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Items 1 to 26 of about 26
1. Park SS, Kim BK, Kim CJ, Kim WS, Kim IO, Park KW, Shin HY, Ahn HS: Colorectal adenocarcinoma as a second malignant neoplasm following rhabdomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder: a case report. J Korean Med Sci; 2000 Aug;15(4):475-7
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  • [Title] Colorectal adenocarcinoma as a second malignant neoplasm following rhabdomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder: a case report.
  • Following improvements in therapy for childhood malignancies, the striking increase in survival rate over the past 30 years has led to the increase risk of developing second malignant neoplasms (SMNs).
  • We report a case of colorectal carcinoma as a SMN, following treatment for rhabdomyosarcoma.
  • The patient was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder at his age of three years, and developed adenocarcinoma in the colon 13 years later.
  • This case emphasizes the need for dose observation in survivors of early childhood malignancies treated with radiation and multiagent chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / etiology. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Colorectal Neoplasms / etiology. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / etiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Rhabdomyosarcoma. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Colitis / etiology. Colitis / pathology. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / adverse effects. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / adverse effects. Genes, p53. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis. Radiation Injuries / etiology. Radiation Injuries / pathology. Sigmoid Neoplasms / etiology. Sigmoid Neoplasms / genetics. Sigmoid Neoplasms / pathology. Time Factors. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / analysis. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 10983702.001).
  • [ISSN] 1011-8934
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of Korean medical science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Korean Med. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] KOREA (SOUTH)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3054655
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2. Tanguay C, Harvey I, Houde M, Srigley JR, Têtu B: Leiomyosarcoma of urinary bladder following cyclophosphamide therapy: report of two cases. Mod Pathol; 2003 May;16(5):512-4
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  • [Title] Leiomyosarcoma of urinary bladder following cyclophosphamide therapy: report of two cases.
  • Leiomyosarcoma of urinary bladder is rare, although it is the most common mesenchymal tumor in adults.
  • We report two cases of this tumor following cyclophosphamide therapy.
  • He presented with painless hematuria, and the initial biopsy of the bladder tumor revealed a malignant spindle cell neoplasm.
  • A final diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma was made on radical cystoprostatectomy.
  • He also presented with painless hematuria, and a bladder tumor was resected transurethrally and diagnosed as leiomyosarcoma.
  • Cyclophosphamide, when used for a neoplastic or non-neoplastic condition, is associated with an increased risk of developing bladder cancer.
  • The distribution of histologic subtypes differs from that seen in spontaneous bladder tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclophosphamide / adverse effects. Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Leiomyosarcoma / chemically induced. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis / complications. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis / drug therapy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms, Second Primary. Retinoblastoma / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 12748258.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-3952
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
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3. Miyake H, Hara I, Kamidono S, Gleave ME: Synergistic chemsensitization and inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis by the antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting clusterin gene in a human bladder cancer model. Clin Cancer Res; 2001 Dec;7(12):4245-52
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  • [Title] Synergistic chemsensitization and inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis by the antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting clusterin gene in a human bladder cancer model.
  • Clusterin expression is highly up-regulated in several normal and malignant tissues undergoing apoptosis.
  • Although recent studies have demonstrated a protective role of clusterin expression against various kinds of apoptotic stimuli, the functional role of clusterin in the acquisition of a therapy-resistant phenotype in bladder cancer remains unknown.
  • The objectives of this study were to determine whether antisense (AS) oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) targeting the clusterin gene enhances apoptosis induced by cisplatin and to evaluate the usefulness of combined treatment with AS clusterin ODN and cisplatin in the inhibition of KoTCC-1 tumor growth and metastasis in a human bladder cancer KoTCC-1 model.
  • We initially revealed the dose-dependent and sequence-specific inhibition of clusterin expression by AS clusterin ODN treatment in KoTCC-1 cells at both mRNA and protein levels.
  • Clusterin mRNA was increased in a dose-dependent manner by cisplatin treatment at concentrations < or =10 mg/ml, and clusterin mRNA up-regulation induced by 10 mg/ml cisplatin peaked by 48-h post-treatment and began decreasing by 72-h post-treatment.
  • Although there was no significant effect on growth of KoTCC-1 cells, AS clusterin ODN treatment significantly enhanced cisplatin chemosensitivity of KoTCC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, reducing the IC(50) by >50%.
  • Characteristic apoptotic DNA ladder formation and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase protein were detected after combined treatment with AS clusterin ODN and cisplatin but not either agent alone.
  • Furthermore, after the orthotopic implantation of KoTCC-1 cells, combined treatment with AS clusterin and cisplatin significantly inhibited the growth of primary KoTCC-1 tumors, as well as the incidence of lymph node metastasis.
  • Collectively, these findings demonstrated that clusterin helps confer a chemoresistant phenotype through inhibition of apoptosis and that combined AS clusterin ODN may be useful in enhancing the effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with bladder cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Glycoproteins / genetics. Molecular Chaperones / genetics. Neoplasm Proteins / genetics. Oligodeoxyribonucleotides, Antisense / toxicity. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Clusterin. Drug Synergism. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Humans. Kinetics. Lymphatic Metastasis / prevention & control. Mice. Mice, Nude. Models, Biological. Transcription, Genetic. Transplantation, Heterologous. Tubulin / genetics. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 11751526.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CLU protein, human; 0 / Clu protein, mouse; 0 / Clusterin; 0 / Glycoproteins; 0 / Molecular Chaperones; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Oligodeoxyribonucleotides, Antisense; 0 / Tubulin
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4. Maluf FC, Cordon-Cardo C, Verbel DA, Satagopan JM, Boyle MG, Herr H, Bajorin DF: Assessing interactions between mdm-2, p53, and bcl-2 as prognostic variables in muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by locoregional surgical treatment. Ann Oncol; 2006 Nov;17(11):1677-86
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  • [Title] Assessing interactions between mdm-2, p53, and bcl-2 as prognostic variables in muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by locoregional surgical treatment.
  • Both individual and cooperative effects of these gene products may affect the biological behavior of primary bladder cancers and long-term outcome to standard therapy.
  • METHODS: This study retrospectively evaluated the association with survival of mdm-2, p53, and bcl-2 expression in 59 patients with muscle-invasive, node-negative transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) treated with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by locoregional surgery.
  • Each marker was defined as an altered phenotype if >or=20% malignant cells in the primary tumor exhibited staining; normal or minimal expression was defined as <20% cells exhibiting staining.
  • There was no association of molecular markers either alone or in combination with pathologic downstaging after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSION: The cooperative effects of phenotypes determined by mdm-2, p53, and bcl-2 expression may predict survival in patients with muscle-invasive TCC of the bladder.

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  • (PMID = 16984978.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; EC 6.3.2.19 / MDM2 protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2
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5. Bondavalli C, Dall'Oglio B, Schiavon L, Luciano M, Guatelli S, Parma P, Galletta V: [Complications of urinary diversion after radiotherapy]. Arch Ital Urol Androl; 2003 Mar;75(1):10-3
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  • Primary radiation therapy may be recommended for patients with invasive bladder cancer, gynecological or prostatic cancer.
  • When complications occur or in case of malignant recurrence, urinary diversion may be the best chance to restore an acceptable quality of life.

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  • (PMID = 12741338.001).
  • [ISSN] 1124-3562
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivio italiano di urologia, andrologia : organo ufficiale [di] Societa italiana di ecografia urologica e nefrologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Ital Urol Androl
  • [Language] ITA
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Number-of-references] 24
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6. Gómez-Román JJ, Cobo ML, Val-Bernal JF: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma presenting as a bladder neoplasm. Pathol Int; 2008 Apr;58(4):249-52
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  • [Title] Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma presenting as a bladder neoplasm.
  • Malignant lymphoma presenting in the bladder has been classified in primary cases, as the first sign of disseminated disease and as a secondary infiltration.
  • Reported herein is the case of a 45-year-old man with an anaplastic large cell lymphoma (anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and granzyme B positive) that presented as a bladder neoplasm.
  • The morphological differential diagnosis was complex because the EMA-positive immunophenotype, CD45 and CD3 negativity and the clinical manifestation simulated a transitional cell carcinoma.
  • It is important to be aware of its existence because a poorly differentiated bladder carcinoma cannot be ruled out if CD30 and ALK immunostaining are not performed.
  • Although bladder involvement by recurrent lymphoma is a sign of widely disseminated disease and it is associated with a very poor prognosis, it seems that chemotherapeutic regimens in this kind of ALK-positive lymphoma could be effective, given that the present patient had an impressive response to chemotherapy treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / diagnosis. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / metabolism. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD30 / metabolism. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease-Free Survival. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Methylprednisolone / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Mucin-1 / metabolism. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18324919.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD30; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Mucin-1; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; X4W7ZR7023 / Methylprednisolone
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7. Djeu JY, Wei S: Clusterin and chemoresistance. Adv Cancer Res; 2009;105:77-92
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  • Resistance to anticancer agents is one of the primary impediments to effective cancer therapy.
  • Chemoresistance occurs not only to clinically established therapeutic agents but also to novel targeted therapeutics.
  • Both intrinsic and acquired mechanisms have been implicated in drug resistance but it remains controversial which mechanisms are responsible that lead to failure of therapy in cancer patients.
  • Moreover, it is abnormally upregulated in numerous advanced stage and metastatic cancers spanning prostate, renal, bladder, breast, head and neck, colon, cervical, pancreatic, lung carcinomas, melanoma, and lymphoma.
  • Expression of sCLU may be an adaptive response to genotoxic and oxidative stresses but this adaptive response could pose a threat in malignant cells being treated with cytotoxic agents by enhancing their survival potential.
  • Thus, sCLU has a key role in preventing apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents and has the potential to be targeted for cancer therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Clusterin / physiology. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Resistance, Multiple. Humans. Oxidative Stress

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  • (PMID = 19879424.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-230X
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA098080
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CLU protein, human; 0 / Clusterin
  • [Number-of-references] 78
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS539156; NLM/ PMC3889866
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8. Farhat MH, Moumneh G, Jalloul R, El Hout Y: Secondary adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder from a primary gastric cancer. J Med Liban; 2007 Jul-Sep;55(3):162-4
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  • [Title] Secondary adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder from a primary gastric cancer.
  • Primary bladder tumor is a frequent urological malignancy, whereas the incidence of secondary bladder tumor from a distant organ is quite rare.
  • Secondary bladder neoplasms represent no more than 3% of all malignant bladder tumors in surgical specimens, of which distant metastases from stomach account for about 4%.
  • The signs of bladder neoplasm in a patient with malignancy elsewhere should alarm the clinician for a possible metastatic origin.
  • We present a patient with primary adenocarcinoma of the stomach, who underwent total gastrectomy and received adjuvant chemotherapy, and was diagnosed with metastasis to the urinary bladder 15 months later.
  • We review the epidemiology of secondary adenocarcinoma of the bladder, mechanisms of metastasis, associated common primaries with focus on gastric malignancies, radiological findings, and role of immunohistochemical staining.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Follow-Up Studies. Gastrectomy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • [CommentIn] J Med Liban. 2008 Jan-Mar;56(1):48 [19534093.001]
  • (PMID = 17966739.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-9852
  • [Journal-full-title] Le Journal médical libanais. The Lebanese medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Liban
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Lebanon
  • [Number-of-references] 16
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9. Zhang C, Mattern J, Haferkamp A, Pfitzenmaier J, Hohenfellner M, Rittgen W, Edler L, Debatin KM, Groene E, Herr I: Corticosteroid-induced chemotherapy resistance in urological cancers. Cancer Biol Ther; 2006 Jan;5(1):59-64
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  • [Title] Corticosteroid-induced chemotherapy resistance in urological cancers.
  • PURPOSE: Glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone are widely used for medication of urological diseases, e.g., as cotreatment of advanced prostate cancer, to improve appetite, weight loss, fatigue, relieve bone pain, diminish ureteric obstruction, to reduce the production of adrenal androgens, as an antiemetic in patients undergoing chemo- and/or radiotherapy together with serving as "standard" therapy arm in randomized studies.
  • While the potent pro-apoptotic properties and the supportive effects of glucocorticoids to tumor therapy in lymphoid cells are well studied, the impact to growth of prostate and other urological carcinomas is unknown.
  • METHODS: We isolated cells from surgical resections of 21 prostate tumors and measured apoptosis and viability in these primary cells and 17 established cell lines from human prostate, bladder, renal cell and testicular carcinomas.
  • No difference in dexamethasone-mediated protection was found in normal, benign and malignant prostate tumors.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data show for the first time that dexamethasone induced therapy resistance in urological carcinomas is not the exception but a more common phenomenon and implicate that glucocorticoids may have two faces in cancer therapy, a beneficial and a dangerous one.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / adverse effects. Dexamethasone / adverse effects. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / drug effects. Urologic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis. Female. Humans. Male. Radiation Tolerance / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 16294015.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-4047
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer biology & therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Biol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone
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10. May F, Treiber U, Hartung R, Schwaibold H: Significance of random bladder biopsies in superficial bladder cancer. Eur Urol; 2003 Jul;44(1):47-50
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  • [Title] Significance of random bladder biopsies in superficial bladder cancer.
  • OBJECTIVES: We investigated to what extent biopsies of normal-appearing urothelium taken from patients with superficial bladder cancer (Ta, T1, Tis) showed malignant disease and whether those findings had impact on therapeutical decisions.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: 1033 consecutive patients presenting with Ta, T1 or Tis (carcinoma in situ) superficial bladder tumors at increased risk for recurrence underwent multiple random biopsies from normal-appearing urothelium during transurethral resection (TUR).
  • Patients with small, primary, singular tumors (smaller or equal to 1cm) were excluded from random biopsies.
  • 128 patients (12.4%) showed urothelial bladder cancer in their random biopsies (Tis: 74, Ta: 41, T1: 12, T2: 1).
  • In 14 patients, where transurethral resection of the primary tumor revealed no signs of malignancy, urothelial bladder cancer was detected in the random biopsy material: Ta 8 patients, Tis 5 patients and T1 one patient.
  • Upstaging of the primary, resected tumor by histological examination of the random biopsy material occurred in 75 patients (7%).
  • Altogether, due to the random biopsy results therapy was altered in 70 patients (6.8%) of our series: It changed intravesical chemotherapy to BCG in 45, provoked a second TUR in 48 and cystectomy in 15 patients.
  • Regarding random bladder biopsies a simple tool for the urologist to identify high risk groups of patients, we recommend them as part of the routine management of superficial bladder cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Biopsy, Needle / methods. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cystectomy / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Germany. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Random Allocation. Risk Assessment. Sensitivity and Specificity. Time Factors. Urothelium / pathology

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  • (PMID = 12814674.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-2838
  • [Journal-full-title] European urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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11. Fink W, Zimpfer A, Ugurel S: Mucosal metastases in malignant melanoma. Onkologie; 2003 Jun;26(3):249-51
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  • [Title] Mucosal metastases in malignant melanoma.
  • BACKGROUND: We present the case of a patient with malignant melanoma stage IV according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) classification and an unusual pattern of metastasis to the mucosa of the esophagus, the stomach, the bladder and the palatine tonsil.
  • CASE REPORT: A 38-year-old male patient with metastatic malignant melanoma of stage III (AJCC) was admitted for initiation of adjuvant therapy.
  • 4 months earlier a primary melanoma of the left upper leg had been excised and 2 months later the patient had undergone a left inguinal lymph node dissection revealing 2 metastatic lymph nodes.
  • Two cycles of dacarbazine (DTIC) chemotherapy were performed during which the patient developed cutaneous metastases, dyspepsia, and mild hematemesis.
  • A few weeks later the patient developed macroscopic hematuria.
  • A cystoscopy was performed and showed metastases to the mucosa of the bladder.
  • Nutrient vessels of these bladder metastases were embolized in order to control bleeding.
  • [MeSH-major] Esophageal Neoplasms / secondary. Melanoma / secondary. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Stomach Neoplasms / secondary. Tonsillar Neoplasms / secondary. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Diagnosis, Differential. Gastric Mucosa / pathology. Humans. Male. Mucous Membrane / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Tomography, Emission-Computed


12. Mohammadianpanah M, Vasei M, Mosalaei A, Omidvari S, Ahmadloo N: Malignant spinal cord compression in cancer patients may be mimicked by a primary spinal cord tumour. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl); 2006 Dec;15(5):497-500
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  • [Title] Malignant spinal cord compression in cancer patients may be mimicked by a primary spinal cord tumour.
  • Although it is quite rare, second primary neoplasms in cancer patients may present with the signs and symptoms of malignant spinal cord compression.
  • Primary spinal cord tumours in the cancer patients may be deceptive and considered as the recurrent first cancer.
  • A 50-year-old man developed intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord 1.5 years following chemoradiation for Waldeyer's ring lymphoma.
  • He presented with a 2-month history of neck pain, progressive upper- and lower-extremity numbness and weakness, and bowel and bladder dysfunction.
  • The clinical and radiological findings were suggestive of malignant process.
  • [MeSH-major] Ependymoma / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Second Primary / diagnosis. Spinal Cord Compression / etiology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Cervical Vertebrae. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / radiotherapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Quadriplegia / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17177910.001).
  • [ISSN] 0961-5423
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 10
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13. Otrock ZK, Mahfouz RA, Salem ZM: Four primary tumors of lung, bladder, prostate, and breast in a male patient. South Med J; 2005 Sep;98(9):946-9
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  • [Title] Four primary tumors of lung, bladder, prostate, and breast in a male patient.
  • It is a case of both synchronous and metachronous primary malignant neoplasms occurring in four different organs.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first documented case with this combination of primary tumors.
  • The tumors included an adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung, transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, and adenocarcinomas of the prostate and the breast.
  • We also review the medical literature for the possible causes of multiple primary malignant neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cystectomy. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Mastectomy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Shock, Septic / complications. Spinal Neoplasms / complications. Spinal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Spinal Neoplasms / secondary. Urinary Diversion

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  • (PMID = 16217994.001).
  • [ISSN] 0038-4348
  • [Journal-full-title] Southern medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] South. Med. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Mehdi I, Shah AH, Moona MS, Verma K, Abussa A, Elramih R, El-Hashmi H: Synchronous and metachronous malignant tumours expect the unexpected. J Pak Med Assoc; 2010 Nov;60(11):905-9

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  • [Title] Synchronous and metachronous malignant tumours expect the unexpected.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate occurrence of synchronous and metachronous malignant tumours, to find tumour types, age group, and relationship to treatment received.
  • METHODS: Previously diagnosed 1st primary tumour cases experiencing a synchronous or metachronous tumour, seen at AOI from February 2003 to August 2009 (78 months) were included.
  • The cases were analyzed for morphology/histology of 1st primary tumour, age and gender of patient, treatment received for first tumour, time interval between the 1st and 2nd primary tumour, morphology/histology of second tumour, and the treatment conferred for 2nd tumour.
  • The follow up time was 24-150 months.
  • The time to 2nd primary tumour was 2-132 months.
  • The 1st primary tumours were breast, ovary, GIT and urinary bladder.
  • The patients received surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy alone or as multi-modality treatment for the 1st tumours.
  • CONCLUSION: It is imperative that patients with a primary malignant tumour should be thoroughly, closely, and regularly followed.
  • The 2nd primary tumour is usually more aggressive, treatment resistant, and metastasizes early requiring a more aggressive treatment strategy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Distribution. Aged. Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Sex Distribution. Time Factors. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 21375191.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-9982
  • [Journal-full-title] JPMA. The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pak Med Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Pakistan
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15. Riesz P, Székely E, Törzsök P, Majoros A, Szendroi A, Dombovári P, Romics I: [Can inverted papilloma in urinary bladder be considered as a benign tumor]. Orv Hetil; 2010 Jan 17;151(3):92-5
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  • [Title] [Can inverted papilloma in urinary bladder be considered as a benign tumor].
  • Inverted papilloma of the urinary bladder is a rare entity.
  • According to literature data, this disease is not malignant, and has low recurrence rate.
  • They aimed to find out the rate of inverted papilloma recurrences, and transformations into malignant bladder cancer.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty patients with histologically proven inverted papilloma were followed after transurethral resection of bladder, which meant urine tests every three months, abdominal ultrasound and cystoscopy.
  • In one patient, inverted papilloma was found by control cystoscopy after transurethral resection of bladder (pT1 G2) and local chemotherapy 15 months later.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Based on authors' experience, inverted papilloma of the urinary bladder is a benign lesion, but malignant changes or concomitant transitiocellular tumor may occur, thus follow-up is needed.
  • Although references are not standardized, authors suggest following patients with inverted papilloma as a primary (pTa G1) bladder cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Papilloma, Inverted / pathology. Papilloma, Inverted / surgery. Precancerous Conditions / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 20061266.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6002
  • [Journal-full-title] Orvosi hetilap
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orv Hetil
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
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16. Lopez-Beltrán A, Luque RJ, Vicioso L, Anglada F, Requena MJ, Quintero A, Montironi R: Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a clinicopathologic study of 13 cases. Virchows Arch; 2001 Jun;438(6):552-7
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  • [Title] Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a clinicopathologic study of 13 cases.
  • Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELCA) of the urinary bladder is a rare variant of bladder cancer characterized by a malignant epithelial component densely infiltrated by lymphoid cells.
  • These neoplasms deserve recognition and attention, chiefly because they may be responsive to chemotherapy.
  • Our data suggest that pure and predominant LELCA of the bladder appear to be morphologically and clinically different from other bladder (undifferentiated and poorly differentiated conventional TCC) carcinomas and should be recognized as separate clinicopathological variants of TCC with heavy lymphocytic reaction relevant in patient management.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Aneuploidy. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / chemistry. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / surgery. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Female. Humans. Image Cytometry. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Keratins / analysis. Male. Middle Aged. Mucin-1 / analysis. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / chemistry. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / pathology. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11469686.001).
  • [ISSN] 0945-6317
  • [Journal-full-title] Virchows Archiv : an international journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Virchows Arch.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Mucin-1; 68238-35-7 / Keratins
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17. Paner GP, McKenney JK, Epstein JI, Amin MB: Rhabdomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder in adults: predilection for alveolar morphology with anaplasia and significant morphologic overlap with small cell carcinoma. Am J Surg Pathol; 2008 Jul;32(7):1022-8
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  • [Title] Rhabdomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder in adults: predilection for alveolar morphology with anaplasia and significant morphologic overlap with small cell carcinoma.
  • Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) represents the most common malignant soft tissue tumor in children and adolescents with the urinary bladder representing a frequent site.
  • Most of these urinary bladder tumors are embryonal RMS, predominantly the botryoid subtype.
  • RMSs of the urinary bladder in adults are distinctively rare and the subject of only case reports.
  • We report the clinicopathologic features of 5 bladder neoplasms with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation in adults and emphasize the differential diagnosis in the adult setting.
  • Four cases were pure primary RMSs of the bladder and 1 case was a sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma with RMS representing the extensive heterologous component.
  • The degree of morphologic overlap with small cell carcinoma of the bladder, a relatively more common round cell tumor in adults, was striking.
  • No other case had previous history of bladder cancer or concurrent carcinoma in situ or invasive urothelial carcinoma.
  • Two patients received chemotherapy, 2 underwent cystectomy, and 1 had transurethral resection alone.
  • In conclusion, (1) RMS of the urinary bladder in adults more commonly presents as a primitive round blue cell neoplasm that has significant morphologic and immunohistochemical overlap with small cell carcinoma of the bladder. (2) Although RMS in children generally have a botryoid embryonal histology with favorable outcome, bladder RMS in adults frequently demonstrates alveolar or unclassified histology, commonly with anaplasia, and have a uniformly aggressive clinical course.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Small Cell / pathology. Rhabdomyosarcoma, Alveolar / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Anaplasia. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Cell Nucleus / pathology. Combined Modality Therapy. Desmin / analysis. Diagnosis, Differential. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. MyoD Protein / analysis. Myogenin / analysis. Synaptophysin / analysis

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  • (PMID = 18469707.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0979
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Desmin; 0 / MyoD Protein; 0 / MyoD1 myogenic differentiation protein; 0 / Myogenin; 0 / Synaptophysin
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18. Huang HY, Ko SF, Chuang JH, Jeng YM, Sung MT, Chen WJ: Primary yolk sac tumor of the urachus. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2002 Sep;126(9):1106-9
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  • [Title] Primary yolk sac tumor of the urachus.
  • Pure yolk sac tumor is the most common malignant gonadal tumor of infants and toddlers.
  • To date, only 1 primary urachal pure yolk sac tumor has been reported in the literature.
  • With periodic follow-up for 3 years following surgical extirpation of the tumor and adjuvant chemotherapy, this patient is still alive without evidence of disease.
  • Flow cytometry demonstrated a diploid DNA content with S-phase being as high as 55.36%.
  • [MeSH-major] Endodermal Sinus Tumor / pathology. Nuclear Proteins. Urachus / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Bleomycin / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Infant. Keratins / analysis. Male. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / analysis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. alpha 1-Antitrypsin / analysis. alpha-Fetoproteins / analysis

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  • (PMID = 12204063.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-9985
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / alpha 1-Antitrypsin; 0 / alpha-Fetoproteins; 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 68238-35-7 / Keratins; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; EC 6.3.2.19 / MDM2 protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; BEP protocol
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19. Machtens S, Serth J, Meyer A, Kleinhorst C, Ommer KJ, Herbst U, Kieruij M, Boerner AR: Positron emission tomography (PET) in the urooncological evaluation of the small pelvis. World J Urol; 2007 Aug;25(4):341-9
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  • [Title] Positron emission tomography (PET) in the urooncological evaluation of the small pelvis.
  • Positron emission tomography (PET) with the use of ((18)F)2-fluoro-D: -2-desoxyglucose (FDG) has been investigated to be a highly sensitive and specific imaging modality in the diagnostic of primary and recurrent tumors and in the control of therapies in numerous non-urologic cancers.
  • The aim of this review is to validate the significance of PET as a diagnostic tool in malignant urological tumors of the small pelvis.
  • A systematic review of the current literature concerning the role of PET for malignant prostate, testicular and bladder tumors was carried out.
  • The data indicate no additional role for PET in comparison with conventional imaging in tumor detection and local staging for prostate, bladder or testicular cancer.
  • FDG-PET can be regarded as accepted imaging modality in the restaging of seminomatous germ cell tumors after chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Pelvis / diagnostic imaging. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnostic imaging. Testicular Neoplasms / diagnostic imaging. Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon / methods. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / diagnostic imaging
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Reproducibility of Results

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  • (PMID = 17624533.001).
  • [ISSN] 0724-4983
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 66
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20. Bien E, Stachowicz-Stencel T, Balcerska A, Godzinski J, Kazanowska B, Perek-Polnik M, Madziara W, Rybczynska A, Kurylak A, Zalewska-Szewczyk B, Peregud-Pogorzelski J: Angiosarcoma in children - still uncontrollable oncological problem. The report of the Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours Study. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl); 2009 Jul;18(4):411-20
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The report of the Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours StudyAngiosarcoma is a rare, highly malignant vascular neoplasm with little data available on its clinical course and management in children.
  • Ten children with angiosarcoma (M/F: 6/4; aged 2, 3-16 years) registered in Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours and Soft Tissue Sarcomas Studies between 1992 and 2006.
  • Primary tumour exceeded 5 cm in seven patients and affected mainly deep tissues (heart-2, head/neck, bladder, brain, liver and upper limb - one patient each).
  • Complete primary excision was unfeasible even in local stages.
  • All patients received supplementing chemotherapy with no response in four.
  • Relapsed patients received chemotherapy +/- radiotherapy and surgery (three).
  • Complete primary excision is unfeasible, even in seemingly local stages.
  • The response to chemotherapy is poor and the large number of metastatic recurrences suggests a need for systemic therapy modifications.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemangiosarcoma / pathology. Hemangiosarcoma / therapy. Sarcoma / pathology. Sarcoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease Progression. Humans. Male. Poland / epidemiology. Prognosis. Radiotherapy. Recurrence. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 19490008.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2354
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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21. Hassan HT: Ajoene (natural garlic compound): a new anti-leukaemia agent for AML therapy. Leuk Res; 2004 Jul;28(7):667-71
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ajoene (natural garlic compound): a new anti-leukaemia agent for AML therapy.
  • Several garlic compounds including allicin and its corresponding sulfide inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis of several human non-leukaemia malignant cells including breast, bladder, colorectal, hepatic, prostate cancer, lymphoma and skin tumour cell lines.
  • More significantly, ajoene profoundly enhanced the apoptotic effect of the two chemotherapeutic drugs: cytarabine and fludarabine in human CD34-positive resistant myeloid leukaemia cells through enhancing their bcl-2 inhibitory and caspase-3 activation activities.
  • Since acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a heterogeneous malignant disease in which disease progression at the level of CD34-positive cells has a major impact on resistance to chemotherapy and relapse and the inability to undergo apoptosis is a crucial mechanism of multi-drug resistance in AML patients.
  • The recent findings of the potent enhancing activity of ajoene on chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in CD34-positive resistant human myeloid leukaemia cells suggest a novel promising role for the treatment of refractory and/or relapsed AML patients as well as elderly AML patients.
  • Further studies are warranted to evaluate similar enhancing effect for ajoene in blast cells from AML patients in primary cultures before its introduction in pilot clinical study.
  • [MeSH-major] Disulfides / therapeutic use. Garlic. Leukemia, Myeloid / drug therapy. Plant Extracts / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Drug Synergism. Humans

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  • (PMID = 15158086.001).
  • [ISSN] 0145-2126
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Editorial; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Disulfides; 0 / Plant Extracts; 99A0041VG8 / ajoene
  • [Number-of-references] 66
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22. Volkmer BG, Seidl-Schlick EM, Bach D, Romics I, Kleinschmidt K: Cyclophosphamide is contraindicated in patients with a history of transitional cell carcinoma. Clin Rheumatol; 2005 Aug;24(4):319-23
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Cyclophosphamide is a urotoxic agent that increases the incidence of malignant neoplasms of the urinary tract.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term impact of cyclophosphamide on patients with a history of superficial bladder cancer.
  • Between July 1986 and January 1988, 58 consecutive patients with primary superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were included in this study.
  • Whereas there were no recurrences in the upper urinary tract among the patients of group B, 2 of the 22 patients from group A developed cancer of the renal pelvis.
  • In patients with a history of superficial bladder cancer, a single dose of cyclophosphamide poses a significantly increased risk of tumor recurrence in the lower and in the upper urinary tract as well.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Cyclophosphamide / adverse effects. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / chemically induced. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Intravesical. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cystectomy / methods. Cystoscopy. Female. Humans. Incidence. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Mycobacterium bovis. Neoplasm Staging. Probability. Prognosis. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Ultrasonography

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  • (PMID = 16034647.001).
  • [ISSN] 0770-3198
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical rheumatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Rheumatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
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23. Várady E, Deák B, Molnár ZS, Rosta A, Schneider T, Esik O, Eckhardt S: Second malignancies after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. Leuk Lymphoma; 2001 Nov-Dec;42(6):1275-81
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Hodgkin Disease.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Second malignancies after treatment for Hodgkin's disease.
  • The occurrence of treatment-related second malignancy following Hodgkin's disease (HD) has now been recognized as a major problem.
  • Second neoplasm developed in 32 cases (4.8%).
  • Among patients with second hematological malignancies, the mean age at diagnosis of HD was 44 years and the mean interval until the development of second malignancy was 6.1 years.
  • Five patients received chemo- and radiotherapy and in two cases chemotherapy was used.
  • Twenty-five patients have had solid tumors, affecting lung (5), breast (3), colon (3), stomach (2), urinary bladder (2), head-and-neck (1), thyroid gland (1), esophagus (1), liver (1), pancreas (1), furthermore, three sarcomas and two malignant melanomas were observed.
  • Their mean age at the diagnosis of HD was 46 years and the mean period of latency was 8.3 years.
  • Chemotherapy was applied to nine patients, 16 patients received both chemo- and radiotherapy.
  • Since alkylating agents increase the risk of leukemia and irradiation contributes mainly to other malignancies, future treatment protocols should attempt to reduce the most serious consequence of therapy without compromising the survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 11911408.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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24. Mistrangelo M, Mobiglia A, Cassoni P, Castellano I, Maass J, Martina MC, Bellò M, Mussa A: [Verrucous carcinoma of the anus or Buschke-Lowenstein tumor of the anus: staging and treatment. Report of 3 cases]. Suppl Tumori; 2005 May-Jun;4(3):S29-30
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Anal Cancer.

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  • [Title] [Verrucous carcinoma of the anus or Buschke-Lowenstein tumor of the anus: staging and treatment. Report of 3 cases].
  • These are slow-growing, expansive, cauliflower-like, destructive lesions that could propagate to vulvar and vaginal region, rectum and bladder.
  • The hallmark of the disease is the high rate of recurrence (66%) and malignant transformation (56%).
  • In two cases immunodeficiency was evidentiated (HIV in one case and ciclosporin treatment in the second one).
  • All patients were submitted to extensive local surgical treatment.
  • All inguinal nodes revealed negative to definitive histological exam, that confirmed the diagnosis of Buschke Lowenstein tumor of the primary lesion.
  • Local surgery with elettrocautery or laser is the first treatment of choice, even if abdominoperineal amputation sec.
  • Others treatments proposed are radiotherapy, chemotherapy, interferon, iniquimod and so on.
  • Other studies are requested to value the best treatment.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 16437884.001).
  • [ISSN] 2283-5423
  • [Journal-full-title] I supplementi di Tumori : official journal of Società italiana di cancerologia ... [et al.]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Suppl Tumori
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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25. Chiewvit P, Danchaivijitr N, Sirivitmaitrie K, Chiewvit S, Thephamongkhol K: Does magnetic resonance imaging give value-added than bone scintigraphy in the detection of vertebral metastasis? J Med Assoc Thai; 2009 Jun;92(6):818-29
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - MRI Scans.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Does magnetic resonance imaging give value-added than bone scintigraphy in the detection of vertebral metastasis?
  • The MR imaging findings were studied: location (cervical or thoracic or lumbar or sacrum spine), number of lesions (solitary or multiple lesions), pattern of enhancement (homogeneous or inhomogeneous), involvement of spinal canal, compression of spinal cord, extradural extension, other incidental findings such as pulmonary metastasis, pleural effusion, lymphadenopathy The final diagnosis was confirmed clinically and followed-up for further management (radiation or surgery) or followed-up by MR imaging (1 month-16 months) and bone scintigraphy (5 months-12 months).
  • Primary neoplasms include breast cancer (n=11), colorectal cancer (n=7), lung cancer (n=6), prostate cancer (n=5), nasopharyngeal cancer (n=5), head and neck cancer (n=3), thyroid cancer (n=2), liver cancer (n=2), esophagus cancer (n=1), bladder cancer (n=1), retroperitoneum cancer (n=1), medulloblastoma (n=1), cervical cancer (n=1), ovarian cancer (n=1), malignant melanoma (n=1).
  • Furthermore, MR imaging is important for the further treatment planning such as radiation therapy or systemic chemotherapy.
  • Although MR imaging is useful in the detection of early metastasis that are localized completely in the bone marrow cavity routinely bone scintigraphy remains that most cost-effective method for examination of the entire skeleton.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Child. Diphosphonates. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis / radionuclide imaging. Organotechnetium Compounds. Radionuclide Imaging. Retrospective Studies. Spinal Cord Compression. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19530588.001).
  • [ISSN] 0125-2208
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Assoc Thai
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Thailand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Organotechnetium Compounds; 0 / technetium 99m methylene bisphosphonate
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26. Kersun LS, Wimmer RS, Hoot AC, Meadows AT: Secondary malignant neoplasms of the bladder after cyclophosphamide treatment for childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2004 Mar;42(3):289-91
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Secondary malignant neoplasms of the bladder after cyclophosphamide treatment for childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclophosphamide / adverse effects. Neoplasms, Second Primary / chemically induced. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Female. Hematuria. Humans. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / drug therapy. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Urinary Incontinence

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  • (PMID = 14752871.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5009
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
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