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6. Frimodt-Møller N: How predictive is PK/PD for antibacterial agents? Int J Antimicrob Agents; 2002 Apr;19(4):333-9
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  • The pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters most often used in studies of antibiotic effect include the following relationships between the antibiotic concentration curve in serum as a surrogate marker for the antibiotic concentration at the infection site, the peak/minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) ratio, the area under the curve (AUC)/MIC ratio and the duration of time the concentration exceeds the MIC (T(>MIC)).
  • The predictive role of T(>MIC) is important for drugs showing minimal concentration dependent effect such as the beta-lactam antibiotics, the macrolides and others.
  • The time can be calculated as the chronological time measured or as the (cumulative) per cent of the dosing interval covered by the dose.
  • It can be deduced from experimental as well as clinical studies that there is a minimal effective time (MET), which needs to be covered by the antibiotic concentration at the site of infection in order to achieve cure.
  • For antibiotics with a clear concentration-dependent bacterial killing effect the most important pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) index is the peak/MIC ratio (or the AUC/MIC ratio).
  • This is the case for aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones, and for both classes a peak/MIC ratio of at least 10 within the first 24 h of treatment has been shown to result in around 90% bacteriological as well as clinical cure.
  • One consequence of clinical dosing has been the once-a-day (OD) dosing for aminoglycosides, which is the standard mode of therapy in many countries.
  • Clinical studies in the field of antibacterial PD are still relatively scarce, and much information is needed to enable relevant dosing strategies for all types of antibiotics against all common infections and micro-organisms.
  • [MeSH-minor] Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. Kinetics. Species Specificity. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 11978504.001).
  • [ISSN] 0924-8579
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of antimicrobial agents
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Antimicrob. Agents
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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7. Hamed NA, Sharaki OA, Zeidan MM: Leptin in acute leukaemias: relationship to interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Egypt J Immunol; 2003;10(1):57-66
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  • [Title] Leptin in acute leukaemias: relationship to interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor.
  • This effect may be due to prevention of apoptosis of progenitor cells or upregulation of specific receptors on leukaemic precursors that make them more responsive to stimuli.
  • This work investigates the relationship between serum leptin level, serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in acute leukaemic patients.
  • The relationship to blood cell counts, haemoglobin and response to chemotherapy was also investigated.
  • The study included 25 acute leukaemic male patients [15 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and 10 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL)] and 15 age and sex matched healthy controls.
  • In addition, patients were subjected to bone marrow aspiration, cytochemistry and immunophenotyping study and serum leptin assay after chemotherapy.
  • This elevation was unrelated to the presence of extramedullary infiltration or response to chemotherapy and correlated only with body mass index (p<0.05).
  • In both AML and ALL, there was no significant difference in serum leptin level before and after treatment.

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  • (PMID = 15719623.001).
  • [ISSN] 1110-4902
  • [Journal-full-title] The Egyptian journal of immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Egypt J Immunol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Leptin; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
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8. Akiyama M, Yamada O, Agawa M, Yuza Y, Yanagisawa T, Eto Y, Yamada H: Effects of prednisolone on specifically expressed genes in pediatric acute B-lymphoblastic leukemia. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2008 Apr;30(4):313-6
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  • [Title] Effects of prednisolone on specifically expressed genes in pediatric acute B-lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Although glucocorticoid is essential in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), their precise mechanisms of action remain unclear.
  • We used DNA microarray to evaluate prednisolone-regulated genes in pre-B-ALL cells from 2 pediatric patients.
  • We found up-regulation of 26 genes in ALL cells from both patients, compared with peripheral normal B lymphocytes before maintenance chemotherapy.
  • Treatment with prednisolone for 48 hours induced down-regulation of 5 genes (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase, heparin-binding epidermal growth factorlike growth factor, pre-B-lymphocyte genes 1 and 3, and immunoglobulin lambda-like polypeptide) among 26 specifically expressed genes in pre-B-ALL cells from both patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / genetics. Prednisone / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Infant. Neoplasm Staging. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Radiography, Thoracic. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 18391702.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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9. Lancaster DL, Patel N, Lennard L, Lilleyman JS: 6-Thioguanine in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: influence of food on parent drug pharmacokinetics and 6-thioguanine nucleotide concentrations. Br J Clin Pharmacol; 2001 Jun;51(6):531-9
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  • [Title] 6-Thioguanine in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: influence of food on parent drug pharmacokinetics and 6-thioguanine nucleotide concentrations.
  • AIMS: Since relatively little is known about the pharmacokinetics of 6-thioguanine (6TG) in children receiving 6-thioguanine for maintenance therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), we studied plasma drug concentrations under standardized conditions and investigated the effect of food on parent drug pharmacokinetics and the accumulation of the active metabolites 6-thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGNs) in red cells.
  • Concomitant food administration resulted in a significant reduction in Cmax (median 71 vs 313 pmol ml(-1), P = 0.006, CI from 36 to 426), AUC (median 200 vs 586 pmol ml(-1) h, P = 0.006, 95% CI from 109 to 692), and time to reach Cmax (median 1.5 vs 3 h, P = 0.013, 95% CI from 0.74 to 2.73).
  • There was no difference in the steady state concentration of red cell 6-TGNs observed after a 4 week period of 6-TG administered fasting or after food.
  • Although there would appear to be a reduction in parent drug Cmax and AUC with food there was no difference in 6-TGN concentrations after 4 weeks of 6-TG.
  • Taking the drug on an empty stomach may not be necessary.
  • [MeSH-major] Food. Food-Drug Interactions / physiology. Guanine Nucleotides / analysis. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / blood. Thioguanine / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adolescent. Area Under Curve. Child. Child, Preschool. Cross-Over Studies. Fasting. Genetic Variation. Half-Life. Humans. Infant. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 11422012.001).
  • [ISSN] 0306-5251
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of clinical pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Clin Pharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Guanine Nucleotides; FTK8U1GZNX / Thioguanine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2014483
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10. Kahng J, Shin SY, Han K: [Proportions of cells expressing CD38-/CD34+, CD38+/CD34+, CD19+/CD34+, or CD13,33+/CD34+ in the regenerating bone marrows during complete remission of acute leukemia or after bone marrow transplantation]. Korean J Lab Med; 2007 Dec;27(6):406-13
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  • [Title] [Proportions of cells expressing CD38-/CD34+, CD38+/CD34+, CD19+/CD34+, or CD13,33+/CD34+ in the regenerating bone marrows during complete remission of acute leukemia or after bone marrow transplantation].
  • BACKGROUND: The hemopoietic stem cells increase in number during the regeneration after chemotherapy or bone marrow transplantation (BMT).
  • We attempted to discover the proportions of undifferentiated stem cells, committed stem cells, B cell precursors, and myeloid precursors in the regenerating bone marrows during complete remission (CR) and after engraftment of BMT.
  • METHODS: Bone marrow samples from 82 patients with acute leukemia in CR and from 25 patients after BMT engraftment, along with 22 control samples, were used to find the numbers of CD38-/CD34+, CD38+/CD34+, CD19+/CD34+, and CD13,33+/CD34+ cells in the large lymphocyte gate by flow cytometry.
  • We cross-analyzed our results in terms of groups: CR, BMT, and initial diagnosis groups.
  • RESULTS: The proportions of CD38-/CD34+, CD38+/CD34+, CD19+/CD34+, and CD13,33+/CD34+ cells are more highly distributed in acute B-lymphoblastic leukemia than the normal group and also in the CR than the BMT group.
  • CD19+/CD34+ cells were increased in the relapse group and CD38+/ CD34+, CD19+/CD34+, and CD13,33+/CD34+ cells were increased in the group with chromosomal abnormality.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The increases of the markers spanned too widely to apply one specific cutoff value to analyze them.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD19 / metabolism. Antigens, CD34 / metabolism. Antigens, CD38 / metabolism. Bone Marrow Transplantation. Leukemia / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Bone Marrow / physiology. Flow Cytometry. Follow-Up Studies. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / immunology. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / metabolism. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Regeneration. Remission Induction

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  • (PMID = 18160830.001).
  • [ISSN] 1598-6535
  • [Journal-full-title] The Korean journal of laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Korean J Lab Med
  • [Language] kor
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD19; 0 / Antigens, CD34; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; EC 3.2.2.5 / Antigens, CD38
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11. Pandya NA, Meller ST, MacVicar D, Atra AA, Pinkerton CR: Vertebral compression fractures in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and remodelling after treatment. Arch Dis Child; 2001 Dec;85(6):492-3
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  • [Title] Vertebral compression fractures in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and remodelling after treatment.
  • Three children, aged 7-10 years, with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia presented with back pain, along with a mild kyphosis.
  • Chemotherapy resulted in pain resolution and spontaneous remodelling of the vertebrae.
  • [MeSH-major] Fractures, Spontaneous / etiology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Spinal Fractures / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11719337.001).
  • [ISSN] 1468-2044
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of disease in childhood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Dis. Child.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1719030
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12. Herrera L, Yarbrough S, Ghetie V, Aquino DB, Vitetta ES: Treatment of SCID/human B cell precursor ALL with anti-CD19 and anti-CD22 immunotoxins. Leukemia; 2003 Feb;17(2):334-8
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  • [Title] Treatment of SCID/human B cell precursor ALL with anti-CD19 and anti-CD22 immunotoxins.
  • The potential of these agents for the treatment of childhood B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is unknown.
  • We have previously shown that, in vitro these two ITs selectively kill leukemia cells obtained from children with leukemia.
  • To evaluate the efficacy of our ITs in an in vivo model we injected the human pre-B ALL cell line, NALM-6-UM1, into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice.
  • In early disease, treatment with HD37-dgRTA, RFB4-dgRTA, or Combotox (an equimolar concentration of the two ITs) significantly improved their survival.
  • In advanced disease, treatment with RFB4-dgRTA or Combotox significantly improved survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD / immunology. Antigens, CD19 / immunology. Antigens, Differentiation, B-Lymphocyte / immunology. Burkitt Lymphoma / therapy. Cell Adhesion Molecules. DNA / genetics. Immunotoxins / therapeutic use. Lectins / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. DNA Primers. Humans. Mice. Mice, SCID. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency / complications. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency / drug therapy. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency / immunology. Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 2. Survival Analysis. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 12592332.001).
  • [ISSN] 0887-6924
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leukemia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA77701-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, CD19; 0 / Antigens, Differentiation, B-Lymphocyte; 0 / CD22 protein, human; 0 / Cd22 protein, mouse; 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / Immunotoxins; 0 / Lectins; 0 / Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 2; 9007-49-2 / DNA
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13. de Vries WB, Karemaker R, Mooy NF, Strengers JL, Kemperman H, Baerts W, Veen S, Visser GH, Heijnen CJ, van Bel F: Cardiovascular follow-up at school age after perinatal glucocorticoid exposure in prematurely born children: perinatal glucocorticoid therapy and cardiovascular follow-up. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med; 2008 Aug;162(8):738-44
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  • [Title] Cardiovascular follow-up at school age after perinatal glucocorticoid exposure in prematurely born children: perinatal glucocorticoid therapy and cardiovascular follow-up.
  • OBJECTIVE: To study whether antenatal or neonatal glucocorticoid therapy to reduce the incidence and severity of chronic lung disease in preterm infants is associated with long-term adverse cardiac effects and hypertension.
  • Main Exposure Neonatal treatment with dexamethasone disodium phosphate(n = 48) or the clinically equally effective glucocorticoid hydrocortisone (n = 51), or only antenatal treatment with betamethasone disodium phosphate and betamethasone acetate (n = 51).
  • These 3 groups were compared with a reference group of prematurely born children who had not been exposed to perinatal glucocorticoid therapy (n = 43).
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: General hemodynamic data (heart rate and blood pressure), cardiovascular function as assessed at echocardiography, intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries, and cardiac biochemical features as early markers of expansion and volume overload of the cardiac left ventricle (B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide).
  • RESULTS: No significant group differences were found for heart rate, blood pressure, biochemical features, intima-media thickness, or systolic or diastolic left ventricular function.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / adverse effects. Cardiovascular Diseases / diagnosis. Infant, Premature. Infant, Premature, Diseases / drug therapy. Perinatal Care
  • [MeSH-minor] Betamethasone / administration & dosage. Betamethasone / adverse effects. Biomarkers / blood. Blood Pressure Determination. Case-Control Studies. Child. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Dexamethasone / adverse effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Gestational Age. Heart Function Tests. Hemodynamics / physiology. Humans. Hydrocortisone / administration & dosage. Hydrocortisone / adverse effects. Infant, Newborn. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal. Male. Probability. Reference Values. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Sensitivity and Specificity. Tunica Intima / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18678806.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-3628
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Biomarkers; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; 9842X06Q6M / Betamethasone; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
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4. Roy A, Cargill A, Love S, Moorman AV, Stoneham S, Lim A, Darbyshire PJ, Lancaster D, Hann I, Eden T, Saha V: Outcome after first relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia - lessons from the United Kingdom R2 trial. Br J Haematol; 2005 Jul;130(1):67-75
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  • [Title] Outcome after first relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia - lessons from the United Kingdom R2 trial.
  • A retrospective analysis of children with first relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), treated on the UKALL R2 protocol at four different hospitals, between June 1995 and December 2002 was performed.
  • In the IR group, those with a very early isolated central nervous system relapse also had a significantly worse outcome (P = 0.0001).
  • Given the poor outcome of a second relapse, clear strategies are required to identify those in the IR group who will most benefit from stem cell transplantation (SCT).
  • A higher proportion (16%) of induction failures in the HR group suggest the need for novel agents during this phase of treatment, but SCT was associated with a lower relapse rate and better outcome than those treated with chemotherapy alone.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow Transplantation. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Asparaginase / administration & dosage. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Recurrence. Remission Induction. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. United Kingdom. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 15982346.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / / 14840
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase
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15. Szczepański T, Flohr T, van der Velden VH, Bartram CR, van Dongen JJ: Molecular monitoring of residual disease using antigen receptor genes in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Best Pract Res Clin Haematol; 2002 Mar;15(1):37-57
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  • [Title] Molecular monitoring of residual disease using antigen receptor genes in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • Immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements are assumed to be unique 'fingerprint-like' sequences for each acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).
  • Various clonal Ig/TCR gene rearrangements can be identified at diagnosis in virtually all childhood ALL patients, representing molecular targets for detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) during follow-up analysis.
  • This is particularly powerful for evaluation of early treatment response and consequently can be used for improved therapy stratification.
  • MRD monitoring in second complete remission identifies patients with excellent drug sensitivity and predicts outcome after stem cell transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. DNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Gene Rearrangement. Genes, Immunoglobulin / genetics. Genes, T-Cell Receptor / genetics. Humans. Neoplasm, Residual / diagnosis. Neoplasm, Residual / genetics. Neoplasm, Residual / immunology. Prognosis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.
  • (PMID = 11987915.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-6926
  • [Journal-full-title] Best practice & research. Clinical haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Best Pract Res Clin Haematol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Neoplasm
  • [Number-of-references] 100
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16. Ak I, Aslan V, Vardareli E, Gülbaş Z: Assessment of the P-glycoprotein expression by 99mTc-MIBI bone marrow imaging in patients with untreated leukaemia. Nucl Med Commun; 2003 Apr;24(4):397-402
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  • [Title] Assessment of the P-glycoprotein expression by 99mTc-MIBI bone marrow imaging in patients with untreated leukaemia.
  • The ability of cancer cells to become simultaneously resistant to different drugs is a significant impediment to successful chemotherapy.
  • The aim of the study was to ascertain the relationship between the degree of 99mTc-MIBI uptake and the level of Pgp expression in patients with newly diagnosed leukaemia.
  • A total of 26 patients (12 female and 14 male; mean age 46.8+/-3.7 years) with newly diagnosed leukaemia were included in the study.
  • None of the patients had been previously treated with chemotherapy.
  • These data indicate that an increased level of Pgp expression is correlated with a low accumulation of 99mTc-MIBI in bone marrow of patients with leukaemia.
  • 99mTc-MIBI bone marrow imaging, as a method of functional imaging, can give in vivo information concerning the functional expression of the MDR phenotype in patients with untreated leukaemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow / metabolism. Bone Marrow / radionuclide imaging. Leukemia / metabolism. Leukemia / radionuclide imaging. P-Glycoprotein / metabolism. Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Drug Resistance, Multiple. Female. Humans. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / metabolism. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / radionuclide imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / metabolism. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / radionuclide imaging. Radiopharmaceuticals / pharmacokinetics. Reproducibility of Results. Sensitivity and Specificity. Statistics as Topic. Tissue Distribution. Whole-Body Counting / methods

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  • (PMID = 12673168.001).
  • [ISSN] 0143-3636
  • [Journal-full-title] Nuclear medicine communications
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nucl Med Commun
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / P-Glycoprotein; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 971Z4W1S09 / Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi
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17. Lee-Sherick AB, Linger RM, Gore L, Keating AK, Graham DK: Targeting paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: novel therapies currently in development. Br J Haematol; 2010 Nov;151(4):295-311
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  • [Title] Targeting paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: novel therapies currently in development.
  • Modifications to the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children have led to a dramatic increase in survival in the past 40 years.
  • Despite this success, a significant subset of paediatric leukaemia patients either relapse or fail to ever achieve a complete remission.
  • Additionally, some patients necessitate treatment with intensified chemotherapy regimens due to clinical or laboratory findings which identify them as high risk.
  • These patients are unlikely to respond to further minor adjustments to the dosing or timing of administration of the same chemotherapy medications.
  • Many novel targeted therapies for the treatment of childhood ALL provide potential mechanisms to further improve cure rates, and provide the possibility of minimizing toxicity to non-malignant cells, given their specificity to malignant cell phenotypes.
  • This article explores many of the potential targeted therapies in varying stages of development, from those currently in clinical trials to those still being refined in the research laboratory.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Molecular Targeted Therapy / methods. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis / drug effects. Child. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Epigenesis, Genetic / drug effects. Humans. Phosphotransferases / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • [Copyright] © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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  • (PMID = 20813012.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2141
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / K12 HD000850; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA058187; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA137078; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5P50CA058187
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; EC 2.7.- / Phosphotransferases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS374428; NLM/ PMC3354740
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18. Afset JE, Maeland JA: [Erythromycin and ciprofloxacin resistant Campylobacter jejuni]. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen; 2001 Aug 10;121(18):2152-4
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  • BACKGROUND: Diarrhoea caused by Campylobacter is normally a self-limiting disease, but treatment with antibiotics may be indicated in very severe or complicated cases or in immunocompromised patients.
  • INTERPRETATION: During the 1998-99 period, nearly one in four of all C. jejuni isolates in Sør-Trøndelag County, Norway, were resistant to ciprofloxacin.
  • In Norway erythromycin should still be the drug of choice in campylobacteriosis in cases where antibiotic treatment is indicated.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology. Anti-Infective Agents / pharmacology. Campylobacter jejuni / drug effects. Ciprofloxacin / pharmacology. Drug Resistance, Microbial. Erythromycin / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Campylobacter Infections / drug therapy. Campylobacter Infections / microbiology. Diarrhea / drug therapy. Diarrhea / microbiology. Humans. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 11571989.001).
  • [ISSN] 0029-2001
  • [Journal-full-title] Tidsskrift for den Norske lægeforening : tidsskrift for praktisk medicin, ny række
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tidsskr. Nor. Laegeforen.
  • [Language] nor
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Norway
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Anti-Infective Agents; 5E8K9I0O4U / Ciprofloxacin; 63937KV33D / Erythromycin
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19. Faderl S, Thall PF, Kantarjian HM, Estrov Z: Time to platelet recovery predicts outcome of patients with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who have achieved a complete remission. Br J Haematol; 2002 Jun;117(4):869-74
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  • [Title] Time to platelet recovery predicts outcome of patients with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who have achieved a complete remission.
  • Survival in acute leukaemia depends on the achievement of complete remission (CR).
  • Because platelet recovery > 100 x 10(9)/l is an essential component of CR in acute leukaemia, we hypothesized that time to platelet recovery (TPR) might be predictive of overall survival (OS) or disease-free survival (DFS) in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).
  • We analysed TPR in 249 patients with ALL who entered CR after one course of induction chemotherapy and correlated TPR with DFS and OS.
  • TPR was significantly associated with both DFS and OS if it occurred within a maximum of about 60 d from start of therapy.
  • Furthermore, during that time period, the relative risk of death increased with increasing TPR.
  • Although presence of the Philadelphia chromosome was the single most important adverse feature at diagnosis, the effect of TPR on survival continued to be significant within this patient subgroup.
  • This effect was so pronounced that Philadelphia chromosome-positive patients with a TPR of 12 d had a better outcome than Philadelphia chromosome-negative patients with a TPR of 48 d.
  • Thus, a short TPR seems to be able to override adverse characteristics in the outcome of ALL patients treated with chemotherapy.
  • As platelet counts are obtained almost daily in patients undergoing chemotherapy, TPR can readily be utilized to assess the prognosis of these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Platelet Count. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / blood. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Philadelphia Chromosome. Prognosis. Regression Analysis. Remission Induction. Risk. Time Factors. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • [ErratumIn] Br J Haematol. 2003 Oct;123(1):186
  • (PMID = 12060122.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; CVAD protocol
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20. Hoelzer D, Gökbuget N: New approaches to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults: where do we go? Semin Oncol; 2000 Oct;27(5):540-59
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  • [Title] New approaches to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults: where do we go?
  • The optimization of conventional treatment approaches, such as chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation (SCT), and supportive care, and the exploration of new approaches will hopefully further improve the outcome of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
  • Subgroup-adjusted treatment has already greatly improved treatment outcomes in T- and mature B-cell ALL.
  • These approaches should be further refined, for example, in T-ALL with cyclophosphamide and cytarabine, in pro-B ALL with high-dose cytarabine (HdAC), in B-precursor ALL with high-dose methotrexate (HdM) and 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP), and in mature B-ALL with HdM and HdAC.
  • The indications for SCT will be extended to include elderly patients undergoing allogeneic mini-transplants, and tumor eradication will be improved by better conditioning regimens such as radioimmunoconjugates and methods to induce the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect, such as donor leukocyte infusions (DLI) or allogeneic mini-transplants applied after autologous transplants.
  • Molecular therapeutic approaches, for example, those directed against the fusion protein BCR-ABL with ABL-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are on the way to creating a new avenue for the treatment of ALL.
  • In the future, drug resistance should be exploited as a pretherapeutic test for treatment strategies, but whether multidrug resistance modulation with available drugs will be used in ALL remains open.
  • Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of cytostatic drugs and the pharmacogenomics of cytostatic agents in adult ALL may contribute to the development of individualized treatment strategies with higher efficacy and lower toxicity.
  • It has been shown to be predictive for relapse and might be of benefit for redefinition of complete remission (CR), for determination of the efficacy of single treatment elements, and for treatment tailoring during the course of disease.
  • New treatment approaches include also several forms of immunotherapy for B- as well as T-lineage ALL; after the demonstration that such approaches are also effective in ALL, their optimal place in the treatment strategy for adult ALL can be determined.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chromosome Aberrations. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Humans. Neoplasm, Residual. Prognosis. Risk

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  • (PMID = 11049022.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 131
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21. Temming P, Jenney ME: The neurodevelopmental sequelae of childhood leukaemia and its treatment. Arch Dis Child; 2010 Nov;95(11):936-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The neurodevelopmental sequelae of childhood leukaemia and its treatment.
  • The overall survival of childhood leukaemia has increased dramatically over recent decades.
  • With the increasing number of survivors, chemotherapy protocols are designed not only to improve cure rates but also to minimise long-term sequelae.
  • Central-nervous-system-directed therapy given as intrathecal chemotherapy and/or cranial irradiation plays a crucial part in acute leukaemia treatment but can also result in adverse effects on the developing brain.
  • The elimination of cranial irradiation from current treatment protocols has improved the neurocognitive outcome without compromising survival rates.
  • Although neurodevelopmental long-term sequelae after chemotherapy-only central-nervous-system-directed therapies may be more subtle, survivors of childhood leukaemia will continue to require methodical follow-up and appropriate rehabilitation.
  • [MeSH-major] Developmental Disabilities / etiology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Central Nervous System / pathology. Child. Cranial Irradiation / adverse effects. Humans. Leukemic Infiltration / prevention & control. Radiation Injuries / etiology

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  • [ErratumIn] Arch Dis Child. 2011 Aug;96(8):787
  • (PMID = 20980277.001).
  • [ISSN] 1468-2044
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of disease in childhood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Dis. Child.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
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22. Li T, Xue Y, Zhang J, Chen S, Pan J, Wu Y, Wang Y, Shen J: Isodicentric 20q- in two cases of B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia with the respective t(9;20)(p11;q11.2) and t(9;22)(q34;q11.2). Cancer Genet Cytogenet; 2008 Feb;181(1):55-9
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  • [Title] Isodicentric 20q- in two cases of B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia with the respective t(9;20)(p11;q11.2) and t(9;22)(q34;q11.2).
  • The cytogenetic anomaly der(20)del(20)(q11.2q13.3)idic(20)(p11), or idic(20q-) in short form, has been reported in 13 cases of myelodysplastic syndrome, one case of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and one case of acute myeloid leukemia since 2004.
  • Here we report the cases of two patients with B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) having a novel idic(20q-).
  • One was a 34-year-old man with B-cell ALL whose leukemic cells at presentation had a karyotype of 45,XY,dic(9;20)(p11;q11.2); at relapse, a small marker chromosome was found coexisting with the dic(9;20).
  • The other was a 39-year-old woman with Ph-positive B-cell-ALL whose leukemic cells contained both t(9;22)(q34;q11.2) and a small marker chromosome.
  • Both patients died with a short survival time, despite receiving intensive chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Chromosomes, Human, Pair 20. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9. Leukemia, B-Cell / genetics. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / genetics. Translocation, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 18262055.001).
  • [ISSN] 0165-4608
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer genetics and cytogenetics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Genet. Cytogenet.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Reismüller B, Attarbaschi A, Peters C, Dworzak MN, Pötschger U, Urban C, Fink FM, Meister B, Schmitt K, Dieckmann K, Henze G, Haas OA, Gadner H, Mann G, Austrian Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) Study Group: Long-term outcome of initially homogenously treated and relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Austria--a population-based report of the Austrian Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) Study Group. Br J Haematol; 2009 Feb;144(4):559-70
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term outcome of initially homogenously treated and relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Austria--a population-based report of the Austrian Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) Study Group.
  • Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common cause for a fatal outcome in paediatric oncology.
  • In order to analyse a population-based cohort with uniform treatment of initial disease, we examined the outcome of children suffering from relapsed ALL in Austria for the past 20 years and the validity of the currently used prognostic factors (e.g. time to and site of relapse, immunophenotype).
  • Furthermore, we compared survival rates after chemotherapy alone with those after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT).
  • Clinical prognostic markers that independently influenced survival were time to relapse, site of relapse and the immunophenotype.
  • Additionally, a Cox regression model demonstrated that allogeneic SCT after first relapse was associated with a superior EFS compared with chemo/radiotherapy only (hazard ratio = 0.254; P = 0.0017).
  • [MeSH-major] Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Austria / epidemiology. Child. Child, Preschool. Epidemiologic Methods. Female. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Infant. Male. Prognosis. Recurrence. Research Design. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19077160.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2141
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Investigator] Ausserer B; Busch U; Müller G; Kurz R; Urban Ch; Berger H; Fink FM; Meister B; Kaulfersch W; Messner H; Mutz I; Stöllinger O; Tulzer W; Schmidt K; Ebetsberger T; Grienberger H; Jones N; Jones R; Rücker J; Haas H; Ploier R; Gadner H; Grümayer-Panzer ER; Krepler P; Mann G; Pichler E; Jürgenssen O; Slavc I; Höcker P; Knapp W; Pickl WF; Haas OA; Lion T; Kärcher KH; Hawlicek R; Pötter R; Dieckmann K
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24. Elmantaser M, Stewart G, Young D, Duncan R, Gibson B, Ahmed SF: Skeletal morbidity in children receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Arch Dis Child; 2010 Oct;95(10):805-9
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  • [Title] Skeletal morbidity in children receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • BACKGROUND: Children receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) may be susceptible to skeletal morbidity.
  • The median (10th, 90th centiles) age at diagnosis of ALL in those children without skeletal morbidity was 3.9 (1.4-12) years which was lower than in those with skeletal morbidity at 8.2 (2.2-14.3) years (p<0.00001, 95% CI 1.7 to 4.4).
  • CONCLUSION: The occurrence of skeletal morbidity in ALL children may be influenced by age and the type of glucocorticoids.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Diseases / etiology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age Factors. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Child. Child, Preschool. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Dexamethasone / adverse effects. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Fractures, Bone / chemically induced. Fractures, Bone / etiology. Fractures, Bone / pathology. Glucocorticoids / administration & dosage. Glucocorticoids / adverse effects. Humans. Male. Osteonecrosis / chemically induced. Osteonecrosis / etiology. Osteonecrosis / pathology. Pain / etiology. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Prednisolone / adverse effects. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Retrospective Studies. Sex Distribution

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  • (PMID = 20576660.001).
  • [ISSN] 1468-2044
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of disease in childhood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Dis. Child.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glucocorticoids; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone
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25. Knapper S: FLT3 inhibition in acute myeloid leukaemia. Br J Haematol; 2007 Sep;138(6):687-99
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] FLT3 inhibition in acute myeloid leukaemia.
  • Activating mutations of FLT3 are present in approximately one-third of acute myeloid leukaemia patients and are associated with adverse clinical outcome, while many non-mutated cases also show evidence of FLT3 activation.
  • FLT3 thus represents a potentially exciting molecular therapeutic target.
  • A number of small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors with anti-FLT3 activity have been developed and several of these compounds have entered early phase clinical trials where clinical anti-leukaemic activity has been demonstrated.
  • Based on preclinical evidence of synergy with conventional chemotherapy, several combination trials are now underway.
  • FLT3 inhibition may also be effective used in combination with other molecularly targeted agents, in postchemotherapy stem-cell-directed maintenance therapy and in MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Myeloid / drug therapy. fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3 / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. Humans. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Remission Induction / methods

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  • (PMID = 17655729.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins; EC 2.7.10.1 / fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3
  • [Number-of-references] 89
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26. Clofarabine: new drug. Children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a last resort. Prescrire Int; 2007 Dec;16(92):238-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clofarabine: new drug. Children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a last resort.
  • (1) Standard treatments fail in about 20% of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • About half these children die within 10 weeks. (2) Clofarabine, a cytotoxic drug chemically related to fludarabine, is now marketed for use in this setting. (3) The decision to grant marketing authorization was based mainly on the results of a non comparative trial including 61 patients aged from 1 year to 20 years who had few if any other therapeutic options.
  • The median survival time was 13 weeks overall, but about 70 weeks in the subgroup of children who had a full haematological response (20% of the study population).
  • About half these latter patients were able to undergo potentially curative haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. (4) Preliminary results from another non comparative trial suggest similar efficacy. (5) Short-term adverse effects are frequent and often serious, and include gastrointestinal disorders, infections, tumour lysis syndrome, and cardiac, renal and hepatobiliary disorders.
  • In the meantime, this last-chance treatment can sometimes create the conditions for potentially curative therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenine Nucleotides / therapeutic use. Arabinonucleosides / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Humans. Infant. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18092403.001).
  • [ISSN] 1167-7422
  • [Journal-full-title] Prescrire international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prescrire Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adenine Nucleotides; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Arabinonucleosides
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27. Rajantie J, Siimes MA: Long-term prognosis of children with Down's syndrome and leukaemia: a 34-year nation-wide experience. J Intellect Disabil Res; 2003 Nov;47(Pt 8):617-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term prognosis of children with Down's syndrome and leukaemia: a 34-year nation-wide experience.
  • BACKGROUND: Although the characteristics of leukaemia in patients with Down's syndrome (DS) have been well documented, little is known about the long-term results of treatment.
  • METHOD: Retrospectively from 1968 to 1981 and prospectively from 1982 to 2002, the present authors collected data on every child with DS in Finland who had been diagnosed with leukaemia between 1968 and 1994.
  • RESULTS: Forty-one children with DS had acute leukaemia: 28 had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL); and 13 had acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia (ANLL).
  • The median age of the subjects at diagnosis was 3.8 years (range = 0-15.9 years).
  • Treatment -related toxicities were common: eight patients with ALL and two with ANLL died of septicaemia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Standard leukaemia chemotherapy is effective in patients with DS.
  • However, because toxicities are unacceptably frequent, specific anti-leukaemia regimens are needed for subjects with DS design.
  • [MeSH-major] Down Syndrome / mortality. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / mortality. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cause of Death. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Finland / epidemiology. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Male. Remission Induction / methods. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14641809.001).
  • [ISSN] 0964-2633
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of intellectual disability research : JIDR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Intellect Disabil Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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28. Sikorska-Fic B, Stańczak E, Matysiak M, Kamiński A: [Acute pancreatitis during chemotherapy of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia complicated with pseudocyst]. Med Wieku Rozwoj; 2008 Oct-Dec;12(4 Pt 2):1051-5
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  • [Title] [Acute pancreatitis during chemotherapy of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia complicated with pseudocyst].
  • The incidence of pancreatitis in patients with haematopoetic neoplasms who are treated with L-asparaginase is fom 2 to 24%.
  • Acute haemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis caused by L-asparaginase is rare but potentially life-threatening complication.
  • We present 2 cases of acute pancreatitis in children aged 2 and 4 years.
  • They were diagnosed to have acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and were treated according to the ALLLIC BFM 2002 protocol.
  • Acute pancreatitis developed in these children after induction therapy and was followed by formation of a pseudocyst.
  • In both cases the diagnosis of this complication was made directly after phase I of the protocol I (after eighth dose of L-Asparaginase).
  • In the first case the course of acute pancreatitis was mild.
  • Normalization of the amylase levels occurred after 7 days and the diagnosis of post inflammatory cyst was made 15 days after the first signs of the disease.
  • In the second case acute pancreatitis had a severe course and the child required treatment in the Intensive Care Unit for 21 days.
  • The surgical procedure, applied in both cases was internal drainage by anastomosis of the cyst with the back wall of the stomach.
  • Antileukaemic treatment was recommenced after 6-8 weeks when complications resolved.
  • Currently both children are well and remain in haematological remission and continue maintenance chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Pancreatic Pseudocyst / complications. Pancreatitis / etiology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Asparaginase / administration & dosage. Asparaginase / adverse effects. Asparaginase / therapeutic use. Child, Preschool. Daunorubicin / adverse effects. Daunorubicin / therapeutic use. Drainage. Female. Humans. Prednisone / adverse effects. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Vincristine / adverse effects. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 19531825.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Medycyna wieku rozwojowego
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Wieku Rozwoj
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; ZS7284E0ZP / Daunorubicin; PVDA protocol
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29. Starý J, Gajdos P, Blazek B, Ptoszková H, Mihál V, Pospísilová D, Hrstková H, Dembická D, Kopecná L, Slavík Z, Hak J, Procházková D, Zahálka F, Cerná Z, Jabali Y, Timr P, Vávra V, Mydlil J, Hrusák O, Trka J: [Improved results in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with the ALL-BFM 90 protocol in the Czech Republic]. Cas Lek Cesk; 2003;142(7):404-9
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  • [Title] [Improved results in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with the ALL-BFM 90 protocol in the Czech Republic].
  • BACKGROUND: Prognosis of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL)--the most common cancer in childhood, has improved remarkably over the last 40 years.
  • The authors report the treatment outcome in children with ALL cured according to ALL-BFM 90 Study protocol in the Czech Republic during the first half of nineties.
  • Patients were classified into standard-risk (SR), medium-risk (MR) and high-risk (HR) group according to initial leukaemic burden, early treatment response, and genotype of leukaemia.
  • Duration of the chemotherapy was two years.
  • Treatment results were evaluated in 352 children.
  • With a median follow-up of 7.3 years, event-free-survival (EFS) was 71.3% and overall survival 76.4%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The treatment outcome of children with ALL improved significantly (p = 0.0045) compared to the previous study ALL-BFM 83 (EFS 62%).
  • These results are comparable to those achieved by leading leukaemia study groups in the world.
  • [MeSH-major] 6-Mercaptopurine / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Asparaginase / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Cytarabine / therapeutic use. Daunorubicin / therapeutic use. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 14515443.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-7335
  • [Journal-full-title] Casopís lékar̆ů c̆eských
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cas. Lek. Cesk.
  • [Language] cze
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Czech Republic
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; E7WED276I5 / 6-Mercaptopurine; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; ZS7284E0ZP / Daunorubicin; AIEOP acute lymphoblastic leukemia protocol
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30. Estlin EJ, Lowis SP, Hall AG: Optimizing antimetabolite-based chemotherapy for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Br J Haematol; 2000 Jul;110(1):29-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Optimizing antimetabolite-based chemotherapy for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] 6-Mercaptopurine / administration & dosage. 6-Mercaptopurine / pharmacology. 6-Mercaptopurine / therapeutic use. Child. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Cytarabine / pharmacology. Cytarabine / therapeutic use. Drug Administration Schedule. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Etoposide / pharmacology. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Humans. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Methotrexate / pharmacology. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Teniposide / administration & dosage. Teniposide / pharmacology. Teniposide / therapeutic use. Thioguanine / administration & dosage. Thioguanine / pharmacology. Thioguanine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 10930977.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 957E6438QA / Teniposide; E7WED276I5 / 6-Mercaptopurine; FTK8U1GZNX / Thioguanine; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  • [Number-of-references] 99
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31. Meijer FA, Peeters HR, Starmans-Kool MJ, van der Tempel H, Houben HH: [Two patients with joint pain as initial presentation of a haematological malignancy]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd; 2005 Aug 6;149(32):1799-801
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  • The man, who had polyarticular gout secondary to chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia, was able to maintain control of his joint pain with medical treatment.
  • In the woman, with a history of stable joint pain due to polyarthritis, deterioration of the symptoms and the development of pancytopaenia led to a diagnosis of acute lymphocytic leukaemia; she died after receiving multiple courses of chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diagnosis, Differential. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 16121666.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-2162
  • [Journal-full-title] Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd
  • [Language] dut
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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32. Jansen NC, Kingma A, Tellegen P, van Dommelen RI, Bouma A, Veerman A, Kamps WA: Feasibility of neuropsychological assessment in leukaemia patients shortly after diagnosis: directions for future prospective research. Arch Dis Child; 2005 Mar;90(3):301-4
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  • [Title] Feasibility of neuropsychological assessment in leukaemia patients shortly after diagnosis: directions for future prospective research.
  • AIMS: To study neuropsychological functioning of newly diagnosed children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) within two weeks after diagnosis in order to determine the feasibility of a sibling controlled prospective study design.
  • Treatment would include intrathecal and systemic chemotherapy according to the DCLSG ALL-9 protocol.
  • Children were evaluated with an extensive neuropsychological battery including measures of intelligence, memory, attention, language, visual-constructive function, and fine-motor abilities within two weeks after start of the chemotherapy.
  • To examine specific neuropsychological functions, norm scores based on the exact age were acquired by fitting procedures, but no significant differences were found.
  • The prospective design of this study of cognitive late effects of chemotherapy will allow discrimination between adverse sequelae of disease and treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Mental Disorders / diagnosis. Nervous System Diseases / diagnosis. Neuropsychological Tests / standards. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / psychology

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  • (PMID = 15723923.001).
  • [ISSN] 1468-2044
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of disease in childhood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Dis. Child.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1720319
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33. Baghdassarian N, Bertrand Y, Gerland LM, Ffrench P, Duhaut P, Bryon PA, Magaud JP, Ffrench M: Bcl-2, cell cycle regulatory proteins and corticosensitivity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Leuk Lymphoma; 2001 Sep-Oct;42(5):1067-75
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  • [Title] Bcl-2, cell cycle regulatory proteins and corticosensitivity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • The results of treatment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remain incompletely satisfactory because of relapses observed even with high dose chemotherapy.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of bcl-2 or cell cycle regulatory protein expression in peripheral blood cells before and during the first 48 hours of corticotherapy, and corticosensitivity criteria for predicting relapse and prognosis.
  • Fifty two children presenting with ALL were studied at diagnosis and during the first 48 hours of treatment for the level of cell proliferation by measurement of DNA content, and for expression of several cell proliferation regulatory proteins by Western blot.
  • Two criteria for corticosensitivity were used: 1--the number of blast cells present after seven days of treatment with a threshold at 1 G/L (usual criterion), 2--the D8/D1 blast cell ratio, which is independent of the initial leucocytosis.
  • Relapse in the total patient population or in B-cell ALL could only be predicted by the level of leucocytosis before treatment or by p27kip1 expression during the first 48 hours of treatment.
  • Disease free survival was significantly longer when the D8/D1 blast cell ratio was under the 0.75 quartile in the entire patient population (p = 0.03).
  • Among the proteins analyzed, bcl-2 expression before treatment and p27kip1 expression analyzed after 48 hours of corticotherapy were the sole variables associated with significant differences in disease free survival duration in the entire patient population (p < 0.01 and p = 0.04 respectively) or in the B-cell ALL subgroup (p < 0.01).
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / pharmacology. Cell Cycle Proteins / metabolism. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Cell Cycle. Child. Child, Preschool. Cytogenetic Analysis. Female. Humans. Infant. Leukocytosis. Male. Multivariate Analysis. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Prednisolone / pharmacology. Prognosis. Recurrence. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 11697624.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone
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34. Leonardi S, La Spina M, La Rosa M, Schilirò G: Prolylhydroxylase and procollagen type III in long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): a biochemical approach to HCV-related liver disease. Med Pediatr Oncol; 2003 Jul;41(1):17-20
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  • [Title] Prolylhydroxylase and procollagen type III in long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): a biochemical approach to HCV-related liver disease.
  • BACKGROUND: We examined two proteins, prolylhydroxylase (hPH) and procollagen type III (PIIIP), as possible non-invasive HCV-related markers of liver disease.
  • The purpose of this study was to assess whether the measurement of these proteins could serve to monitor HCV related liver damage in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) patients.
  • PROCEDURE: A total of 34 ALL patients, 24 HCV-seropositive and 10 HCV-seronegative, who had had increased transaminase values (ALT) for almost 6 months were studied.
  • Serum hPH levels were significantly elevated in those with chronic hepatitis C with either normal or high transaminases when compared to those who never were HCV seropositive.
  • This might suggest that the liver damage is more marked in patients with chronic hepatitis and that the liver damage is related to the HCV rather than chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Collagen Type III / blood. Hepatitis C, Chronic / diagnosis. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Alanine Transaminase / blood. Biomarkers / blood. Case-Control Studies. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Liver Cirrhosis / complications. Liver Cirrhosis / diagnosis. Liver Cirrhosis / pathology. Male. Predictive Value of Tests. Radioimmunoassay. Sensitivity and Specificity. Survivors

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 12764737.001).
  • [ISSN] 0098-1532
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical and pediatric oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Pediatr. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Collagen Type III; EC 1.14.11.2 / Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase; EC 2.6.1.2 / Alanine Transaminase
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35. Corbacioglu S, Eber S, Gungor T, Hummerjohann J, Niggli F: Induction of long-term remission of a relapsed childhood B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia with rituximab chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and autologous stem cell transplantation. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2003 Apr;25(4):327-9
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  • [Title] Induction of long-term remission of a relapsed childhood B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia with rituximab chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and autologous stem cell transplantation.
  • Childhood B-cell neoplasms account for approximately 2% of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
  • The short but intensive chemotherapy yields a currently 75% to 85% event-free survival.
  • We report a 12-year old boy diagnosed with B-cell ALL with central nervous system (CNS) involvement.
  • He relapsed in the bone marrow immediately after primary chemotherapy.
  • Rituximab as a single agent achieved a complete morphologic remission.
  • After 4 treatments with rituximab an isolated CNS relapse occurred.
  • CNS remission was reinduced with chemotherapy and the patient received an autologous transplant with rituximab for in vivo purging.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Burkitt Lymphoma / therapy. Immunotherapy. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy. Salvage Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antigens, CD20 / immunology. Antigens, Neoplasm / immunology. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow Purging. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Humans. Leukemic Infiltration / drug therapy. Leukemic Infiltration / therapy. Male. Meninges / pathology. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Recurrence. Remission Induction. Rituximab. Testis / pathology. Topotecan / administration & dosage. Transplantation, Autologous. Vindesine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 12679650.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antigens, CD20; 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 7M7YKX2N15 / Topotecan; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; RSA8KO39WH / Vindesine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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36. Márky I, Björk O, Forestier E, Jónsson OG, Perkkiö M, Schmiegelow K, Storm-Mathiesen I, Gustafsson G, Nordic Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology: Intensive chemotherapy without radiotherapy gives more than 85% event-free survival for non-Hodgkin lymphoma without central nervous involvement: a 6-year population-based study from the nordic society of pediatric hematology and oncology. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2004 Sep;26(9):555-60
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  • [Title] Intensive chemotherapy without radiotherapy gives more than 85% event-free survival for non-Hodgkin lymphoma without central nervous involvement: a 6-year population-based study from the nordic society of pediatric hematology and oncology.
  • The authors report the results from a 6-year population-based study of clinical characteristics and treatment results of NHL from the five Nordic countries.
  • METHODS: All children younger than 15 years of age at diagnosis with NHL diagnosed from 1995 to 2000 were stratified and treated according to immunophenotypic classification and stage of disease.
  • RESULTS: A total of 230 patients were diagnosed with primary NHL, which gives an annual incidence of 0.9/100.000 children, with a median age of 8 years.
  • Seven percent of the children were below 3 years of age at diagnosis.
  • Patients with pre-B and T-cell NHL constituted 33%, B-cell NHL 53%, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) 14%.
  • According to Murphy's classification, 14% had stage 1, 17% stage 2, 50% stage 3, and 19% stage 4 disease, 12 of whom (28%) had central nervous involvement (CNS) at diagnosis.
  • By January 1, 2003, four children had died during induction, three children died in remission (2, 6, and 26 months from diagnosis), and 24 children experienced a relapse.
  • The 5-year p-EFS values were 91% for B-cell, 87% for pre-B, 81% for ALCL, and 79% for T-cell NHL.
  • The 12 patients with CNS involvement at diagnosis had a significantly poorer outcome than stage 4 patients with CNS involvement (p-EFS = 50% vs. 90%, P < 0.01).
  • The 218 patients without CNS disease at diagnosis had a 5-year p-EFS of 88%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: With modern intensive chemotherapy, more than 85% of NHL patients will achieve long-lasting first remission.
  • In the future, preventing death during induction and remission and improving therapy for patients with CNS disease would have a major impact on the overall p-EFS.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Finland / epidemiology. Humans. Iceland / epidemiology. Immunophenotyping. Incidence. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Remission Induction. Scandinavian and Nordic Countries / epidemiology. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15342981.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Nelarabine: new drug. T-lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma: more evaluation needed. Prescrire Int; 2009 Feb;18(99):3-5
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  • [Title] Nelarabine: new drug. T-lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma: more evaluation needed.
  • 1) Acute T-lymphoblastic leukaemia and T-lymphoblastic lymphoma are closely related malignant haemopathies.
  • There is no consensus treatment in case of relapses.
  • However, only haematopoietic stem cell transplantation following chemotherapy offers a chance of long-term survival;.
  • It is marketed for the treatment of children and adults with one or the other of these two malignant haemopathies, after failure of at least two lines of chemotherapy;.
  • But this type of non-comparative trial cannot demonstrate whether a specific drug increases survival time compared with existing alternatives;.
  • Some adverse effects were serious, and they did not all resolve after treatment cessation.
  • 5) In practice, there are too many outstanding questions to determine whether nelarabine represents a therapeutic advance compared with clofarabine, or even whether it should be used outside the clinical trial setting.
  • [MeSH-major] Arabinonucleosides / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Child. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Approval. Europe. Humans. Orphan Drug Production. Recurrence

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  • (PMID = 19382393.001).
  • [ISSN] 1167-7422
  • [Journal-full-title] Prescrire international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prescrire Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Arabinonucleosides
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38. Wilkins MR, Ali O, Bradlow W, Wharton J, Taegtmeyer A, Rhodes CJ, Ghofrani HA, Howard L, Nihoyannopoulos P, Mohiaddin RH, Gibbs JS, Simvastatin Pulmonary Hypertension Trial (SiPHT) Study Group: Simvastatin as a treatment for pulmonary hypertension trial. Am J Respir Crit Care Med; 2010 May 15;181(10):1106-13
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  • [Title] Simvastatin as a treatment for pulmonary hypertension trial.
  • OBJECTIVES: To assess the therapeutic value of simvastatin in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).
  • The treatment effect was -9.1 g (P = 0.028).
  • N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels decreased significantly in the statin group (-75 +/- 167 fmol/ml; P = 0.02) but not the placebo group (49 +/- 224 fmol/ml; P = 0.43; overall treatment effect -124 fmol/ml; P = 0.041).
  • From 6 to 12 months, both RV mass and NT-proBNP increased toward baseline values in 16 patients on active treatment who continued with simvastatin but remained stable in 18 patients who switched from placebo to simvastatin.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Simvastatin added to conventional therapy produces a small and transient early reduction in RV mass and NT-proBNP levels in patients with PAH, but this is not sustained over 12 months.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypertension, Pulmonary / drug therapy. Simvastatin / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Double-Blind Method. Female. Humans. Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular / blood. Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular / diagnostic imaging. Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular / drug therapy. Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Natriuretic Peptide, Brain / blood. Peptide Fragments / blood. Ultrasonography. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20460548.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-4970
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00180713
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0400511; United Kingdom / British Heart Foundation / / ; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / pro-brain natriuretic peptide (1-76); 114471-18-0 / Natriuretic Peptide, Brain; AGG2FN16EV / Simvastatin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2874452
  • [Investigator] Barker D; Cabrita I; Coghlan G; Davidson A; Grappa J; Hobbs A; Meehan S; Wage R; Williams F; Wort SJ; Gall H; Gruenig E; Mach H; Riethmueller-Winzen H
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39. Popat U, Carrum G, Heslop HE: Haemopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Cancer Treat Rev; 2003 Feb;29(1):3-10
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  • [Title] Haemopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • The majority of children and some adults with acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) can be cured with current intensive chemotherapy regimens.
  • For those patients who relapse or who do not achieve remission, allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers the best chance for long-term disease control.
  • Relapse remains the major cause of transplant failure and immunotherapy strategies post-transplant to augment the graft versus leukaemia effect are being explored.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Child. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Graft vs Leukemia Effect. Humans. Immunotherapy. Middle Aged. Recurrence. Risk Factors. Tissue Donors. Transplantation, Homologous

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  • (PMID = 12633575.001).
  • [ISSN] 0305-7372
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer treatment reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Treat. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA78792
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 60
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40. Crawford JH, Eikelboom JW, McQuillan A: Recurrent palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia following high-dose cytarabine treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Eur J Haematol; 2002 Nov-Dec;69(5-6):315-7
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  • [Title] Recurrent palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia following high-dose cytarabine treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia (PPE) is an uncommon cutaneous complication of cytotoxic chemotherapy which generally presents as a painful erythema involving the palms and soles.
  • We report a patient with recurrent, increasingly severe episodes of PPE, ultimately complicated by a severe bullous eruption, following successive cycles of high-dose cytarabine for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • Contrary to previous recommendations, our experience cautions against the further use of high-dose cytarabine in patients who develop PPE, and is a timely reminder of the potential toxicity of this agent, which is now increasingly being used as first-line treatment in the management of haematologic malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Cytarabine / adverse effects. Paresthesia / chemically induced. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Skin Diseases / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Drug Eruptions / etiology. Erythema / chemically induced. Foot Dermatoses / chemically induced. Hand Dermatoses / chemically induced. Humans. Male. Recurrence

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  • (PMID = 12460237.001).
  • [ISSN] 0902-4441
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine
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41. Carroll WL, Bhojwani D, Min DJ, Raetz E, Relling M, Davies S, Downing JR, Willman CL, Reed JC: Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program; 2003;:102-31
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  • [Title] Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • The outcome for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved dramatically with current therapy resulting in an event free survival exceeding 75% for most patients.
  • However significant challenges remain including developing better methods to predict which patients can be cured with less toxic treatment and which ones will benefit from augmented therapy.
  • In addition, 25% of patients fail therapy and novel treatments that are focused on undermining specifically the leukemic process are needed urgently.
  • Polymorphisms of drug metabolizing genes have been shown to influence toxicity and the best example is the gene thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) a key enzyme in the metabolism of 6-mercaptopurine.
  • The role of polymorphisms in other genes whose products play an important role in drug metabolism as well as cytokine genes are discussed.
  • Willman describes her laboratory's examination of infant leukemia and precursor B-ALL where unsupervised approaches have led to the identification of inherent biologic groups not predicted by conventional morphologic, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic variables. Dr.
  • Seven distinct leukemia subtypes were identified representing known leukemia subtypes including: BCR-ABL, E2A-PBX1, TEL-AML1, rearrangements in the MLL gene, hyperdiploid karyotype (i.e., > 50 chromosomes), and T-ALL as well as a new leukemia subtype.
  • A subset of genes have been identified whose expression appears to be predictive of outcome but independent verification is needed before this type of analysis can be integrated into treatment assignment.
  • Chemotherapeutic agents kill cancer cells by activating apoptosis, or programmed cell death.
  • John Reed describes major apoptotic pathways and the specific role of key proteins in this response.
  • New therapeutic approaches that modulate the apoptotic pathway are now available and Dr.
  • Reed highlights those that may be applicable to the treatment of childhood ALL.

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  • (PMID = 14633779.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-4391
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology. American Society of Hematology. Education Program
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA88361
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 219
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42. Hato A, Murayama T, Nishikawa S, Kajimoto K, Gomyo H, Sugimoto T, Mizuno I, Koizumi T: Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing normal karyotype in G-banding chromosomal examination before chemotherapy. Hematology; 2005 Oct;10(5):379-81
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  • [Title] Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing normal karyotype in G-banding chromosomal examination before chemotherapy.
  • A diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was made on the basis of a 61.6% infiltration of leukemic cells in his bone marrow.
  • He received combination chemotherapy, and achieved hematological complete remission.
  • However, chromosomal analysis of bone marrow cells after 2 courses of consolidation therapy showed the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome in two cells out of 20 analysed.
  • We retrospectively examined the sample of bone marrow cells before chemotherapy; It showed minor BCR/ABL positivity with FISH and RT-PCR methods.
  • The Ph chromosome disappeared after consolidation chemotherapy and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, but the Ph chromosome reappeared at relapse.
  • At the initial diagnosis, Ph chromosome was not detected because the G-banding method analyzed only metaphase cells, which contained few Ph-positive clones.
  • In order to offer effective therapy with molecular targeting agents, in this poor prognostic disease, it is necessary to detect Ph chromosome before the first chemotherapy and BCR/ABL detection with FISH or RT-PCR methods appears more useful than G-banding chromosome analysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow / pathology. Leukemic Infiltration / pathology. Philadelphia Chromosome. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16273725.001).
  • [ISSN] 1024-5332
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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43. Furuya ME, González-Martínez F, Vargas MH, Miranda-Novales MG, Bernáldez-Ríos R, Zúñiga-Vázquez G: Guidelines for diagnosing and treating pulmonary infiltrates in children with acute leukaemia: impact of timely decisions. Acta Paediatr; 2008 Jul;97(7):928-34
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  • [Title] Guidelines for diagnosing and treating pulmonary infiltrates in children with acute leukaemia: impact of timely decisions.
  • AIM: Children with leukaemia are at increased risk of pulmonary complications, often with unspecific clinical data, delayed diagnosis and a high mortality rate.
  • We evaluated the usefulness of diagnostic-therapeutic guidelines (DTG) in which specific times for decision making were incorporated.
  • METHODS: Clinical charts of children with acute leukaemia and suspicion of pulmonary involvement were reviewed.
  • Patients were allocated to group I if their diagnostic and therapeutic decisions were in accordance with the DTG, and to group II if not.
  • RESULTS: Children from group I (n=32) and group II (n=28) did not differ with respect to age (9.3+/-0.5 years old, mean+/-SEM), gender, type, risk and stage of leukaemia, anaemia and neutropenia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Diagnostic-therapeutic guidelines that incorporate timely decisions constitute a useful algorithm to reduce the length of hospital stay and mortality in children with acute leukaemia and pulmonary infiltrates.
  • [MeSH-major] Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / complications. Lung Diseases / diagnosis. Lung Diseases / therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications

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  • (PMID = 18430068.001).
  • [ISSN] 0803-5253
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Paediatr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Norway
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44. Godt C, Regnery A, Schwarze B, Junker K, Porschen R: A rare cause of ulcerative colitis - diarrhoea and perianal bleeding due to posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Z Gastroenterol; 2009 Mar;47(3):283-7
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  • [Title] A rare cause of ulcerative colitis - diarrhoea and perianal bleeding due to posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD).
  • Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is characterised by frequent extranodal manifestation, in 20 - 25 % including the gastrointestinal tract.
  • We report the case of a 43-year-old male presenting with a short history of rectal bleeding, diarrhoea and weight loss.
  • He had received a bone marrow transplant two years previously for an acute lymphocytic leukaemia of B-cell origin.
  • Histologically, a monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder was diagnosed, the subtype was a high grade diffuse-large cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of B-cell origin.
  • This is a common feature of PTLD and possibly plays a critical role in its pathogenesis.
  • The current therapeutic approach to the subtype of PTLD we saw in this patient is CHOP chemotherapy, comprising the anti-CD 20 antibody rituximab if CD 20-positivity is present.
  • This patient had a fatal course of the disease and died a few days after the first chemotherapy cycle due to severe multiple organ failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Colitis, Ulcerative / etiology. Colorectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Diarrhea / etiology. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage / etiology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy


45. Miller WL, Hartman KA, Burritt MF, Borgeson DD, Burnett JC Jr, Jaffe AS: Biomarker responses during and after treatment with nesiritide infusion in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure. Clin Chem; 2005 Mar;51(3):569-77
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  • [Title] Biomarker responses during and after treatment with nesiritide infusion in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure.
  • BACKGROUND: Objective methods to assess the adequacy of medication therapy for patients with advanced heart failure are lacking.
  • Therapy guided by N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) might be helpful because NT-proBNP should be lowered by therapies that decrease endogenous BNP secretion.
  • Patients with decreases >20% in both NT-pro BNP and BNP at 6 h post infusion were designated "biochemical responders".
  • RESULTS: Forty patients [27 males; mean (SE) age, 68 (2) years; mean (SE) left ventricular ejection fraction, 25 (1.4)%] were studied.
  • Overall, the changes in NT-proBNP were a 18 (4.6)% [mean (SE)] and 19.8% (median) decrease from baseline at 24 h of infusion and a 22 (6.0)% and 17.8% decrease at 6 h post infusion (P <0.001 compared with baseline).
  • Subgroup analysis showed that 22 of 40 patients were infusion responders with a >20% decrease from baseline in NT-proBNP during nesiritide infusion, whereas only 12 patients were biochemical responders with >20% decreases from baseline postinfusion for both NT-proBNP and BNP.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this study, many patients had decreased NT-proBNP and BNP values after therapy with nesiritide, but the majority of patients did not demonstrate biochemically significant decreases in analytes despite a clinical response.
  • Until we know more about the responses of natriuretic peptides to therapies such as nesiritide, a strategy of monitoring NT-proBNP and BNP to guide therapy cannot be universally advocated.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / drug therapy. Natriuretic Peptide, Brain / blood. Natriuretic Peptide, Brain / therapeutic use. Nerve Tissue Proteins / blood. Peptide Fragments / blood. Protein Precursors / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biomarkers / blood. Chronic Disease. Cohort Studies. Drug Monitoring / methods. Female. Humans. Immunoassay. Infusions, Intravenous. Luminescent Measurements. Male. Recombinant Proteins / administration & dosage. Recombinant Proteins / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome

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  • [ErratumIn] Clin Chem. 2005 Apr;51(4):798
  • (PMID = 15615816.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-9147
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / Protein Precursors; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / pro-brain natriuretic peptide (1-76); 114471-18-0 / Natriuretic Peptide, Brain
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46. Bartolomé Alvarez J, Romero Macías JR, Lorente Ortuño S, Marín Ors A, Heredero Gálvez E: [Acute lymphocytic leukaemia following breast cancer and Q fever]. An Med Interna; 2004 Aug;21(8):414
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  • [Title] [Acute lymphocytic leukaemia following breast cancer and Q fever].
  • [Transliterated title] Leucemia linfoide aguda tras cáncer de mama y fiebre Q.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Bacterial / blood. Coxiella burnetii / isolation & purification. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Q Fever / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / complications. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 15373734.001).
  • [ISSN] 0212-7199
  • [Journal-full-title] Anales de medicina interna (Madrid, Spain : 1984)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] An Med Interna
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Antibodies, Bacterial; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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47. Baillargeon J, Langevin AM, Lewis M, Estrada J, Mullins J, Pitney A, Ma JZ, Chisholm GB, Pollock BH: Obesity and survival in a cohort of predominantly Hispanic children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2006 Sep;28(9):575-8
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  • [Title] Obesity and survival in a cohort of predominantly Hispanic children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common malignancy in children, constitutes 25% of all pediatric cancer.
  • Childhood cancer patients who are obese at diagnosis represent a particular challenge for the oncologist.
  • Obesity may complicate chemotherapy dose determination, and has been associated with decreased overall and event-free survival in a number of adult cancer patients, and more recently in pediatric patients.
  • The purpose of the present study was to examine whether obesity at diagnosis was associated with decreased overall and event-free survival in a cohort of 322 predominantly Hispanic pediatric patients with B-precursor ALL.
  • Obesity at diagnosis was not associated with decreased overall survival (HR = 1.40, 95% confidence interval = 0.69-2.87) or event-free survival (HR = 1.08, 95% confidence interval = 0.65-1.82) in the overall cohort or in either of the 2 age-at-diagnosis (2 to 9 y; 10 to 18 y) subgroups.
  • Our finding of no obesity-related prognostic effect in the overall cohort and in the under 2 to 9-year age-at-diagnosis cohort was consistent with the previous large-scale study of ALL patients; the absence of a prognostic effect in the 10 to 18-year age-at-diagnosis cohort, however, conflicted with previous findings.
  • [MeSH-major] Obesity / complications. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / mortality


48. Storring JM, Minden MD, Kao S, Gupta V, Schuh AC, Schimmer AD, Yee KW, Kamel-Reid S, Chang H, Lipton JH, Messner HA, Xu W, Brandwein JM: Treatment of adults with BCR-ABL negative acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with a modified paediatric regimen. Br J Haematol; 2009 Jun;146(1):76-85
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  • [Title] Treatment of adults with BCR-ABL negative acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with a modified paediatric regimen.
  • Between 2000 and 2006, 85 adult BCR-ABL negative acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) patients between 18 and 60 years of age were treated using a modified paediatric regimen, which included high doses of asparaginase delivered weekly for 30 weeks during intensification.
  • The complete response rate with induction therapy was 89%, and decreased with increasing age, mainly due to higher induction mortality.
  • All post-induction treatments were delivered on an outpatient basis.
  • The most common complications during intensification were infections (47%), osteonecrosis (32%), venous thromboembolism (23%) and neuropathy (22%).
  • Significant adverse predictors for OS were age >35 years, high white blood cell count, MLL rearrangement, allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission and <80% of the planned asparaginase dose delivered during intensification.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Asparaginase / administration & dosage. Asparaginase / therapeutic use. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Remission Induction / methods. Stem Cell Transplantation. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19438471.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2141
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.10.2 / Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase
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49. Beger C, Gerdes K, Lauten M, Tissing WJ, Fernandez-Munoz I, Schrappe M, Welte K: Expression and structural analysis of glucocorticoid receptor isoform gamma in human leukaemia cells using an isoform-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction approach. Br J Haematol; 2003 Jul;122(2):245-52
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  • [Title] Expression and structural analysis of glucocorticoid receptor isoform gamma in human leukaemia cells using an isoform-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction approach.
  • Glucocorticoids are broadly used for chemotherapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).
  • To evaluate hGR-gamma mRNA expression levels, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach, allowing the selective amplification of hGR-gamma, was developed and optimized.
  • We were able to demonstrate target selectivity of hGR-gamma amplification using sequence-specific primers.
  • Using analysis of hGR-gamma-specific amplification in comparison with the expression of hGR-total (all isoforms) in leukaemic blasts from patients with either a good response to prednisone (PGR) or poor-prednisone response (PPR) in vivo, relative hGR-gamma expression was observed to be lower in cells from patients with PGR compared with PPR, in particular after 10 h of dexamethasone stimulation.
  • These data were correlated with cell survival, demonstrating a more pronounced induction of apoptosis in cells from patients with PGR as compared with PPR.
  • [MeSH-major] Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / genetics. Protein Isoforms / genetics. Receptors, Glucocorticoid / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis. Base Sequence. Case-Control Studies. Child. DNA Primers. Dexamethasone. Glucocorticoids / therapeutic use. Humans. Molecular Sequence Data. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Remission Induction. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 12846893.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 0 / Protein Isoforms; 0 / Receptors, Glucocorticoid; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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50. Jia YP, Liu GL, Zhang LP: [Real-time quantitative study of minimal residual disease in childhood B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia]. Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi; 2004 Aug;42(8):600-4
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  • [Title] [Real-time quantitative study of minimal residual disease in childhood B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia].
  • OBJECTIVE: The study was aimed to investigate the feasibility and clinical significance of quantitative detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR).
  • METHODS: Clonal IgH gene rearrangements of samples at diagnosis were identified by standard PCR assay with consensus primers.
  • Upstream primers were designed with the Primer Express software and allele specific oligonucleotide developed complementary to the V-D or D-J junction.
  • Samples at diagnosis were serially diluted to generate the patient specific standard curves.
  • RQ-PCR method was used to quantify the MRD of the follow up samples collected at five time points during chemotherapy.
  • Non-specific amplification was seen in 6 patients.
  • There was no apparent relationship between MRD degree at the end of induction chemotherapy and other high risk factors of ALL (P > 0.05).
  • CONCLUSION: The study showed that the above approach with RQ-PCR was applicable to clinical detection of MRD in childhood ALL.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Rearrangement, B-Lymphocyte. Neoplasm, Residual / diagnosis. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis


51. Jansen NC, Kingma A, Schuitema A, Bouma A, Huisman J, Veerman AJ, Kamps WA: Post-treatment intellectual functioning in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with chemotherapy-only: a prospective, sibling-controlled study. Eur J Cancer; 2006 Nov;42(16):2765-72
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  • [Title] Post-treatment intellectual functioning in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with chemotherapy-only: a prospective, sibling-controlled study.
  • Intellectual functioning (verbal, performance and full-scale IQ) in 43 children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with chemotherapy-only was evaluated in a nationwide, prospective, sibling-controlled study.
  • Intellectual assessment was performed at diagnosis and repeated shortly after cessation of 2 years treatment, including intrathecal and systemic chemotherapy.
  • Using hierarchical regression analysis, patients' and siblings' (n=27) scores were longitudinally analysed and compared to assess possible changes and differences over time.
  • At both assessments, before and after treatment, the patients showed average scores on intelligence tests compared to population norms.
  • Despite intensive and potentially neurotoxic treatment, no evident negative effects on intelligence were found.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Intelligence. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 16935489.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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52. Greve J, Bas M, Schipper J, Hoffmann TK: [Primary cutane manifestation of a precursor-B-lymphoblastic lymphoma in the external ear]. Laryngorhinootologie; 2008 Oct;87(10):728-30
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  • [Title] [Primary cutane manifestation of a precursor-B-lymphoblastic lymphoma in the external ear].
  • [Transliterated title] Primäre kutane Manifestation eines Vorläufer-B-lymphoblastischen Lymphoms im Bereich des äusseren Ohres.
  • We report on an extranodal B-cell-lymphoma of the ear in a young woman.
  • She reported on a piercing of the pinna months before with a subsequent infection.
  • Histologic examination resulted in the final diagnosis.
  • In spite of the considerable extent of the lymphoma there was no systemic manifestation and a total remission was induced by chemotherapy before adjuvant radiation.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / diagnosis. Ear, External. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Body Piercing / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Wound Infection / complications. Wound Infection / etiology. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 18633860.001).
  • [ISSN] 0935-8943
  • [Journal-full-title] Laryngo- rhino- otologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngorhinootologie
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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53. Erba E, Serafini M, Gaipa G, Tognon G, Marchini S, Celli N, Rotilio D, Broggini M, Jimeno J, Faircloth GT, Biondi A, D'Incalci M: Effect of Aplidin in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Br J Cancer; 2003 Aug 18;89(4):763-73
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  • [Title] Effect of Aplidin in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells.
  • The cytotoxic effect of Aplidin was investigated on fresh leukaemia cells derived from children with B-cell-precursor (BCP) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) by using stromal-layer culture system and on four cell lines, ALL-PO, Reh, ALL/MIK and TOM-1, derived from patients with ALL with different molecular genetic abnormalities.
  • In ALL cell lines Aplidin was cytotoxic at nanomolar concentrations.
  • In the ALL cell lines the drug-induced cell death was clearly related to the induction of apoptosis and appeared to be p53-independent.
  • Only in ALL-PO 20 nM Aplidin treatment caused a block of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion and downregulation of VEGF-mRNA, but Aplidin cytotoxicity does not seem to be related to VEGF inhibition since the sensitivity of ALL-PO cells to Aplidin is comparable to that observed for the other cells used.
  • Aplidin induced a G(1) and a G(2) M block in ALL cell lines.
  • In patient-derived leukaemia cells, Aplidin induced a strong cytotoxicity evidenced in a stroma-supported immunocytometric assay.
  • Cells from children with genetic abnormalities such as t(9;22) and t(4;11) translocations, associated with an inferior treatment outcome, were sensitive to Aplidin to the same extent as that observed in other BCP-ALL cases.
  • Aplidin exerted a strong cell killing effect (>88%) against primary culture cells from five relapsed ALL cases, at concentrations much lower than those reported to be achieved in plasma of patients receiving Aplidin at recommended doses.
  • Taken together these data suggest that Aplidin could be a new anticancer drug to be investigated in ALL patients resistant to available therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Depsipeptides. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Peptides, Cyclic / pharmacology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Apoptosis / drug effects. B-Lymphocytes / drug effects. Caspase 3. Caspases / metabolism. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Child. Child, Preschool. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Endothelial Growth Factors / genetics. Endothelial Growth Factors / metabolism. Female. Humans. Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / genetics. Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / metabolism. Karyotyping. Lymphokines / genetics. Lymphokines / metabolism. Male. Mass Spectrometry. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. RNA, Neoplasm / metabolism. Stromal Cells / drug effects. Stromal Cells / pathology. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors

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  • (PMID = 12915891.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Depsipeptides; 0 / Endothelial Growth Factors; 0 / Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Lymphokines; 0 / Peptides, Cyclic; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors; EC 3.4.22.- / CASP3 protein, human; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases; Y76ID234HW / aplidine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2376915
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54. Daenen S, van Imhoff GW, de Wolf JT, Vellenga E, van den Berg-de Ruiter E, Kluin-Nelemans HC: A 'pre-induction course' with non-cross-reacting cytostatic drugs for rapid tumour load reduction improves outcome in adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Br J Haematol; 2007 Jul;138(2):275-7
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  • [Title] A 'pre-induction course' with non-cross-reacting cytostatic drugs for rapid tumour load reduction improves outcome in adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cytarabine / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy, Combination. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Male. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Burden / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 17593034.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Letter
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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55. Thomas DA, Cortes J, Kantarjian HM: New agents in the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukaemia. Best Pract Res Clin Haematol; 2002 Dec;15(4):771-90
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  • [Title] New agents in the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukaemia.
  • The overall prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) has improved significantly over the past few decades.
  • Combined modality strategies (e.g. chemotherapy used with targeted therapies such as monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors) may improve long-term disease-free survival.
  • This chapter reviews new agents with the potential to be incorporated into therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Arsenicals / pharmacology. Arsenicals / therapeutic use. Asparaginase / pharmacology. Asparaginase / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Folic Acid Antagonists / pharmacology. Folic Acid Antagonists / therapeutic use. Humans. Liposomes / pharmacology. Liposomes / therapeutic use. Oligonucleotides, Antisense / pharmacology. Oligonucleotides, Antisense / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 12617876.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-6926
  • [Journal-full-title] Best practice & research. Clinical haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Best Pract Res Clin Haematol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Arsenicals; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Folic Acid Antagonists; 0 / Liposomes; 0 / Oligonucleotides, Antisense; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase
  • [Number-of-references] 113
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56. Johns MC, Stephenson C: Amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide testing in neonatal and pediatric patients. Am J Cardiol; 2008 Feb 4;101(3A):76-81
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  • [Title] Amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide testing in neonatal and pediatric patients.
  • Concentrations of amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptides (NT-proBNP) are often markedly elevated immediately after birth and typically decrease to normal concentrations after the first week of life.
  • Despite these early life elevations (which likely reflect activity of the natriuretic peptide system to assist in mobilization of fluid in the neonatal period), NT-proBNP has been shown to be useful for the diagnosis or exclusion of heart failure (HF) in the neonate, infant, adolescent, and older child.
  • Furthermore, NT-proBNP may be useful for the identification of patients treated with cardiotoxic chemotherapy at risk for the subsequent development of cardiomyopathy.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / blood. Heart Failure / diagnosis. Natriuretic Peptide, Brain / blood. Peptide Fragments / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Biomarkers / blood. Child. Child, Preschool. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Prognosis. Protein Precursors

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  • (PMID = 18243864.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9149
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / Protein Precursors; 0 / pro-brain natriuretic peptide (1-76); 114471-18-0 / Natriuretic Peptide, Brain
  • [Number-of-references] 37
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57. Gudowius S, Recker K, Laws HJ, Dirksen U, Tröger A, Wieczorek U, Furlan S, Göbel U, Hanenberg H: Identification of candidate target antigens for antibody-based immunotherapy in childhood B-cell precursor ALL. Klin Padiatr; 2006 Nov-Dec;218(6):327-33
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  • [Title] Identification of candidate target antigens for antibody-based immunotherapy in childhood B-cell precursor ALL.
  • BACKGROUND: Contemporary risk adapted treatment protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) rely on accurate risk assessment strategies for disease re-occurrence by incorporating clinical parameters as well as immunological, molecular and cytogenetic features of the blasts at initial manifestation.
  • Additional risk stratification is provided by analysis of the IN VITRO and IN VIVO response of the blasts towards standard chemotherapy.
  • Despite adapted therapies, a number of children with good and bad prognostic factors still fail therapy.
  • One approach to this problem might be to incorporate monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) as additional modalities into the first or second line treatment.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: In order to identify target antigen structures, we analyzed the immunological expression profiles of blasts from 181 patients with B-cell precursor ALL treated at our institution in 11 years according to the CoALL-92/97/03 protocols.
  • Blasts were classified according to the EGIL guidelines as 9 proB-, 110 common (c-) and 62 preB-ALL.
  • CD10 was expressed on all c-/preB-ALL and absent on proB-ALL cells.
  • CD20 was expressed on 11-37 % of B-cell precursor ALL samples.
  • CD34 positive blasts were found in 89, 83 and 68 % of patients with proB-, c- and preB-ALL, respectively.
  • < 20 % CD45(+) blasts were found in 11, 19 and 18 % of patients with proB-, c- and preB-ALL.
  • CD33(+) was expressed on 33, 29 and 21 % of patients samples with proB-, c- and preB-ALL.
  • Analyses of the immunological profile of blasts in 9 consecutive children with relapse revealed that the antigen expression profile varied little compared to the initial diagnosis for CD10, CD19, CD22 and HLA-DR.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These analyses clearly identified the three antigens CD19, CD22 and HLA-DR present on blasts in more than 90 % of patients as potential target structures for targeted therapies with native or toxin-bound monoclonal antibodies in childhood ALL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antigens, CD19 / analysis. Burkitt Lymphoma / immunology. HLA-DR Antigens / analysis. Immunotherapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy. Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 2 / analysis

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  • (PMID = 17080335.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8630
  • [Journal-full-title] Klinische Pädiatrie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Klin Padiatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD19; 0 / HLA-DR Antigens; 0 / Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 2
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58. Bonifaz A, Macias B, Paredes-Farrera F, Arias P, Ponce RM, Araiza J: Palatal zygomycosis: experience of 21 cases. Oral Dis; 2008 Sep;14(6):569-74
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  • OBJECTIVE: To present a clinical report of palatal zygomycosis, its epidemiological, mycological features, and our treatment experience.
  • This study reports the treatment experience with amphotericin B alone and in combination with itraconazole and fluconazole.
  • The associated pre-disposing factors were: ketoacidotic diabetes (five type-1 and 15 type-2), and acute leukaemia in one patient.
  • CONCLUSION: Zygomycosis with palatal involvement occurs in around 18% of cases, usually associated with RC modalities; it has an acute and generally lethal course.
  • [MeSH-major] Mouth Diseases / microbiology. Palate / microbiology. Zygomycosis / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Absidia / isolation & purification. Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Amphotericin B / administration & dosage. Amphotericin B / therapeutic use. Antifungal Agents / administration & dosage. Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Brain Diseases / microbiology. Child. Diabetic Ketoacidosis / complications. Drug Combinations. Female. Fluconazole / administration & dosage. Fluconazole / therapeutic use. Humans. Itraconazole / administration & dosage. Itraconazole / therapeutic use. Male. Mucormycosis / diagnosis. Mucormycosis / drug therapy. Nose Diseases / microbiology. Opportunistic Infections / diagnosis. Oral Ulcer / microbiology. Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Retrospective Studies. Rhizopus / isolation & purification. Treatment Outcome


59. Domenech C, Mercier M, Plouvier E, Puraveau M, Bordigoni P, Michel G, Benoit Y, Leverger G, Baruchel A, Bertrand Y: First isolated extramedullary relapse in children with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: results of the Cooprall-97 study. Eur J Cancer; 2008 Nov;44(16):2461-9
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  • [Title] First isolated extramedullary relapse in children with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: results of the Cooprall-97 study.
  • We report on the efficiency of treatment of first isolated extramedullary relapse of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • Stratification criteria were time to relapse: first complete remission duration of less than 24 months for group G3A (n=35), relapse beyond 24 months for group G3B (n=33).
  • Treatment consisted of risk-adapted alternating short course multiagent systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and irradiation (18Gy).
  • Our analyses highlighted two independent risks factors predictive of decreased EFS: early relapse and age at the initial diagnosis above 6 years.
  • Early central nervous system relapses have a bad prognosis, and new therapeutic strategies are needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age of Onset. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / prevention & control. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Ovarian Neoplasms / prevention & control. Testicular Neoplasms / prevention & control. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 18804997.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0852
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
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60. Rana ZA, Rabbani MW, Sheikh MA, Khan AA: Outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia after induction therapy--3 years experience at a single paediatric oncology centre. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad; 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):150-3
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  • [Title] Outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia after induction therapy--3 years experience at a single paediatric oncology centre.
  • BACKGROUND: Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common paediatric malignancy.
  • It represents 25% of all childhood cancers and approximately 75% of all cases of childhood leukaemia.
  • Objective was to see the bone marrow remission pattern at the end of induction therapy in paediatric ALL patients in our setup.
  • Diagnosis was based on history, examination, blast cells count on peripheral blood film and bone marrow biopsy and immunophenotyping on peripheral blood/bone marrow aspirate.
  • According to UK ALL 2003 protocol all patients were given 4-drug induction therapy, i.e., vincristine, prednisolone/dexamethasone, L-aspiragenase and daunomycin.
  • Bone marrow biopsy was repeated at day 28 of induction therapy and remission pattern was seen.
  • At day 28 of induction therapy, 28 (74%) patients went into complete remission (< 5% blast cells in bone marrow), 2 (5%) into partial remission (5-25% blast cells in bone marrow) and 1 (3%) was not in remission (> 25% blast cells in the bone marrow).
  • Seven (18%) patient died due to febrile neutropenia and sepsis during the course of induction therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: ALL in children is curable with effective chemotherapy.
  • Remission can be achieved in most of these patients after induction therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 21067050.001).
  • [ISSN] 1025-9589
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad : JAMC
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Pakistan
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61. Felner EI, Thompson MT, Ratliff AF, White PC, Dickson BA: Time course of recovery of adrenal function in children treated for leukemia. J Pediatr; 2000 Jul;137(1):21-4
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  • [Title] Time course of recovery of adrenal function in children treated for leukemia.
  • OBJECTIVE: Many protocols for treating children with early B-cell lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia use 28 consecutive days of high-dose glucocorticoids during induction therapy.
  • We prospectively studied the effects of this therapy on adrenal function.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Ten children with early B-cell lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia were evaluated by cosyntropin (corticotropin (1-24)) stimulation testing before initiation of dexamethasone therapy and every 4 weeks thereafter until adrenal function returned to normal.
  • RESULTS: All 10 patients had normal adrenal function before dexamethasone treatment and insufficient adrenal responses 24 hours after completing therapy.
  • Each child felt ill for 2 to 4 weeks after completing therapy.
  • Although 7 patients recovered normal adrenal function after 4 weeks, 3 patients did not have normal adrenal function until 8 weeks after discontinuing therapy.
  • Statistically significant differences in both basal and corticotropin-stimulated cortisol levels were noted when comparing tests performed at baseline, 24 hours after completing therapy, and 4 weeks after completing therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: High-dose dexamethasone therapy, a standard treatment for early B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, can cause adrenal insufficiency lasting more than 4 weeks after cessation of treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Cortex / drug effects. Adrenal Cortex / physiopathology. Adrenal Insufficiency / chemically induced. Dexamethasone / adverse effects. Glucocorticoids / adverse effects. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenal Cortex Function Tests. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone / blood. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Hydrocortisone / blood. Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System / drug effects. Male. Pituitary-Adrenal System / drug effects. Prospective Studies. Radioimmunoassay

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  • [CommentIn] J Pediatr. 2000 Jul;137(1):3-4 [10891811.001]
  • (PMID = 10891816.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3476
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R37 DK37867; United States / PHS HHS / / T32 OK07307
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glucocorticoids; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; 9002-60-2 / Adrenocorticotropic Hormone; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
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62. Shanks D, Linke R, Saxon B: Bones, groans and blasts. J Paediatr Child Health; 2001 Oct;37(5):504-6
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  • A 14-year-old girl presented with the acute onset of gastrointestinal symptoms due to hypercalcaemia.
  • Chest X-ray revealed osteolytic lesions in the ribs which in conjunction with a normal parathyroid hormone level raised the possibility of malignancy.
  • Despite the absence of blast cells in her blood film, the bone marrow biopsy was diagnostic of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • She responded well to treatment with pamidronate and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Diphosphonates / therapeutic use. Hypercalcemia / etiology. Osteolysis / complications. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Parathyroid Hormone / blood. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11885718.001).
  • [ISSN] 1034-4810
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of paediatrics and child health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Paediatr Child Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Parathyroid Hormone; OYY3447OMC / pamidronate
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63. Merlin F, Prochilo T, Kildani B, Tucci A, Ferrari S, Rossi G, D'Adda P, Beretta GD: Secondary acute lymphoblastic leukaemia following oxaliplatin for adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer. Acta Oncol; 2008;47(3):464-6
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  • [Title] Secondary acute lymphoblastic leukaemia following oxaliplatin for adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / adverse effects. Neoplasms, Second Primary / chemically induced. Organoplatinum Compounds / adverse effects. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / chemically induced. Sigmoid Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Cerebral Hemorrhage / etiology. Combined Modality Therapy. Fatal Outcome. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Leucovorin / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 17851873.001).
  • [ISSN] 1651-226X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter; Review
  • [Publication-country] Norway
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; Folfox protocol
  • [Number-of-references] 11
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64. Bieber MM, Twist CJ, Bhat NM, Teng NN: Effects of human monoclonal antibody 216 on B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia in vitro. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2007 Apr;48(4):380-6
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  • [Title] Effects of human monoclonal antibody 216 on B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia in vitro.
  • This study investigated if this mAb could bind and kill acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) B-progenitor lymphoblasts in vitro.
  • ALL cell lines were used to determine if combining mAb 216 with chemotherapeutic drugs would enhance killing and cell lines were used to measure cytotoxicity by mAb 216 with human complement.
  • PROCEDURE: Expression of cell surface markers and mAb 216 epitope on fresh and banked ALL bone marrow samples was determined by flow cytometry.
  • Cytotoxicity of ALL cell lines incubated with mAb 216 and vincristine (VCR) or human complement was determined using flow cytometry.
  • RESULTS: Pre-B-ALL cells but not T-ALL cells are bound and killed by mAb 216.
  • The combination of mAb 216 and VCR at sub-therapeutic levels demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity beyond that observed for either agent alone.
  • Incubation of mAb 216 with human complement increased cytotoxicity of ALL cell lines.
  • CONCLUSION: This increased cytotoxicity with chemotherapy and the functional ability of mAb 216 to use multiple pathways to induce cell death identify mAb 216 as a potentially novel therapeutic tool in the treatment of B-progenitor ALL.
  • Based on the results from this preclinical study, a Phase I clinical trial with mAb 216 for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory B-lineage ALL is ongoing.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Bone Marrow / immunology. Bone Marrow / pathology. Cell Line, Tumor / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor / immunology. Child. Complement System Proteins / immunology. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / drug effects. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / immunology. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Immunotherapy. Leukemia, Myeloid / immunology. Leukemia, Myeloid / pathology. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / immunology. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / pathology. Neoplastic Stem Cells / drug effects. Neoplastic Stem Cells / immunology. Specimen Handling. Tissue Preservation

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  • (PMID = 16421902.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5009
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 98543
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 9007-36-7 / Complement System Proteins
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65. Milek M, Karas Kuzelicki N, Smid A, Mlinaric-Rascan I: S-adenosylmethionine regulates thiopurine methyltransferase activity and decreases 6-mercaptopurine cytotoxicity in MOLT lymphoblasts. Biochem Pharmacol; 2009 Jun 15;77(12):1845-53
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  • Six-mercaptopurine (6-MP) is a pro-drug widely used in treatment of various diseases, including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).
  • Side-effects of thiopurine therapy have been correlated with thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) activity.
  • We propose a novel TPMT-mediated mechanism of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-specific effects on 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) induced cytotoxicity in a model cell line for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (MOLT).
  • We prove that the extent of methylthioinosine monophosphate (MeTIMP) induced inhibition of de novo purine synthesis (DNPS) determines the concentrations of intracellular ATP, and consequently SAM, which acts as a positive modulator of TPMT activity.
  • This study provides new insights into the pharmacogenetics of thiopurine drugs.
  • Identification of SAM as critical modulator of TPMT activity and consequently thiopurine toxicity may set novel grounds for the rationalization of thiopurine therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] 6-Mercaptopurine / pharmacology. Methyltransferases / drug effects. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. S-Adenosylmethionine / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Drug Antagonism. Humans. Lymphocytes / pathology. RNA, Messenger

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  • (PMID = 19428339.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2968
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger; 7LP2MPO46S / S-Adenosylmethionine; E7WED276I5 / 6-Mercaptopurine; EC 2.1.1.- / Methyltransferases; EC 2.1.1.67 / thiopurine methyltransferase
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66. Zhai Q, Ji H, Zheng Z, Yu X, Sun L, Liu X: Copper induces apoptosis in BA/F3beta cells: Bax, reactive oxygen species, and NFkappaB are involved. J Cell Physiol; 2000 Aug;184(2):161-70
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  • But thorough investigations into the cytotoxicity of copper and subsequent molecular mechanisms are rare, although the cytotoxicity of copper has been applied to cancer chemotherapy.
  • The present study demonstrates that Cu(2+) inhibits [(3)H] thymidine incorporation in mouse pro-B cell line BA/F3beta and induces apoptosis.
  • Apoptosis was mainly judged by morphology of cells, quantification of subdiploid DNA contents by flow cytometry, and detection of DNA fragmentation by gel electrophoresis.
  • The apoptotic effect is dose and time dependent.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Copper / pharmacology. NF-kappa B / drug effects. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / drug effects. Reactive Oxygen Species / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Acetylcysteine / pharmacology. Animals. Cell Death / drug effects. Cell Death / physiology. Cell Line. Free Radical Scavengers / pharmacology. Mice. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / pharmacology. Up-Regulation. bcl-2-Associated X Protein

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 10867640.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9541
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cellular physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cell. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bax protein, mouse; 0 / Free Radical Scavengers; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 0 / bcl-2-Associated X Protein; 789U1901C5 / Copper; WYQ7N0BPYC / Acetylcysteine
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67. Gottfredsson M, Steingrímsdóttir H: Disseminated invasive aspergillosis in a patient with acute leukaemia. Acta Biomed; 2006;77 Suppl 2:10-3
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  • [Title] Disseminated invasive aspergillosis in a patient with acute leukaemia.
  • A 46-year-old previously healthy woman was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • The induction phase was complicated by alpha-haemolytic streptococcal bacteremia which responded to antibacterial therapy.
  • Subsequently, the patient developed pneumonie due to Chlamydiapneumoniae which responded to macrolides.
  • Following this infection the patient developed recurrent fever and new pulmonary infiltrates were noted.
  • Bronchoscopy was performed and treatment was administered with liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB, AmBisome) for two days, but was complicated by acute renal failure.
  • Despite aggressive antifungal therapy the patient developed progressive invasive infection, with central nervous system involvement as well as lesions appearing in the kidneys and liver.
  • The patient died one week following the diagnosis of aspergillosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Amphotericin B / therapeutic use. Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Aspergillosis / complications. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Kidney Injury / chemically induced. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bacteremia / complications. Bacteremia / drug therapy. Chlamydophila Infections / complications. Chlamydophila Infections / drug therapy. Chlamydophila pneumoniae. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug Resistance, Multiple, Fungal. Drug Therapy, Combination. Echinocandins. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Immunocompromised Host. Liposomes. Lung Diseases, Fungal / complications. Lung Diseases, Fungal / drug therapy. Medical Futility. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Neuroaspergillosis / drug therapy. Neuroaspergillosis / etiology. Peptides, Cyclic / administration & dosage. Peptides, Cyclic / therapeutic use. Pneumonia, Bacterial / complications. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Streptococcal Infections / complications. Streptococcal Infections / drug therapy. Triazoles / therapeutic use. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Voriconazole

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  • [ErratumIn] Acta Biomed. 2006;77 Suppl 4:following 33
  • (PMID = 16918060.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-4203
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta bio-medica : Atenei Parmensis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Biomed
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Antifungal Agents; 0 / Echinocandins; 0 / Liposomes; 0 / Peptides, Cyclic; 0 / Pyrimidines; 0 / Triazoles; 0 / liposomal amphotericin B; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 7XU7A7DROE / Amphotericin B; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; F0XDI6ZL63 / caspofungin; JFU09I87TR / Voriconazole; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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68. Brummel B, Bernbeck B, Schneider DT: Complicated but successful treatment of a patient with ataxia telangiectasia and pre-B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Klin Padiatr; 2010 Nov;222(6):391-4
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  • [Title] Complicated but successful treatment of a patient with ataxia telangiectasia and pre-B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Pediatric patients may develop lymphomas and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), especially of the T-lineage.
  • CASE REPORT: Here, we first report on a patient with AT and pre B-cell ALL.
  • The therapy was administered according to the medium risk arm of the ALL-BFM 2000 study protocol of the German Society of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology.
  • Over 1 year after the end of the maintenance therapy the patient is still in complete first remission.
  • CONCLUSION: A general recommendation for dose modification in these patients group cannot be made due to the low number of patients suffering from AT and leukaemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Ataxia Telangiectasia / diagnosis. Ataxia Telangiectasia / drug therapy. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Remission Induction


69. Bruch C, Schmermund A, Dagres N, Bartel T, Caspari G, Sack S, Erbel R: Changes in QRS voltage in cardiac tamponade and pericardial effusion: reversibility after pericardiocentesis and after anti-inflammatory drug treatment. J Am Coll Cardiol; 2001 Jul;38(1):219-26
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  • [Title] Changes in QRS voltage in cardiac tamponade and pericardial effusion: reversibility after pericardiocentesis and after anti-inflammatory drug treatment.
  • OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to define the association between low QRS voltage and cardiac tamponade or pericardial effusion and to assess the reversibility of low QRS voltage after therapeutic procedures.
  • BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether low QRS voltage is a sign of cardiac tamponade or whether it is a sign of pericardial effusion per se.
  • METHODS: In a prospective study design, we recorded consecutive 12-lead electrocardiograms and echocardiograms in 43 patients who were referred to our institution for evaluation and therapy of a significant pericardial effusion.
  • Five patients received anti-inflammatory medication (group B).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Low QRS voltage is a feature of cardiac tamponade but not of pericardial effusion per se.

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  • (PMID = 11451278.001).
  • [ISSN] 0735-1097
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American College of Cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Coll. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. Bryant J, Picot J, Levitt G, Sullivan I, Baxter L, Clegg A: Cardioprotection against the toxic effects of anthracyclines given to children with cancer: a systematic review. Health Technol Assess; 2007 Jul;11(27):iii, ix-x, 1-84
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  • RESULTS: Four randomised controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria of the review, each considering a different cardioprotective intervention; all trials included children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, and one also included children with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Two studies considered cardioprotective agents, one concluded that dexrazoxane prevents or reduces cardiac injury without compromising the antileukaemic efficacy of doxorubicin and the other reported a protective effect of coenzyme Q10 on cardiac function during anthracycline therapy.
  • Two cohort studies considering atrial natriuretic peptide and two considering brain (B-type) natriuretic peptide suggested that these chemicals are elevated in some subgroups of children treated with anthracyclines for cancer.
  • N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide levels were significantly elevated in children treated with anthracyclines who had cardiac dysfunction.
  • Mechanisms to reduce or prevent cardiotoxicity from anthracycline therapy and cardiac markers to improve monitoring could alter the extent of this impact on service provision.
  • [MeSH-major] Anthracyclines / adverse effects. Anthracyclines / economics. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / adverse effects. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / economics. Cardiovascular Agents / therapeutic use. Heart Diseases / prevention & control. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers / blood. Child. Drug Administration Schedule. Heart Failure / chemically induced. Heart Failure / prevention & control. Humans

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  • (PMID = 17610809.001).
  • [ISSN] 1366-5278
  • [Journal-full-title] Health technology assessment (Winchester, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Technol Assess
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anthracyclines; 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Cardiovascular Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 44
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71. Donadieu J, Hill C: Early response to chemotherapy as a prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a methodological review. Br J Haematol; 2001 Oct;115(1):34-45
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  • [Title] Early response to chemotherapy as a prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a methodological review.
  • Published studies of the prognostic value of the early response to induction treatment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) were analysed.
  • Three criteria were used to judge the early treatment response: persistence of peripheral blasts (PPB) or of bone marrow blasts (PBMB) during induction therapy and minimal residual disease (MRD) after completion of induction therapy.
  • Treatment modalities differed among, and sometimes within, studies.
  • Detection of MRD was associated with poor outcome in 12 of the 13 studies.
  • Because none of the parameters used to measure the early response to induction therapy for childhood ALL have been properly assessed as prognostic factors, we conclude that they should be considered only as candidate prognostic indicators pending more thorough studies.
  • [MeSH-major] Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Remission Induction
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone Marrow / immunology. Cytogenetics. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Lymphocytes / immunology. Neoplasm, Residual. Prognosis. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 11722407.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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72. Segawa H, Kimura S, Kuroda J, Sato K, Yokota A, Kawata E, Kamitsuji Y, Ashihara E, Yuasa T, Fujiyama Y, Ottmann OG, Maekawa T: Zoledronate synergises with imatinib mesylate to inhibit Ph primary leukaemic cell growth. Br J Haematol; 2005 Aug;130(4):558-60
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  • [Title] Zoledronate synergises with imatinib mesylate to inhibit Ph primary leukaemic cell growth.
  • These findings suggest that the combination of ZOL and imatinib accelerate the eradication of Ph+ clone, resulting in better prognosis of Ph+ leukaemia patients who have not yet acquired mutations.
  • [MeSH-major] Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Benzamides. Diphosphonates. Drug Synergism. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Imidazoles. Mice. Mice, SCID. Models, Animal. Neoplasm Transplantation. Piperazines. Pyrimidines. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 16098070.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Imidazoles; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 6XC1PAD3KF / zoledronic acid; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate
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73. Zhang LP, Cheng YF, Liu GL, Lu AD, Liu YR, Wang H: [The clinical significance of detecting minimal residual disease in acute childhood B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia with flow cytometry]. Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi; 2005 Jul;43(7):481-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [The clinical significance of detecting minimal residual disease in acute childhood B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia with flow cytometry].
  • OBJECTIVE: Flow cytometry may be used to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia because leukemic cells often display aberrant phenotypes when compared to normal cells.
  • The investigators also aimed to study the value of the detection of MRD by flow cytometry in childhood B-ALL without effective antibody combinations.
  • METHODS: Thirty-six cases of childhood B-ALL with effective antibody combinations were performed MRD analysis after induction therapy.
  • The sensitivity of this method was 0.01%. (2) Patients with MRD levels > or = 0.01% at 9 and 12 months of therapy had significantly low disease-free survival compared with patients with MRD levels < 0.01%. (3) Six out of seven patients with recurrence in the BM had MRD levels > or = 0.1% prior to recurrence.
  • Patients with MRD levels > or = 0.1% during chemotherapy had significantly low disease-free survival as compared with patients with MRD values < 0.1%. (4) Two out of seven patients with recurrence had positive results of the qualitative PCR prior to recurrence. (5) Five patients with recurrence had no shift of antigen expression at relapse except that a patient missed CD(13). (6) Detectable MRD was not found in six patients without effective antibody combinations.
  • CONCLUSION:. (1) Flow cytometry is a sensitive and specific method for detecting MRD of childhood ALL, and could predict the coming relapse. (2) Patients with MRD levels > 10(-3) had poor prognosis. (3) The levels of MRD at month 9 and 12 had prognostic value. (4) The value of antibody combinations consisting of CD(45)/CD(19)/CD(10)/CD(34) and CD(45)/CD(19)/CD(20)/CD(22) should be further investigated in patients without effective antibody combinations.
  • [MeSH-major] B-Lymphocyte Subsets / immunology. Flow Cytometry. Immunophenotyping. Neoplasm, Residual / diagnosis. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. China. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Sensitivity and Specificity. Treatment Outcome


74. Bury J, Hurt C, Roy A, Cheesman L, Bradburn M, Cross S, Fox J, Saha V: LISA: a web-based decision-support system for trial management of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Br J Haematol; 2005 Jun;129(6):746-54
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] LISA: a web-based decision-support system for trial management of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • Continuation chemotherapy is a key component of the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • During this treatment phase, weekly dose adjustments are carried out based on current and historical full blood counts (FBCs).
  • The dose decision pathway is complex and suboptimal therapy may result if information on FBC results is not readily available and/or the prescriber is inexperienced.
  • A web-based decision-support system (Leukaemia Intervention Scheduling and Advice, 'LISA') was designed to facilitate access to FBC information across geographical locations and to assist with dosage adjustments.
  • Thirty-six clinicians with varying degrees of experience were each asked to decide on appropriate oral chemotherapy dosages for eight simulated cases: four using LISA and four without.
  • LISA significantly reduced the number of erroneous prescriptions (zero of 144 with LISA vs. 54 of 144 without; P < 0.0001) without affecting the number of times subjects deliberately overrode the protocol (seven of 144 times using LISA and six of 144 without).
  • Using LISA reduced the time taken by novices to reach a decision for each case but increased the time taken by experts.
  • A system like LISA is likely to be acceptable to clinicians, and has the potential to increase protocol compliance and decrease prescribing errors while allowing clinicians to override the protocol in specific cases where sound reasons exist for doing so.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Clinical Trials as Topic / methods. Decision Support Systems, Clinical. Internet. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Clinical Protocols. Cross-Over Studies. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Therapy, Computer-Assisted / methods. Guideline Adherence. Humans

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  • (PMID = 15953000.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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75. Wiernikowski JT, Barr RD, Webber C, Guo CY, Wright M, Atkinson SA: Alendronate for steroid-induced osteopenia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: results of a pilot study. J Oncol Pharm Pract; 2005 Jun;11(2):51-6
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  • [Title] Alendronate for steroid-induced osteopenia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: results of a pilot study.
  • BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Osteopenia is a significant morbidity in children undergoing therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL).
  • We conducted a pilot study to assess the impact of alendronate on whole body bone mineral content (WB-BMC), lumbar spine bone mineral density (LS-BMD), biochemical measures of bone mineral metabolism, as well as gross motor function and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in children undergoing therapy for ALL or NHL.
  • METHODS: Ten children (nine boys) between the ages of 3.6 and 14.6 years, on identical maintenance chemotherapy for ALL or NHL were treated with oral alendronate once weekly, and daily calcium supplementation, for a period of six months.
  • Outcome measures were WB-BMC and LS-BMD; biochemical measures of bone mineral metabolism including plasma osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTx), serum calcium, 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25-OHD), and parathyroid hormone (PTH); as well as assessments of motor function and HRQL.
  • Serum calcium and 25-OHD remained normal throughout treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Alendronate therapy was tolerated well.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / adverse effects. Alendronate / therapeutic use. Bone Density Conservation Agents / therapeutic use. Bone Diseases, Metabolic / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Absorptiometry, Photon. Administration, Oral. Adolescent. Bone Density / drug effects. Calcium / blood. Calcium Carbonate / administration & dosage. Calcium Carbonate / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Collagen / blood. Collagen Type I. Female. Humans. Lumbar Vertebrae / drug effects. Lumbar Vertebrae / metabolism. Male. Osteocalcin / blood. Osteocalcin / drug effects. Parathyroid Hormone / blood. Peptides / blood. Pilot Projects. Quality of Life. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Vitamin D / blood

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  • (PMID = 16460605.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-1552
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oncology pharmacy practice : official publication of the International Society of Oncology Pharmacy Practitioners
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Oncol Pharm Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Bone Density Conservation Agents; 0 / Collagen Type I; 0 / Parathyroid Hormone; 0 / Peptides; 0 / collagen type I trimeric cross-linked peptide; 104982-03-8 / Osteocalcin; 1406-16-2 / Vitamin D; 9007-34-5 / Collagen; H0G9379FGK / Calcium Carbonate; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium; X1J18R4W8P / Alendronate
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81. Gaynon PS, Angiolillo AL, Carroll WL, Nachman JB, Trigg ME, Sather HN, Hunger SP, Devidas M, Children's Oncology Group: Long-term results of the children's cancer group studies for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia 1983-2002: a Children's Oncology Group Report. Leukemia; 2010 Feb;24(2):285-97
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  • [Title] Long-term results of the children's cancer group studies for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia 1983-2002: a Children's Oncology Group Report.
  • Outcomes were examined in three time periods, 1983-1988, 1989-1995, 1996-2002.
  • Over the three intervals, 10-year event-free survival (EFS) for Rome/National Cancer Institute standard risk (SR) and higher risk (HR) B-precursor patients was 68 and 58%, 77 and 63%, and 78 and 67%, respectively, whereas for SR and HR T-cell patients, EFS was 65 and 56%, 78 and 68%, and 70 and 72%, respectively.
  • With improved systemic therapy, additional intrathecal (IT) methotrexate effectively replaced cranial radiation.
  • For SR patients receiving three-drug induction, iso-toxic substitution of dexamethasone for prednisone improved EFS.
  • Thus, rational therapy modifications yielded better outcomes for both SR and HR patients.


82. Chisholm JC, Devine T, Charlett A, Pinkerton CR, Zambon M: Response to influenza immunisation during treatment for cancer. Arch Dis Child; 2001 Jun;84(6):496-500
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  • [Title] Response to influenza immunisation during treatment for cancer.
  • These children were receiving continuing chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or were within six months of completing chemotherapy.
  • Older age was associated with increased response to the H1N1 and H3N2 vaccine components, but total white cell count or neutrophil count at immunisation, type of cancer, or length of time on treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia did not affect response.
  • [MeSH-major] Influenza Vaccines / immunology. Influenza, Human / immunology. Leukemia, Myeloid / immunology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Age Factors. Antibodies, Viral / blood. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease Susceptibility. Hemagglutination Inhibition Tests. Humans. Influenza A virus / immunology. Influenza B virus / immunology. Leukocyte Count. Linear Models. Normal Distribution. Statistics, Nonparametric. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11369567.001).
  • [ISSN] 1468-2044
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of disease in childhood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Dis. Child.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Viral; 0 / Influenza Vaccines
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1718812
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83. Schlezinger JJ, Emberley JK, Sherr DH: Activation of multiple mitogen-activated protein kinases in pro/pre-B cells by GW7845, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist, and their contribution to GW7845-induced apoptosis. Toxicol Sci; 2006 Aug;92(2):433-44
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  • [Title] Activation of multiple mitogen-activated protein kinases in pro/pre-B cells by GW7845, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist, and their contribution to GW7845-induced apoptosis.
  • PPARgamma agonists of diverse chemical structure induce apoptosis in several malignant B cell lines.
  • Understanding the mechanisms of PPARgamma agonist-induced death is essential to minimizing loss of normal cells during chemotherapy.
  • Therefore, we investigated the activation of MAPKs in primary pro-B cells and cultured pro/pre-B cells and their role in GW7845-induced apoptosis.
  • Treatment of a nontransformed murine pro/pre-B-cell line with GW7845 transiently induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related protein kinase (ERK) 1/2, but strongly and persistently induced the activation of p38 MAPK and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK).
  • In primary pro-B-cells, p38 MAPK and JNK were activated following treatment with GW7845.
  • Phosphorylation of activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2) was induced strongly in both B-cell types.
  • In pro/pre-B cells, pretreatment with the p38 MAPK/JNK inhibitor PD169316 potently suppressed multiple facets of GW7845-induced apoptosis signaling.
  • Inhibitors specific for p38 MAPK and JNK were only partially effective, suggesting that suppression of a single MAPK is not sufficient to inhibit death.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. B-Lymphocytes / drug effects. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases / metabolism. Oxazoles / toxicity. PPAR gamma / agonists. Tyrosine / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Caspases / metabolism. Cell Line. Cytochromes c / metabolism. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Phosphorylation / drug effects. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 16672323.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-6080
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicol. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / 2P42ES007381-12; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01-HL68105
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / GW 7845; 0 / Oxazoles; 0 / PPAR gamma; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 42HK56048U / Tyrosine; 9007-43-6 / Cytochromes c; EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases
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84. Huisman J, Aukema EJ, Deijen JB, van Coeverden SC, Kaspers GJ, van der Pal HJ, Delemarre-van de Waal HA: The usefulness of growth hormone treatment for psychological status in young adult survivors of childhood leukaemia: an open-label study. BMC Pediatr; 2008;8:25
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  • [Title] The usefulness of growth hormone treatment for psychological status in young adult survivors of childhood leukaemia: an open-label study.
  • BACKGROUND: To reduce the risk of brain damage children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) are nowadays mainly treated with intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC) instead of central nervous system (CNS) radiation therapy (CRT) to prevent CNS relapse.
  • However, chemotherapy may also lead to cognitive deficits.
  • As growth hormone deficiency (GHD) or impaired growth hormone secretion are frequently found in ALL patients treated with cranial radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy, we hypothesized that GH therapy may reduce cognitive deficits in these patients.
  • A final group of 13 patients (9 males and 4 females), mean age 23.7 +/- 2.9 years (range 20 - 29.7) completed a 2-year treatment with GH.IQ and neuropsychological performance were assessed at pre-treatment (T1) and after one (T2) and two (T3) years.
  • Visual-spatial memory was improved after one year of GH treatment.
  • A significant positive correlation was found for Delta IGF-I (T2-T1) with difference scores of visual-spatial memory (T2-T1 and T3-T1), indicating that IGF-I increase after one year of GH treatment is associated with increase in cognitive-perceptual performance at month 12 and 24.
  • CONCLUSION: Since the level of intellectual functioning of our patient cohort was in the normal range the present finding that GH treatment has negative effects on verbal memory and positive on attention and visual-spatial memory warrants similar studies in other groups of ALL survivors.
  • The present findings indicate that more knowledge is needed before GH treatment may be recommended to enhance cognitive functions in ALL survivors.
  • [MeSH-major] Cognition / drug effects. Human Growth Hormone / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / physiopathology. Survivors / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Attention / drug effects. Bone Density / drug effects. Bone Density / radiation effects. Brain Neoplasms / prevention & control. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion / adverse effects. Cognition Disorders / chemically induced. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hormone Replacement Therapy. Humans. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I / analysis. Intelligence Tests. Male. Memory Disorders / chemically induced. Neuropsychological Tests. Psychomotor Performance / drug effects. Quality of Life. Statistics, Nonparametric. Verbal Learning / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 18570650.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2431
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Pediatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 12629-01-5 / Human Growth Hormone; 67763-96-6 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2447830
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85. Groninger E, de Graaf SS, Meeuwsen-de Boer GJ, Sluiter WJ, Poppema S: Vincristine-induced apoptosis in vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Br J Haematol; 2000 Dec;111(3):875-8
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  • [Title] Vincristine-induced apoptosis in vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).
  • We conducted a study to demonstrate vincristine-induced apoptosis in vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Apoptosis / drug effects. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / drug effects. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Vincristine / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Humans. In Situ Nick-End Labeling / methods. Infant. Jurkat Cells. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / drug therapy. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / immunology. Poisson Distribution. Statistics, Nonparametric

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  • (PMID = 11122150.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine
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86. Appel IM, den Boer ML, Meijerink JP, Veerman AJ, Reniers NC, Pieters R: Up-regulation of asparagine synthetase expression is not linked to the clinical response L-asparaginase in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Blood; 2006 Jun 1;107(11):4244-9
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  • [Title] Up-regulation of asparagine synthetase expression is not linked to the clinical response L-asparaginase in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • L-asparaginase (L-Asp) is an effective drug for treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
  • We monitored AS mRNA levels in leukemic cells before and during 5 days after intravenous administration of 1000 IU/m(2) pegylated L-asparaginase (PEG-Asp) in a therapeutic window in children with ALL at initial diagnosis.
  • No significant difference of AS mRNA up-regulation was found between precursor B- and T-ALL or between hyperdiploids, TEL/AML1 rearranged ALL or absence of genetic abnormalities.
  • In 3 of 12 patients with T-ALL even a slight down-regulation of AS mRNA expression upon L-Asp exposure was found.
  • In conclusion, although L-Asp exposure induces the expression of AS mRNA, the up-regulated gene expression does not correlate with an early clinical poor response to this drug in children with ALL.
  • [MeSH-major] Asparaginase / pharmacology. Aspartate-Ammonia Ligase / genetics. Polyethylene Glycols / pharmacology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Up-Regulation / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / drug therapy. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / pathology. Male. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / pathology. RNA, Neoplasm / analysis. RNA, Neoplasm / drug effects. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16497975.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 0 / pegaspargase; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase; EC 6.3.1.1 / Aspartate-Ammonia Ligase
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87. Pui CH, Campana D, Evans WE: Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia--current status and future perspectives. Lancet Oncol; 2001 Oct;2(10):597-607
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  • [Title] Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia--current status and future perspectives.
  • The current cure rate of 80% in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia attests to the effectiveness of risk-directed therapy developed through well-designed clinical trials.
  • In the past decade there have been remarkable advances in the definition of the molecular abnormalities involved in leukaemogenesis and drug resistance.
  • These advances have led to the development of promising new therapeutic strategies, including agents targeted to the molecular lesions that cause leukaemia.
  • Thus, genetic polymorphisms of certain enzymes have been linked with host susceptibility to the development of de novo leukaemia or therapy-related second cancers.
  • Furthermore, recognition of inherited differences in the metabolism of antileukaemic agents has provided rational selection criteria for optimal drug dosages and scheduling.
  • Treatment response assessed by measurements of submicroscopic leukaemia (minimal residual disease) has emerged as a powerful and independent prognostic indicator for gauging the intensity of therapy.
  • Ultimately, treatment based on biological features of leukaemic cells, host genetics, and the amount of residual disease should improve cure rates further.
  • [MeSH-major] Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma

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  • (PMID = 11902549.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-2045
  • [Journal-full-title] The Lancet. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA21765; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA36401; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA51001; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA58297; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA60419; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA78224
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 75
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88. Stanciu-Herrera C, Morgan C, Herrera L: Anti-CD19 and anti-CD22 monoclonal antibodies increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy in Pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. Leuk Res; 2008 Apr;32(4):625-32
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  • [Title] Anti-CD19 and anti-CD22 monoclonal antibodies increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy in Pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines.
  • The monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) HD37 and RFB4 bind to receptors on precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells.
  • These MAbs were tested alone and in combination with chemotherapy for their anti-leukemic activity.
  • HD37 and not RFB4 increased the in vitro cytotoxicity of daunorubicin (DNR) and vincristine (VCR) in three Pre-B ALL cell lines.
  • The treatment of SCID/ALL mice with either chemotherapy agent minimally prolonged their mean survival time (MST) versus controls but HD37 or RFB4 plus VCR significantly extended the MST.
  • In conclusion, chemotherapy was made more effective when combined with HD37, and less so with RFB4.

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  • (PMID = 17706771.001).
  • [ISSN] 0145-2126
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA101897-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K01 CA101897-04
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD19; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 2; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; ZS7284E0ZP / Daunorubicin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS42262; NLM/ PMC2276361
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89. Mann G, Trebo MM, Haas OA, Grümayer-Panzer ER, Dworzak MN, Lion T, Gadner H: Philadelphia chromosome-positive mature B-cell (Burkitt cell) leukaemia. Br J Haematol; 2002 Aug;118(2):559-62
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  • [Title] Philadelphia chromosome-positive mature B-cell (Burkitt cell) leukaemia.
  • Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute leukaemia usually shows lymphoblastic morphology and a B-precursor phenotype.
  • The bone marrow aspirate of a 9-year-old boy showed a L3 blast cell morphology in 90% of cells; immunophenotyping revealed a mature B-blast population.
  • Chemotherapy according to the Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL-BFM 95) protocol with maintenance according to the BFM acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL-BFM 90) protocol resulted in continuing complete remission of 54 months.
  • The occurrence of Ph+ Burkitt's leukaemia might reflect multiple-step cancer development.
  • [MeSH-major] Burkitt Lymphoma / pathology. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / genetics. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / pathology. Child. Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl / genetics. Gene Rearrangement, B-Lymphocyte, Light Chain. Humans. Immunophenotyping / methods. Karyotyping / methods. Male. Translocation, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 12139745.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.10.2 / Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl
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90. Gill S, Lane SW, Crawford J, Cull G, Joske D, Marlton P, Mollee PN, Prince HM, Seymour JF: Prolonged haematological toxicity from the hyper-CVAD regimen: manifestations, frequency, and natural history in a cohort of 125 consecutive patients. Ann Hematol; 2008 Sep;87(9):727-34
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  • Secondary myelodysplasia (MDS) or acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) also occurs.
  • One hundred and twenty-five patients were treated with a median of six hyper-CVAD cycles and followed for a median of 28 months.
  • Follow-up for cytopenias was censored at the next cytotoxic therapy.
  • At 3 months post-therapy, 77 patients were evaluable.
  • The median time to normalisation of counts for those with post-treatment cytopenias in the respective lineages was 9 months (range, 6-12) for anaemia, 6 months (range, 6-30) for neutropenia and 9 months (range, 6-30) for thrombocytopenia.
  • MDS/AML was diagnosed in four patients at 4, 21, 24 and 37 months after therapy with a cumulative incidence rate of 4.43% at 4 years.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / toxicity. Hematologic Diseases / chemically induced. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / drug therapy. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Myelodysplastic Syndromes / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Biopsy. Bone Marrow / pathology. Cohort Studies. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neutrophils / drug effects. Neutrophils / physiology. Time Factors. Vincristine / administration & dosage


91. Raciborska A, Wypych A, Rokicka-Milewska R, Siedlecki JA, Kulik J: [Preliminary results of the use of MRD test among children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia]. Przegl Lek; 2004;61 Suppl 2:62-6
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  • [Title] [Preliminary results of the use of MRD test among children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia].
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: 56 children, with de novo diagnosed ALL, comprised test group.
  • During research applied was the PCR method with the use of starters specific for conservative IgH and TCR delta gene fragments.
  • ALL therapy was monitored by evaluation of MRD in the 15th and 33rd day of treatment and prior to supportive treatment.
  • Stratification into risk groups, based on the MRD test results was compared with the stratification conducted in accordance with the recognised prognostic factors, such as: primary leucocytosis, steroid therapy response, drug resistance and karyotype.
  • RESULTS: Among 52 children (92.8%) of the 56, which were tested prior to the start of treatment, obtained the sought for rearrangement, 90-120bp size stripe being an amplified regrouping of the VDJ fragment.
  • Testing the IgH and TCR delta gene regrouping allowed to demonstrate clonality of the neoplastic process during the diagnosis in 92.8% of the cases.
  • The number of patients with a positive MRD test result was dependent on the phase of treatment.
  • Steroid resistance was stated among 18/56 children, out of which 8/56 obtained a positive MRD test result in the 33rd day of treatment.
  • Among 3 of them the result was maintained prior to supportive treatment.
  • Leucocytosis during diagnosis above 50 thousand was recorded among 10/56 patients.
  • Among 5 of them determined was rearrangement on the 33rd day of treatment, and for 1 prior to supportive treatment.
  • Stratification into therapeutic groups based on classical prognostic factors in most cases was the same with the stratification based on the MRD test results.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Genes, Immunoglobulin. Genes, T-Cell Receptor delta. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow Transplantation. Case-Control Studies. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Neoplasm, Residual / drug therapy. Neoplasm, Residual / genetics. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Prognosis. Recurrence. Remission Induction. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • (PMID = 15686049.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-2240
  • [Journal-full-title] Przegla̧d lekarski
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prz. Lek.
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm
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92. Campana R, Patrone V, Franzini IT, Diamantini G, Vittoria E, Baffone W: Antimicrobial activity of two propolis samples against human Campylobacter jejuni. J Med Food; 2009 Oct;12(5):1050-6
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  • EEPs showed MIC values of 0.3125-0.156 mg/mL for all C. jejuni strains; galangin and quercetin gave MICs ranging from 0.250 to 0.125 mg/mL.
  • Thus propolis preparations could be used as support to traditional therapy for Campylobacter infection, especially when the antibiotic agents show no activity against this microorganism.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology. Campylobacter jejuni / drug effects. Flavonoids / pharmacology. Plant Extracts / pharmacology. Propolis / pharmacology. Quercetin / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Enterobacter / drug effects. Humans. Microbial Sensitivity Tests. Staphylococcus aureus / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 19857069.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-7600
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medicinal food
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Food
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Flavonoids; 0 / Plant Extracts; 142FWE6ECS / galangin; 9009-62-5 / Propolis; 9IKM0I5T1E / Quercetin
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93. Mahoney DH Jr, Shuster JJ, Nitschke R, Lauer S, Steuber CP, Camitta B: Intensification with intermediate-dose intravenous methotrexate is effective therapy for children with lower-risk B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A Pediatric Oncology Group study. J Clin Oncol; 2000 Mar;18(6):1285-94
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  • [Title] Intensification with intermediate-dose intravenous methotrexate is effective therapy for children with lower-risk B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A Pediatric Oncology Group study.
  • PURPOSE: To determine whether early intensification with 12 courses of intravenous (IV) methotrexate (MTX) and IV mercaptopurine (MP) is superior to 12 courses of IV MTX alone for prevention of relapse in children with lower-risk B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
  • Vincristine, prednisone, and asparaginase were used for remission induction therapy.
  • Triple intrathecal therapy was used for CNS prophylaxis.
  • Continuation therapy included standard oral MP, weekly MTX, and triple intrathecal therapy every 12 weeks for 2 years.
  • The estimated 4-year overall continuous complete remission for patients treated with regimen A is 82.1% (SE = 2.4%) and for regimen C is 82.2% (SE = 2.6%; P =.5).
  • CONCLUSION: Intensification with 12 courses of IV MTX is an effective therapy for prevention of relapse in children with B-precursor ALL who are at lower risk for relapse but may be associated with an increased risk for neurotoxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] 6-Mercaptopurine / therapeutic use. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Infant. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Proportional Hazards Models. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 10715299.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; E7WED276I5 / 6-Mercaptopurine; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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94. Powles R, Sirohi B, Treleaven J, Kulkarni S, Tait D, Singhal S, Mehta J: The role of posttransplantation maintenance chemotherapy in improving the outcome of autotransplantation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Blood; 2002 Sep 1;100(5):1641-7
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  • [Title] The role of posttransplantation maintenance chemotherapy in improving the outcome of autotransplantation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Extending the principle of conventional acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy to transplantation, 77 adult patients receiving autografts in first remission after melphalan with or without total body irradiation were scheduled to receive 6-mercaptopurine (6MP), methotrexate (MTX), and vincristine-prednisone (VP) for 2 years after transplantation to reduce relapse.
  • In Cox analysis of the 71 patients alive and well 120 days after transplantation, those receiving 2 or 3 maintenance chemotherapy agents had significantly lower relapse rates and superior DFS compared with those receiving 0 or 1 agent.
  • Our data suggest that maintenance chemotherapy improves the outcome of patients with ALL undergoing autografting.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] 6-Mercaptopurine / administration & dosage. Adolescent. Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Prospective Studies. Secondary Prevention. Survival Analysis. Transplantation, Autologous. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 12176883.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; E7WED276I5 / 6-Mercaptopurine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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95. Earle EA, Clarke SA, Eiser C, Sheppard L: 'Building a new normality': mothers' experiences of caring for a child with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Child Care Health Dev; 2007 Mar;33(2):155-60
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  • [Title] 'Building a new normality': mothers' experiences of caring for a child with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • BACKGROUND: Treatment of childhood cancer occurs over a 2- to 3-year period, with initial intense phases of chemotherapy followed by less severe treatment periods.
  • From first diagnosis, families are encouraged by healthcare professionals (following government guidelines) to try to maintain a normal life.
  • METHODS: This study was longitudinal and involved a cross section of 32 mothers of children recently diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) currently participating in the Medical Research Council ALL-97 randomized control trial.
  • Mothers were interviewed at three time points (3-4 months post diagnosis, 15 and 27 months) using a semi-structured format with open-ended questions.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Families felt encouraged on diagnosis to be told that despite the severity of the disease and treatment regime, a normal life was possible and should be pursued.
  • Our findings indicate that over time, more concrete information is needed to guide parents through the treatment process in order to help them achieve this.
  • [MeSH-major] Family Health. Life Style. Mothers / psychology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / psychology

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  • (PMID = 17291319.001).
  • [ISSN] 0305-1862
  • [Journal-full-title] Child: care, health and development
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Child Care Health Dev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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96. Chessells JM, Harrison G, Richards SM, Bailey CC, Hill FG, Gibson BE, Hann IM: Down's syndrome and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: clinical features and response to treatment. Arch Dis Child; 2001 Oct;85(4):321-5
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  • [Title] Down's syndrome and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: clinical features and response to treatment.
  • AIMS: To examine the clinical and biological features of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children with Down's syndrome (DS), to compare their survival with other children, and to determine if entry to trials and survival has improved.
  • METHODS: Examination of presenting features and response to treatment in patients treated in two consecutive national trials, MRC UKALL X and XI.
  • Children with DS tended to be under 10 years and to have the common ALL subtype.
  • Cytogenetic analysis showed that favourable features, such as high hyperdiploidy and t(12;21) were less frequent but also that there was a lack of translocations associated with a poor prognosis.
  • However they remain at risk of relapse and also of treatment related mortality.
  • These findings emphasise the need for both intensive chemotherapy and optimal supportive care.
  • [MeSH-major] Down Syndrome / complications. Patient Selection. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Chromosome Aberrations. Chromosome Disorders. Clinical Trials as Topic. Cytogenetic Analysis. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Infant. Male. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11567943.001).
  • [ISSN] 1468-2044
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of disease in childhood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Dis. Child.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1718934
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97. Lauten M, Fernandez-Munoz I, Gerdes K, von Neuhoff N, Welte K, Schlegelberger B, Schrappe M, Beger C: Kinetics of the in vivo expression of glucocorticoid receptor splice variants during prednisone treatment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2009 Apr;52(4):459-63
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  • [Title] Kinetics of the in vivo expression of glucocorticoid receptor splice variants during prednisone treatment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • BACKGROUND: The in vivo glucocorticoid response in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) correlates with the response to multi-agent chemotherapy.
  • PROCEDURE: In the present study, the initial in vivo expression of the common GR (cGR) and its splice variants GR-alpha, GR-gamma and GR-P was determined using a quantitative RT-PCR approach.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Differential regulation of the cGR and its splice variants under glucocorticoid treatment rather than the expression level at diagnosis is associated with glucocorticoid response.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Gene Expression / drug effects. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / metabolism. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Receptors, Glucocorticoid / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Case-Control Studies. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Protein Isoforms / biosynthesis. Protein Isoforms / drug effects. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 19061214.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5017
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Protein Isoforms; 0 / Receptors, Glucocorticoid; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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98. Villar Alvarez F, Méndez Bailón M, de Miguel Díez J: [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure]. Arch Bronconeumol; 2009 Aug;45(8):387-93
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The sensitivity and specificity of clinical judgment in the diagnosis of heart failure in patients with COPD can be enhanced by biological markers such as B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide.
  • There is little evidence on the management of patients with COPD and heart failure, although treatment of COPD undeniably affects the clinical course of patients with heart failure and viceversa.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenergic beta-Agonists / adverse effects. Adrenergic beta-Agonists / pharmacology. Adrenergic beta-Agonists / therapeutic use. Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / adverse effects. Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / contraindications. Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / pharmacology. Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / therapeutic use. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers / therapeutic use. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Atrial Natriuretic Factor / blood. Biomarkers. Bronchodilator Agents / adverse effects. Bronchodilator Agents / pharmacology. Bronchodilator Agents / therapeutic use. C-Reactive Protein / analysis. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Interactions. Heart Function Tests. Humans. Hypertension, Pulmonary / drug therapy. Hypertension, Pulmonary / etiology. Natriuretic Peptide, Brain / blood. Oxygen Inhalation Therapy. Peptide Fragments / blood. Pulmonary Heart Disease / drug therapy. Pulmonary Heart Disease / etiology. Respiration, Artificial. Respiratory Function Tests

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  • (PMID = 19595494.001).
  • [ISSN] 1579-2129
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivos de bronconeumología
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Bronconeumol.
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Agonists; 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers; 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Bronchodilator Agents; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / pro-brain natriuretic peptide (1-76); 114471-18-0 / Natriuretic Peptide, Brain; 85637-73-6 / Atrial Natriuretic Factor; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein
  • [Number-of-references] 72
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99. Niizuma H, Fujii K, Sato A, Fujiwara I, Takeyama J, Imaizumi M: PTHrP-independent hypercalcemia with increased proinflammatory cytokines and bone resorption in two children with CD19-negative precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2007 Dec;49(7):990-3
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  • [Title] PTHrP-independent hypercalcemia with increased proinflammatory cytokines and bone resorption in two children with CD19-negative precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Hypercalcemia in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is rare and occasionally associated with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP).
  • We report two children with precursor B ALL who had marked hypercalcemia (15.8 and 16.6 mg/dl, respectively) and disseminated osteolysis.
  • Patients had ALL with immunophenotype positive for CD10, CD34, and HLA-DR but negative for CD19 and obtained remission with chemotherapy.
  • These findings suggest that increased osteoclastic bone resorption via stimulation with TNF-alpha and IL-6 may be mechanism causing PTHrP-independent hypercalcemia in some patients with precursor B ALL lacking CD19 expression.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Resorption / complications. Cytokines / blood. Diphosphonates / administration & dosage. Hypercalcemia / complications. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein / blood. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acids / analysis. Amino Acids / urine. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Bone Density Conservation Agents / administration & dosage. Child, Preschool. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Male. Remission Induction. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
  • (PMID = 16496289.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5009
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amino Acids; 0 / Bone Density Conservation Agents; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein; 90032-33-0 / deoxypyridinoline
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100. Galimberti S, Sasieni P, Valsecchi MG: A weighted Kaplan-Meier estimator for matched data with application to the comparison of chemotherapy and bone-marrow transplant in leukaemia. Stat Med; 2002 Dec 30;21(24):3847-64
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  • [Title] A weighted Kaplan-Meier estimator for matched data with application to the comparison of chemotherapy and bone-marrow transplant in leukaemia.
  • Studies on the comparison of transplantation with respect to standard therapy present a number of statistical challenges: they are usually not randomized, often retrospective (based on registry data) and the treatment assignment is time dependent (waiting time to transplant).
  • Matching on known prognostic factors and waiting time to transplant can be used to select appropriate samples for the analysis.
  • When a variable number of patients treated with conventional therapy matches each transplanted patient, the standard estimating and testing procedures need to be modified in order to account for the fact that matched data are highly stratified, with strata containing a few, possibly censored, observations.
  • The problem of the comparison of the survival experience in the two treatment groups is also considered.
  • Two tests, based on the distance between the survival estimates calculated at a prefixed time point, are examined and their behaviour is evaluated through simulations.
  • The procedures proposed here are applied to data collected from an Italian study whose aim was the evaluation of bone marrow transplant, as compared to intensive chemotherapy, in the cure of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Transplantation / standards. Drug Therapy / standards. Matched-Pair Analysis. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • (PMID = 12483771.001).
  • [ISSN] 0277-6715
  • [Journal-full-title] Statistics in medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stat Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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