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1. Aydinli U, Ozturk C, Yalcinkaya U, Tirelioglu O, Ersozlu S: Limb-sparing surgery for primary malignant tumours of the pelvis. Acta Orthop Belg; 2004 Oct;70(5):417-22
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  • [Title] Limb-sparing surgery for primary malignant tumours of the pelvis.
  • Treatment of malignant tumours of the pelvis represents one of the most difficult problems in musculoskeletal oncology.
  • The aim of this paper is to present our results in 16 cases of primary malignant pelvic tumours following resection only or following reconstruction with autogenous or allogenous bone grafts without using megaprostheses, and to assess the possibility to restore acceptable function with autogenous or allogenous bone grafts while avoiding the high risks of massive endoprostheses.
  • Wound complication was the most common complication in our series, with 10 patients requiring additional treatment in the form of local surgical debridement, appropriate multi-drug antimicrobial therapy and wound care.
  • Major blood loss and long operation time, aggressive radical surgery due to the frequent delay in diagnosis, and wound complications after surgery are important points that should be considered in the treatment of primary malignant pelvic tumours.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Angiography. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Sampling Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15587029.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6462
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta orthopaedica Belgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Orthop Belg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Belgium
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2. Ding Y, Niu XH, Zhang Q, Ma K, Liu WF: [The surgical treatment of primary malignant bone tumors of pelvis]. Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2008 Jun 15;46(12):886-90
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  • [Title] [The surgical treatment of primary malignant bone tumors of pelvis].
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the surgical treatment effect of primary malignant pelvic bone tumors.
  • METHODS: Retrospective study was carried out in 79 patients with primary malignant pelvic bone tumors treated surgically and followed up regularly between October 1992 and July 2007.
  • In this cohort, 23 tumors were low-grade malignant of I B, and 56 tumors were high-grade malignant of II B.
  • According to the preoperative diagnosis and the effect of chemotherapy, different methods of tumor resection and reconstruction were applied respectively.
  • The mean time of follow-up was 28.6 months (range, 0-183 months).
  • The minimum follow-up time in survival patients was 4 months.
  • In 14 patients developed postoperative distant metastasis, 12 in local recurrence group which incidence was 48.0%, compared to 2 in no-recurrence group which incidence was 3.7%, and the difference was significant (P = 0.000).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Wide surgical margin is essential for successful resection of primary malignant pelvic bone tumors.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19035144.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5815
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua wai ke za zhi [Chinese journal of surgery]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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3. McIlwain L, Sokol L, Moscinski LC, Saba HI: Acute myeloid leukemia mimicking primary testicular neoplasm. Presentation of a case with review of literature. Eur J Haematol; 2003 Apr;70(4):242-5
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  • [Title] Acute myeloid leukemia mimicking primary testicular neoplasm. Presentation of a case with review of literature.
  • Further work-up with computed tomography of the chest, abdomen and pelvis revealed massive retroperitoneal, peripancreatic and mediastinal lymphadenopathy, suggesting primary testicular neoplasm.
  • The patient was subjected to right orchiectomy that showed infiltration of testicular tissue with malignant cells, originally misinterpreted as undifferentiated carcinoma.
  • Both the morphology and immunophenotype of the blast cells were consistent with AML type M4 (acute myelo-monocytic leukemia), using French-American-British (FAB) classification.
  • The patient received standard induction chemotherapy with cytosine arabinoside (ARA-C) and daunorubicin followed with two cycles of consolidation therapy with high dose ARA-C, which resulted in remission of BM disease and resolution of lymphadenopathy and left testicular masses.
  • After the second cycle of consolidation therapy, the patient developed sepsis that was complicated by refractory disseminated intravascular coagulopathy.
  • [MeSH-major] Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Acute / diagnosis. Leukemic Infiltration / diagnosis. Testicular Neoplasms / diagnosis. Testis / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdominal Pain / etiology. Adult. Antigens, CD / analysis. Antigens, Neoplasm / analysis. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Daunorubicin / administration & dosage. Diagnosis, Differential. Diagnostic Errors. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation / etiology. Estradiol / blood. Fatal Outcome. Gynecomastia / etiology. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Karyotyping. Male. Multiple Organ Failure / etiology. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis. Neoplastic Stem Cells / chemistry. Neoplastic Stem Cells / pathology. Peroxidase / analysis

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  • (PMID = 12656749.001).
  • [ISSN] 0902-4441
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol; EC 1.11.1.7 / Peroxidase; ZS7284E0ZP / Daunorubicin
  • [Number-of-references] 19
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4. Sabo D, Bernd L, Buchner M, Treiber M, Wannenmacher M, Ewerbeck V, Parsch D: [Intraoperative extracorporeal irradiation and replantation in local treatment of primary malignant bone tumors]. Orthopade; 2003 Nov;32(11):1003-12
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  • [Title] [Intraoperative extracorporeal irradiation and replantation in local treatment of primary malignant bone tumors].
  • In 13 patients with primary malignant bone tumors (10 Ewing's sarcoma, 1 parosteal osteosarcoma, 1 adamantinoma recurrence, and 1 MFH) local therapy was performed as intraoperative extracorporeal irradiation and replantation (IEIR) of the involved bone segment (5 tibia, 2 femur, and 6 pelvis).
  • Of the 13 patients (69%), 9 are alive at the time of the follow-up (5 CDF, 4 AWM(treated)) and 4 patients died of disease (DOD).
  • IEIR must be seen as an extraordinary reconstruction procedure in cases where established procedures such as endoprosthesis, biological reconstructions, or rotationplasties cannot be used or are refused by the patient.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Ameloblastoma / drug therapy. Ameloblastoma / pathology. Ameloblastoma / radiotherapy. Ameloblastoma / surgery. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Femoral Neoplasms / drug therapy. Femoral Neoplasms / pathology. Femoral Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Femoral Neoplasms / surgery. Follow-Up Studies. Histiocytic Sarcoma / drug therapy. Histiocytic Sarcoma / pathology. Histiocytic Sarcoma / radiotherapy. Histiocytic Sarcoma / surgery. Humans. Male. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neoplasm Staging. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Osteosarcoma / pathology. Osteosarcoma / radiotherapy. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Radiotherapy Dosage. Sarcoma, Ewing / drug therapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / pathology. Sarcoma, Ewing / radiotherapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / surgery. Tibia / pathology. Tibia / surgery

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  • (PMID = 14615850.001).
  • [ISSN] 0085-4530
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Orthopade
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orthopade
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
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5. Machtens S, Serth J, Meyer A, Kleinhorst C, Ommer KJ, Herbst U, Kieruij M, Boerner AR: Positron emission tomography (PET) in the urooncological evaluation of the small pelvis. World J Urol; 2007 Aug;25(4):341-9
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  • [Title] Positron emission tomography (PET) in the urooncological evaluation of the small pelvis.
  • Positron emission tomography (PET) with the use of ((18)F)2-fluoro-D: -2-desoxyglucose (FDG) has been investigated to be a highly sensitive and specific imaging modality in the diagnostic of primary and recurrent tumors and in the control of therapies in numerous non-urologic cancers.
  • The aim of this review is to validate the significance of PET as a diagnostic tool in malignant urological tumors of the small pelvis.
  • A systematic review of the current literature concerning the role of PET for malignant prostate, testicular and bladder tumors was carried out.
  • The data indicate no additional role for PET in comparison with conventional imaging in tumor detection and local staging for prostate, bladder or testicular cancer.
  • FDG-PET can be regarded as accepted imaging modality in the restaging of seminomatous germ cell tumors after chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Pelvis / diagnostic imaging. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnostic imaging. Testicular Neoplasms / diagnostic imaging. Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon / methods. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / diagnostic imaging
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Reproducibility of Results

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  • (PMID = 17624533.001).
  • [ISSN] 0724-4983
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 66
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6. Wessalowski R, Schneider DT, Mils O, Hannen M, Calaminus G, Engelbrecht V, Pape H, Willers R, Engert J, Harms D, Göbel U: An approach for cure: PEI-chemotherapy and regional deep hyperthermia in children and adolescents with unresectable malignant tumors. Klin Padiatr; 2003 Nov-Dec;215(6):303-9
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  • [Title] An approach for cure: PEI-chemotherapy and regional deep hyperthermia in children and adolescents with unresectable malignant tumors.
  • BACKGROUND: Elevated temperatures of 40 - 44 degrees C increase the actions of various anticancer drugs including N-lost derivatives, cytotoxic antibiotics and platinum analoga.
  • Among these, 24 patients had extracranial non-testicular germ cell tumors and 15 patients soft tissue or chondrosarcomas.
  • INDICATION: locoregional relapse (n = 29) or unresectable tumor after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (n = 10).
  • Among these two groups, there were ten patients with poor response or progressive disease under primary or relapse chemotherapy.
  • Tumor site: pelvis (30), abdomen (4), head and neck (2), proximal leg (2) and lumbar spine (1).
  • CONCLUSION: TCH shows substantial therapeutic efficacy and facilitates complete tumor resection in 14 out of 28 operated patients.
  • Multimodal treatment including TCH, surgical resection and/or radiotherapy leads to sustained remission in the majority of patients with locoregional tumor recurrence.
  • The therapeutic effect is most pronounced, if TCH is administered at first relapse.
  • Therefore, a more valid assessment of treatment efficacy can only be made by a matched-pair comparison in cooperation with the clinical registers.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Neoplasms / therapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Chondrosarcoma / therapy. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Germinoma / therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Hyperthermia, Induced. Ifosfamide / therapeutic use. Lumbar Vertebrae. Pelvic Neoplasms / therapy. Sarcoma / therapy. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / therapy. Spinal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Chi-Square Distribution. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Karnofsky Performance Status. Male. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome


7. Elliott KS, Borowsky ME, Bakdounes K, Huang J, Abulafia O, Lee YC: Malignant thymoma metastatic to the pelvis: a rare case and considerations for management. Gynecol Oncol; 2005 Oct;99(1):228-31

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  • [Title] Malignant thymoma metastatic to the pelvis: a rare case and considerations for management.
  • We present an unusual case of recurrent thymoma metastatic to the pelvis and review treatment experience employing surgical, radiotherapeutic and medical modalities.
  • CASE REPORT: The present case is that of a 46-year-old woman with recurrent thymoma metastatic to a distal pelvic lymph node.
  • Resection of the pelvic recurrence followed many years of local and systemic treatment for her thoracic primary tumor.
  • Her case is unique for its involvement of pelvic anatomy and her clinical course marked by treatment-related congestive heart failure.
  • CONCLUSION: While the indolent clinical course of thyomoma frequently necessitates re-treatment and multi-modality therapy in patients suffering recurrences, treatment selection must take into account potential long-term morbidity and attendant quality of life.
  • When anatomically and technically feasible, resection of recurrent disease should be considered in attempts to avoid potential cumulative and long-term toxicity resultant from radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Pelvic Neoplasms / secondary. Thymoma / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16055177.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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8. Weber K, Damron TA, Frassica FJ, Sim FH: Malignant bone tumors. Instr Course Lect; 2008;57:673-88
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  • [Title] Malignant bone tumors.
  • Malignant bone tumors represent a small percentage of cancers nationwide and also are much less common than malignant soft-tissue tumors.
  • The rarity of the condition makes it imperative that orthopaedic surgeons in nononcologic practices are able to recognize the symptoms that suggest a possible bony malignancy to avoid inappropriate or delayed treatment.
  • The most common primary malignant bone tumors, osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma, occur in childhood.
  • The primary symptom of a patient with a malignant bone tumor is pain, which often occurs at rest or at night.
  • Patients with a likely malignancy require thorough staging to determine the extent of disease and a well-planned biopsy for accurate diagnosis.
  • Knowledge of specific tumor characteristics and treatment options for osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, chondrosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, chordoma, and adamantinoma is important.
  • Patients with osteosarcoma and resectable Ewing's sarcoma are treated with chemotherapy followed by surgical resection.
  • Secondary sarcomas can occur in previously benign bone lesions and require aggressive treatment.
  • Specific techniques are available for the resection of malignant bone tumors from the upper extremities, lower extremities, pelvis, and spine.
  • The care of patients with primary malignant bone tumors requires a multidisciplinary approach to treatment.
  • [MeSH-minor] Global Health. Humans. Morbidity. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 18399615.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-6895
  • [Journal-full-title] Instructional course lectures
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Instr Course Lect
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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9. Ebelin M, Missenard G, Nordin JY: [Iatrogenic tumor metastasis to the pelvis after treatment for hand osteosarcoma. A case report]. Chir Main; 2000 Nov;19(5):272-5
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  • [Title] [Iatrogenic tumor metastasis to the pelvis after treatment for hand osteosarcoma. A case report].
  • [Transliterated title] Inoculation tumorale iatrogène du bassin après cure d'un ostéosarcome de la main. A propos d'un cas.
  • This was first treated by curettage, iliac bone graft and internal fixation, without any complementary investigation being carried out, i.e., no preliminary biopsy and histological diagnosis were made.
  • The results of this inadequate approach were poor: neither satisfactory fixation of the fracture nor control of the primary lesion were obtained.
  • Moreover, the definitive diagnosis was only made four months later, when biopsy findings confirmed the presence of an osteosarcoma.
  • After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, an en-bloc resection of the second metatarsal and the trapezoid bone was carried out.
  • However, nearly a year later the discovery of a large tumor mass at the site where the iliac bone graft was originally taken necessitated resection of the hemi-pelvis, with chemotherapy prior to resection and radiotherapy following surgery.
  • Unfortunately, this salvage procedure did not limit the spread of the disease, and subsequent pulmonary and vertebral metastases were found, leading to the death of the patient three years after the initial fracture.
  • This particular case underlines the fact that the basic rules for the management of malignant tumors should be taken into consideration from the onset, so that a catastrophic prognosis such as that described can be avoided.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Bone Transplantation / adverse effects. Curettage / adverse effects. Fracture Fixation, Internal / adverse effects. Fractures, Spontaneous / etiology. Hand Injuries / etiology. Iatrogenic Disease. Ilium / transplantation. Metacarpus / injuries. Neoplasm Seeding. Osteosarcoma / secondary. Pelvic Bones
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy. Fatal Outcome. Hemipelvectomy. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Salvage Therapy. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


10. Spurgeon JM, Cotlar AM: Cytoreductive surgery in the management of malignant ascites from adenocarcinoma of unknown primary (ACUP). Curr Surg; 2005 Sep-Oct;62(5):500-3
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  • [Title] Cytoreductive surgery in the management of malignant ascites from adenocarcinoma of unknown primary (ACUP).
  • A case report is presented of a 62-year-old man with adenocarcinoma of unknown primary (ACUP) who was admitted with massive ascites from intraperitoneal carcinomatosis secondary to a gastrointestinal tract malignancy.
  • A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis confirmed extensive neoplasm.
  • A near-total omentectomy was performed, and he was given postoperative systemic chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion / methods. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / pathology. Palliative Care. Peritoneal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Ascites / pathology. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Progression. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Laparotomy / methods. Male. Middle Aged. Omentum / pathology. Omentum / surgery. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 16125606.001).
  • [ISSN] 0149-7944
  • [Journal-full-title] Current surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. Spunt SL, Harper JA, Krasin MJ, Billups CA, Rodriguez-Galindo C: Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFT) as second malignant neoplasms (SMN) following treatment of a primary malignant neoplasm (PMN) during childhood. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8539

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFT) as second malignant neoplasms (SMN) following treatment of a primary malignant neoplasm (PMN) during childhood.
  • Demographic data, diagnostic and treatment information for both the PMN and SMN, and outcome data were recorded.
  • The median age at diagnosis of PMN was 4.2 years (range, 0.8-12.5 years), and of ESFT was 13.4 years (range, 4.9-22.0 years).
  • Six patients received chemotherapy for treatment of the PMN including alkylating agents (n=3), anthracyclines (n=6), and etoposide (n=1).
  • Four also received radiotherapy (RT) for the PMN (dose range, 10.8-48 Gy, median 30 Gy).
  • The ESFT primary sites were chest wall/rib (n=4), extremity (n=3) and pelvis (n=1).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of ESFT as a SMN following treatment of childhood cancer is similar to the proportion of ESFT as a PMN in childhood.
  • Survival appears to be only slightly inferior to that of de novo ESFT.

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  • (PMID = 28013834.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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12. Eroğlu A, Kürkçüoğlu IC, Karaoğlanoğlu N, Alper F, Gündoğdu C: Extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma of the diaphragm presenting with hemothorax. Ann Thorac Surg; 2004 Aug;78(2):715-7
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  • Ewing sarcoma is a relatively uncommon malignant bone neoplasm that usually occurs in children and young adults and involves the major long bones, pelvis, and ribs.
  • Primary diaphragmatic Ewing sarcoma is extremely rare.
  • To the best of our knowledge, only three cases of primary Ewing sarcoma of the diaphragm have been reported.
  • After drainage, a roentgenogram film, computed tomography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance image showed a giant mass on the right diaphragm.
  • Primary diaphragmatic tumor was resected totally by right posterolateral thoracotomy, and histologically, an extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma was identified.
  • The patient received adjuvant radio-chemotherapy, and there was no evidence of disease 10 months after the operation.
  • Although extremely rare, extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of diaphragmatic soft tissue tumors.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Dyspnea / etiology. Female. Hemothorax / etiology. Humans. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Mesna / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Organ Specificity. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Remission Induction. Ribs / pathology

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  • (PMID = 15276562.001).
  • [ISSN] 1552-6259
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of thoracic surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Thorac. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; NR7O1405Q9 / Mesna; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide; MAID protocol
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13. Michael H, Lucia J, Foster RS, Ulbright TM: The pathology of late recurrence of testicular germ cell tumors. Am J Surg Pathol; 2000 Feb;24(2):257-73
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  • A total of 91 men had histologically documented late recurrences of testicular germ cell tumors characterized by a complete response to treatment with a subsequent disease-free interval of at least 2 years and no evidence of a second primary lesion.
  • Ninety percent of the patients for whom information was available received chemotherapy shortly after their initial diagnosis of testicular germ cell tumors; most of the other patients were known to have stage I disease initially.
  • Thus, teratoma was the most common type of neoplasm in late recurrences.
  • Excluding teratoma coexisting with other types of neoplasms, yolk sac tumor was the most frequent type of tumor in patients with late recurrence.
  • It occurred in 47% of patients, either alone or with teratoma, another nonteratomatous germ cell tumor type, or a "nongerm cell malignant tumor."
  • Unusual types of yolk sac tumor, including glandular, parietal, clear cell, and pleomorphic patterns, were seen frequently in late recurrences and often raised differential diagnostic problems with "nongerm cell" carcinomas.
  • A smaller number of late recurrences consisted of other types of neoplasms.
  • Twenty percent of patients with late recurrence had a nonteratomatous germ cell tumor other than yolk sac tumor, either alone, with yolk sac tumor, or with a "nongerm cell malignant tumor."
  • "Nongerm cell malignant tumors," including both sarcomas and carcinomas of various types, occurred in 23% of late-recurrence patients, either alone or with a nonteratomatous germ cell tumor.
  • Late recurrences were seen in many different sites in these patients, including the retroperitoneum, abdomen, pelvis, liver, mediastinum, lung, bone (femur, vertebra, and rib), lymph nodes outside the retroperitoneum and mediastinum (supraclavicular, neck, and axillary regions), scrotum and inguinal regions, adrenal gland, chest wall, and buttocks.
  • Patients whose late recurrences consisted of pure "nongerm cell malignant tumor" or pure germ cell tumor (yolk sac tumor or other types) had a much worse prognosis: Only 36% to 37% were alive with no evidence of disease.
  • Patients with two different types of nonteratomatous malignancies in their late recurrences had a dismal clinical course: Only 17% with both yolk sac tumor and other nonteratomatous germ cell tumor had no evidence of disease, whereas no patient with both nonteratomatous germ cell tumor and "nongerm cell malignant tumor" was disease free.
  • Furthermore, late recurrence is not likely to respond to chemotherapy and is best treated by surgical excision when possible.
  • [MeSH-major] Germinoma / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Testicular Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Carcinoma, Embryonal / complications. Carcinoma, Embryonal / pathology. Carcinoma, Embryonal / therapy. Choriocarcinoma / complications. Choriocarcinoma / pathology. Choriocarcinoma / therapy. Endodermal Sinus Tumor / complications. Endodermal Sinus Tumor / pathology. Endodermal Sinus Tumor / therapy. Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Direct. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / therapy. Sarcoma / complications. Sarcoma / pathology. Sarcoma / therapy. Seminoma / complications. Seminoma / pathology. Seminoma / therapy. Teratoma / complications. Teratoma / pathology. Teratoma / therapy

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  • (PMID = 10680894.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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14. Jeon IS, Yi DY: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia secondary to chemoradiotherapy for perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of uterus. Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2009 Mar;26(2):85-8
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  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a primary hematologic malignancy that is especially common in childhood, occurs relatively rarely as a secondary malignant neoplasm.
  • Available data indicate that ALL often follows chemoradiotherapy for soft tissue sarcoma.
  • Perivascular epithelioid tumor (PEComa), a primitive mesenchymal tissue origin, can be classified as a soft tissue sarcoma.
  • An 11-year-old girl was diagnosed with ALL secondary to chemoradiotherapy (vincristine, ifosfamide, and anthracycline) and radiotherapy comprising 45 Gy to the whole pelvis for PEComa.
  • ALL, FAB L2, and immunophenotypically pro-B developed 16 months after the final chemotherapy treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Perivascular Epithelioid Cell Neoplasms / complications. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / etiology. Uterine Neoplasms / complications

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  • (PMID = 19322738.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-0669
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric hematology and oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Hematol Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anthracyclines; 0 / Topoisomerase II Inhibitors
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15. Bading S, Mössinger E, Rosenthal H, Länger F, Bastian L: [Osteosarcoma of the pelvisTwo case reports and review of the literature]. Unfallchirurg; 2004 Jul;107(7):625-32
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  • [Transliterated title] Osteosarkome des SakrumsZwei Fallbeispiele und Literaturübersicht.
  • Primary malignant neoplasms of the bone are rare.
  • Primary bone sarcomas of the pelvis are usually recognized after they have grown to a considerable size.
  • Osteosarcoma patients from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland are treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy combined with complete surgical excision according to the Cooperative Osteosarcoma Study Group (COSS).
  • Based on a review of the literature, diagnosis, treatment, and complications of two cases of sacrum osteosarcoma are introduced.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biopsy. Disease Progression. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnostic imaging. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Pelvic Bones / diagnostic imaging. Pelvic Bones / pathology. Postoperative Complications / diagnostic imaging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 15060775.001).
  • [ISSN] 0177-5537
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Unfallchirurg
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Unfallchirurg
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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16. Petru E, Pasterk C, Reich O, Obermair A, Winter R, Breitenecker G: Small-cell carcinoma of the uterus and the vagina: experience with ten patients. Arch Gynecol Obstet; 2005 Apr;271(4):316-9
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  • BACKGROUND: Small cell carcinomas (small-CCs) of the uterine cervix are rare and highly malignant neoplasms.
  • Patients tend to develop distant metastasis early and thus are potential candidates for systemic therapy.
  • Eight patients underwent radical surgery, 7 of whom also received chemotherapy.
  • Two additional patients underwent primary radiotherapy.
  • She had received six courses of dose-intensive platinum chemotherapy after radical surgery.
  • All three patients with small-CC of the uterine corpus or vagina developed recurrence within the first year after diagnosis.
  • Of the 7 patients who received chemotherapy, 5 developed progressive or recurrent disease in the paraaortic region (n=2), peritoneum (n=1), liver (n=1), or pelvis (n=1).
  • The optimal treatment for these patients most probably including concurrent chemo-radiotherapy remains to be defined.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Small Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Small Cell / therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / diagnosis. Uterine Neoplasms / therapy. Vaginal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Vaginal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Gynecologic Surgical Procedures. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Radiotherapy. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 15197564.001).
  • [ISSN] 0932-0067
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of gynecology and obstetrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Gynecol. Obstet.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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17. Volkmer BG, Seidl-Schlick EM, Bach D, Romics I, Kleinschmidt K: Cyclophosphamide is contraindicated in patients with a history of transitional cell carcinoma. Clin Rheumatol; 2005 Aug;24(4):319-23
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  • Cyclophosphamide is a urotoxic agent that increases the incidence of malignant neoplasms of the urinary tract.
  • Between July 1986 and January 1988, 58 consecutive patients with primary superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were included in this study.
  • Whereas there were no recurrences in the upper urinary tract among the patients of group B, 2 of the 22 patients from group A developed cancer of the renal pelvis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Cyclophosphamide / adverse effects. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / chemically induced. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Intravesical. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cystectomy / methods. Cystoscopy. Female. Humans. Incidence. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Mycobacterium bovis. Neoplasm Staging. Probability. Prognosis. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Ultrasonography

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  • (PMID = 16034647.001).
  • [ISSN] 0770-3198
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical rheumatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Rheumatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
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18. Nahas CS, Akhurst T, Yeung H, Leibold T, Riedel E, Markowitz AJ, Minsky BD, Paty PB, Weiser MR, Temple LK, Wong WD, Larson SM, Guillem JG: Positron emission tomography detection of distant metastatic or synchronous disease in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Ann Surg Oncol; 2008 Mar;15(3):704-11
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  • [Title] Positron emission tomography detection of distant metastatic or synchronous disease in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving preoperative chemoradiation.
  • Choice of optimal treatment--neoadjuvant chemoradiation versus systemic chemotherapy alone--depends on accurate assessment of distant disease.
  • We prospectively evaluated the ability of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to detect distant disease in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were otherwise eligible for combined modality therapy (CMT).
  • Sites other than the rectum, mesorectum, or the area along the inferior mesenteric artery were considered distant and were divided into nine groups: neck, lung, mediastinal lymph node (LN), abdomen, liver, colon, pelvis, peripheral LN, and soft tissue.
  • A score greater than 3 was considered malignant.
  • Confirmation was based on tissue diagnosis, surgical exploration, and subsequent imaging.
  • Greatest accuracy was demonstrated in detection of liver (accuracy = 99.9%, sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 98.8%) and lung (accuracy = 99.9%, sensitivity = 80%, specificity = 100%) disease; PET detected 11/12 confirmed malignant sites in liver and lung.
  • All 10 were correctly staged by pre-CMT PET; abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scans accurately detected nine of them.
  • PET may play a significant role in defining extent of distant disease in selected cases, thus impacting the choice of neoadjuvant therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / radionuclide imaging. Positron-Emission Tomography. Rectal Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Rectal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Prospective Studies. Single-Blind Method

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  • [ErratumIn] Ann Surg Oncol. 2008 Apr;15(4):1265. Leibold, Tobias [added]
  • (PMID = 17882490.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-4681
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / R01 82534-01
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Bruns J, Fiedler W, Werner M, Delling G: Dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma--a fatal disease. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2005 Jun;131(6):333-9
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  • The mean age of the patients at diagnosis was 59.8 years.
  • In one out of three patients with a pelvic tumour resection was followed by implantation of a pelvic replacement; the other two patients received tumour resection with autologous stabilisation of the pelvis.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy was given to five patients.
  • The mean survival time was 9.7 months.
  • DDCS is rare and is the primary malignant bone tumour with the worst prognosis.
  • Surgery is the most important procedure, although it is unclear whether a radical resection improves the long-term results.
  • Information regarding neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy is very limited.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cell Differentiation. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Prognosis. Survival Rate. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15785935.001).
  • [ISSN] 0171-5216
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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20. Eilber FC, Eilber KS, Eilber FR: Retroperitoneal sarcomas. Curr Treat Options Oncol; 2000 Aug;1(3):274-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Imaging of the abdomen and pelvis by computed tomography (CT) provides both an imaging modality and a method by which to obtain tissue for diagnosis.
  • Because a histologic diagnosis is essential in treatment planning, adequate tissue can usually be obtained by a CT-guided core biopsy.
  • If the diagnosis is sarcoma, additional tests necessary for staging include plain chest radiography and evaluation of the liver by either CT scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
  • The treatment options for primary retroperitoneal sarcomas include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, or a combination of these modalities; therefore, a multidisciplinary group best manages treatment planning.
  • Primary radiation therapy for cure is seldom effective for retroperitoneal sarcomas but can provide palliation in select cases.
  • Systemic chemotherapy for chemosensitive lesions, such as poorly differentiated liposarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), synovial cell sarcoma, and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), can be useful when used in a neoadjuvant manner.
  • Consequently, surgical resection continues to be the mainstay of treatment for retroperitoneal sarcomas and requires en bloc resection of the primary tumor.
  • Postoperative adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy or radiation has not been proven to be of any additional benefit.
  • Overall treatment results are predominantly influenced by tumor stage, grade, size, and margins of surgical resection.
  • [MeSH-major] Retroperitoneal Neoplasms / therapy. Sarcoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Biopsy / methods. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Radiotherapy. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 12057171.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-2729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current treatment options in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Treat Options Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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