasive molecular imaging. BMC Cancer; 2010;10:95
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  • [Title] The investigation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 as a potential pharmacological target in non-small cell lung carcinomas, assisted by non-invasive molecular imaging.
  • BACKGROUND: Invasiveness and metastasis are the most common characteristics of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and causes of tumour-related morbidity and mortality.
  • Bioluminescent imaging was utilized to study tumorigenesis of MKP-1 over-expressing H441GL cells and anti-metastatic effect of rosiglitazone.
  • Mice inoculated with MKP-1 over-expressing H441 cells did not develop NSCLC while their control wildtype H441 inoculated littermates developed NSCLC and bone metastasis.
  • H441GL-inoculated mice receiving daily oral rosiglitazone treatment demonstrated a significant inhibition of bone metastasis when compared to mice receiving sham treatment.
  • We found that rosiglitazone treatment impeded the ability of cell migration and invasion in vitro.
  • CONCLUSION: The induction of MKP-1 could significantly suppress the proliferative and metastatic abilities of NSCLC both in vitro and in vivo.
  • Therefore, MKP-1 could be considered as a potential therapeutic target in NSCLC therapy and PPARgamma agonists could be explored for combined chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / enzymology. Dual Specificity Phosphatase 1 / metabolism. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Lung Neoplasms / enzymology

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  • (PMID = 20226009.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CXCR4 protein, human; 0 / Receptors, CXCR4; EC 3.1.3.48 / Dual Specificity Phosphatase 1; EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2850900
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35. Neubauer BL, McNulty AM, Chedid M, Chen K, Goode RL, Johnson MA, Jones CD, Krishnan V, Lynch R, Osborne HE, Graff JR: The selective estrogen receptor modulator trioxifene (LY133314) inhibits metastasis and extends survival in the PAIII rat prostatic carcinoma model. Cancer Res; 2003 Sep 15;63(18):6056-62
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

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  • [Title] The selective estrogen receptor modulator trioxifene (LY133314) inhibits metastasis and extends survival in the PAIII rat prostatic carcinoma model.
  • The PAIII rat prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa) is an androgen receptor-negative, ERalpha- and ERbeta-positive, spontaneously metastatic rodent tumor cell line.
  • PAIII metastasis to the lungs was significantly inhibited by trioxifene treatment.
  • In PAIII-tumor-bearing animals, trioxifene administration produced a maximal regression of 76% for ventral prostate and 64% for seminal vesicle (P < 0.05 for both).
  • Our data support the contention that trioxifene represents a SERM with potential antimetastatic efficacy for the treatment of androgen-independent, metastatic PCa.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pyrrolidines / pharmacology. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Body Weight / drug effects. Cell Division / drug effects. Disease Models, Animal. Estrogen Receptor alpha. Estrogen Receptor beta. Genitalia, Male / drug effects. Luciferases / antagonists & inhibitors. Luciferases / metabolism. Lung Neoplasms / prevention & control. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Organ Size / drug effects. Rats. Receptors, Androgen / biosynthesis. Receptors, Estrogen / biosynthesis. Receptors, Estrogen / metabolism. Testis / anatomy & histology. Testis / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 14522935.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrogen Receptor alpha; 0 / Estrogen Receptor beta; 0 / Pyrrolidines; 0 / Receptors, Androgen; 0 / Receptors, Estrogen; 0 / Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators; EC 1.13.12.- / Luciferases; R0130F043H / trioxifene
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36. Engels FK, Verweij J: Docetaxel administration schedule: from fever to tears? A review of randomised studies. Eur J Cancer; 2005 May;41(8):1117-26
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOCETAXEL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The anti-cancer agent docetaxel is approved for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and for the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer.
  • A less toxic schedule, involving weekly docetaxel administration was developed for patients with poor performance status, multiple comorbidities, poor haematological reserves or those who were heavily pre-treated, elderly or patients for whom palliation is the focus of treatment.
  • Recent randomised trials allow a comparison of efficacy and toxicity between weekly and 3-weekly treatments.
  • Currently, 3-weekly docetaxel remains the standard schedule for treatment, whereas the weekly schedule offers a possibility of treatment individualisation for those patients where the risk of myelosuppression is considered unacceptable.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Taxoids / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic

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  • (PMID = 15911234.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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37. Hatae M, Nakamura T, Ohnishi Y: [Evidenced-based medicine and future direction of Taxol]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2000 Jul;27(8):1279-87
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. TAXOL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Taxol was introduced for the clinical treatment of several solid tumor malignancies in the 1990s.
  • It has been established that primary chemotherapy based on Taxol is the standard for non-small cell lung cancer and epithelial ovarian cancer.
  • After initial chemotherapy containing doxorubicin, sequential administration of Taxol for advanced or metastatic breast cancer is recommended by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States.
  • Taxol-based chemotherapy and/or concurrent chemoradiation for head and neck cancer, esophageal carcinoma, urothelial and prostate cancer are under investigation, but these trials have not produced evidence showing that they are superior to the present standard treatment for these malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Evidence-Based Medicine. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease-Free Survival. Female. Forecasting. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 10945027.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
  • [Number-of-references] 47
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38. Spieth ME, Lin YG, Nguyen TT: Diagnosing and treating small-cell carcinomas of prostatic origin. Clin Nucl Med; 2002 Jan;27(1):11-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • PURPOSE: Small-cell carcinoma is very aggressive, metastasizes early and often, and does not respond to most chemotherapy regimens.
  • In approximately 50% of cases of prostate cancer, tumors are a combination of small-cell carcinoma and androgen-sensitive adenocarcinoma.
  • It is widely believed that no successful treatment exists for androgen-independent prostate cancer.
  • METHODS: A 67-year-old man had undergone androgen ablation therapy and radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer followed by bilateral orchiectomy, limited radiation therapy, and unsuccessful chemotherapy for pain-causing metastatic bone disease.
  • The full extent of metastatic disease was assessed successfully using In-111, a somatostatin derivative.
  • RESULTS: In-111 OctreoScan scintigraphy was more sensitive in the diagnostic demonstration of metastatic foci than was bone scanning.
  • Therapy with the cold somatostatin derivative resulted in a rapid and significant relief of pain with significant tumor shrinkage.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Somatostatin analogs and their radionuclide and cytotoxic derivatives are recommended as adjuvant treatments for prostate carcinoma, especially in those patients who are at high risk for carcinoma recurrence after radical prostatectomy and who have advanced prostate carcinoma at the time of relapse.
  • Because small-cell carcinomas of the prostate and lung are identical, these analogs may be useful in the detection and treatment of these tumors as well.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Small Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Small Cell / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / diagnosis. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / therapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Prostatectomy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Somatostatin / administration & dosage. Somatostatin / analogs & derivatives. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11805477.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-9762
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical nuclear medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Nucl Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 51110-01-1 / Somatostatin
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39. Larkin JM, Kaye SB: Epothilones in the treatment of cancer. Expert Opin Investig Drugs; 2006 Jun;15(6):691-702
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  • [Title] Epothilones in the treatment of cancer.
  • The epothilones ixabepilone, patupilone, BMS-310705, KOS-862 and ZK-EPO are in early clinical trials for cancer treatment.
  • Over 20 Phase II studies of epothilones in cancer treatment have been reported, and significant activity in taxane-sensitive tumour types (such as breast, lung and prostate cancers) has been noted.
  • Response rates in taxane-refractory metastatic breast cancer are relatively modest, but ixabepilone and patupilone have shown promising efficacy in hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer and in taxane-refractory ovarian cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Epothilones / therapeutic use. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tubulin Modulators / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 16732719.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-7658
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on investigational drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Investig Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Epothilones; 0 / Tubulin Modulators; K27005NP0A / ixabepilone; UEC0H0URSE / epothilone B
  • [Number-of-references] 100
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40. Massot-Punyet R, Almajano J, Camacho JM: [Cerebral metastasis]. Rev Neurol; 2000 Dec 16-31;31(12):1242-7
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • INTRODUCTION: Cancer and its metastatic complications are one of the most important types of disease due to their high morbidity and mortality (nearly 100%).
  • Cancer of the lung and breast are the main causes of CM, whilst cancer of the prostate metastasizes more to the base of the skull and spinal coverings.
  • In spite of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy the average survival with CM is three months.
  • The lung is the most usual site of origin.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma / secondary. Child. Diagnostic Imaging. Epilepsy / etiology. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Male. Melanoma / pathology. Melanoma / secondary. Organ Specificity. Palliative Care. Papilledema / etiology. Prognosis. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Skull Base Neoplasms / secondary. Spain / epidemiology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / secondary. Vision Disorders / etiology

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  • (PMID = 11205567.001).
  • [ISSN] 0210-0010
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista de neurologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Neurol
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Number-of-references] 16
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41. Busto Martín LA, Janeiro Pais M, González Dacal J, Chantada Abal V, Busto Castañón L: Signet-ring cell adenocarcinoma of the bladder: case series between 1990-2009. Arch Esp Urol; 2010 Mar;63(2):150-3
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  • Definitive treatment was radical cystectomy with Bricker's urinary diversion in four patients, cysctectomy with Mainz's II diversion in one patient and palliative management with TURB in three cases and percutaneous nephrostomy in the remaining case.
  • We used adyuvant chemotherapy in three cases.
  • Only two patients were alive at the time of the study.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Signet-ring cell primary adenocarcinoma of the bladder is an uncommon type of tumor, with worse prognosis than transitional cell cancer.
  • It is important to discard other possible metastatic origins(like stomach, prostate, lung, or ovary) because the management will be different.
  • Radical cystectomy is the treatment of choice, with adyuvant chemotherapy if possible.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms

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  • (PMID = 20378938.001).
  • [ISSN] 1576-8260
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivos españoles de urología
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Esp. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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42. Liu NN, Shen DL, Chen XQ, He YL: [Clinical analysis of 355 patients with bone metastasis of malignant tumors]. Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi; 2010 Mar;32(3):203-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: The clinical data and survival time of 355 patients with bone metastasis of malignant tumors were retrospectively analyzed.
  • The most common primary tumors were lung cancer in men and breast cancer in women.
  • The thoracic vertebrae, ribs, lumbar vertebrae and pelvic were frequently involved metastatic sites and the multiple bone metastasis was common (83.4%).
  • Integrated treatments were taken, including chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy, radiotherapy, surgery, bisphosphonate analgetics, etc.
  • The median survival time was 13.9 months.
  • Among them, it was 34.9 months in prostate cancer and 4.6 months in hepatocellular carcinoma.
  • The survival time was longer in bone metastasis without other organ metastasis.
  • There was no significant difference between the single and multiple bone metastases regarding the survival time.
  • CONCLUSION: It is important to master the clinical features of bone metastasis of malignant tumors for early diagnosis and treatment, and to improve the quality of life and prolong the survival time.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / pathology. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / secondary. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Pain / etiology. Pain Management. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Quality of Life. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20450589.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-3766
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua zhong liu za zhi [Chinese journal of oncology]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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43. Pallini R, Sabatino G, Doglietto F, Lauretti L, Fernandez E, Maira G: Clivus metastases: report of seven patients and literature review. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2009 Apr;151(4):291-6; discussion 296

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The primary tumours associated were lung adenocarcinoma (n = 2), prostate carcinoma (n = 2), skin melanoma (n = 1), hepatocarcinoma (n = 1) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (n = 1).
  • In spite of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the mean survival was 12 months.
  • Including our series, the most common primary tumours were prostate cancer (26.4%), thyroid carcinoma (11.7%) and hepatocarcinoma (11.7%).
  • The metastatic lesion might be a late and single expression of the primary tumour.
  • The trans-sphenoidal approach is the ideal procedure to establish a histopathological diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / secondary. Cranial Fossa, Posterior / pathology. Skull Base Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Abducens Nerve Diseases / etiology. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Prognosis. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Survival Rate. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 19259614.001).
  • [ISSN] 0942-0940
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Number-of-references] 30
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44. Zucker S, Cao J, Chen WT: Critical appraisal of the use of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors in cancer treatment. Oncogene; 2000 Dec 27;19(56):6642-50
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Critical appraisal of the use of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors in cancer treatment.
  • Phase III clinical trials initiated in 1997-98 using marimastat, prinomastat (AG3340), and BAY 12-9566 alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancers (lung, prostate, pancreas, brain, GI tract) have recently been reported; no clinical efficacy was demonstrated.
  • Bayer and Agouron have discontinued their ongoing Phase III drug trials of MMPIs in advanced cancer.
  • In retrospect, the failure of MMPIs to alter disease progression in metastatic cancer might have been anticipated since MMPs appear to be important in early aspects of cancer progression (local invasion and micrometastasis) and may no longer be required once metastases have been established.
  • (1) most MMPs in tumors are made by stromal cells, not carcinoma cells;.
  • (2) the use of MMPIs along with chemotherapy;.
  • (3) the measurement of MMPs in tumor tissue and blood as a means of identifying patients who are more likely to respond to MMPI therapy; and (4) identification of biomarkers that reflect activation or inhibition of MMPs in vivo.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Design. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Humans. Matrix Metalloproteinases / chemistry. Matrix Metalloproteinases / physiology. Mice. Models, Biological. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neovascularization, Pathologic. Stromal Cells / enzymology

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  • (PMID = 11426650.001).
  • [ISSN] 0950-9232
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncogene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncogene
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors; EC 3.4.24.- / Matrix Metalloproteinases
  • [Number-of-references] 75
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45. Nabeshima S, Kishihara Y, Nabeshima A, Yamaga S, Kinjo M, Kashiwagi S, Hayashi J: Poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet-ring cells of the Vater's ampulla, without jaundice but with disseminated carcinomatosis. Fukuoka Igaku Zasshi; 2003 Jul;94(7):235-40
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LEUCOVORIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • To reduce tumor cells in number and improve DIC, 11 cycles of 5-Fluorouracil and leucovorin therapy were done, and the patient survived for 12 months.
  • Autopsy showed a 0.8 cm diameter, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with the signet-ring cell type in the lamina propria of the Vater's ampulla.
  • Many metastatic foci and micro tumor emboli were found in the lung and in bone marrow.
  • The sections of the stomach, the gallbladder, urinary bladder, prostate, and thyroid gland showed no malignant cells.
  • This is a rare case of an ampullary tumor of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with the signet-ring cell type, without jaundice but with multiple metastasis.
  • 5-Fluorouracil and leucovorin were effective for increasing survival time and improving quality of life.
  • [MeSH-major] Ampulla of Vater. Bone Marrow Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell / pathology. Common Bile Duct Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation / complications. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation / drug therapy. Fatal Outcome. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Jaundice. Leucovorin / administration & dosage. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating / pathology. Quality of Life

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  • (PMID = 14509231.001).
  • [ISSN] 0016-254X
  • [Journal-full-title] Fukuoka igaku zasshi = Hukuoka acta medica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fukuoka Igaku Zasshi
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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46. Tsujino K, Sasada S, Kawahara K, Terada H, Komori C, Suzuki H, Okamoto N, Kobayashi M, Hirashima T, Matsui K, Kawase I: [A case of prostatic adenocarcinoma clinically presenting as supraclavicular and mediastinal lymphadenopathy]. Nihon Kokyuki Gakkai Zasshi; 2007 Aug;45(8):648-53
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  • We report a 70-year-old man with prostatic carcinoma presenting as supraclaviculer and mediastinal lymphadenopathy.
  • He had no urinary tract symptoms, and computed tomography and FDG-PET showed no abnormality in the prostate or pelvic lymph nodes.
  • Metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma was finally diagnosed from the results of immunohistochemical staining for PSA of a biopsy specimen of the mediastinal lymph node, and he was treated by hormonal therapy.
  • There are fears that some other similar cases might be treated with chemotherapy as lung cancer without immunohistochemical staining.
  • Prostatic carcinoma should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of elderly men with supraclaviculer or mediastinal lymph node metastases, since appropriate treatment will lead to a prolonged survival.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biopsy, Needle. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Mediastinum. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood

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  • (PMID = 17763696.001).
  • [ISSN] 1343-3490
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Kokyūki Gakkai zasshi = the journal of the Japanese Respiratory Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nihon Kokyuki Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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47. Zhou J, Rothman VL, Sargiannidou I, Dimitrov S, Qiu C, Smith E, Sheffield J, Sharma M, Tuszynski GP: Cloning and characterization of angiocidin, a tumor cell binding protein for thrombospondin-1. J Cell Biochem; 2004 May 1;92(1):125-46
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  • Our laboratory previously showed that the CSVTCG (cys-ser-val-thr-cys-gly) sequence of TSP-1 functioned as a tumor cell adhesion domain and CSVTCG peptides as well as an anti-peptide antibody possessed anti-metastatic activity in a murine model of lung metastasis.
  • In a subsequent study, a putative TSP-1 binding protein from lung carcinoma was isolated by CSVTCG-peptide affinity chromatography.
  • In this study, we present the full-length cDNA of this binding protein isolated from a prostate cancer cell (PC3-NI) cDNA library.
  • The purified recombinant protein, termed angiocidin, is a potent inhibitor of tumor growth of Lewis Lung carcinoma in vivo and tumor invasion and angiogenesis in vitro.
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / isolation & purification. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Apoptosis. Carcinoma, Lewis Lung / genetics. Carcinoma, Lewis Lung / metabolism. Cloning, Molecular. Endothelial Cells / ultrastructure. Gene Library. Humans. Male. Mice. Molecular Sequence Data. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Transplantation. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Peptide Fragments / genetics. Peptide Fragments / metabolism. Peptides / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / genetics. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism. Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex. Protein Binding. Protein Interaction Mapping. Protein Structure, Tertiary / genetics. Sequence Alignment

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 15095410.001).
  • [ISSN] 0730-2312
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cellular biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cell. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA81822; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA88931
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / PSMD4 protein, human; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / Peptides; 0 / Thrombospondin 1; 0 / cysteinyl-seryl-valyl-threonyl-cysteinyl-glycine; EC 3.4.25.1 / Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
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48. Hong WK: The current status of docetaxel in solid tumors. An M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Review. Oncology (Williston Park); 2002 Jun;16(6 Suppl 6):9-15
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  • In less than a decade, docetaxel (Taxotere) has progressed from initial studies in anthracycline-refractory metastatic breast cancer to several large, phase III randomized trials evaluating its efficacy as adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and first-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and ovarian cancer.
  • In other tumor types, including prostate, head and neck, gastric, and bladder cancer, ongoing phase III trials are comparing docetaxel-containing regimens to previously established regimens.
  • For the seven tumor types reviewed in this supplement, phase III study information for docetaxel or docetaxel-based combinations are presented.
  • In early-stage and metastatic breast cancer, NSCLC, and ovarian cancer, randomized trials have shown that docetaxel-containing therapies are superior to or as effective as established standard chemotherapeutic regimens and are often associated with an improved safety profile.
  • Trials of docetaxel as adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer are under way or have been completed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / analogs & derivatives. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use. Taxoids
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Clinical Trials as Topic. Female. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Neoadjuvant Therapy

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  • (PMID = 12108903.001).
  • [ISSN] 0890-9091
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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49. Pecherstorfer M: Efficacy and safety of ibandronate in the treatment of neoplastic bone disease. Expert Opin Pharmacother; 2004 Nov;5(11):2341-50
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy and safety of ibandronate in the treatment of neoplastic bone disease.
  • Bone is an organ commonly involved in spreading neoplastic disease, especially in multiple myeloma and carcinoma of the breast, prostate and lung.
  • Skeletal stabilisation and pain relief are the main treatment goals in metastatic bone disease.
  • Bisphosphonate treatment inhibits osseous breakdown and is well-established as the current standard therapy for reducing complications of neoplastic bone disease (e.g., pain, fractures and hypercalcaemia).
  • Ibandronate is a third-generation bisphosphonate that has recently been approved for the treatment of bone metastases caused by breast cancer.
  • Ibandronate has also been shown to provide significant and sustained relief from metastatic bone pain over 2 years of treatment, improving patient functioning and quality of life.
  • With a favourable long-term safety profile and the added convenience and flexibility offered by its efficacious oral formulation, ibandronate represents a new therapeutic option for metastatic bone disease management.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Diseases / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / complications. Bone Remodeling / drug effects. Bone Resorption / drug therapy. Diphosphonates / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15500381.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-7666
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Diphosphonates; 114084-78-5 / ibandronic acid
  • [Number-of-references] 58
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50. Tropea F, Baldari S, Restifo G, Fiorillo MT, Surace P, Herberg A: Evaluation of chromogranin A expression in patients with non-neuroendocrine tumours. Clin Drug Investig; 2006;26(12):715-22
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  • BACKGROUND: Chromogranin A (CgA) is well established as a serum marker for neuroendocrine tumours and has also been associated with some non-neuroendocrine tumours, suggesting a possible role for somatostatin analogues such as octreotide in the treatment of these tumours.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to measure plasma CgA levels in patients with various non-neuroendocrine tumours in order to identify those patients who might benefit from octreotide therapy.
  • METHODS: Plasma CgA levels were tested in 151 patients with metastatic non-neuroendocrine tumours.
  • Patients with highly elevated levels were assessed by OctreoScan scintigraphy to determine their somatostatin receptor status, and those with positive results were offered treatment with the somatostatin analogue octreotide, 20 mg every 4 weeks, and followed up every 3 months.
  • RESULTS: CgA levels were elevated (>18 U/L) in 34/72 patients with breast cancer, 11/21 with lung cancer, 10/28 with gastrointestinal cancer, 7/12 with gynaecological cancer, 6/9 with genitourinary cancer, 5/5 with haematological cancer, and 3/4 with head and neck cancer.
  • Eight patients with CgA levels >150 U/L underwent scintigraphy, five of whom (two colorectal, two prostate, one non-small cell lung cancer [NSCLC]) showed positive results and received treatment with octreotide.
  • Further studies are required to determine the value of CgA as a marker for non-neuroendocrine tumours and the role of somatostatin analogues as a treatment for these tumour types.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Breast Neoplasms / blood. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / blood. Male. Middle Aged. Octreotide / therapeutic use. Prospective Studies. Prostatic Neoplasms / blood. Receptors, Somatostatin / analysis

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  • (PMID = 17274678.001).
  • [ISSN] 1173-2563
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical drug investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Drug Investig
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
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51. Sirotnak FM: Studies with ZD1839 in preclinical models. Semin Oncol; 2003 Feb;30(1 Suppl 1):12-20
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  • In preclinical studies of cell lines and human tumor xenografts, ZD1839 as single-agent therapy produced growth inhibition in a wide variety of common solid tumor types including lung, prostate, breast, colon, and ovarian cancers.
  • The A431 vulvar carcinoma model, which expresses abnormally high levels of EGFR, was particularly sensitive to ZD1839 treatment, leading to tumor regression.
  • When ZD1839 was coadministered with cytotoxic chemotherapy agents or radiotherapy, additive or even synergistic antitumor activity was achieved.
  • The inhibition observed with ZD1839 treatment was not restricted to advanced metastatic tumors, but also extended to early lesions such as breast xenografts of human ductal carcinoma in situ.
  • The diverse and profound antitumor activities attained with ZD1839 treatment in tumor cells and in xenograft tumor models provided the rationale for clinical development of ZD1839.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Humans. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA)
  • (PMID = 12644980.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA08748; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA56517
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Quinazolines; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; S65743JHBS / gefitinib
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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52. von Minckwitz G, Harder S, Hövelmann S, Jäger E, Al-Batran SE, Loibl S, Atmaca A, Cimpoiasu C, Neumann A, Abera A, Knuth A, Kaufmann M, Jäger D, Maurer AB, Wels WS: Phase I clinical study of the recombinant antibody toxin scFv(FRP5)-ETA specific for the ErbB2/HER2 receptor in patients with advanced solid malignomas. Breast Cancer Res; 2005;7(5):R617-26
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  • Eighteen patients suffering from ErbB2-expressing metastatic breast cancers, prostate cancers, head and neck cancer, non small cell lung cancer, or transitional cell carcinoma were treated.
  • Fifteen minutes after injection, peak concentrations of more than 100 ng/ml scFv(FRP5)-ETA were obtained at a dose of 10 microg/kg, indicating that predicted therapeutic levels of the recombinant protein can be applied without inducing toxic side effects.
  • Induction of antibodies against scFv(FRP5)-ETA was observed 8 days after initiation of therapy in 13 patients investigated, but only in five of these patients could neutralizing activity be detected.
  • CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that systemic therapy with scFv(FRP5)-ETA can be safely administered up to a maximum tolerated dose of 12.5 microg/kg in patients with ErbB2-expressing tumors, justifying further clinical development.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antibodies / toxicity. Area Under Curve. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. Single-Chain Antibodies

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  • (PMID = 16168106.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-542X
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast cancer research : BCR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies; 0 / Cancer Vaccines; 0 / Exotoxins; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / Single-Chain Antibodies; 0 / scFv(FRP5)-ETA antibody toxin; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-2
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1242130
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53. Brahmer JR, Drake CG, Wollner I, Powderly JD, Picus J, Sharfman WH, Stankevich E, Pons A, Salay TM, McMiller TL, Gilson MM, Wang C, Selby M, Taube JM, Anders R, Chen L, Korman AJ, Pardoll DM, Lowy I, Topalian SL: Phase I study of single-agent anti-programmed death-1 (MDX-1106) in refractory solid tumors: safety, clinical activity, pharmacodynamics, and immunologic correlates. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Jul 01;28(19):3167-75
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • This phase I study sought to determine the safety and tolerability of anti-PD-1 blockade in patients with treatment-refractory solid tumors and to preliminarily assess antitumor activity, pharmacodynamics, and immunologic correlates.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with advanced metastatic melanoma, colorectal cancer (CRC), castrate-resistant prostate cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), or renal cell carcinoma (RCC) received a single intravenous infusion of anti-PD-1 (MDX-1106) in dose-escalating six-patient cohorts at 0.3, 1, 3, or 10 mg/kg, followed by a 15-patient expansion cohort at 10 mg/kg.
  • Patients with evidence of clinical benefit at 3 months were eligible for repeated therapy.
  • In nine patients examined, tumor cell surface B7-H1 expression appeared to correlate with the likelihood of response to treatment.
  • Exploration of alternative dosing regimens and combinatorial therapies with vaccines, targeted therapies, and/or other checkpoint inhibitors is warranted.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antigens, CD / immunology. Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins / immunology. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Fatigue / chemically induced. Female. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Lymphopenia / chemically induced. Male. Melanoma / drug therapy. Melanoma / pathology. Middle Aged. Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Immunotherapy. 2010 Nov;2(6):757-60 [21091107.001]
  • (PMID = 20516446.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA006973; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA058236; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA142779
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; 0 / PDCD1 protein, human; 0 / Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor; 31YO63LBSN / nivolumab
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS375712; NLM/ PMC4834717
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54. Pistevou-Gombaki K, Eleftheriadis N, Plataniotis GA, Sofroniadis I, Kouloulias VE: Octreotide for palliative treatment of hepatic metastases from non-neuroendocrine primary tumours: evaluation of quality of life using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Palliat Med; 2003 Apr;17(3):257-62
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Palliative Care.

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  • [Title] Octreotide for palliative treatment of hepatic metastases from non-neuroendocrine primary tumours: evaluation of quality of life using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire.
  • BACKGROUND AND AIM: While octreotide has been used in palliative treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumours with good results, little is known about the possible role of this in palliative treatment of hepatic metastases.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: We present our experience from the use of octreotide in palliative treatment of symptomatic liver metastases in 16 patients (11 males, five females, age ranged 43-69 years) with proven hepatic metastases from different primary tumours (six with non-small lung cancer, four with colon carcinoma, two with primary pancreatic head carcinoma, two with prostate cancer and two with adenocarcinoma of the stomach).
  • All patients were administered 20 mg long-acting octreotide IM (octreotide LAR) once the first day, octreotide SC 0.5 mg three times daily on days 2-14 and then 20 mg long-acting octreotide IM every month.
  • Quality of life was assessed by using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30).
  • Two patients died two months after the initiation of the study due to generalized metastatic disease, while the remaining 14 patients were still alive seven months after the initiation of the study.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although further studies are warranted, we consider the use of octreotide a good alternative in palliative treatment of symptomatic liver metastases in patients with end-stage malignant disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Octreotide / therapeutic use. Pain / drug therapy. Palliative Care. Quality of Life. Surveys and Questionnaires
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Statistics, Nonparametric

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  • (PMID = 12725479.001).
  • [ISSN] 0269-2163
  • [Journal-full-title] Palliative medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Palliat Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; RWM8CCW8GP / Octreotide
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55. Morabito A, Piccirillo MC, Costanzo R, Sandomenico C, Carillio G, Daniele G, Giordano P, Bryce J, Carotenuto P, La Rocca A, Di Maio M, Normanno N, Rocco G, Perrone F: Vandetanib: An overview of its clinical development in NSCLC and other tumors. Drugs Today (Barc); 2010 Sep;46(9):683-98
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  • Four randomized phase III clinical trials evaluated the efficacy of vandetanib in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in combination with docetaxel (ZODIAC), pemetrexed (ZEAL) or as a single agent (ZEST and ZEPHYR).
  • No significant antitumor activity has been observed in small cell lung cancer, advanced ovarian, colorectal, breast, prostate cancer and multiple myeloma.
  • In advanced metastatic medullary thyroid cancer, one randomized phase III clinical trial has demonstrated that vandetanib can significantly improve response rate, PFS and time to worsening of pain.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Piperidines / therapeutic use. Quinazolines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Humans


56. Kondo M, Sakuta K, Noguchi A, Ariyoshi N, Sato K, Sato S, Sato K, Hosoi A, Nakajima J, Yoshida Y, Shiraishi K, Nakagawa K, Kakimi K: Zoledronate facilitates large-scale ex vivo expansion of functional gammadelta T cells from cancer patients for use in adoptive immunotherapy. Cytotherapy; 2008;10(8):842-56
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  • METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors and patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, bone metastatic breast or prostate cancer, or lung metastatic colorectal cancer, were stimulated with zoledronate (5 microM) and interleukin (IL)-2 (1000 IU/mL) for 14 days.
  • RESULTS: Gammadelta T cells from cancer patients and healthy donors responded to zoledronate equally well in terms of both phenotype and function. gammadelta T cells grew rapidly in vitro and expression of effector molecules, such as interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, perforin, granzyme B, FasL and TRAIL, increased over time.
  • Cytotoxicity peaked on days 12-14, and proliferation continued up to 14 days, during which time>1x10(9) gammadelta T cells could be obtained from a starting sample of 45-70 mL peripheral blood.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Breast Neoplasms / therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / therapy. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Colorectal Neoplasms / therapy. Cytokines / metabolism. Cytotoxicity, Immunologic / drug effects. Diphosphonates / pharmacology. Imidazoles / pharmacology. Immunotherapy, Adoptive. Lung Neoplasms / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy. Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta / metabolism. T-Lymphocytes / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19016372.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-2566
  • [Journal-full-title] Cytotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cytotherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Imidazoles; 0 / Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta; 63231-63-0 / RNA; 6XC1PAD3KF / zoledronic acid
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57. Micke P, Ostman A: Tumour-stroma interaction: cancer-associated fibroblasts as novel targets in anti-cancer therapy? Lung Cancer; 2004 Aug;45 Suppl 2:S163-75
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  • [Title] Tumour-stroma interaction: cancer-associated fibroblasts as novel targets in anti-cancer therapy?
  • Stroma cells, together with extracellular matrix components, provide the microenvironment that is pivotal for cancer cell growth, invasion and metastatic progression.
  • Seminal functional studies in various cancer types, including breast, colon, prostate and lung cancer, have confirmed the concept that fibroblasts can determine the fate of the epithelial cell, since they are able to promote malignant conversion as well as to revert tumour cells to a normal phenotype.
  • A possible implication in lung carcinogenesis is emphasised.
  • Finally, a laser-capture- and microarray-based approach is presented, which comprehensively characterises carcinoma-associated fibroblasts in their in vivo environment for the identification of potential targets for anti-cancer therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Fibroblasts / drug effects. Fibroblasts / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Stromal Cells / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Epithelial Cells / drug effects. Epithelial Cells / pathology. Humans. Muscle Cells / drug effects. Muscle Cells / pathology. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Metastasis. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor / metabolism. Transforming Growth Factor beta / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15552797.001).
  • [ISSN] 0169-5002
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Platelet-Derived Growth Factor; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta
  • [Number-of-references] 140
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58. Heimburg J, Yan J, Morey S, Glinskii OV, Huxley VH, Wild L, Klick R, Roy R, Glinsky VV, Rittenhouse-Olson K: Inhibition of spontaneous breast cancer metastasis by anti-Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen monoclonal antibody JAA-F11. Neoplasia; 2006 Nov;8(11):939-48
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  • Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF-Ag) is expressed in many carcinomas, including those of the breast, colon, bladder, and prostate.
  • This was tested using in vitro models of tumor cell growth; cytotoxicity assays; in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of cancer metastasis; and, finally, in vivo effects in mice with metastatic breast cancer.
  • Unlike some anti-TF-Ag antibodies, JAA-F11 did not enhance breast carcinoma cell growth.
  • However, JAA-F11 blocked the stages of metastasis that involve the adhesion of human breast carcinoma cells to human endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human bone marrow endothelial cells 60) in in vitro static adhesion models, in a perfused ex vivo model, and in murine lung vasculature in an in vivo metastatic deposit formation assay.
  • JAA-F11 significantly extended the median survival time of animals bearing metastatic 4T1 breast tumors and caused a > 50% inhibition of lung metastasis.

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  • (PMID = 17132226.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5586
  • [Journal-full-title] Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neoplasia
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R15 AI049210; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / T32 HL07094; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL078816; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / T32 HL007094; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R37 HL042528; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R15 AI49210-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, Tumor-Associated, Carbohydrate; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 3554-90-3 / Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1716011
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59. Street SE, Cretney E, Smyth MJ: Perforin and interferon-gamma activities independently control tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis. Blood; 2001 Jan 1;97(1):192-7
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  • Using experimental (B6, RM-1 prostate carcinoma) and spontaneous (BALB/c, DA3 mammary carcinoma) models of metastatic cancer, mice deficient in both pfp and IFN-gamma were significantly less proficient than pfp- or IFN-gamma-deficient mice in preventing metastasis of tumor cells to the lung.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Interferon-gamma / pharmacology. Membrane Glycoproteins / pharmacology. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Experimental / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Cell Division / drug effects. Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic. Disease Models, Animal. Fibrosarcoma / chemically induced. Fibrosarcoma / drug therapy. Fibrosarcoma / immunology. Killer Cells, Natural / drug effects. Killer Cells, Natural / immunology. Leukocyte Count. Methylcholanthrene / pharmacology. Mice. Mice, Inbred Strains. Mice, Knockout. Mice, SCID. Perforin. Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins. Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, alpha-beta / immunology

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  • (PMID = 11133760.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins; 0 / Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, alpha-beta; 126465-35-8 / Perforin; 56-49-5 / Methylcholanthrene; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma
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60. Palma JP, Wang YC, Rodriguez LE, Montgomery D, Ellis PA, Bukofzer G, Niquette A, Liu X, Shi Y, Lasko L, Zhu GD, Penning TD, Giranda VL, Rosenberg SH, Frost DJ, Donawho CK: ABT-888 confers broad in vivo activity in combination with temozolomide in diverse tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 2009 Dec 1;15(23):7277-90
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  • We investigated ABT-888+TMZ combination therapy in multiple xenograft models representing various human tumors having different responses to TMZ.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: ABT-888+TMZ efficacy in xenograft tumors implanted in subcutaneous, orthotopic, and metastatic sites was assessed by tumor burden, expression of poly(ADP-ribose) polymer, and O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT).
  • RESULTS: Varying levels of ABT-888+TMZ sensitivity were evident across a broad histologic spectrum of models (55-100% tumor growth inhibition) in B-cell lymphoma, small cell lung carcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, pancreatic, ovarian, breast, and prostate xenografts, including numerous regressions.
  • Moreover, TMZ resistance was overcome in crossover treatments, indicating that combination therapy may overcome acquired TMZ resistance.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Robust ABT-888+TMZ efficacy is observed across a spectrum of tumor types, including orthotopic and metastatic implantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Benzimidazoles / administration & dosage. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / administration & dosage. DNA Damage. DNA Modification Methylases / metabolism. DNA Repair. DNA Repair Enzymes / metabolism. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Humans. Mice. Mice, SCID. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Transplantation. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19934293.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / Benzimidazoles; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 01O4K0631N / veliparib; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 85622-93-1 / temozolomide; EC 2.1.1.- / DNA Modification Methylases; EC 2.1.1.63 / MGMT protein, human; EC 6.5.1.- / DNA Repair Enzymes
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61. Weiss JM, Ridnour LA, Back T, Hussain SP, He P, Maciag AE, Keefer LK, Murphy WJ, Harris CC, Wink DA, Wiltrout RH: Macrophage-dependent nitric oxide expression regulates tumor cell detachment and metastasis after IL-2/anti-CD40 immunotherapy. J Exp Med; 2010 Oct 25;207(11):2455-67
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  • Using an orthotopic model of renal cell carcinoma, we showed previously that IL-2/anti-CD40 immunotherapy resulted in synergistic anti-tumor responses, whereas IL-2 or α-CD40 alone mediated partial transient anti-tumor effects.
  • We now show that treatment of tumor-bearing mice with IL-2/α-CD40, but not IL-2 or α-CD40, induced significant nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 2 expression in tumor-associated macrophages.
  • However, during immunotherapy (high NO), NOS2 inhibition or macrophage depletion reversed the ability of IL-2/α-CD40 treatment to reduce lung metastases but had no effect on primary tumor burden.
  • Furthermore, IL-2/α-CD40 induced the IFN-γ- and NO-dependent decrease in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity, concomitant with increases in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 1 and E-cadherin expression within tumors.
  • Finally, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with the NO donor JS-K significantly reduced metastases.
  • Furthermore, reduced MMP9 activity implicates M1-polarized macrophages within the tumor microenvironment as critical components of therapeutic response.
  • Our data demonstrate the mechanistic basis for IL-2/α-CD40-mediated control of metastases and suggest that the context-dependent application of NO donors may hold promise for prevention of metastatic disease.

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  • (PMID = 20921282.001).
  • [ISSN] 1540-9538
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of experimental medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Exp. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA095572; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / ; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA-95572; United States / CCR NIH HHS / RC / HHSN261200800001C; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / HHSN261200800001E
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD40; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cadherins; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Nitric Oxide Donors; 0 / Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma; EC 1.14.13.39 / Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II; EC 1.14.13.39 / Nos2 protein, mouse; EC 3.4.24.- / Mmp9 protein, mouse; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2964582
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62. Ruggeri B, Singh J, Gingrich D, Angeles T, Albom M, Yang S, Chang H, Robinson C, Hunter K, Dobrzanski P, Jones-Bolin S, Pritchard S, Aimone L, Klein-Szanto A, Herbert JM, Bono F, Schaeffer P, Casellas P, Bourie B, Pili R, Isaacs J, Ator M, Hudkins R, Vaught J, Mallamo J, Dionne C: CEP-7055: a novel, orally active pan inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases with potent antiangiogenic activity and antitumor efficacy in preclinical models. Cancer Res; 2003 Sep 15;63(18):5978-91
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF-VEGF receptor (VEGF-R) kinase axes in the tumor angiogenic cascade is a promising therapeutic strategy in oncology.
  • Single-dose p.o. or s.c. administration of CEP-7055 or CEP-5214 to CD-1 mice at 23.8 mg/kg/dose b.i.d. resulted in a reversible inhibition of VEGF-R2/FLK-1 phosphorylation in murine lung tissues.
  • Chronic p.o. administration of CEP-7055 at doses of 11.9 to 23.8 mg/kg/dose b.i.d. resulted in significant inhibition (50-90% maximum inhibition relative to controls) in the growth of a variety of established murine and human s.c. tumor xenografts in nude mice, including A375 melanomas, U251MG and U87MG glioblastomas, CALU-6 lung carcinoma, ASPC-1 pancreatic carcinoma, HT-29 and HCT-116 colon carcinomas, MCF-7 breast carcinomas, and SVR angiosarcomas.
  • Significant antitumor efficacy was observed similarly against orthotopically implanted LNCaP human prostate carcinomas in male nude mice and orthotopically implanted renal carcinoma (RENCA) tumors in BALB/c mice, in terms of a significant reduction in the metastatic score and the extent of pulmonary metastases.
  • The antitumor efficacy of chronic CEP-7055 administration was independent of initial tumor volume (in the ASPC-1 pancreatic carcinoma model) and reversible on withdrawal of treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Carbazoles / pharmacology. Neoplasms, Experimental / drug therapy. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 / antagonists & inhibitors. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 / antagonists & inhibitors. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3 / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Animals. Endothelium, Vascular / cytology. Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Endothelium, Vascular / enzymology. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacokinetics. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Female. In Vitro Techniques. Male. Mice. Mice, Nude. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Neovascularization, Pathologic / enzymology. Phosphorylation. Prodrugs / pharmacokinetics. Prodrugs / pharmacology. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Solubility. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • [ErratumIn] Cancer Res. 2003 Nov 1;63(21):7543
  • (PMID = 14522925.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 3-(5,6,7,13-tetrahydro-9-((1-methylethoxy)methyl)-5-oxo-12H-indeno(2,1-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)carbazol-12-yl)propanol; 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Carbazoles; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / N,N-dimethylglycine 3-(5,6,7,13-tetrahydro-9-((1-methylethoxy)methyl)-5-oxo-12H-indeno(2,1-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)carbazol-12-yl)propyl ester; 0 / Prodrugs; EC 2.7.10.1 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1; EC 2.7.10.1 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2; EC 2.7.10.1 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3
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