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1. Aloysius MM, Zaitoun AM, Bates TE, Ilyas M, Constantin-Teodosiu D, Rowlands BJ, Lobo DN: Immunohistochemical expression of mitochondrial membrane complexes (MMCs) I, III, IV and V in malignant and benign periampullary epithelium: a potential target for drug therapy of periampullary cancer? BMC Cancer; 2010;10:80
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  • [Title] Immunohistochemical expression of mitochondrial membrane complexes (MMCs) I, III, IV and V in malignant and benign periampullary epithelium: a potential target for drug therapy of periampullary cancer?
  • METHODS: This was a retrospective study on tissue microarrays constructed from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from 126 consecutive patients (cancer = 104, chronic pancreatitis = 22) undergoing pancreatic resections between June 2001 and June 2006.
  • 78 specimens of chronic pancreatitis tissue were obtained adjacent to areas of cancer.
  • Normal pancreatic tissue was obtained from the resection specimens in a total of 30 patients.
  • RESULTS: MMCs I, III, IV and V were highly expressed (p < 0.05) in all primary periampullary cancers compared with metastatic lymph nodes and adjacent benign pancreas.
  • MMCs III, IV and V were highly expressed in all cancers regardless of type compared with chronic pancreatitis (p < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Differential expression of MMCs III, IV and V in primary periampullary cancers compared with adjacent benign periampullary tissue and chronic pancreatitis is a novel finding, which may render them attractive anticancer targets.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cell Proliferation. Epithelium / drug effects. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Oxidative Stress. Pancreas / pathology. Pancreatitis / pathology. Phosphorylation. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 20202214.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2841142
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2. Tsavaris N, Lazaris A, Kosmas C, Gouveris P, Kavantzas N, Kopterides P, Papathomas T, Agrogiannis G, Zorzos H, Kyriakou V, Patsouris E: Topoisomerase I and IIalpha protein expression in primary colorectal cancer and recurrences following 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2009 Jul;64(2):391-8
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  • [Title] Topoisomerase I and IIalpha protein expression in primary colorectal cancer and recurrences following 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • In the present study, we correlate topo-I and -II expression and outcome after chemotherapy in primary and relapsed colorectal cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with colorectal cancer that had recurred, following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and underwent a second operation were included in the present study.
  • All had undergone surgical resection of the primary tumor and received post-operatively 5-FU-based (5FU + Leucovorin, Mayo Clinic regimen) adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Tumor tissue was collected at the initial operation from the primary tumor and at the time of recurrence (during the second operation following chemotherapy).
  • All tissue samples were analyzed for levels of expression of both topo-I and topo-IIa using standard three-step immunohistochemistry on paraffin sections.
  • Levels of expression of topo-I and topo-II were higher in malignant cells from tumor recurrences compared to primary tumors (P = 0.0001 for both).
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, Neoplasm / metabolism. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. DNA Topoisomerases, Type I / metabolism. DNA Topoisomerases, Type II / metabolism. DNA-Binding Proteins / metabolism. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. DNA / genetics. Female. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Ploidies. Prognosis. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • [ErratumIn] Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 2009 Jul;64(2):399. Arapogiannis, George [corrected to Agrogiannis, George]; Patsouris, Efstathios [corrected to Patsouris, Efstratios]
  • (PMID = 19083133.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0843
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 9007-49-2 / DNA; EC 5.99.1.2 / DNA Topoisomerases, Type I; EC 5.99.1.3 / DNA Topoisomerases, Type II; EC 5.99.1.3 / DNA topoisomerase II alpha; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2688619
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3. Huss WJ, Gray DR, Greenberg NM, Mohler JL, Smith GJ: Breast cancer resistance protein-mediated efflux of androgen in putative benign and malignant prostate stem cells. Cancer Res; 2005 Aug 01;65(15):6640-50
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  • [Title] Breast cancer resistance protein-mediated efflux of androgen in putative benign and malignant prostate stem cells.
  • Malignantly transformed stem cells represent a potential common nidus for the primary cancer and the recurrent cancer that arises after treatment failure.
  • Putative prostate stem cells and prostate tumor stem cells in benign and malignant human prostate tissue, in primary human prostate xenografts, and in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mouse model of prostate cancer, are defined by expression of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), a marker of pluripotent hematopoietic, muscle, and neural stem cells, and by an absence of androgen receptor (AR) protein.
  • In both benign and malignant human prostate tissue, the rare epithelial cells that express BCRP and lack AR protein are localized in the basal cell compartment, survive androgen deprivation, and maintain proliferative potential in the hypoxic, androgen-deprived prostate.
  • Therefore, BCRP expression isolates prostate stem/tumor stem cells from the prostate tissue microenvironment through constitutive efflux of androgen, protecting the putative tumor stem cells from androgen deprivation, hypoxia, or adjuvant chemotherapy, and providing the nidus for recurrent prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters / biosynthesis. Androgens / metabolism. Neoplasm Proteins / biosynthesis. Neoplastic Stem Cells / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Sub-Family G, Member 2. Animals. Cell Line. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. Humans. Indoles / pharmacology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Mice, Transgenic. Novobiocin / pharmacology. Prostate / metabolism. Protein Processing, Post-Translational. RNA, Messenger / biosynthesis. RNA, Messenger / genetics. Rats. Receptors, Androgen / biosynthesis. Receptors, Androgen / deficiency. Receptors, Androgen / genetics. Receptors, Androgen / metabolism. Transplantation, Heterologous

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  • (PMID = 16061644.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA84296; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA077739; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA77739; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA64851; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES07017; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA64865
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ABCG2 protein, human; 0 / ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Sub-Family G, Member 2; 0 / ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters; 0 / Androgens; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Androgen; 17EC19951N / Novobiocin; CW5S8OP3VO / tryptoquivaline
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4. Bacci G, Ferrari C, Longhi A, Ferrari S, Forni C, Bacchini P, Palmerini E, Briccoli A, Pignotti E, Balladelli A, Picci P: Second malignant neoplasm in patients with osteosarcoma of the extremities treated with adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2006 Dec;28(12):774-80
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  • [Title] Second malignant neoplasm in patients with osteosarcoma of the extremities treated with adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • We evaluated the rate of second malignancies in 1205 patients with osteosarcoma of the extremity treated at our Institution with different protocols of adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Twenty-six patients (2.15%) developed a second malignant neoplasm at a median of 7.6 years (1 to 25 y) after primary osteosarcoma treatment.
  • Of these, 2 developed a third cancer which were not considered in the series.
  • Second neoplasms were leukemia (10), breast (7), lung (2), kidney (2), central nervous system cancer (2), soft tissue (1), parotid (1), and colon (1).
  • Ten of these 26 patients are disease free at a median of 7.7 years (range 1 to 15 y) after the last treatment.
  • Our study showed that the risk of second neoplasm within 15 years increased and then leveled off and that although secondary solid tumors could be explained as unrelated cases, leukemias seem to be over represented.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology. Osteosarcoma
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Incidence. Infant. Male. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / epidemiology. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Sex Factors. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 17164644.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Iwasa S, Ando M, Ono M, Hirata T, Yunokawa M, Nakano E, Yonemori K, Kouno T, Shimizu C, Tamura K, Katsumata N, Fujiwara Y: Relapse with malignant transformation after chemotherapy for primary mediastinal seminoma: case report. Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2009 Jul;39(7):456-9
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  • [Title] Relapse with malignant transformation after chemotherapy for primary mediastinal seminoma: case report.
  • This case report details a relapse with malignant transformation after the completion of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for primary mediastinal seminoma, although the residual mass after chemotherapy was <3 cm in size and did not display an increased uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose when examined using positron emission tomography.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Mediastinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / etiology. Seminoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Male. Positron-Emission Tomography. Radiopharmaceuticals. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19395465.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-3621
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18; 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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6. Cleton-Jansen AM, van Beerendonk HM, Baelde HJ, Bovée JV, Karperien M, Hogendoorn PC: Estrogen signaling is active in cartilaginous tumors: implications for antiestrogen therapy as treatment option of metastasized or irresectable chondrosarcoma. Clin Cancer Res; 2005 Nov 15;11(22):8028-35
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  • [Title] Estrogen signaling is active in cartilaginous tumors: implications for antiestrogen therapy as treatment option of metastasized or irresectable chondrosarcoma.
  • PURPOSE: Chondrosarcoma is a malignant cartilaginous matrix-producing tumor that can be lethal in 10% to 50% of the patients.
  • Surgery is the only effective treatment known as these tumors are notorious refractory to all types of conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy.
  • To identify a target for therapy, we want to determine whether estrogen signaling is active in chondrosarcoma because estrogen is important in the regulation of longitudinal growth that is initiated by chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in the epiphyseal growth plate of long bones.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We studied protein expression of the estrogen receptor in 35 cartilaginous tumors as well as mRNA levels for the estrogen receptor and for aromatase, an enzyme for estrogen synthesis and another potential therapeutic target.
  • The aromatase activity assay showed a functional aromatase enzyme in primary chondrosarcoma cultures and in a cell line.
  • This observation implicates potential use of targeted drugs that interfere with estrogen signaling, such as those applied for treating breast cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Chondrosarcoma / drug therapy. Estrogen Antagonists / therapeutic use. Estrogens / physiology. Signal Transduction
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Androstadienes / pharmacology. Androstenedione / pharmacology. Aromatase / genetics. Aromatase / metabolism. Aromatase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Receptors, Estrogen / genetics. Receptors, Estrogen / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16299232.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androstadienes; 0 / Aromatase Inhibitors; 0 / Estrogen Antagonists; 0 / Estrogens; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Estrogen; 107868-30-4 / exemestane; 409J2J96VR / Androstenedione; EC 1.14.14.1 / Aromatase
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7. Lim YP, Wong CY, Ooi LL, Druker BJ, Epstein RJ: Selective tyrosine hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal and stress proteins in primary human breast cancers: implications for adjuvant use of kinase-inhibitory drugs. Clin Cancer Res; 2004 Jun 15;10(12 Pt 1):3980-7
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  • [Title] Selective tyrosine hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal and stress proteins in primary human breast cancers: implications for adjuvant use of kinase-inhibitory drugs.
  • To clarify this discrepancy, we compared the patterns of tyrosine phosphoprotein expression in human cancer cells and primary tumors.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Immunoaffinity chromatography, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and antiphosphotyrosine immunoblotting were combined with mass spectrometry to determine the phosphoproteomic signatures of 40 matched normal and malignant tissues from patients with breast or liver cancer.
  • RESULTS: Patterns of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins are similar among normal tissues of the same origin but vary markedly between different tissues.
  • Primary breast tumors exhibit a strikingly homogeneous tyrosine phosphorylation profile, whereas liver cancers display greater phosphoproteomic diversity.
  • The main breast-tumor-specific tyrosine phosphoproteins are cytoskeletal molecules (actin, tubulin, and vimentin) and molecular chaperones (Hsp70, Hsc71, and Grp75).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Identification of cytoskeletal and stress proteins as the most abundant tyrosine phosphoproteins in breast tumors implicates these molecules, rather than promitogenic effectors, as the prime stoichiometric substrates for kinase-inhibitory anticancer drugs in vivo.
  • Because phosphorylated cytoskeletal proteins and chaperones mediate cell motility and apoptotic resistance, respectively, these data raise the intriguing possibility that small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be of greatest value either as adjuvant antimetastatic/-invasive drugs or as chemo-/radiosensitizers.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Cytoskeleton / metabolism. Tyrosine / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis. Cell Line, Tumor. Chromatography / methods. Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional / methods. Heat-Shock Proteins / chemistry. Humans. Immunoblotting. Ligands. Male. Mass Spectrometry. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasms / metabolism. Phosphoproteins / chemistry. Phosphorylation. Phosphotyrosine / chemistry. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 15217928.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Heat-Shock Proteins; 0 / Ligands; 0 / Phosphoproteins; 21820-51-9 / Phosphotyrosine; 42HK56048U / Tyrosine
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8. Tukenova M, Diallo I, Hawkins M, Guibout C, Quiniou E, Pacquement H, Dhermain F, Shamsaldin A, Oberlin O, de Vathaire F: Long-term mortality from second malignant neoplasms in 5-year survivors of solid childhood tumors: temporal pattern of risk according to type of treatment. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 2010 Mar;19(3):707-15
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  • [Title] Long-term mortality from second malignant neoplasms in 5-year survivors of solid childhood tumors: temporal pattern of risk according to type of treatment.
  • BACKGROUND: The temporal pattern in mortality from late second malignant neoplasms in solid childhood cancer survivors, according to the type of treatment, has not been investigated in detail.
  • Complete clinical, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy data were recorded and the integral radiation dose was estimated for 2,701 of the 2,948 patients who had received radiotherapy.
  • The standardized mortality ratio was of a similar magnitude after radiotherapy alone and chemotherapy alone and higher after both treatments.
  • This temporal pattern was similar after chemotherapy alone, radiotherapy alone, or both treatments.
  • We observed a similar long-term temporal pattern among survivors who had died of a second malignant neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract and breast.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Five-year survivors of childhood cancer run a high long-term mortality risk for all types of second malignant neoplasms whatever the treatment received and require careful long-term screening well beyond 25 years after the diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / mortality. Neoplasms, Second Primary / mortality. Radiotherapy / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Male. Risk Factors. Survivors

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  • (PMID = 20200431.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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9. Meinardi MT, Gietema JA, van Veldhuisen DJ, van der Graaf WT, de Vries EG, Sleijfer DT: Long-term chemotherapy-related cardiovascular morbidity. Cancer Treat Rev; 2000 Dec;26(6):429-47

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  • [Title] Long-term chemotherapy-related cardiovascular morbidity.
  • As a consequence of the successful use of chemotherapy in the treatment of curable neoplasms such as germ cell tumours and malignant lymphomas, and the increasing application of primary and adjuvant chemotherapy for various tumour types, the number of patients with a prolonged life expectancy after treatment is rising.
  • In this review we evaluate the literature on long-term cardiovascular toxicity related to chemotherapy in adult patients.
  • Two categories of patient with favourable life expectancy have been reviewed, namely patients cured of metastatic disease by chemotherapy and patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • In the first category, the literature on long-term cardiovascular morbidity in survivors of metastatic testicular cancer and lymphomas is discussed, while in the second category this is done for patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for breast and colon cancer.
  • As well as the direct toxic effects of chemotherapy on the cardiovascular system, the indirect toxic effects such as chemotherapy-related metabolic changes that may cause cardiovascular morbidity are also discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Cardiovascular Diseases / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Female. Humans. Lymphoma / drug therapy. Male. Morbidity. Neoplasm Metastasis. Testicular Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.
  • (PMID = 11139373.001).
  • [ISSN] 0305-7372
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer treatment reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Treat. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Number-of-references] 191
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10. Takeyama H, Takahashi H, Tabei I, Fukuchi O, Nogi H, Kinoshita S, Uchida K, Morikawa T: Malignant neoplasm in the axilla of a male: suspected primary carcinoma of an accessory mammary gland. Breast Cancer; 2010 Apr;17(2):151-4
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  • [Title] Malignant neoplasm in the axilla of a male: suspected primary carcinoma of an accessory mammary gland.
  • A 58-year-old Japanese male patient visited our hospital for evaluation of an elastic hard mass, measuring 80 x 50 mm, in the right axillary area.
  • Incisional biopsy for suspected malignancy was performed, and histopathologic examination by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining yielded a diagnosis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma metastatic from an unknown primary.
  • As the tumor was immunohistochemically positive for both ER and PgR, metastatic breast cancer was strongly suspected.
  • Detailed examination of the head and neck region, lung, and upper and lower gastrointestinal tract also revealed no evidence of a primary tumor.
  • After chemotherapy, the patient underwent tumor resection with axillary lymph node dissection.
  • On the basis of the histological features of H&E-stained specimens and immunohistochemistry of the resected tumor, this case was diagnosed as breast cancer of unknown origin in a male.
  • The tumor could have been an axillary lymph node metastasis from an occult breast carcinoma, or primary cancer arising in an accessory mammary gland.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Breast Neoplasms, Male / pathology. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Axilla. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 19387775.001).
  • [ISSN] 1880-4233
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast cancer (Tokyo, Japan)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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11. Otrock ZK, Mahfouz RA, Salem ZM: Four primary tumors of lung, bladder, prostate, and breast in a male patient. South Med J; 2005 Sep;98(9):946-9
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  • [Title] Four primary tumors of lung, bladder, prostate, and breast in a male patient.
  • We present a very rare case of quadruple cancers in a 65-year-old male patient.
  • It is a case of both synchronous and metachronous primary malignant neoplasms occurring in four different organs.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first documented case with this combination of primary tumors.
  • The tumors included an adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung, transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, and adenocarcinomas of the prostate and the breast.
  • We also review the medical literature for the possible causes of multiple primary malignant neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / complications. Carcinoma / complications. Lung Neoplasms / complications. Prostatic Neoplasms / complications. Urologic Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cystectomy. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Mastectomy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Shock, Septic / complications. Spinal Neoplasms / complications. Spinal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Spinal Neoplasms / secondary. Urinary Diversion

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  • (PMID = 16217994.001).
  • [ISSN] 0038-4348
  • [Journal-full-title] Southern medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] South. Med. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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12. Ohta Y, Shimizu Y, Matsumoto I, Watanabe G: Management of malignant pleural effusion by multimodality treatment including the use of paclitaxel administered by 24-hour intrathoracic infusion for patients with carcinomatous pleuritis. J Exp Clin Cancer Res; 2006 Mar;25(1):15-9
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  • [Title] Management of malignant pleural effusion by multimodality treatment including the use of paclitaxel administered by 24-hour intrathoracic infusion for patients with carcinomatous pleuritis.
  • For successful intrapleural chemotherapy, intrapleural drug activity should be maintained for as long as possible.
  • This interim report presents the results of treatment with paclitaxel administered by 24-hour intrathoracic infusion as an adjunct to selective surgical management and/or systemic chemotherapy for controlling malignant pleural effusion.
  • The sites of primary disease were the lung in 12 patients and the breast in one patient.
  • Seven patients underwent elective surgical treatment and 11 patients received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy.
  • During a median follow-up period of 9 months (range, 2-33 months), malignant effusion was controlled successfully in 11 patients (84.6%).
  • The multimodality treatment, including the use of paclitaxel, in this manner merits further investigation for possible intervention for malignant pleural effusion originating in lung and breast neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Lung Neoplasms / therapy. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / therapy. Pleural Neoplasms / therapy. Pleurisy / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Pleural Effusion. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16761613.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-9078
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of experimental & clinical cancer research : CR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Exp. Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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13. Mehdi I, Shah AH, Moona MS, Verma K, Abussa A, Elramih R, El-Hashmi H: Synchronous and metachronous malignant tumours expect the unexpected. J Pak Med Assoc; 2010 Nov;60(11):905-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Synchronous and metachronous malignant tumours expect the unexpected.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate occurrence of synchronous and metachronous malignant tumours, to find tumour types, age group, and relationship to treatment received.
  • METHODS: Previously diagnosed 1st primary tumour cases experiencing a synchronous or metachronous tumour, seen at AOI from February 2003 to August 2009 (78 months) were included.
  • The cases were analyzed for morphology/histology of 1st primary tumour, age and gender of patient, treatment received for first tumour, time interval between the 1st and 2nd primary tumour, morphology/histology of second tumour, and the treatment conferred for 2nd tumour.
  • The follow up time was 24-150 months.
  • The time to 2nd primary tumour was 2-132 months.
  • The 1st primary tumours were breast, ovary, GIT and urinary bladder.
  • The patients received surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy alone or as multi-modality treatment for the 1st tumours.
  • The frequent 2nd tumours were breast, ovary and Gastro Intestinal tumours.
  • CONCLUSION: It is imperative that patients with a primary malignant tumour should be thoroughly, closely, and regularly followed.
  • The 2nd primary tumour is usually more aggressive, treatment resistant, and metastasizes early requiring a more aggressive treatment strategy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Distribution. Aged. Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Sex Distribution. Time Factors. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 21375191.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-9982
  • [Journal-full-title] JPMA. The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pak Med Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Pakistan
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14. Kolschmann S, Ballin A, Gillissen A: Clinical efficacy and safety of thoracoscopic talc pleurodesis in malignant pleural effusions. Chest; 2005 Sep;128(3):1431-5
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  • [Title] Clinical efficacy and safety of thoracoscopic talc pleurodesis in malignant pleural effusions.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term efficacy and safety of pleurodesis by thoracoscopic talc poudrage (TTP) in malignant pleural effusions (MPEs).
  • One hundred eighty-day follow-up was completed for all patients, and outcome measures included time to recurrence of the effusion and survival.
  • Procedure-related complications were documented.
  • RESULTS: The most common primary neoplasms were lung cancer (n = 48), breast cancer (n = 16), and malignant pleural mesothelioma (n = 10).
  • Twenty-eight patients had other types of tumors, including renal cell carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, GI tumors, prostate, malignant lymphoma, and unknown primary cancer.
  • At the end of the primary observation period of 180 days, 38 of 46 surviving patients (82.6%) had a successful pleurodesis.
  • Type of primary neoplasm had no significant influence on success rate.
  • Adverse effects included empyema in one case and malignant invasion of the scar.
  • [MeSH-major] Irritants / administration & dosage. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / drug therapy. Pleurodesis / methods. Talc / administration & dosage. Thoracoscopy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Recurrence. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 16162739.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-3692
  • [Journal-full-title] Chest
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chest
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Irritants; 14807-96-6 / Talc
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15. Nio Y, Tamura K, Kan N, Inamoto T, Ohgaki K, Kodama H: Anticancer chemosensitivity profiles of human breast cancer cells assessed by in vitro DNA synthesis inhibition assay. Anticancer Res; 2000 Mar-Apr;20(2B):1237-44
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  • [Title] Anticancer chemosensitivity profiles of human breast cancer cells assessed by in vitro DNA synthesis inhibition assay.
  • The present study was designed to assess the profile of the chemosensitivity of breast cancer cells and to screen effective agents for combination regimens.
  • Chemosensitivity to anticancer agents was assessed by the 3H-thymidine incorporation assay, as the rate of inhibition of DNA synthesis in 145 samples (88 primary and 57 metastatic or recurrent lesions) from 136 patients with breast cancer.
  • The chemosensitivity of breast cancer showed variations according to tumor location: primary lesions seemed to be slightly sensitive to carboquone (CQ), adriamycin (ADR), and cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C); nodal involvement was moderately sensitive to CQ and slightly sensitive to Ara-C, 5-FU, ADR, mitomycin-C (MMC), and cisplatin (CDDP); malignant effusions were highly sensitive to ADR, moderately sensitive to CQ, and slightly sensitive to Ara-C and CDDP; local recurrences were slightly sensitive to Ara-C, CQ and 5-FU; vincristine (VCR) and nimustine chloride (ACNU), however, seemed to be ineffective against breast cancer.
  • There were no differences in chemosensitivity between stages of primary lesions or between estrogen receptor-positive and -negative tumors.
  • In 10 patients, simultaneous nodal involvement was more sensitive to the agents than were primary lesions, and the correlation of chemosensitivity to ADR and CQ between such lesions was significant.
  • On the other hand, there was no significant difference or correlation of chemosensitivity between the original lesions and recurrent ones after chemotherapy.
  • The heterogeneity and homogeneity in the chemosensitivity of breast cancer suggested not only the necessity of patient-specific chemotherapy based on a sensitivity assay, but also the usefulness of choosing agents for widely-applicable combination regimens against breast cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / toxicity. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Breast Neoplasms, Male / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms, Male / pathology. Breast Neoplasms, Male / surgery. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma / surgery. Cell Division / drug effects. DNA, Neoplasm / biosynthesis. DNA, Neoplasm / drug effects. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor / methods. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 10810427.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GREECE
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm
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16. Markowski J, Gierek T, Zielińska-Pajak E, Witkowska M, Wodołazski A, Pajak J, Paluch J: [Distant metastases to the parotid gland--review of the literature and report of own two cases]. Otolaryngol Pol; 2005;59(4):547-52
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  • However, metastasis from distant primary neoplasm below clavicle is possible, too.
  • The women with breast cancer and metastases to the parotid gland 11 years after surgery, radio- and chemotherapy of breast cancer.
  • The man with metastasis of malignant melanoma of unknown primary site.
  • In spite of intensive exam the primary location of the melanoma was unknown.
  • The authors described pathophysiology of distant metastases to the parotid gland with special attention to possibilities of treatment and survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Melanoma / pathology. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / genetics. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / pathology. Parotid Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 16273860.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6657
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologia polska = The Polish otolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Pol
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Number-of-references] 15
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17. Whatley WS, Thompson JW, Rao B: Salivary gland tumors in survivors of childhood cancer. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2006 Mar;134(3):385-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: There is an increased incidence of second malignant neoplasms in survivors of childhood cancers.
  • The most common second malignancies are acute leukemia, bone and soft tissue tumors, and carcinoma of the skin, breast, and thyroid.
  • Although, ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing a salivary gland neoplasm, there are few reports of salivary gland neoplasms occurring in patients treated for cancer in childhood.
  • RESULTS: Twelve survivors of childhood cancer developed a salivary gland neoplasm after completion of treatment.
  • These patients were initially treated for a variety of childhood cancers with a combination of radiation and chemotherapy.
  • All patients were treated with surgical excision of the primary tumor, and postoperative radiation was added in select patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Radiation and chemotherapy used to treat patients with childhood malignancies increases the risk of developing a second neoplasm of salivary gland origin.
  • The majority of these neoplasms are malignant; mucoepidermoid carcinoma occurs most frequently.
  • The treatment of these tumors includes surgical excision of the primary, with neck dissection in patients with clinical evidence of nodal metastasis, and postoperative radiation added for pathologies with adverse features.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Second Primary / diagnosis. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / diagnosis. Survivors
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoma, Pleomorphic / diagnosis. Adenoma, Pleomorphic / surgery. Carcinoma, Adenoid Cystic / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Adenoid Cystic / surgery. Carcinoma, Mucoepidermoid / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Mucoepidermoid / surgery. Child. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lymphatic Metastasis / diagnosis. Male. Neck Dissection. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Registries. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors


18. Ensinger C, Sterlacci W: Implications of EGFR PharmDx kit for cetuximab eligibility. Expert Rev Mol Diagn; 2008 Mar;8(2):141-8
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  • EGF receptor (EGFR) represents an attractive target for anticancer therapies in a variety of malignant neoplasms, including colorectal, non-small-cell lung, head and neck carcinomas and gliomas.
  • Particularly for application of drugs against extracellular EGFR parts, knowledge about EGFR levels within the cell membrane is of high import, because only EGFR-depending tumors respond to these therapeutic approaches.
  • Immunohistochemical investigation of tissue slides of the primary tumor are performed to screen for EGFR occurrence in tumor cells.
  • It represents the second approved combination of diagnostic tools and dependent application of monoclonal antibody therapies after the successful HercepTest/Herceptin for breast carcinomas.
  • This proceeding represents an important step toward a personalized cancer therapy with major advantages for patients, mainly reduction of toxic side effects and dramatically increased efficiency.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colonic Neoplasms / metabolism. Neoplasm Proteins / biosynthesis. Reagent Kits, Diagnostic. Receptors, Fibroblast Growth Factor / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Cetuximab. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Male. Protein Structure, Tertiary. Trastuzumab. United States. United States Food and Drug Administration

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  • (PMID = 18366301.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8352
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of molecular diagnostics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev. Mol. Diagn.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Reagent Kits, Diagnostic; 0 / Receptors, Fibroblast Growth Factor; P188ANX8CK / Trastuzumab; PQX0D8J21J / Cetuximab
  • [Number-of-references] 111
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19. Di Nicolantonio F, Neale M, Onadim Z, Hungerford JL, Kingston JL, Cree IA: The chemosensitivity profile of retinoblastoma. Recent Results Cancer Res; 2003;161:73-80
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  • Retinoblastoma is a rare malignant tumour of the developing retina with an incidence of 1 in 20,000 live births in all human races.
  • Chemotherapy is used in retinoblastoma as adjuvant therapy to prevent the growth of metastases and to treat metastatic disease once this has become clinically apparent.
  • Current regimens are based on empirical drug combinations, and few clinical trials have been conducted because of the rarity of this tumour.
  • The ATP-based chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA) has already helped to design new regimens for melanoma and breast and ovarian cancer.
  • Primary retinoblastoma tumour material was obtained from 10 eyes, 7 of which contained sufficient viable cells for ATP-TCA.
  • These data confirm that retinoblastoma is a rapidly growing malignancy that is very susceptible to cytotoxic drugs of all types.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor / methods. Retinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Retinoblastoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenosine Triphosphate / metabolism. Child, Preschool. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Tumor Cells, Cultured / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 12528800.001).
  • [ISSN] 0080-0015
  • [Journal-full-title] Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progrès dans les recherches sur le cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Recent Results Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 8L70Q75FXE / Adenosine Triphosphate
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20. Kisselbach C, Ristic AD, Pankuweit S, Karatolius K, Maisch B: [Women and pericardial neoplastic manifestations of the heart and pericardium]. Herz; 2005 Aug;30(5):409-15; quiz 429-30
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  • Despite the proportions, most women believe that heart disease is a man's disease and that they will die of breast cancer.
  • Data on epidemiology and incidence are rare: there is only an estimated incidence of cardiac neoplasm at necropsy ranging from 0,001% to 0,3%.
  • The majority of the primary tumors are benign.
  • Malignant heart tumors are less common.
  • Most often they are different types of sarcomas, which have a poor outcome and affect more males than females.
  • Metastatic tumors of the heart are 100 times more common than the primary ones.
  • They originate mainly from melanomas, leukemias, lymphomas, and cancer, especially of the lung or breast.
  • Indeed in women breast cancer is the most common metastatic tumor associated with pericardial effusion.
  • To prevent death from tamponade, pericardiocentesis, in addition to the systemic chemotherapy, is mandatory, best when instillation of chemotherapeutics (cisplatin or thiotepa) or radioisotopes is given into the pericardial sac to prevent recurrence of the effusion.
  • However, more of the malignant tumors may be curable if exactly diagnosed at an earlier stage.
  • METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted of all patients with cardiac and pericardial neoplasm exactly diagnosed by endomyocardial or epicardial biopsy and pericardiocentesis, using hospital medical records and a biopsy and pericardiocentesis registry from 2000-2005 with 297 patients.
  • RESULTS: In 76 cases (25.6%) a neoplasm was the reason for a pericardial effusion.
  • 36 women suffered from the breast carcinoma (47%) and 40 males lung cancer (42%) as the firstly metastatic tumor.
  • CONCLUSION: Females are more often affected by primary cardiac tumors than males with an excellent outcome.
  • By contrast, the preventive checkup and aftercare will gain more prognostic importance, especially in case of breast cancer, to earlier recognize a secondary cardiac neoplasm by biopsy and pericardiocentesis with intrapericardial treatment of neoplastic pericarditis.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / epidemiology. Breast Neoplasms / secondary. Heart Neoplasms / epidemiology. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Registries. Risk Assessment / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Comorbidity. Female. Germany / epidemiology. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Sex Distribution. Sex Factors. Women's Health

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  • (PMID = 16132244.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-9937
  • [Journal-full-title] Herz
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Herz
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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21. Sur RK, Nayler S, Ahmed SN, Donde B, Uijs RR, Cooper K, Giraud A: Angiosarcomas--clinical profile, pathology and management. S Afr J Surg; 2000 May;38(1):13-6
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  • Files of 8 patients with primary angiosarcomas treated in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of the Witwatersrand from 1982 to 1995 were identified.
  • None of these patients had received prior radiotherapy or chemotherapy which would have predisposed them to the formation of an angiosarcoma.
  • Four patients had angiosarcomas of the breast, while there was 1 patient each with angiosarcoma of the skin, intestine and brain.
  • Complete excision was the primary modality of management whenever possible.
  • Four patients died within 4 months of diagnosis.
  • Three patients are alive (2 with no evidence of disease) 22-96 months after diagnosis.
  • In 1 patient follow-up details were not available as he did not return for treatment.
  • Angiosarcomas are aggressive malignant tumours arising from the endothelial cells.
  • Complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice in the management of this aggressive disease, which has a poor prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Neoplasms / pathology. Abdominal Neoplasms / surgery. Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Hemangiosarcoma / pathology. Hemangiosarcoma / surgery. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Biopsy. Causality. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. South Africa / epidemiology. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12365113.001).
  • [ISSN] 0038-2361
  • [Journal-full-title] South African journal of surgery. Suid-Afrikaanse tydskrif vir chirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] S Afr J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] South Africa
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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22. O'Connor R, O'Leary M, Ballot J, Collins CD, Kinsella P, Mager DE, Arnold RD, O'Driscoll L, Larkin A, Kennedy S, Fennelly D, Clynes M, Crown J: A phase I clinical and pharmacokinetic study of the multi-drug resistance protein-1 (MRP-1) inhibitor sulindac, in combination with epirubicin in patients with advanced cancer. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2007 Jan;59(1):79-87
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  • [Title] A phase I clinical and pharmacokinetic study of the multi-drug resistance protein-1 (MRP-1) inhibitor sulindac, in combination with epirubicin in patients with advanced cancer.
  • PURPOSE: Multi-drug resistance mediated by ATP-binding cassette trans-membrane protein pumps is an important cause of cancer treatment failure.
  • Sulindac has been shown to be a competitive substrate for the clinically important resistance protein, multi-drug resistance protein-1 (MRP-1), and thus might enhance the anti-cancer activity of substrate chemotherapeutic agents, e.g. anthracyclines.
  • RESULTS: Seventeen patients (8 breast, 3 lung, 2 bowel, 1 melanoma, 1 renal, 1 ovarian and 1 of unknown primary origin, 16/17 having had prior chemotherapy) were enrolled.
  • Eight patients received a full six cycles of treatment; 14 patients received three or more cycles.
  • Among 15 patients with evaluable tumour, two partial responses were seen (malignant melanoma and breast cancer).
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / pharmacokinetics. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Epirubicin / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / drug therapy. P-Glycoprotein / antagonists & inhibitors. Sulindac / pharmacokinetics. Sulindac / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Creatinine / blood. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Resistance, Multiple / drug effects. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / drug effects. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Myocardium / metabolism. Platelet Count. Prospective Studies. Troponin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16642371.001).
  • [ISSN] 0344-5704
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / P-Glycoprotein; 0 / Troponin; 184SNS8VUH / Sulindac; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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23. Várady E, Deák B, Molnár ZS, Rosta A, Schneider T, Esik O, Eckhardt S: Second malignancies after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. Leuk Lymphoma; 2001 Nov-Dec;42(6):1275-81
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  • [Title] Second malignancies after treatment for Hodgkin's disease.
  • The occurrence of treatment-related second malignancy following Hodgkin's disease (HD) has now been recognized as a major problem.
  • Second neoplasm developed in 32 cases (4.8%).
  • Among patients with second hematological malignancies, the mean age at diagnosis of HD was 44 years and the mean interval until the development of second malignancy was 6.1 years.
  • Five patients received chemo- and radiotherapy and in two cases chemotherapy was used.
  • Twenty-five patients have had solid tumors, affecting lung (5), breast (3), colon (3), stomach (2), urinary bladder (2), head-and-neck (1), thyroid gland (1), esophagus (1), liver (1), pancreas (1), furthermore, three sarcomas and two malignant melanomas were observed.
  • Their mean age at the diagnosis of HD was 46 years and the mean period of latency was 8.3 years.
  • Chemotherapy was applied to nine patients, 16 patients received both chemo- and radiotherapy.
  • Since alkylating agents increase the risk of leukemia and irradiation contributes mainly to other malignancies, future treatment protocols should attempt to reduce the most serious consequence of therapy without compromising the survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 11911408.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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24. Fang Z, Matsumoto S, Ae K, Kawaguchi N, Yoshikawa H, Ueda T, Ishii T, Araki N, Kito M: Postradiation soft tissue sarcoma: a multiinstitutional analysis of 14 cases in Japan. J Orthop Sci; 2004;9(3):242-6
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  • [Title] Postradiation soft tissue sarcoma: a multiinstitutional analysis of 14 cases in Japan.
  • Radiation therapy (RT) is commonly used to treat malignant tumors, but it leads to side effects and complications.
  • This article focuses on the clinical manifestations, pathological characteristics, and therapeutic effects concerning postradiation soft tissue sarcomas (PRSTSs).
  • Their histological types were malignant fibrous histiocytoma (eight cases), extraskeletal osteosarcoma (four cases), fibrosarcoma (one case), and leiomyosarcoma (one case).
  • The primary diagnoses, RT history, latent period, and outcome of treatment were studied retrospectively.
  • The original tumors included uterine cancer (seven cases), breast cancer (four cases), synovial sarcoma (one case), squamous cell carcinoma (one case), and Hodgkin's disease (one case).
  • There were 13 women and 1 man, with ages ranging from 23 to 77 years (mean 58 years) at the time of the appearance of the PRSTS.
  • RT doses ranged from 48 to 91 Gy (mean 62 Gy).
  • One of three who underwent RT and one of five who underwent chemotherapy (CT) responded.
  • Because adjuvant therapies including RT and CT had a poor effect on PRSTSs, the primary treatment of PRSTSs should be radical resection with a wide margin.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Second Primary / surgery. Sarcoma / surgery. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Breast Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Female. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / etiology. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / surgery. Humans. Japan. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Radiotherapy Dosage. Uterine Neoplasms / radiotherapy

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  • [Copyright] The Japanese Orthopaedic Association
  • (PMID = 15168177.001).
  • [ISSN] 0949-2658
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of orthopaedic science : official journal of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Orthop Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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25. Chiewvit P, Danchaivijitr N, Sirivitmaitrie K, Chiewvit S, Thephamongkhol K: Does magnetic resonance imaging give value-added than bone scintigraphy in the detection of vertebral metastasis? J Med Assoc Thai; 2009 Jun;92(6):818-29
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  • [Title] Does magnetic resonance imaging give value-added than bone scintigraphy in the detection of vertebral metastasis?
  • The MR imaging findings were studied: location (cervical or thoracic or lumbar or sacrum spine), number of lesions (solitary or multiple lesions), pattern of enhancement (homogeneous or inhomogeneous), involvement of spinal canal, compression of spinal cord, extradural extension, other incidental findings such as pulmonary metastasis, pleural effusion, lymphadenopathy The final diagnosis was confirmed clinically and followed-up for further management (radiation or surgery) or followed-up by MR imaging (1 month-16 months) and bone scintigraphy (5 months-12 months).
  • Primary neoplasms include breast cancer (n=11), colorectal cancer (n=7), lung cancer (n=6), prostate cancer (n=5), nasopharyngeal cancer (n=5), head and neck cancer (n=3), thyroid cancer (n=2), liver cancer (n=2), esophagus cancer (n=1), bladder cancer (n=1), retroperitoneum cancer (n=1), medulloblastoma (n=1), cervical cancer (n=1), ovarian cancer (n=1), malignant melanoma (n=1).
  • Furthermore, MR imaging is important for the further treatment planning such as radiation therapy or systemic chemotherapy.
  • Although MR imaging is useful in the detection of early metastasis that are localized completely in the bone marrow cavity routinely bone scintigraphy remains that most cost-effective method for examination of the entire skeleton.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Child. Diphosphonates. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis / radionuclide imaging. Organotechnetium Compounds. Radionuclide Imaging. Retrospective Studies. Spinal Cord Compression. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19530588.001).
  • [ISSN] 0125-2208
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Assoc Thai
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Thailand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Organotechnetium Compounds; 0 / technetium 99m methylene bisphosphonate
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26. Virtanen A, Pukkala E, Auvinen A: Incidence of bone and soft tissue sarcoma after radiotherapy: a cohort study of 295,712 Finnish cancer patients. Int J Cancer; 2006 Feb 15;118(4):1017-21
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  • [Title] Incidence of bone and soft tissue sarcoma after radiotherapy: a cohort study of 295,712 Finnish cancer patients.
  • Radiotherapy is commonly used for treatment of malignant disease.
  • As a consequence of radiotherapy, an increased risk of developing a second malignant neoplasm has been shown.
  • The aim of this study was to examine the risk of developing a bone or soft tissue sarcoma after radiotherapy for a first primary cancer.
  • The study population included all the patients with primary cancers of breast, cervix uteri, corpus uteri, lung, ovary, prostate, rectum and lymphoma diagnosed during 1953-2000 and identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry.
  • Compared to the national incidence rates, after 10 years of follow-up sarcoma risk was increased among patients who had received neither radiotherapy nor chemotherapy (standardised incidence ratio (SIR) 2.0, 95% CI 1.3-3.0), radiotherapy without chemotherapy (SIR 3.2, 95% CI 2.3-4.3), chemotherapy without radiotherapy (SIR 4.9, 95% CI 1.0-14.4), as well as combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy (SIR 3.4, 95% CI 0.4-12.5).
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cohort Studies. Female. Finland / epidemiology. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Registries / statistics & numerical data. Risk Factors


27. Armstrong GT, Sklar CA, Hudson MM, Robison LL: Long-term health status among survivors of childhood cancer: does sex matter? J Clin Oncol; 2007 Oct 1;25(28):4477-89
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  • Increasing numbers of children diagnosed with cancer will survive their primary malignancy.
  • Within this growing population of long-term survivors, considerable effort has been put forth to identify treatment-related risks for adverse health-related outcomes, such as exposure to alkylating agents, anthracyclines, radiotherapy, and surgery.
  • In this article, we review the literature, which generally supports associations between female sex and cognitive dysfunction after cranial irradiation, cardiovascular outcomes, obesity, radiation-associated differences in pubertal timing, development of primary hypothyroidism, breast cancer as a second malignant neoplasm and suggests an increased prevalence for the development of osteonecrosis among females.
  • Results of this review support future investigations to further define sex as a risk factor for other common treatment-specific exposures and outcomes.
  • Historically, evidence from both basic science and clinical research has been used to develop risk-stratified therapy, allowing reduction of toxic therapies to low-risk patients without compromising overall survival.
  • With greater knowledge of sex-specific risks, the potential application of sex-specific therapy designed to avoid poor long-term adverse outcomes may become a viable strategy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Health Status. Neoplasms / complications. Neoplasms / therapy. Radiotherapy / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Child. Combined Modality Therapy / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Male. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / radiotherapy. Risk Factors. Sex Factors. Survivors / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 17906209.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 164
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28. Paulino AC, Fowler BZ: Secondary neoplasms after radiotherapy for a childhood solid tumor. Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2005 Mar;22(2):89-101
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  • This study was conducted to determine the outcome of patients who develop a second neoplasm after radiotherapy (RT) for a childhood solid tumor.
  • From 1956 to 1998, 429 children with a malignant solid tumor were treated at a single radiation oncology facility.
  • The medical records and radiotherapy charts were reviewed to determine if the patient developed a secondary neoplasm after treatment for malignancy.
  • Twenty-three (5.4%) patients developed a secondary neoplasm.
  • There were 14 malignant neoplasms in 13 (3.0%) and 14 benign neoplasms in 11 patients (2.6%).
  • The types of initial solid tumors treated with RT were Ewing sarcoma in 6, Wilms tumor in 6, medulloblastoma in 5, neuroblastoma in 3, and other in 3.
  • Median RT dose was 45 Gy (range, 12.3 to 60 Gy) using 4 MV in 9, 1.25 MV in 8, 250 KV in 4, and 6 MV photons in 1 patient.
  • Fourteen had chemotherapy.
  • For the 14 malignant neoplasms, the median time interval from initial tumor to second malignancy was 10.1 years.
  • The 14 second malignant neoplasms (SMN) were osteosarcoma in 3, breast carcinoma in 2, melanoma in 2, malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 1, dermatofibrosarcoma in 1, leiomyosarcoma in 1, mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 1, colon cancer in 1, chronic myelogenous leukemia in 1, and basal cell carcinoma in 1.
  • The 5- and 10-year overall survival rate after diagnosis of an SMN was 69.2%; it was 70% for children with a SMN at the edge or inside the RT field and 66.7% for those outside of the RT field.
  • The 14 benign neoplasms appeared at a median time of 16.9 years and included cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in 3, osteochondroma in 3, thyroid adenoma in 1, duodenal adenoma in 1, lipoma in 1, cherry angioma in 1, uterine leiomyoma in 1, ovarian cystadenofibroma in 1, and giant cell tumor in 1.
  • More than two-thirds of children with a radiation-induced malignancy are alive 10 years after the diagnosis of a SMN.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Radiotherapy / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Cause of Death. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Male. Radiation Dosage. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 15804994.001).
  • [ISSN] 0888-0018
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric hematology and oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Hematol Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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29. Hirschmann-Jax C, Foster AE, Wulf GG, Nuchtern JG, Jax TW, Gobel U, Goodell MA, Brenner MK: A distinct "side population" of cells with high drug efflux capacity in human tumor cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 2004 Sep 28;101(39):14228-33
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  • [Title] A distinct "side population" of cells with high drug efflux capacity in human tumor cells.
  • A subset of stem cells, termed the "side population" (SP), has been identified in several tissues in mammalian species.
  • These cells maintain a high efflux capability for antimitotic drugs.
  • We initially examined primary tumor cells from 23 patients with neuroblastoma and cell lines derived from a range of other tumors.
  • These cells also expressed high levels of ABCG2 and ABCA3 transporter genes and had a greater capacity to expel cytotoxic drugs, such as mitoxantrone, resulting in better survival.
  • A SP also was detected in breast cancer, lung cancer, and glioblastoma cell lines, suggesting that this phenotype defines a class of cancer stem cells with inherently high resistance to chemotherapeutic agents that should be targeted during the treatment of malignant disease.
  • [MeSH-minor] ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters / biosynthesis. Adult. Antigens, Surface / analysis. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Benzimidazoles / pharmacokinetics. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival. Child. Child, Preschool. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Flow Cytometry. Fluorescent Dyes / pharmacokinetics. Gene Expression. Humans. Infant. Male. Middle Aged. Mitoxantrone / pharmacology. Neuroblastoma / drug therapy. Neuroblastoma / metabolism. Neuroblastoma / pathology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 15381773.001).
  • [ISSN] 0027-8424
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA094237; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / T32 HL092332; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / T32 HL092332-06; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA78792
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters; 0 / Antigens, Surface; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzimidazoles; 0 / Fluorescent Dyes; BZ114NVM5P / Mitoxantrone; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit; P976261J69 / bisbenzimide ethoxide trihydrochloride
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC521140
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