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1. Gately S, Kerbel R: Therapeutic potential of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in the management of tumor angiogenesis. Prog Exp Tumor Res; 2003;37:179-92
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  • [Title] Therapeutic potential of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in the management of tumor angiogenesis.
  • Selective pharmacologic inhibition of COX-2 represents a viable therapeutic option for the treatment of malignancies.
  • Agents that selectively inhibit COX-2 appear to be safe, and well tolerated suggesting that chronic treatment for angiogenesis inhibition is feasible [107-110].
  • Because these agents inhibit angiogenesis, they should have at least additive benefit in combination with standard chemotherapy [111] and radiation therapy [24, 112].
  • In preclinical models, a selective inhibitor of COX-2 was shown to potentiate the beneficial antitumor effects of ionizing radiation with no increase in normal tissue cytotoxicity [113-115].
  • This antiangiogenic chemotherapy regimen could be enhanced by the concurrent administration of an angiogenesis inhibitor [116-119].
  • Given the safety and tolerability of the selective COX-2 inhibitors, and the potent antiangiogenic properties of these agents, the combination of antiangiogenic chemotherapy with a COX-2 inhibitor warrants clinical evaluation [118, 121, 122].
  • In conclusion, the contribution of COX-2 at multiple points in the angiogenic cascade makes it an ideal target for pharmacologic inhibition.
  • As premalignant lesions progress towards malignancy, there is a switch to the angiogenic phenotype that is subsequently followed by rapid tumor growth [128, 129].
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Isoenzymes / antagonists & inhibitors. Neoplasms / blood supply. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 12795055.001).
  • [ISSN] 0079-6263
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in experimental tumor research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Exp Tumor Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / Endothelial Growth Factors; 0 / Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / Lymphokines; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors; 57576-52-0 / Thromboxane A2; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 1.14.99.1 / PTGS2 protein, human; EC 1.14.99.1 / Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
  • [Number-of-references] 131
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2. Giraudo E, Inoue M, Hanahan D: An amino-bisphosphonate targets MMP-9-expressing macrophages and angiogenesis to impair cervical carcinogenesis. J Clin Invest; 2004 Sep;114(5):623-33
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  • A mouse model involving the human papillomavirus type-16 oncogenes develops cervical cancers by lesional stages analogous to those in humans.
  • Preclinical trials sought to target MMP-9 and angiogenesis with a prototypical MMP inhibitor and with a bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid (ZA), revealing both to be antiangiogenic, producing effects comparable to a Mmp9 gene KO in impairing angiogenic switching, progression of premalignant lesions, and tumor growth.
  • ZA therapy increased neoplastic epithelial and endothelial cell apoptosis without affecting hyperproliferation, indicating that ZA was not antimitotic.
  • Given its track record in clinical use with limited toxicity, ZA holds promise as an "unconventional" MMP-9 inhibitor for antiangiogenic therapy of cervical cancer and potentially for additional cancers and other diseases where MMP-9 expression by infiltrating macrophages is evident.
  • [MeSH-major] Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / blood supply. Diphosphonates / pharmacology. Imidazoles / pharmacology. Macrophages / drug effects. Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / blood supply
  • [MeSH-minor] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Animals. Cell Movement / drug effects. Enzyme Activation / drug effects. Female. Humans. Macrophage Activation / drug effects. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 / metabolism. Mice. Mice, Transgenic. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors / metabolism


3. Lippman SM, Sudbø J, Hong WK: Oral cancer prevention and the evolution of molecular-targeted drug development. J Clin Oncol; 2005 Jan 10;23(2):346-56
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  • [Title] Oral cancer prevention and the evolution of molecular-targeted drug development.
  • Biomarkers of genomic instability, such as aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, can accurately measure the cancer risk of oral premalignant lesions, or intraepithelial neoplasia (IEN).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma in Situ / prevention & control. Drug Delivery Systems. Mouth Neoplasms / prevention & control. Technology, Pharmaceutical
  • [MeSH-minor] Aneuploidy. Biomarkers, Tumor. Cyclooxygenase 2. Green Fluorescent Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. Humans. Isoenzymes / antagonists & inhibitors. Membrane Proteins. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Precancerous Conditions / genetics. Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 15637397.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 16672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / N01 CN 35159; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA 106451; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA 52051; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA 79437
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / enhanced green fluorescent protein; 147336-22-9 / Green Fluorescent Proteins; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 1.14.99.1 / PTGS2 protein, human; EC 1.14.99.1 / Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
  • [Number-of-references] 92
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4. Klaassen I, Braakhuis BJ: Anticancer activity and mechanism of action of retinoids in oral and pharyngeal cancer. Oral Oncol; 2002 Sep;38(6):532-42
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  • Administration of retinoids has been shown to elicit responses in leukoplakia, a premalignant lesion of the oral mucosa that frequently develops into invasive cancer.
  • Because of the short duration of the response, the intrinsic resistance to retinoids and the toxic side effects, the treatment with this class of compounds has not become a standard therapy.
  • This review gives an update on the role of retinoids in oral and oropharyngeal cancer and their precursor lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Mouth Neoplasms / prevention & control. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / prevention & control. Retinoids / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Leukoplakia, Oral / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 12167430.001).
  • [ISSN] 1368-8375
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Retinoids
  • [Number-of-references] 107
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5. Sharma RA: The advancement of cancer chemoprevention by revision of clinical trial strategies. Panminerva Med; 2002 Mar;44(1):41-5
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  • After a quarter of a century of rapid advances in cancer research, the focus of oncological drug development has shifted from cytotoxic chemotherapy to rationally designed agents that target specific molecules associated with malignant cells or their environment.
  • As a consequence of greater public awareness of health related issues and population screening, the detection of early cancer or premalignant lesions has demonstrated the potential that exists for targeting the same molecules during carcinogenesis.
  • This structured approach currently emerging is providing pharmacological and mechanistic data on novel agents which will prove essential in the planning of larger-scale commitments.

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  • (PMID = 11887091.001).
  • [ISSN] 0031-0808
  • [Journal-full-title] Panminerva medica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Panminerva Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Number-of-references] 38
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6. Amini S, Viera MH, Valins W, Berman B: Nonsurgical innovations in the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol; 2010 Jun;3(6):20-34
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  • [Title] Nonsurgical innovations in the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer.
  • Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most frequent types of cancer in the United States and represent 75 percent and 20 percent, respectively, of all nonmelanoma skin cancers.
  • Additional preventive measures include identifying high-risk individuals for early detection along with using agents, such as retinoids, that are effective in decreasing the risk of premalignant cells further developing into carcinomas.
  • Procedural modalities are currently the standard of treatment, but recent evidence has consistently shown that newer (nonsurgical) therapies, such as interferon, imiquimod, retinoids, and 5-fluorouracil, can be used effectively either as monotherapies or as adjuvants to those surgical modalities for the treatment of superficial nonmelanoma skin cancers and premalignant lesions.
  • These newer therapies have achieved significant reductions in morbidity and mortality.
  • Procedural modalities that have been evolving into important tools for the treatment of actinic keratosis and nonmelanoma skin cancers include photodynamic therapy and lasers.
  • Nonsurgical therapies currently proving to be effective in clinical trials include ingenol mebutate and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

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  • (PMID = 20725548.001).
  • [ISSN] 1941-2789
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical and aesthetic dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Aesthet Dermatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2921754
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7. Scardina GA, Ruggieri A, Messina P: Chronic hyperplastic candidosis: a pilot study of the efficacy of 0.18% isotretinoin. J Oral Sci; 2009 Sep;51(3):407-10
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  • Chronic hyperplastic candidosis (CHC) is considered a premalignant lesion of the oral mucosa, occurring as speckled or homogeneous white lesions.
  • If the lesions are untreated, a minor proportion may become dysplastic and progress to carcinoma.
  • The traditional treatment of this lesion is based on the use of antifungal agents.
  • The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of 0.18% isotretinoin for treatment of nystatin-resistant candidiasis.
  • In all six patients, daily antimycotic topical therapy with nystatin for 30 days had failed to resolve the candidal stomatitis.
  • After one month of isotretinoin treatment, five of the six patients were negative for Candida, whereas in untreated control patients the situation was unchanged.
  • None of the patients had any complaints about the medication.
  • [MeSH-major] Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Candidiasis, Oral / drug therapy. Isotretinoin / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Chronic Disease. Drug Resistance, Fungal. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Nystatin / pharmacology. Pilot Projects

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  • (PMID = 19776507.001).
  • [ISSN] 1880-4926
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oral science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Oral Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 1400-61-9 / Nystatin; EH28UP18IF / Isotretinoin
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8. Unger M: Endobronchial therapy of neoplasms. Chest Surg Clin N Am; 2003 Feb;13(1):129-47
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  • [Title] Endobronchial therapy of neoplasms.
  • The majority of these obstructions are part of pulmonary involvement by primary lung neoplasms or metastatic lesions from other organs.
  • Benign lesions, although capable of producing similar symptoms, are more rare.
  • Successful endobronchial management of airway obstruction not only provides significant improvement in patients' quality of life, it also adds to their survival time.
  • Both results fulfill the stated goals of appropriate and desired palliative therapy.
  • Interventional pulmonology also contributes to research of the process of lung carcinogenesis and the introduction of targeted therapy for early minimally invasive cancer and the potential chemotherapy of premalignant lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Bronchial Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 12698642.001).
  • [ISSN] 1052-3359
  • [Journal-full-title] Chest surgery clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chest Surg. Clin. N. Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 53
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9. Baroli A, Pedrazzini L, Lomuscio G, Marzoli L: Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Practical aspects of multimodal therapy and data emerging from a 40-year experience at a single Italian institution. Minerva Endocrinol; 2010 Mar;35(1):9-16
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  • [Title] Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Practical aspects of multimodal therapy and data emerging from a 40-year experience at a single Italian institution.
  • Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is a rare malignant neoplasia with high biological aggressiveness and rapid and lethal clinical course.
  • In selected patients, an aggressive multimodal therapy could decrease illness progression both in the neck e in other sites.
  • However, it is not clear if these combined treatments improve survival.
  • In our institution, the Department of Nuclear Medicine has a 40-year experience in monitor and treatment of a group of 48 patient with ATC confirmation that clinical presentation could overlap pre-existent nodular goitre or rapid enlarging mass of recent onset.
  • A better mean survival was noticed in those patients who respond to the multimodal therapy (8 months vs 4.6 months).
  • Radioiodine (131 I) therapy is unnecessary due to the loss of NIS expression of the ATC cells.
  • Therefore, after quick clinical and instrumental work up, our experience and the literature data suggest that the first line therapy is represented from external radiotherapy combined also with cisplatin or doxorubicin, followed by "curative" surgical procedure of the primary lesion in the neck and subsequent chemotherapy.
  • For those patients who show distant metastasis at onset chemotherapy is the first line therapy followed by external radiotherapy and when possible subsequent surgical procedure.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / diagnosis. Carcinoma / therapy. Thyroid Neoplasms / diagnosis. Thyroid Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Incidence. Italy / epidemiology. Male. Middle Aged. Prevalence. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Research Design / statistics & numerical data. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20386523.001).
  • [ISSN] 0391-1977
  • [Journal-full-title] Minerva endocrinologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Minerva Endocrinol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  • [Number-of-references] 29
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10. Cao DZ, Sun WH, Ou XL, Yu Q, Yu T, Zhang YZ, Wu ZY, Xue QP, Cheng YL: Effects of folic acid on epithelial apoptosis and expression of Bcl-2 and p53 in premalignant gastric lesions. World J Gastroenterol; 2005 Mar 21;11(11):1571-6
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  • [Title] Effects of folic acid on epithelial apoptosis and expression of Bcl-2 and p53 in premalignant gastric lesions.
  • AIM: To evaluate the effects of folic acid on epithelial apoptosis and expression of Bcl-2 and p53 in the tissues of premalignant gastric lesions.
  • METHODS: Thirty-eight patients, with premalignant gastric lesions including 18 colonic-type intestinal metaplasia (IM) and 20 mild or moderate dysplasia, were randomly divided into a treatment group (n = 19) receiving folic acid 10 mg thrice daily and a control group (n = 19) receiving sucralfate 1,000 mg thrice daily for 3 mo.
  • All patients underwent endoscopies and four biopsies were taken prior to treatment and repeated after concluding therapy.
  • RESULTS: The mean of folate concentration in gastric mucosa was 9.03+/-3.37 microg/g wet wt in the folic acid treatment group, which was significantly higher than 6.83+/-3.02 microg/g wet wt in the control group.
  • Both the epithelial apoptosis rate and the tumor suppressor p53 expression in gastric mucosa significantly increased after folic acid treatment.
  • In contrast, the expression of Bcl-2 oncogene protein decreased after folic acid therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: These data indicate that folic acid may play an important role in the chemoprevention of gastric carcinogenesis by enhancing gastric epithelial apoptosis in the patients with premalignant lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Folic Acid / administration & dosage. Hematinics / administration & dosage. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / metabolism. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Apoptosis / drug effects. Epithelial Cells / metabolism. Epithelial Cells / pathology. Female. G1 Phase / drug effects. Gastric Mucosa / metabolism. Gastric Mucosa / pathology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 15786529.001).
  • [ISSN] 1007-9327
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hematinics; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 935E97BOY8 / Folic Acid
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4305933
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11. Khuri FR: Primary and secondary prevention of non-small-cell lung cancer: the SPORE Trials of Lung Cancer Prevention. Clin Lung Cancer; 2003 Sep;5 Suppl 1:S36-40
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  • The aims of chemoprevention in lung cancer are to prevent the appearance of disease (primary prevention) and to stop or reverse the progression of premalignant lesions (secondary prevention).
  • However, the results achieved with tamoxifen in the prevention of breast cancer, and the emergence of new therapies specifically targeted to molecules involved in the pathogenesis of lung cancer have set the stage for investigation of these agents for chemoprevention of lung cancer.
  • The SPORE (Specialized Program of Research Excellence) Trials of Lung Cancer Prevention (STOP) are 2 parallel studies that will investigate the potential effectiveness of gefitinib and tipifarnib in preventing the appearance and progression of premalignant lesions in former or current smokers with a history of smoking-related cancer.
  • The STOP trial objectives are to evaluate the effect of gefitinib and tipifarnib on histologic and biologic parameters in patients with evidence of sputum atypia, to evaluate various parameters as potential predictors of the effectiveness of these agents, and to evaluate the tolerability of these agents over a 6-month course of treatment.
  • Histologic response, defined as prevention of appearance or progression of premalignant lesions, is the primary endpoint of these trials.
  • New targeted molecular therapies such as gefitinib and tipifarnib may offer the opportunity to make chemoprevention a viable treatment modality in lung cancer as well as in other human solid tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / prevention & control. Chemoprevention. Lung Neoplasms / prevention & control. Quinazolines / therapeutic use. Quinolones / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor. Clinical Trials as Topic. Disease Progression. Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Humans. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 14641993.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-7304
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lung cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Quinazolines; 0 / Quinolones; 62229-50-9 / Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; MAT637500A / tipifarnib; S65743JHBS / gefitinib
  • [Number-of-references] 43
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12. Oldenburg J, Alfsen GC, Lien HH, Aass N, Waehre H, Fossa SD: Postchemotherapy retroperitoneal surgery remains necessary in patients with nonseminomatous testicular cancer and minimal residual tumor masses. J Clin Oncol; 2003 Sep 1;21(17):3310-7
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  • PURPOSE: To determine preoperative parameters that predict the histology of specimens obtained by retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) in patients with nonseminomatous germ cell cancer (NSGCT) whose residual mass was </= 20 mm in diameter after modern cisplatin-based induction chemotherapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-seven patients with metastatic NSGCT underwent RPLND after having received cisplatin- or carboplatin-based induction chemotherapy.
  • In all patients, the largest diameter of the residual mass on the transaxial plane was </= 20 mm, as assessed by abdominal computed tomography (CT) immediately before RPLND.
  • RESULTS: Complete fibrosis or necrosis was found in 58 patients (67%), teratoma was found in 23 patients (26%), and vital malignant germ cell tumor was found in six patients (7%), including one patient with rhabdomyosarcoma in the RPLND specimen.
  • In five of the six latter patients, the residual lesion was </= 10 mm at pre-RPLND CT.
  • No pre- or postchemotherapy clinical or radiologic parameter was identified that significantly predicted the histology of the residual mass.
  • CONCLUSION: One third of retroperitoneal postchemotherapy lesions </= 20 mm contained residual vital tumor tissue, despite modern chemotherapy regimens.
  • Therefore, postchemotherapy RPLND remains necessary in patients with minimal-size residual lesions to facilitate easy and safe follow-up and initiate additional therapy as early as possible, thus avoiding recurrences.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Chi-Square Distribution. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Humans. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Lymph Node Excision. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Peritoneum. Statistics, Nonparametric. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Jun 1;23(16):3853 [15923581.001]
  • (PMID = 12947067.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
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13. Ong CA, Lao-Sirieix P, Fitzgerald RC: Biomarkers in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma: predictors of progression and prognosis. World J Gastroenterol; 2010 Dec 07;16(45):5669-81
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  • Barrett's esophagus is a well-known premalignant lesion of the lower esophagus that is characterized by intestinal metaplasia of the squamous epithelium.
  • In addition, when patients develop EA, the current staging modalities are limited in stratifying patients into different prognostic groups in order to guide the optimal therapy for an individual patient.
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Cycle Proteins / analysis. Cell Proliferation. Disease Progression. Early Detection of Cancer. Epigenesis, Genetic. Genetic Markers. Humans. Loss of Heterozygosity. Ploidies. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 21128316.001).
  • [ISSN] 2219-2840
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / MC/ U105365007
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / Genetic Markers
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2997982
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14. Vignot S, Spano JP, Lantuejoul S, André F, Le Chevalier T, Soria JC: Chemoprevention of lung cancer. Recent Results Cancer Res; 2005;166:145-65
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  • Lung cancer remains a major cause of mortality worldwide, despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • Most patients present with advanced disease, and early detection approaches are still experimental.
  • Identification of molecular defects involved in premalignant lesions and/or invasive cancer could lead to clinical studies with new molecular-targeted agents (mainly tyrosine kinase inhibitors, farnesyl-transferase inhibitors and/or antiangiogenic molecules) and the development of surrogate biomarkers.
  • Such biomarkers would be essential to detect high-risk patients, select adequate chemoprevention strategies and monitor drug efficacy.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15648189.001).
  • [ISSN] 0080-0015
  • [Journal-full-title] Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progrès dans les recherches sur le cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Recent Results Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
  • [Number-of-references] 88
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15. Strecker TE, Shen Q, Zhang Y, Hill JL, Li Y, Wang C, Kim HT, Gilmer TM, Sexton KR, Hilsenbeck SG, Osborne CK, Brown PH: Effect of lapatinib on the development of estrogen receptor-negative mammary tumors in mice. J Natl Cancer Inst; 2009 Jan 21;101(2):107-13
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  • Lapatinib, a selective orally available inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinases, is a promising agent for the treatment of breast cancer.
  • We examined the effect of lapatinib on the development of mammary tumors in MMTV-erbB2 transgenic mice, which express wild-type ErbB2 under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter and spontaneously develop estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and ErbB2-positive mammary tumors by 14 months of age.
  • By 328 days after the start of treatment, all 17 (100%) of the vehicle-treated mice vs five (31%) of the 16 mice treated with high-dose lapatinib developed mammary tumors (P < .001).
  • Among MMTV-erbB2 mice treated for 5 months (n = 20 mice per group), those treated with lapatinib had fewer premalignant lesions and noninvasive cancers in their mammary glands than those treated with vehicle (P = .02).
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / drug therapy. Cyclin D1 / drug effects. Cyclin D1 / metabolism. Epidermal Growth Factor / drug effects. Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism. Epiregulin. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Humans. Mice. Mice, Transgenic. RNA, Messenger / drug effects. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Receptors, Estrogen / analysis. Signal Transduction / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 19141783.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-2105
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the National Cancer Institute
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA58183
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / EREG protein, human; 0 / Epiregulin; 0 / Ereg protein, mouse; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Quinazolines; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Estrogen; 0VUA21238F / lapatinib; 136601-57-5 / Cyclin D1; 62229-50-9 / Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 2.7.10.1 / Erbb2 protein, mouse; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-2
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2639315
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16. Okamoto Y, Liu X, Suzuki N, Okamoto K, Kim HJ, Laxmi YR, Sayama K, Shibutani S: Equine estrogen-induced mammary tumors in rats. Toxicol Lett; 2010 Apr 1;193(3):224-8
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  • Long-term hormone replacement therapy is associated with an increased risk of breast, ovarian and endometrial cancers in women.
  • Equine estrogens are a principal component of hormone replacement therapy; however, their tumorigenic potential toward mammary tissue and reproductive organs has not been extensively explored.
  • Histological examination revealed premalignant lesions such as apocrine metaplasia in whole-mount preparations of mammary gland from the equilin-treated rats.
  • ACI rats given 10mg equilin developed palpable mammary tumors at 13 weeks of treatment, and 37.5% of the rats developed mammary tumors within 15 weeks.
  • For 2.5mg equilin, palpable tumors were observed in 8.3% of the rats after 8 weeks' treatment; the frequency was lower than that (42.9%) observed with 2.5mg E(2).
  • Evidently, equilin is a mammary carcinogen, and this potential may be associated with development of breast and reproductive cancers in women receiving hormone replacement therapy.

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  • [Copyright] 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20096754.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-3169
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicology letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicol. Lett.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES012408-05; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / R01 ES012408; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES012408; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / R01 ES012408-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrogens, Conjugated (USP)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS177456; NLM/ PMC2837116
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17. Luchman HA, Benediktsson H, Villemaire ML, Peterson AC, Jirik FR: The pace of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia development is determined by the timing of Pten tumor suppressor gene excision. PLoS One; 2008;3(12):e3940
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  • Given that the prostate undergoes rapid androgen-dependent growth at puberty, and that Pten excisions during this time might be especially tumorigenic, we hypothesized that delaying prostate-specific Pten deletions until immediately after puberty might alter the pace of tumorigenesis.
  • Despite evidence of increased Akt/mTOR/S6K axis activity at early time points in Pten-deficient epithelial cells, excisions induced in the post-pubertal (6 wk-old) prostate yielded gradual acquisition of a range of lesions.
  • These progressed from pre-malignant changes (nuclear atypia, focal hyperplasia) and low grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) at 16-20 wks post-tamoxifen exposure, to overtly malignant lesions by approximately 1 yr of age, characterized by high-grade PIN and microinvasive carcinoma.
  • In contrast, when Pten excisions were triggered in the pre-pubertal (2 week-old) prostate, neoplasia evolved over a more abbreviated time-frame, with a spectrum of premalignant lesions, as well as overt PIN and microinvasive carcinoma by 10-12 wks post-tamoxifen exposure.
  • [MeSH-minor] Androgen-Binding Protein / genetics. Animals. Apoptosis. Arrestins / metabolism. Cell Proliferation. Crosses, Genetic. Disease Progression. Epithelium / enzymology. Epithelium / pathology. Female. Humans. Integrases / metabolism. Male. Mice. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases / metabolism. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Precancerous Conditions / enzymology. Precancerous Conditions / genetics. Precancerous Conditions / pathology. Rats. Ribosomal Protein S6 / metabolism. Tamoxifen / analogs & derivatives. Tamoxifen / therapeutic use. Time Factors. Up-Regulation


18. Lakatos PL, Lakatos L: [Current concepts in the genetics of hereditary and sporadic colorectal cancer and the role of genetics in clinical practice: sporadic and IBD-associated colorectal tumors, significance of genetic tests in diagnosis, prognosis and assessment of chemotherapy outcome]. Orv Hetil; 2006 Mar 12;147(10):449-55
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  • [Title] [Current concepts in the genetics of hereditary and sporadic colorectal cancer and the role of genetics in clinical practice: sporadic and IBD-associated colorectal tumors, significance of genetic tests in diagnosis, prognosis and assessment of chemotherapy outcome].
  • Reason for this is partly that CRC has a strong hereditary trait and premalignant lesions are frequent and easily accessible.
  • In the second part of the review the authors discuss the genetic background of sporadic and IBD associated colorectal cancers as well as the role of genetics in the diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of therapy.
  • Similarly, genetic investigation may play an increasing role in the prediction of prognosis, therapy and complication of chemotherapy.
  • A more distant goal may be the individualization of the therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Colorectal Neoplasms / genetics. Irritable Bowel Syndrome / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenomatous Polyposis Coli / genetics. Chromosomal Instability. Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis / genetics. DNA Methylation. Gene Expression Profiling. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Microsatellite Repeats. Mutation. Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome / genetics. Pharmacogenetics. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome


19. Doganavsargil B, Argin M, Kececi B, Sezak M, Sanli UA, Oztop F: Secondary osteosarcoma arising in fibrous dysplasia, case report. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg; 2009 Apr;129(4):439-44
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  • Malignant transformation of fibrous dysplasia is very rare.
  • Early radiological features of sarcomatous transformation are moth-eaten or cystic areas of osteolysis, cortical destruction and gradual formation of a soft tissue mass.
  • The prognosis is unfavorable as most of the cases are in an advanced stage in the time of diagnosis.
  • Plain graphies of left femur showed a well-delineated lesion with endosteal scalloping and areas having a ground-glass appearance.
  • The MRI revealed minimal contrast enhancement but no heterogenous signal intensity, cortical destruction, periost reaction or accompanying soft tissue component was noted.
  • The lesion was initially curetted.
  • But being diagnosed as osteosarcoma histologically, classical osteosarcoma protocol pre and postoperative chemotherapy was applied.
  • Resected femur showed areas of fibrous dysplasia admixed with osteosarcoma having fibroblastic, chondroblastic and osteoblastic areas that were focally invading the soft tissue.
  • She did not respond to postoperative chemotherapy and lost with pulmonary metastases less than a years' time after the operation.
  • The case is presented to increase awareness on the possibility of malignant transformation in an otherwise unsuspected fibrous dysplasia.


20. Ravery V: Chemotherapy of premalignant lesions: new insights. BJU Int; 2007 Jul;100 Suppl 2:18-21
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  • [Title] Chemotherapy of premalignant lesions: new insights.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Antioxidants / therapeutic use. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 17594352.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-4096
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Antioxidants; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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21. Deviere J: Barrett's oesophagus: the new endoscopic modalities have a future. Gut; 2005 Mar;54 Suppl 1:i33-7
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  • Barrett's oesophagus is defined as the replacement of squamous oesophageal epithelium by intestinal metaplasia in the distal oesophagus.
  • GORD is essential for the development of Barrett's oesophagus.1 Intestinal metaplasia is a premalignant lesion that may further develop into dysplasia and lead to adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus.
  • Patients with Barrett's oesophagus have a 2-25% risk of developing mild to severe dysplasia and a 2-5% risk of having adenocarcinoma: 30-150 times higher than the risk in the general population.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Esophageal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Esophageal Neoplasms / pathology. Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery. Esophagoscopy / methods. Esophagus / pathology. Esophagus / surgery. Humans. Metaplasia / surgery. Mucous Membrane / pathology. Mucous Membrane / surgery. Photochemotherapy / methods. Postoperative Complications / etiology. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Precancerous Conditions / pathology. Precancerous Conditions / surgery

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  • (PMID = 15711006.001).
  • [ISSN] 0017-5749
  • [Journal-full-title] Gut
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gut
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 50
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1867791
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22. Serdar ZA, Eren PA, Canbakan M, Turan K, Tellioglu G, Gülle S, Ozgezer T, Kara M, Berber I, Titiz MI: Dermatologic findings in renal transplant recipients: Possible effects of immunosuppression regimen and p53 mutations. Transplant Proc; 2010 Sep;42(7):2538-41
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  • OBJECTIVE: To analyze the dermatologic lesions and possible effects of immunosuppression treatment and p53 gene mutations on dermatologic findings in renal transplant recipients.
  • Patients were categorized into 3 groups according to time since the transplantation procedure.
  • The most frequently observed drug-related lesion was hypertrichosis, in 46 of 150 patients.
  • Of 115 lesions, the most commonly observed were verruca vulgaris (n = 34) from viruses, and pityriasis versicolor (n = 21) from superficial fungal infections.
  • Compared with the entire cohort, the group with premalignant lesions demonstrated more p53 mutations (11% vs 50%; P = .004).
  • Patients given cyclosporine therapy exhibited more premalignant or malignant cutaneous lesions compared with patients who received other agents (P = .03).
  • CONCLUSION: Patients carrying p53 mutations developed a malignant lesion in the late posttransplantation period, which suggests the importance of prediction of risk.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Dermatomycoses / epidemiology. Drug Therapy, Combination. Exons / genetics. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational. Postoperative Complications / genetics. Precancerous Conditions / genetics. Skin Diseases, Bacterial / epidemiology. Skin Diseases, Viral / epidemiology. Time Factors

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  • [Copyright] 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20832539.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2623
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
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23. Huber S, Wagner M, Zuna I, Medl M, Czembirek H, Delorme S: Locally advanced breast carcinoma: evaluation of mammography in the prediction of residual disease after induction chemotherapy. Anticancer Res; 2000 Jan-Feb;20(1B):553-8
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  • [Title] Locally advanced breast carcinoma: evaluation of mammography in the prediction of residual disease after induction chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess the mammographic features of locally advanced breast carcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and to evaluate morphological criteria that determine the value of mammography in therapy monitoring.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed the pre- and post-therapeutic mammograms of 44 patients with stage III-breast carcinoma with regard to tumor characteristics and malignant calcifications and compared to histopathological results.
  • In 34 tumors more than 50% of the lesion was defined; these showed a high correlation between the mammographically determined tumor diameter and that determined on histopathological examination (r = 0.77).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The diagnostic value of mammography in the evaluation of tumor response to induction chemotherapy depends primarily on the extent to which the tumor can be delineated from the adjacent breast tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / radiography. Mammography
  • [MeSH-minor] Calcinosis / etiology. Calcinosis / radiography. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Mastectomy. Neoplasm, Residual. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 10769724.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GREECE
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24. Nucci V, Torchia D, Cappugi P: Treatment of anogenital condylomata acuminata with topical photodynamic therapy: report of 14 cases and review. Int J Infect Dis; 2010 Sep;14 Suppl 3:e280-2
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  • [Title] Treatment of anogenital condylomata acuminata with topical photodynamic therapy: report of 14 cases and review.
  • Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is an emerging technique for the treatment of genital human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced benign and premalignant lesions.
  • We conclude that PDT can be considered a highly effective and safe treatment option for anogenital condylomata acuminata.
  • [MeSH-major] Condylomata Acuminata / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Adolescent. Adult. Aminolevulinic Acid / administration & dosage. Aminolevulinic Acid / therapeutic use. Anus Diseases / drug therapy. Anus Diseases / pathology. Female. Genital Diseases, Female / drug therapy. Genital Diseases, Female / pathology. Genital Diseases, Male / drug therapy. Genital Diseases, Male / pathology. Humans. Male. Photosensitizing Agents / administration & dosage. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20346722.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-3511
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of infectious diseases : IJID : official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Infect. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 88755TAZ87 / Aminolevulinic Acid
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25. Podhorecka M: [gamma H2AX in the recognition of DNA double-strand breaks]. Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online); 2009 Feb 27;63:92-8
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  • Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly deleterious DNA lesions because they can lead to chromosome aberrations or apoptosis.
  • The development of immunocytochemical methods of gamma H2AX detection provided a convenient tool for research and is considered a gold standard for DSB analysis.
  • These methods are sensitive and specific in the detection of a single DSB.
  • Assessment of H2AX phosphorylation can be used in clinical practice as a marker of premalignant lesions and to predict cell sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 19252467.001).
  • [ISSN] 1732-2693
  • [Journal-full-title] Postepy higieny i medycyny doswiadczalnej (Online)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online)
  • [Language] POL
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / H2AFX protein, human; 0 / Histones; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; EC 2.7.11.1 / ATM protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
  • [Number-of-references] 68
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26. Papanikolaou A: Osseous hydatid disease. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg; 2008 Mar;102(3):233-8
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  • Pre-operative diagnosis is based on radiological findings and serological assays, which lack high sensitivity and specificity.
  • The treatment of choice is surgical, following the principles of a locally malignant lesion.
  • Chemotherapy (albendazole alone or in combination with praziquantel) is used as an adjuvant treatment or when surgery is not possible.
  • The prognosis is often poor, especially in the spine: most patients do not recover neurologically, the mortality and complication rate is high and many cases recur, as it is often impossible to radically excise the pathologic tissue.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Sheep / parasitology. Tomography Scanners, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 17996916.001).
  • [ISSN] 0035-9203
  • [Journal-full-title] Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 39
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27. Braga L, Semelka RC, Pedro MS, de Barros N: Post-treatment malignant liver lesions. MR imaging. Magn Reson Imaging Clin N Am; 2002 Feb;10(1):53-73
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  • [Title] Post-treatment malignant liver lesions. MR imaging.
  • MR imaging is also an excellent method for evaluation of the liver after surgical resection, systemic or local tumor therapies, and liver transplantation.
  • It permits early recognition of complications and the presence of recurrent tumor, providing an opportunity to repeat treatment or use alternative treatment.
  • Surgical resection remains the standard therapy for treating liver metastases.
  • The variety of techniques and the sensitivity for contrast enhancement have made MR imaging an ideal method to follow the response of tumors to various treatment approaches.
  • The appearance of tumor recurrence and the response to treatment are relatively consistently shown on MR images; however, the time course of change in lesion appearance has not been fully elucidated, particularly in the setting of chemotherapy.
  • Evaluating the response to chemotherapy is rendered complex because of the longer duration of the therapy, the types of response that various chemotherapeutic agents engender, the method of action of this therapy and the time of imaging in relation to therapy.
  • The various local therapies share some general principles of action, and many have similar MR imaging findings.
  • Some local therapies are effective only with certain malignancies (e.g., alcohol therapy and HCC), whereas other therapies are more limited because of the size of the tumor kill zone (e.g., interstitial laser therapy).
  • We are in the early stages of using MR imaging to guide local therapies and to monitor response during treatment in real time.
  • The role of MR imaging in liver transplantation involves pre- and postoperative investigation of both donors (in the case of living-related transplantation) and recipients.
  • [MeSH-major] Liver Neoplasms / diagnosis. Liver Neoplasms / therapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • [MeSH-minor] Cryotherapy. Embolization, Therapeutic. Hepatectomy. Humans. Laser Coagulation. Liver Transplantation. Microwaves / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11998575.001).
  • [ISSN] 1064-9689
  • [Journal-full-title] Magnetic resonance imaging clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Magn Reson Imaging Clin N Am
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 101
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28. Hersmus R, de Leeuw BH, Stoop H, Bernard P, van Doorn HC, Brüggenwirth HT, Drop SL, Oosterhuis JW, Harley VR, Looijenga LH: A novel SRY missense mutation affecting nuclear import in a 46,XY female patient with bilateral gonadoblastoma. Eur J Hum Genet; 2009 Dec;17(12):1642-9
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  • Patients with disorders of sex development (DSD), especially those with gonadal dysgenesis and hypovirilization, are at risk of developing the so-called type II germ cell tumors (GCTs).
  • Both carcinoma in situ and gonadoblastoma (GB) can be the precursor lesion, resulting in a seminomatous or non-seminomatous invasive cancer.
  • The premalignant lesion of the initially removed gonad was positive for OCT3/4, TSPY and stem cell factor in germ cells, and for FOXL2 in the stromal component (ie, granulosa cells), but not for SOX9.
  • On the basis of these findings, prophylactical gonadectomy of the other gonad was performed, also showing a GB lesion positive for both FOXL2 (ovary) and SOX9 (testis).
  • The identified W70L mutation in the SRY gene resulted in a 50% reduction in the nuclear accumulation of the mutant protein compared with wild type.
  • This case shows the value of the proper diagnosis of human GCTs in identification of patients with DSD, which allows subsequent early diagnosis and prevention of the development of an invasive cancer, likely to be treated by chemotherapy at young age.

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  • (PMID = 19513096.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5438
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of human genetics : EJHG
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / SRY protein, human; 0 / Sex-Determining Region Y Protein
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2987026
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29. Obszynska JA, Atherfold PA, Nanji M, Glancy D, Santander S, Graham TA, Otto WR, West K, Harrison RF, Jankowski JA: Long-term proton pump induced hypergastrinaemia does induce lineage-specific restitution but not clonal expansion in benign Barrett's oesophagus in vivo. Gut; 2010 Feb;59(2):156-63
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  • BACKGROUND: Barrett's oesophagus is a common premalignant lesion caused partly by acid reflux.
  • Although the requisite therapy, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), have been implicated in the progression of Barrett's oesophagus in animal models, harmful effects of prolonged PPI therapy in Barrett's oesophagus is both inconclusive and controversial.
  • We therefore aimed to test the role of PPI-induced hypergastrinaemia in vitro and see whether any biological parameters were useful surrogates of long-term therapy in man.
  • METHODS: We undertook detailed serological and tissue assessment of gastrin and CCK(2) receptors in 90 patients randomised to different doses of PPI therapy during a detailed 2-year follow-up.
  • CONCLUSION: While the short-term effects of gastrin enhance epithelial restitution in Barrett's oesophagus (but not squamous mucosa) there is no clinical evidence that Barrett's oesophagus length expands over time.
  • This study, which is the largest and longest term randomised controlled trial of gastrin biology in Barrett's oesophagus, is further proof of the clinical safety of PPI therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Barrett Esophagus / drug therapy. Esophageal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Gastrins / biosynthesis. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Proton Pump Inhibitors / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cell Movement / drug effects. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay / methods. Esophagus / metabolism. Female. Gastric Mucosa / metabolism. Gene Expression. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. RNA, Messenger / genetics. Receptor, Cholecystokinin B / biosynthesis. Receptor, Cholecystokinin B / genetics. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods. Tumor Cells, Cultured


30. Sehr P, Pawlita M, Lewis J: Evaluation of different glutathione S-transferase-tagged protein captures for screening E6/E6AP interaction inhibitors using AlphaScreen. J Biomol Screen; 2007 Jun;12(4):560-7
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  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is responsible for the development of cervical cancer and its premalignant lesions in women.
  • The virus-encoded oncogene E6 is a promising target for an anti-HPV drug therapy.
  • The results obtained with both types of GST-detecting reagents correlated very well and demonstrated the great potential of the newly developed glutathione-coated Acceptor beads as a detection reagent for GST fusion proteins.
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Binding, Competitive. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Humans. Molecular Sequence Data. Pilot Projects. Protein Binding. Protein Interaction Mapping

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  • (PMID = 17478484.001).
  • [ISSN] 1087-0571
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of biomolecular screening
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Biomol Screen
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / E6 protein, Human papillomavirus type 16; 0 / Oncogene Proteins, Viral; 0 / Repressor Proteins; 0 / UBE3A protein, human; EC 2.5.1.18 / Glutathione Transferase; EC 6.3.2.19 / Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
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31. Mutter GL, Bergeron C, Deligdisch L, Ferenczy A, Glant M, Merino M, Williams AR, Blithe DL: The spectrum of endometrial pathology induced by progesterone receptor modulators. Mod Pathol; 2008 May;21(5):591-8
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  • Progesterone receptor modulators (PRM) are hormonally active drugs effective in the management of endometriosis and uterine leiomyomata.
  • Overtly premalignant lesions (atypical hyperplasia or EIN) were not seen.
  • In a subset of cases, asymmetry of stromal and epithelial growth resulted in prominent cystically dilated glands with admixed estrogen (mitotic) and progestin (secretory) epithelial effects of a type not encountered in contemporary clinical practice.
  • The variety of endometrial appearances suggested that findings might differ by agent and dose over time according to relationships that must be specified for each agent.
  • [MeSH-major] Endometrium / drug effects. Endometrium / pathology. Hormone Antagonists / adverse effects. Receptors, Progesterone / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Endometriosis / drug therapy. Female. Humans. Leiomyoma / drug therapy. Uterine Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 18246050.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-3952
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hormone Antagonists; 0 / Receptors, Progesterone
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32. Dong Y, Ip C, Ganther H: Evidence of a field effect associated with mammary cancer chemoprevention by methylseleninic acid. Anticancer Res; 2002 Jan-Feb;22(1A):27-32
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  • The first approach examined the modulation of biomarkers in pathologically-defined premalignant lesions of the rat mammary gland.
  • The second approach involved the use of cDNA microarray technology to characterize the profile of gene expression changes in the whole mammary tissue.
  • Treatment with methylseleninic acid led to quantifiable changes in the expression of selective cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins in the premalignant lesions.
  • These were found to be modulated in a manner that was consistent with a reduction in the development of premalignant lesions by methylseleninic acid.
  • Microarray analysis using RNA isolated from the whole mammary gland provided highly suggestive clues that methylseleninic acid was able to produce a widespread effect on gene expression in adipocytes and stromal cells, which are present in abundance in the mammary tissue.
  • Thus, epithelial cells may not be the only targets for the action of selenium, even though the focus of selenium chemoprevention is to inhibit premalignant lesions and cancers arising from the epithelial cells.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biomarkers, Tumor / biosynthesis. Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Cell Cycle Proteins / biosynthesis. Cell Cycle Proteins / genetics. Female. Gene Expression / drug effects. Gene Expression Profiling. Mammary Glands, Animal / drug effects. Mammary Glands, Animal / metabolism. Mammary Glands, Animal / physiology. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Precancerous Conditions / genetics. Precancerous Conditions / metabolism. Precancerous Conditions / pathology. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 12017302.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 16056; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 27706
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / Organoselenium Compounds; 28274-57-9 / methylselenic acid
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33. Marana HR, de Andrade JM, da Silva Mathes AC, Duarte G, da Cunha SP, Bighetti S: Chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer and pregnancy. Gynecol Oncol; 2001 Feb;80(2):272-4
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  • [Title] Chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer and pregnancy.
  • BACKGROUND: Carcinoma of the cervix is the most common malignant tumor associated with pregnancy.
  • The initial stages and premalignant lesions apparently present the same prognosis in pregnant and nonpregnant women; however, there are limited data regarding outcome for locally advanced cervical cancer in pregnancy.
  • CASE: A 26-year-old woman, gravida 4, para 3, at 14 weeks and 4 days' gestation, was diagnosed with a FIGO stage IIB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, treated by primary chemotherapy with cisplatin and bleomycin, until pregnancy resolution at 38 weeks.
  • CONCLUSION: The present case demonstrates that chemotherapy was harmless for the child up to the present time.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy


34. Marks F, Fürstenberger G, Neufang G, Müller-Decker K: Mouse skin as a model for cancer chemoprevention by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Recent Results Cancer Res; 2003;163:46-57; discussion 264-6
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  • [Title] Mouse skin as a model for cancer chemoprevention by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
  • While therapeutic gene repair is a still unrealized dream, tumor promotion provides an attractive target for cancer prevention.
  • A key event in epithelial tumor development is an aberrant constitutive overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), being detectable already in premalignant lesions and leading to an overproduction of prostaglandins.
  • The well-established chemopreventive effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs seems to be mainly due to COX-2 inhibition.
  • Targeted transgenic overexpression of COX-2 in mouse epidermis induces a preneoplastic phenotype and renders the tissue extremely sensitive to genotoxic carcinogens; i.e., for the induction of skin tumor development, tumor promoter treatment can be omitted in those animals.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Disease Models, Animal. Isoenzymes / metabolism. Neoplasms, Experimental / prevention & control. Neoplasms, Experimental / therapy. Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cyclooxygenase 2. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors. Gene Expression / drug effects. Mice. Mice, Transgenic. Phenotype. Precancerous Conditions / pathology. Prostaglandins / biosynthesis. Skin / drug effects. Skin / enzymology. Skin / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / enzymology. Skin Neoplasms / prevention & control. Skin Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 12903842.001).
  • [ISSN] 0080-0015
  • [Journal-full-title] Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progrès dans les recherches sur le cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Recent Results Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / Prostaglandins; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 1.14.99.1 / Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
  • [Number-of-references] 85
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35. Dragnev KH, Rigas JR, Dmitrovsky E: The retinoids and cancer prevention mechanisms. Oncologist; 2000;5(5):361-8
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  • Carcinogenesis is a multistep process that converts normal cells into malignant cells.
  • Once transformed, malignant cells acquire the ability to invade and metastasize, leading to clinically evident disease.
  • During this continuum from normal to metastatic cells, carcinogenic steps can be arrested or reversed through pharmacological treatments, known as cancer chemoprevention.
  • Chemoprevention strategies represent therapeutic interventions at early stages of carcinogenesis, before the onset of invasive cancer.
  • Effective chemoprevention should reduce or avoid the clinical consequences of overt malignancies by treating early neoplastic lesions before development of clinically apparent signs or symptoms.
  • Preclinical, clinical, and epidemiological data provide considerable support for cancer chemoprevention as an attractive therapeutic strategy.
  • Derivatives of vitamin A, the retinoids, have reported activity in treating specific premalignant lesions and reducing incidence of second primary tumors in patients with prior head and neck, lung or liver cancers.
  • An improved understanding of cancer prevention mechanisms should aid in the discovery of new therapeutic targets and chemoprevention agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / prevention & control. Retinoids / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Humans. Receptors, Retinoic Acid

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  • (PMID = 11040271.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-7159
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA54494; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA62275; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA87546
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Receptors, Retinoic Acid; 0 / Retinoids
  • [Number-of-references] 85
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36. Stockfleth E, Meyer T, Benninghoff B, Christophers E: Successful treatment of actinic keratosis with imiquimod cream 5%: a report of six cases. Br J Dermatol; 2001 May;144(5):1050-3
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  • [Title] Successful treatment of actinic keratosis with imiquimod cream 5%: a report of six cases.
  • BACKGROUND: Actinic keratoses (AK) are premalignant lesions, which are routinely treated by destructive procedures such as cryotherapy, electrodessication or topical 5-fluorouracil.
  • OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to report six cases of AK treated with a potential new topical therapy, imiquimod.
  • All six men were treated with imiquimod 5% cream three times a week for 6-8 weeks.
  • In the event of a local skin reaction treatment was modified to two times per week.
  • RESULTS: All the AK lesions were successfully cleared after treatment with imiquimod cream 5% for 6-8 weeks.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that imiquimod may be useful as a new therapy for the treatment of actinic keratoses.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminoquinolines / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Keratosis / drug therapy. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Cutaneous. Aged. Drug Administration Schedule. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / pathology. Recurrence. Scalp Dermatoses / drug therapy. Scalp Dermatoses / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11359396.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0963
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aminoquinolines; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 99011-02-6 / imiquimod
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37. Ibáñez de Cáceres I, Cairns P: Methylated DNA sequences for early cancer detection, molecular classification and chemotherapy response prediction. Clin Transl Oncol; 2007 Jul;9(7):429-37
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  • [Title] Methylated DNA sequences for early cancer detection, molecular classification and chemotherapy response prediction.
  • Molecular studies of many types of cancer have revealed that clinically evident tumours carry multiple genetic and epigenetic abnormalities, including DNA sequence alterations, chromosome copy number changes and aberrant promoter hypermethylation.
  • In many cases these abnormalities can be found in premalignant lesions and even in histological normal adjacent cells.
  • Many tumour types are difficult to detect early and are frequently resistant to available chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • Therefore, the early detection, chemoprevention and the design of new therapeutic strategies based on the increased understanding of cancer molecular changes are one of the great challenges nowadays.
  • Thus, hypermethylated DNA sequences from tumours are one of the most promising markers for early detection screenings as well as tumour classification and chemotherapy response in many types of cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] DNA Methylation. Neoplasms / diagnosis. Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 17652056.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-048X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 9007-49-2 / DNA
  • [Number-of-references] 54
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38. Kwak EL, Jankowski J, Thayer SP, Lauwers GY, Brannigan BW, Harris PL, Okimoto RA, Haserlat SM, Driscoll DR, Ferry D, Muir B, Settleman J, Fuchs CS, Kulke MH, Ryan DP, Clark JW, Sgroi DC, Haber DA, Bell DW: Epidermal growth factor receptor kinase domain mutations in esophageal and pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Clin Cancer Res; 2006 Jul 15;12(14 Pt 1):4283-7
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  • We also identified the TKI drug resistance-associated EGFR T790M mutation in an untreated case of Barrett's esophagus and the corresponding adenocarcinoma.
  • EGFR mutations in premalignant lesions of Barrett's esophagus also point to these as an early event in transformation of the esophageal epithelium.
  • The role of genotype-directed TKI therapy should be tested in prospective clinical trials.

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  • (PMID = 16857803.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K08 DK071329; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA115830; United States / PHS HHS / / P01 95281; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA11530
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS519524; NLM/ PMC3807136
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39. Taub AF: Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: history and horizons. J Drugs Dermatol; 2004 Jan-Feb;3(1 Suppl):S8-25
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  • [Title] Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: history and horizons.
  • Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a photosensitizer, light, and molecular oxygen to selectively kill cells.
  • When localized in the target tissue, the photosensitizer is activated by light to produce oxygen intermediates that destroy target tissue cells.
  • The easy access of skin to light-based therapy has led dermatologists to apply PDT to cutaneous disorders.
  • This has led to new interest in PDT not only for nonmelanoma skin cancer and premalignant lesions but also in the treatment of acne and as an adjuvant to photorejuvenation procedures.
  • [MeSH-major] Photochemotherapy / methods. Photochemotherapy / trends. Skin Diseases / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Lasers. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 14964757.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-9616
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of drugs in dermatology : JDD
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Drugs Dermatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 153
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40. Moll A, Krenauer A, Bierbach U, Till H, Hirsch W, Leuschner I, Schmitz N, Wittekind C, Aigner T: Mixed hepatoblastoma and teratoma of the liver in a 3-year-old child: a unique combination and clinical challenge. Diagn Pathol; 2009;4:37
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  • Primary liver tumors in children are rare with malignant hepatoblastoma being the most common neoplasm.
  • In this report, we describe the diagnosis and clinical management of a large liver tumor in a 3-year-old child that displayed the features of both, conventional hepatoblastoma and malignant teratoma.
  • Pathological assessment on a pre-operative bioptical specimen showed an immature teratoid tumor with no area of hepatoblastic differentiation present.
  • Histological and immunohistological examination of the resected tumor specimen additionally showed tumor areas of very different differentiation pattern intermixed with each other, namely areas of hepatoblastoma-typical and neuroblastoma-like morphology as well as areas of rhadomyosarcomatous differentiation.After chemotherapy the tumor size increased and an extended right hemihepatectomy was performed.
  • Post-operatively, the general condition of the child improved and adjuvant chemotherapy was started two weeks later.
  • 36 months after initial diagnosis the patient is healthy, in good general condition, and without any sign of residual tumor disease.Overall, we describe the diagnosis and clinical management of a large liver tumor in a 3-year-old child that displayed the features of both, conventional hepatoblastoma and malignant teratoma and was designated as mixed hepatoblastoma and teratoma.
  • Though mesenchymal tumor portions can occur within hepatoblastomas, most commonly osteoid or chondroid, our case is different as it presents a large spectrum of mesenchymal and epithelial differentiation pattern in most of the lesion.

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  • (PMID = 19909520.001).
  • [ISSN] 1746-1596
  • [Journal-full-title] Diagnostic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diagn Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2784753
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41. Ram H, Mohammad S, Husain N, Gupta PN: Ameloblastic carcinoma. J Maxillofac Oral Surg; 2010 Dec;9(4):415-9
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  • Ameloblastic carcinoma (AC) is a rare aggressive malignant epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxillofacial skeleton with a distinct predilection in the mandible.
  • It may appear de novo or originate from a pre-existing ameloblastoma or odontogenic cyst.
  • It may present as a cystic lesion with benign clinical features or as a large tissue mass with ulceration, significant bone resorption and tooth mobility.
  • Wide local excision is the treatment of choice.
  • Radiotherapy and chemotherapy have limited role in the treatment of ameloblastic carcinomas.

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  • (PMID = 22190836.001).
  • [ISSN] 0974-942X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of maxillofacial and oral surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Maxillofac Oral Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3177477
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Ameloblastic carcinoma / Ameloblastoma / Odontogenic tumor
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42. Jiang Y, Liang ZD, Wu TT, Cao L, Zhang H, Xu XC: Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated expression is associated with tobacco smoke exposure in esophageal cancer tissues and benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide in cell lines. Int J Cancer; 2007 Jan 1;120(1):91-5
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  • [Title] Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated expression is associated with tobacco smoke exposure in esophageal cancer tissues and benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide in cell lines.
  • To understand how this binding affects the alteration of ATM expression and to identify biomarkers for the detection of esophageal cancer, we analyzed ATM mRNA expression in tissue specimens from patients with esophageal SCC and premalignant lesions using in situ hybridization.
  • We found that ATM expression was increased in esophageal SCC and its premalignant lesions when compared with normal tissues and that increased ATM expression was associated with tobacco smoke exposure and tumor de-differentiation.
  • Moreover, BPDE induced ATM expression in esophageal SCC cell lines in a time-dependent manner.
  • In summary, the BPDE in tobacco smoke may be responsible for increased ATM expression in premalignant and malignant esophageal tissues.
  • Our findings suggest that the ATM gene should be further evaluated as a biomarker for the early detection of esophageal cancer and tobacco use in patients.
  • [MeSH-major] 7,8-Dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene 9,10-oxide / toxicity. Carcinogens / toxicity. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / genetics. Cell Cycle Proteins / genetics. DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Esophageal Neoplasms / genetics. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / genetics. Smoking. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins. Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Blotting, Western. Case-Control Studies. Humans. In Situ Hybridization. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Precancerous Conditions / genetics. Precancerous Conditions / metabolism. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 17019709.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA102265
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 55097-80-8 / 7,8-Dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene 9,10-oxide; EC 2.7.11.1 / ATM protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
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43. Kershenbaum A, Lavi I, Rennert G, Almog R: Fecal occult blood test performance indicators in warfarin-treated patients. Dis Colon Rectum; 2010 Feb;53(2):224-9
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  • BACKGROUND: Antithrombotic drugs such as warfarin cause a general increase in bleeding tendency and therefore could influence fecal occult blood test results.
  • Data on lower gastrointestinal evaluation were collected on 425 cases with a positive fecal occult blood test: all positives on warfarin and positive cases of a subsample of those tests in the group without antithrombotic treatment.
  • The detection rates of both clinically significant adenomas and findings not indicative of significant neoplasia were increased in the warfarin group (8.9/1000 and 32.5/1000 respectively) compared with the no-antithrombotic group (4.0/1000 and 11.3/1000) (P = .02 and P <.0001 respectively), whereas that of carcinoma was not found to be different (3.7/1000 in the warfarin group vs 3.3/1000, P = .85).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Fecal occult blood test screening in warfarin users results in a higher, yet reasonable, positivity load and in a higher detection of premalignant lesions than in the general population.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Incidence. Israel / epidemiology. Male. Mass Screening / methods. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Thrombosis / complications. Thrombosis / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 20087099.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticoagulants; 5Q7ZVV76EI / Warfarin
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44. Smith W, Saba N: Retinoids as chemoprevention for head and neck cancer: where do we go from here? Crit Rev Oncol Hematol; 2005 Aug;55(2):143-52
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  • Adhering to the concept of field cancerization and following multi-step carcinogenesis, premalignant lesions of the head and neck have long been the focus of intervention with retinoids.
  • Similarly, these agents have been applied towards preventing second primary malignancies from developing following curative therapy for upper aerodigestive cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Chemoprevention / methods. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Retinoids / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15886010.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-8428
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical reviews in oncology/hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Rev. Oncol. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Retinoids
  • [Number-of-references] 75
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45. González-Peramato P, Regadera J, Juarranz A: [Photodynamic therapy in urology. Biologic and pathologic mechanisms of action]. Arch Esp Urol; 2008 Nov;61(9):1135-44
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  • [Title] [Photodynamic therapy in urology. Biologic and pathologic mechanisms of action].
  • [Transliterated title] La terapia fotodinámica en urologia. Mecanismos de acción biológicos y patológicos.
  • Photodynamic Therapy (FDT) is a minimally invasive therapeutic modality extraordinarily useful.
  • In urology, FDT is very useful and may be applied through endoscopes or directly, with excellent results obtained for the diagnosis and treatment of bladder tumors, in the treatment of prostate cancer and its recurrences, and in the treatment of dermatological premalignant lesions and carcinomas of the penis.
  • FDT is founded on the use of photosensitizing products which selectively accumulate in tumor tissues.
  • The irradiation of these tissues with a proper wavelength light (generally in the red region of the visible spectrum lambda > or = 600 nm) produces the formation of oxygen reactive species with cytotoxic effects leading to selective death of neoplastic cells, and tumor regression.
  • The main advantage of FDT is the restriction of cellular damage to the irradiation area, with the associated decrease of secondary effects on healthy tissues near the tumor, on the contrary to what happen with other conventional therapies for some tumors of the urinary tract.
  • Moreover, FDT may be used in combination with radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Photochemotherapy. Urologic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Male. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19140598.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-0614
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivos españoles de urología
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Esp. Urol.
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Photosensitizing Agents
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46. Raben D, Helfrich BA, Chan D, Johnson G, Bunn PA Jr: ZD1839, a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, alone and in combination with radiation and chemotherapy as a new therapeutic strategy in non-small cell lung cancer. Semin Oncol; 2002 Feb;29(1 Suppl 4):37-46
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  • [Title] ZD1839, a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, alone and in combination with radiation and chemotherapy as a new therapeutic strategy in non-small cell lung cancer.
  • Preclinical studies have shown additive to synergistic effects when ZD1839 is combined with radiation or chemotherapy in colon, head and neck, and non-small cell lung cancers.
  • Future studies will certainly combine ZD1839 with chemotherapy or radiation.
  • ZD1839 also may be effective as a chemoprevention agent because premalignant lesions often overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Quinazolines / pharmacology. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / biosynthesis. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Animals. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Chemoprevention. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Models, Animal. Humans. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Transplantation, Heterologous. Up-Regulation


47. Rogers CL, Theodore N, Dickman CA, Sonntag VK, Thomas T, Lam S, Speiser BL: Surgery and permanent 125I seed paraspinal brachytherapy for malignant tumors with spinal cord compression. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2002 Oct 1;54(2):505-13
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  • [Title] Surgery and permanent 125I seed paraspinal brachytherapy for malignant tumors with spinal cord compression.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the functional outcome, predictors of response, and toxicity from spinal surgery and 125I brachytherapy in patients with malignant tumors resulting in spinal cord compression.
  • Surgical procedures were based on the location of the impinging lesion: corpectomy or spondylectomy in 13 cases and laminectomy in 12.
  • Three had no EBRT: 1 had lymphoma treated with chemotherapy, 1 had remote previous EBRT for a childhood tumor, and 1 refused EBRT.
  • The mean time to recurrence for these 4 patients was 20.3 months.
  • An ambulatory function score was assigned pre- and postoperatively: I, normal ambulation; II, abnormal not requiring assistance; III, abnormal requiring assistance; and IV, unable to ambulate.
  • All patients with score I, 91% of those with score II, 67% of those with score III, and 67% of those with score IV were ambulatory after the procedure; 84% had either normal or improved ambulation postoperatively.
  • CONCLUSION: This is the largest series in the literature exploring surgery and 125I brachytherapy in the treatment of malignant spinal cord compression.
  • Our results suggest a benefit to aggressive local therapy in selected patients with spinal cord compression.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachytherapy / methods. Iodine Radioisotopes / therapeutic use. Spinal Cord Compression / radiotherapy. Spinal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Spinal Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Analysis of Variance. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Recovery of Function. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12243829.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Iodine Radioisotopes
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48. Strauss HG, Wolters M, Methfessel G, Buchmann J, Koelbl H: Significance of endovaginal ultrasonography in assessing tamoxifen-associated changes of the endometrium. A prospective study. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand; 2000 Aug;79(8):697-701
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  • However, the role of vaginal ultrasound in screening for endometrial cancer or premalignant lesions remains uncertain.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / adverse effects. Endometrium / drug effects. Tamoxifen / adverse effects. Vagina / ultrasonography
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. False Positive Reactions. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 10949237.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6349
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] DENMARK
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen
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49. Narducci F, Orazi G, Cosson M: [Ovarian cyst: surgical indications and access]. J Gynecol Obstet Biol Reprod (Paris); 2001 Nov;30(1 Suppl):S59-67
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  • Laparoscopic treatment of adnexal masses is indicated when all criteria of a benign lesion are present: transvaginal ultrasound demonstrates a mass < 5 cm, with liquid or dermoid content, with less than 3 fine partitions (< 3 mm), a thin wall (< 3 mm), no vegetations, normal Doppler.
  • Since the benign or malignant nature of an ovarian mass cannot be determined macroscopically, precaution must be taken to avoid potential laparoscopic dissemination: use of an extraction pouch, instrument cleaning, cytotoxic agent (chlorexidine or povidone-iodine) for trocar tracts, prevention of gas leakage, 3-plane suture of trocar orifices measuring > 10 mm, short interval between laparoscopic diagnosis of cancer and onset of chemotherapy or complete surgery (1 week).
  • In case of pre- or peroperatively suspected malignancy, cytology examination of the peritoneal fluid and careful peroperative exploration of the abdomen and pelvis with peritoneal biopsy as needed are required.

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  • (PMID = 11917377.001).
  • [ISSN] 0368-2315
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal de gynécologie, obstétrique et biologie de la reproduction
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gynecol Obstet Biol Reprod (Paris)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 65
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50. Hampson L, Kitchener HC, Hampson IN: Specific HIV protease inhibitors inhibit the ability of HPV16 E6 to degrade p53 and selectively kill E6-dependent cervical carcinoma cells in vitro. Antivir Ther; 2006;11(6):813-25
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  • Although HIV protease inhibitor (PI) drugs predominantly target HIV proteases 1 and 2, it is also known that part of their efficacy is due to selective inhibition of the proteasome.
  • Comparison of the ability of the PIs indinavir, ritonavir, amprenavir, lopinavir, atazanavir, nelfinavir and saquinavir to inhibit E6-mediated proteasomal degradation of mutant p53 in E6-transfected C33A cells showed that 15 microM lopinavir, 1 mM indinavir or 125 microM ritonavir treatment for 24 h produced a stable increase in the level of nuclear p53 in these cells with minimal cell death.
  • After 4 h exposure of HPV16+ve SiHa cells to 15 microM lopinavir, a transient increase in wild-type p53 expression was observed associated with a 7% reduction in the chymotryptic activity of the 205 proteasome and apoptosis after 24h.
  • In conclusion, these data show that specific HIV PIs such as lopinavir and possibly indinavir, can induce selective toxicity of HPV-transformed cervical carcinoma cells expressing wild-type p53 and may form the basis of a topically applied alternative to surgery for the treatment of HPV-related premalignant lesions of the cervix.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / virology. Cell Line, Tumor / drug effects. Female. Humans. Lopinavir. Mice. NIH 3T3 Cells. Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex / metabolism. Transfection. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / virology


51. Milas L, Mason KA, Crane CH, Liao Z, Masferrer J: Improvement of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy by targeting COX-2 enzyme. Oncology (Williston Park); 2003 May;17(5 Suppl 5):15-24
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  • Radiation therapy has traditionally been the treatment of choice for locally or regionally advanced cancer, but its therapeutic efficacy is often hindered by limited tolerance of normal tissues and by tumor radioresistance.
  • To improve therapeutic outcome, radiotherapy is frequently combined with chemotherapeutic drugs that are themselves cytotoxic and may sensitize cells to radiation.
  • These therapeutic improvements, however, have been achieved at the expense of considerable normal tissue toxicity.
  • Preclinical studies have shown that these agents are potent radiosensitizers, providing a strong biologic rationale for using these drugs in combination with radiotherapy.
  • These studies also generated information critical for designing effective treatment schedules in clinical settings.
  • The therapeutic efficacy of topoisomerase inhibitor-radiation combinations is currently being tested clinically.
  • COX-2 is often overexpressed in premalignant lesions and cancer, and is involved in carcinogenesis, tumor growth, and metastatic spread.
  • Preclinical studies provided solid evidence that inhibition of this enzyme with selective COX-2 inhibitors prevents carcinogenesis, slows the growth of established tumors, and enhances tumor response to radiation without appreciably affecting normal tissue radioresponse.
  • Additional therapeutic benefit was observed for celecoxib (Celebrex), a selective COX-2 inhibitor, consisting of a strong reduction in irinotecan-induced diarrhea.
  • Thus, selective targeting of COX-2 may potentially improve radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy--a therapeutic strategy that is currently being tested in clinical trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Isoenzymes / drug effects. Isoenzymes / radiation effects. Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases / drug effects. Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases / radiation effects. Radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclooxygenase 2. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Humans. Membrane Proteins. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / enzymology. Neoplasms / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 12800601.001).
  • [ISSN] 0890-9091
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-06294; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-16672
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 7673326042 / irinotecan; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 1.14.99.1 / PTGS2 protein, human; EC 1.14.99.1 / Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
  • [Number-of-references] 77
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52. Lysa B, Tartler U, Wolf R, Arenberger P, Benninghoff B, Ruzicka T, Hengge UR, Walz M: Gene expression in actinic keratoses: pharmacological modulation by imiquimod. Br J Dermatol; 2004 Dec;151(6):1150-9
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  • [Title] Gene expression in actinic keratoses: pharmacological modulation by imiquimod.
  • BACKGROUND: Actinic keratoses (AKs) are premalignant lesions that can progress into squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Imiquimod, which belongs to the new class of immune-response modifiers, was recently shown to be effective in the treatment of AKs.
  • OBJECTIVES: To study the expression of individual genes in uninvolved skin and AKs before therapy and to elucidate the way in which the expression of these genes is influenced by imiquimod therapy.
  • METHODS: We treated 13 patients with AK with imiquimod and compared gene expression before, during (five patients) and after (eight patients) therapy with that in uninvolved skin.
  • During imiquimod therapy, we detected a further upregulation of interferon-alpha, IL-6, IL-10 receptor 1 and TLR7.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminoquinolines / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Gene Expression Regulation / drug effects. Interferon Inducers / pharmacology. Keratosis / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Apoptosis / genetics. Cell Adhesion Molecules / metabolism. Cytokines / genetics. Cytokines / metabolism. Genes, p53. Humans. Male. Membrane Glycoproteins / metabolism. Middle Aged. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / genetics. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / metabolism. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Precancerous Conditions / genetics. Precancerous Conditions / metabolism. Receptors, Cell Surface / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / genetics. Skin Neoplasms / metabolism. Toll-Like Receptor 7. Toll-Like Receptor 8. Toll-Like Receptors

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  • (PMID = 15606509.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0963
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aminoquinolines; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Interferon Inducers; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Receptors, Cell Surface; 0 / TLR7 protein, human; 0 / TLR8 protein, human; 0 / Toll-Like Receptor 7; 0 / Toll-Like Receptor 8; 0 / Toll-Like Receptors; 99011-02-6 / imiquimod
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53. Sato M, Shames DS, Gazdar AF, Minna JD: A translational view of the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer. J Thorac Oncol; 2007 Apr;2(4):327-43
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  • In many cases these abnormalities can be found in premalignant lesions and in histologically normal lung bronchial epithelial cells.
  • Lung cancer has a high morbidity because it is difficult to detect early and is frequently resistant to available chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • New, rationally designed early detection, chemoprevention, and therapeutic strategies based on the growing understanding of the molecular changes important to lung cancer are under investigation.
  • For example, methylated tumor DNA sequences in sputum or blood are being investigated for early detection screening, and new treatments that specifically target molecules such as vascular endothelial growth factor and the epidermal growth factor receptor are becoming available.
  • Meanwhile, global gene expression signatures from individual tumors are showing potential as prognostic and therapeutic indicators, such that molecular typing of individual tumors for therapy selection is not far away.

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  • (PMID = 17409807.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-1380
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of thoracic oncology : official publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Thorac Oncol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA070907; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / N01-CN-43301; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50CA75907
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
  • [Number-of-references] 187
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54. Brown KS, Kane MA: Chemoprevention of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Otolaryngol Clin North Am; 2006 Apr;39(2):349-63
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  • Because of the poor out-comes associated with the disease, the presence of identifiable premalignant lesions, and the failure of local preventive therapies, such as surgery, many investigators have hoped to find an effective chemopreventive compound.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Ascorbic Acid / therapeutic use. Drugs, Chinese Herbal / therapeutic use. Flavonoids / therapeutic use. Folic Acid / therapeutic use. Humans. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Retinoids / therapeutic use. Selenium / therapeutic use. Vitamin A / therapeutic use. Vitamin E / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 16580916.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6665
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologic clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal; 0 / Flavonoids; 0 / Retinoids; 11103-57-4 / Vitamin A; 1406-18-4 / Vitamin E; 935E97BOY8 / Folic Acid; H6241UJ22B / Selenium; PQ6CK8PD0R / Ascorbic Acid
  • [Number-of-references] 82
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55. Liao Z, Milas L, Komaki R, Stevens C, Cox JD: Combination of a COX-2 inhibitor with radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy in the treatment of thoracic cancer. Am J Clin Oncol; 2003 Aug;26(4):S85-91
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  • [Title] Combination of a COX-2 inhibitor with radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy in the treatment of thoracic cancer.
  • The enzyme is often overexpressed in premalignant lesions and cancer, including cancers of the lung and esophagus.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Esophageal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Esophageal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Isoenzymes / antagonists & inhibitors. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Sulfonamides / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / radiotherapy. Celecoxib. Clinical Trials as Topic. Cyclooxygenase 2. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors. Humans. Membrane Proteins. Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases / metabolism. Pyrazoles

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  • (PMID = 12902863.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-453X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; 0 / Sulfonamides; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 1.14.99.1 / PTGS2 protein, human; EC 1.14.99.1 / Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases; JCX84Q7J1L / Celecoxib
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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56. Nakamura T, Kusuzaki K, Seto M, Matsumine A, Uchida A: Case report: recurrence of soft tissue MFH in bone due to minute intravenous tumor emboli detected by MRI. Oncol Rep; 2003 Nov-Dec;10(6):1957-60
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  • [Title] Case report: recurrence of soft tissue MFH in bone due to minute intravenous tumor emboli detected by MRI.
  • We recently encountered a case with local recurrence of malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) in the bone after wide resection, caused by minute intravenous tumor emboli which were retrospectively detected in MR imaging.
  • The patient received postoperative brachytherapy, but no chemotherapy.
  • We reviewed the pre-operative films obtained by various imaging modalities, as well as the histology of the primary tumor, and found minute intravenous tumor emboli in the MR imaging obtained before surgery.
  • Such intravenous tumor emboli have recently been implicated in the development of regional bone metastasis near the site of the primary lesion in cases of malignant soft tissue tumors.
  • It is therefore emphasized that MR images should be carefully reviewed for the presence of such intravenous tumor emboli before surgery in cases of high-grade malignant sarcomas.
  • As at the time of writing, our patient remains alive and disease-free, with no evidence of any local recurrence or distant metastasis after wide tumor resection for the recurrent tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / diagnosis. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / diagnosis. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / metabolism. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Recurrence. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 14534725.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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57. Armstrong WB, Wan XS, Kennedy AR, Taylor TH, Meyskens FL Jr: Development of the Bowman-Birk inhibitor for oral cancer chemoprevention and analysis of Neu immunohistochemical staining intensity with Bowman-Birk inhibitor concentrate treatment. Laryngoscope; 2003 Oct;113(10):1687-702
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  • [Title] Development of the Bowman-Birk inhibitor for oral cancer chemoprevention and analysis of Neu immunohistochemical staining intensity with Bowman-Birk inhibitor concentrate treatment.
  • The retinoids are archetypal chemopreventive agents for oral premalignant lesions.
  • The purposes of the study were to summarize the preclinical and clinical development of Bowman-Birk Inhibitor and a Bowman-Birk Inhibitor concentrate against oral premalignant lesions and to evaluate Neu immunohistochemical staining intensity for lesions and simultaneously obtained biopsy specimens of normal-appearing mucosa from the Phase IIa Bowman-Birk Inhibitor concentrate oral leukoplakia chemoprevention trial.
  • METHODS: Thirty-two sets of biopsy specimens from lesions and uninvolved oral mucosa before and after treatment with Bowman-Birk Inhibitor concentrate in doses ranging from 200 to 1066 chymotrypsin inhibitory units were examined in blinded fashion for Neu immunohistochemical staining intensity using the 3B-5 monoclonal antibody.
  • Staining intensity scores among the lesion and control biopsy specimens before and after Bowman-Birk Inhibitor concentrate treatment were analyzed and compared with previously obtained values for serum Neu, oral mucosal cell Neu, protease activity, and clinical response to treatment.
  • RESULTS: Mean Neu staining score was significantly higher in lesions compared with uninvolved mucosa (P <.001).
  • Pretreatment staining scores for biopsy specimens of lesions and control biopsy specimens of normal-appearing tissues were correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient [r] = 0.375, P =.045), but no correlation between lesion and control biopsy specimen scores was evident after treatment.
  • The change in Neu staining score with Bowman-Birk Inhibitor concentrate treatment in control site biopsy specimens demonstrated an inverse relationship of change in lesion area with Bowman-Birk Inhibitor concentrate treatment (Spearman r = -0.493, P <.007).
  • The current investigation identified increased Neu staining intensity in hyperplastic lesions compared with simultaneously obtained biopsy specimens of normal-appearing mucosa both before and after Bowman-Birk Inhibitor concentrate treatment.
  • This finding supports prior observations that increased Neu expression is present in a subset of oral premalignant lesions and head and neck cancers.
  • The trend of increased Neu staining score in control biopsy tissues of subjects exhibiting decreased lesion area following Bowman-Birk Inhibitor concentrate treatment raises questions about the mechanisms of Bowman-Birk Inhibitor concentrate action.
  • Further study of modulation of Neu and protease activity by Bowman-Birk Inhibitor concentrate treatment may provide insights into the role of proteases and protease inhibitors in oral premalignant lesions and the mechanisms underlying Bowman-Birk Inhibitor concentrate effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Plant Proteins / therapeutic use. Trypsin Inhibitor, Bowman-Birk Soybean / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Chemoprevention. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Leukoplakia, Oral / drug therapy. Leukoplakia, Oral / metabolism. Receptor, ErbB-2 / metabolism. Trypsin Inhibitors. alpha-Amylases / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 14520092.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-852X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA 62203; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA 46496
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Plant Proteins; 0 / Trypsin Inhibitor, Bowman-Birk Soybean; 0 / Trypsin Inhibitors; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-2; EC 3.2.1.1 / alpha-Amylases
  • [Number-of-references] 162
  • [Keywords] NASA ; Non-programmatic
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58. Nagy K, Szöke I, Sonkodi I, Nagy E, Mari A, Szolnoky G, Newman HN: Inhibition of microflora associated with oral malignancy. Oral Oncol; 2000 Jan;36(1):32-6
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  • Changes in the microflora on oral carcinoma surfaces may lead to both local and systemic infections, which may complicate the morbidity of the patient suffering from oral malignant neoplasms.
  • Thus, anticancer therapy, irradiation, chemotherapy or surgery impairs the defence mechanism of the oral mucosa and is accompanied by proliferation of the mucosal biofilm with overgrowth of yeast and bacteria.
  • Biofilm samples were obtained from the central surface (1 cm2) of each lesion in 10 patients (eight male, two female; mean age: 47.6 years; SD +/- 7.6) before any antibiotherapy or tumour treatment.
  • Samples were transported in pre-reduced brain heart infusion broth and cultured within 1 h of removal, using aerobic and anaerobic complete and selective media.
  • ) It was concluded that 7-days (three times a day) Meridol rinsing significantly reduced the surface biofilm of oral carcinoma compared to rinsing with placebo.
  • The findings of the present study indicate that in addition to any other oral focus, the lesion itself, when ulcerated, should receive direct antimicrobial treatment so as to reduce patient morbidity and enhance quality of life.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacterial Infections / prevention & control. Biofilms. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / microbiology. Mouth Neoplasms / microbiology. Mouthwashes / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 10889916.001).
  • [ISSN] 1368-8375
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mouthwashes
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59. Yasuda Y, Shimizu M, Shirakami Y, Sakai H, Kubota M, Hata K, Hirose Y, Tsurumi H, Tanaka T, Moriwaki H: Pitavastatin inhibits azoxymethane-induced colonic preneoplastic lesions in C57BL/KsJ-db/db obese mice. Cancer Sci; 2010 Jul;101(7):1701-7
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  • [Title] Pitavastatin inhibits azoxymethane-induced colonic preneoplastic lesions in C57BL/KsJ-db/db obese mice.
  • Statins, which are commonly used for the treatment of hyperlipidemia, are known to possess anti-inflammatory effects.
  • The present study examined the effects of pitavastatin, a recently developed lipophilic statin, on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-initiated colonic premalignant lesions in C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db/db) obese mice.
  • Feeding with either dose of pitavastatin significantly reduced the number of colonic premalignant lesions, beta-catenin accumulated crypts, by inhibiting proliferation and the surrounding inflammation.
  • In addition, the expression levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-18, and COX-2 mRNAs on the colonic mucosa of AOM-treated mice were decreased by treatment with this agent.
  • These findings suggest that pitavastatin attenuates chronic inflammation and improves the imbalance of adipocytokines, both of which are caused by the presence of excess adipose tissues, thereby preventing the development of colonic premalignancies in an obesity-related colon cancer model.
  • Therefore, some types of statins, including pitavastatin, may be a useful chemoprevention modality for colon cancer in obese individuals.
  • [MeSH-major] Azoxymethane / toxicity. Colonic Neoplasms / prevention & control. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Precancerous Conditions / prevention & control. Quinolines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Carcinogens / toxicity. Cell Division / drug effects. Cytokines / drug effects. Cytokines / metabolism. Humans. Inflammation / prevention & control. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Mice, Obese. Obesity / complications. Obesity / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 20398056.001).
  • [ISSN] 1349-7006
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors; 0 / Quinolines; M5681Q5F9P / pitavastatin; MO0N1J0SEN / Azoxymethane
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60. Yang Y, Ge JP, Zhou ZT: Effects of thalidomide on DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis in hamster with respect to angiogenesis. J Oral Pathol Med; 2009 May;38(5):455-62
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  • BACKGROUND: Thalidomide has been shown to have anti-angiogenic effects in pre-clinical models as well as a significant antitumor effect in hematologic tumors.
  • However, the effects of thalidomide on oral pre-malignant lesions and oral carcinogenesis remain unexplored.
  • DMBA solution (0.5% in acetone) was applied topically to the left cheek pouch of male Syrian golden hamsters in group A and B, while animals in group C were painted with acetone, three times a week for 6 weeks.
  • Animals in group E received no treatment and served as blank control.
  • At the end of the experiment, animals were killed and tissue samples were collected for examinations.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Thalidomide has inhibitory effect against the malignant transformation of oral pre-cancerous lesion and angiogenesis during oral carcinogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / prevention & control. Mouth Mucosa / drug effects. Mouth Neoplasms / prevention & control. Neoplasms, Experimental / prevention & control. Thalidomide / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] 9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene. Animals. Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinogens. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / chemically induced. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Chemoprevention / methods. Cricetinae. Male. Mesocricetus. Neovascularization, Pathologic / prevention & control. Precancerous Conditions / chemically induced. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. RNA, Messenger / analysis. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / genetics. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / metabolism. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / genetics. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19141066.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-0714
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oral pathology & medicine : official publication of the International Association of Oral Pathologists and the American Academy of Oral Pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Oral Pathol. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 4Z8R6ORS6L / Thalidomide; 57-97-6 / 9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene
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61. Stan SD, Singh SV, Brand RE: Chemoprevention strategies for pancreatic cancer. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2010 Jun;7(6):347-56
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  • The low survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer points towards an increased need for novel therapeutic and chemopreventive strategies and also early detection of this disease.
  • Some chemopreventive agents (for example, curcumin or resveratrol) have also been reported to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs (for example, gemcitabine or erlotinib), which suggests that chemopreventive agents could potentially be used as potentiators of standard chemotherapy.
  • Further development of pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents may prove to be tremendously valuable for individuals at high risk of developing pancreatic cancer and patients who present with premalignant lesions.
  • [MeSH-minor] Alkyl and Aryl Transferases / therapeutic use. Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Camellia sinensis. Celecoxib. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / genetics. Curcumin / administration & dosage. Curcumin / therapeutic use. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors / pharmacology. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Deoxycytidine / therapeutic use. Disease Models, Animal. Down-Regulation / drug effects. Drug Synergism. Humans. Isothiocyanates / therapeutic use. Phototherapy. Pyrazoles / therapeutic use. Sulfonamides / therapeutic use. Tea. Vitamin D / analogs & derivatives. Vitamin E / administration & dosage. beta Carotene / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 20440279.001).
  • [ISSN] 1759-5053
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature reviews. Gastroenterology & hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA101753; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA101753-07; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA101753
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Isothiocyanates; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Sulfonamides; 0 / Tea; 01YAE03M7J / beta Carotene; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 1406-16-2 / Vitamin D; 1406-18-4 / Vitamin E; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; EC 2.5.- / Alkyl and Aryl Transferases; IT942ZTH98 / Curcumin; JCX84Q7J1L / Celecoxib
  • [Number-of-references] 118
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS228764; NLM/ PMC2927967
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62. Zhang X, Chen ZG, Khuri FR, Shin DM: Induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by a combined treatment with 13-cis-retinoic acid, interferon-alpha2a, and alpha-tocopherol in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Head Neck; 2007 Apr;29(4):351-61
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  • [Title] Induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by a combined treatment with 13-cis-retinoic acid, interferon-alpha2a, and alpha-tocopherol in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
  • BACKGROUND: We have previously conducted phase II trials with a combination of 13-cis-retinoic acid (13-cRA), interferon-alpha2a (IFN-alpha2a), and alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TF) in patients with advanced oral premalignant lesions and locally advanced head and neck cancer in the adjuvant settings and achieved promising outcomes.
  • The present study was conducted in vitro to elucidate the mechanisms of anti-tumor activity of this 3-drug combination in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN).
  • METHODS: Five SCCHN cell lines were treated with 13-cRA, IFN-alpha2a, and alpha-TF as single agents or 2- to 3-drug combinations for 72 hours.
  • Inhibition of cell growth and cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis by the treatments were evaluated.
  • RESULTS: Our results demonstrated that although each single-agent and 2-drug combination showed a certain level of cell growth inhibition, the 3-drug combination apparently further inhibited cell growth in comparison to any single agents and 2-drug combinations in the 5 SCCHN cell lines.
  • Cell cycle analysis on Tu212 and 886LN cells by flow cytometry exhibited significant accumulation of the cells at S phase in the 3-drug combination.
  • On the other hand, Annexin-V binding assay demonstrated that the 3-drug combination induced more profound apoptosis than any of the single agents or 2-drug combinations.
  • In parallel, proteolytic cleavages of pro-caspase-8, -9, -3 and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase as well as caspase-3 activity induced by the 3-drug treatment were observed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that 3-drug combination biochemopreventive regimen has cooperative inhibitory effect on the growth of SCCHN cells.
  • Both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis contribute to cell growth inhibition of this 3-drug combination therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Interferon-alpha / pharmacology. Isotretinoin / pharmacology. Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms / pathology. alpha-Tocopherol / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Caspase 3 / analysis. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Chemoprevention. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Recombinant Proteins

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  • (PMID = 17163463.001).
  • [ISSN] 1043-3074
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & neck
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA101244; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA75603
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3; EH28UP18IF / Isotretinoin; H4N855PNZ1 / alpha-Tocopherol
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63. Papadimitrakopoulou VA, William WN Jr, Dannenberg AJ, Lippman SM, Lee JJ, Ondrey FG, Peterson DE, Feng L, Atwell A, El-Naggar AK, Nathan CO, Helman JI, Du B, Yueh B, Boyle JO: Pilot randomized phase II study of celecoxib in oral premalignant lesions. Clin Cancer Res; 2008 Apr 1;14(7):2095-101
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  • [Title] Pilot randomized phase II study of celecoxib in oral premalignant lesions.
  • In this pilot randomized phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib in patients with oral premalignant lesions (OPL).
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Mouth Neoplasms / prevention & control. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Pyrazoles / therapeutic use. Sulfonamides / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Celecoxib. Cyclooxygenase 2 / biosynthesis. Female. Humans. Hyperplasia / drug therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Pilot Projects. Placebos. Polymerase Chain Reaction. RNA, Messenger / analysis

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  • (PMID = 18381950.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Placebos; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Sulfonamides; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; JCX84Q7J1L / Celecoxib
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64. Lerner SP, Grossman HB, Messing EM, Kibel AS, Stephenson A, Gee JR, O'Donnell MA, Reid RD, Kamat AM, Parnes HL, House MG: BCAN Think Tank session 3: Prevention of bladder cancer. Urol Oncol; 2010 May-Jun;28(3):338-42
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  • Experts sought to define primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention and discussed clinical trials performed to date testing retinoids, difluoromethylornithine, celecoxib, and other oral agents in a tertiary prevention setting following transurethral resection with or without intravesical therapy.
  • Urologists practice tertiary prevention in the form of intravesical therapy, and strategies were discussed to identify biomarkers, including urinary cytokines and pathway single nucleotide polymorphism analysis associated with response to treatment.
  • Optimizing delivery of intravesical chemotherapy to the target tissue with simple pharmacologic manipulations or packaging drugs in nanoparticles may improve treatment outcome.
  • Defining a premalignant lesion should be a focus of future research as a strategy for early detection and secondary prevention.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20439034.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2496
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Congresses
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. Draudin-Krylenko VA, Petukhov AB, Kuvshinov IuP, Levchuk AA, Bukin IuV: [Effect of antioxidant use in dietary therapy in patients with chronic athrofic hastritis]. Vopr Pitan; 2006;75(5):53-5
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  • [Title] [Effect of antioxidant use in dietary therapy in patients with chronic athrofic hastritis].
  • In the 1-year double-blind placebo-controlled intervention trial, it was shown that daily supplementation of patients with gastric premalignant lesions (intestinal metaplasia, IM) with a complex, containing Ester-C with antioxidantsand (2100 mg of Ca-ascorbate + 340 mg of bioflavonoids), produced a sharp decrease of abnormally high ornithine decarboxylase activity in IM gastric mucosa that was accom panied by practically total IM regression in 11 of 18 (61%) patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antioxidants / administration & dosage. Ascorbic Acid / administration & dosage. Gastritis, Atrophic / diet therapy. Gastritis, Atrophic / drug therapy. Helicobacter Infections / diet therapy. Helicobacter Infections / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chronic Disease. Double-Blind Method. Female. Gastric Mucosa / enzymology. Gastric Mucosa / microbiology. Gastric Mucosa / pathology. Humans. Intestines / enzymology. Intestines / pathology. Male. Metaplasia / diet therapy. Metaplasia / drug therapy. Metaplasia / enzymology. Metaplasia / pathology. Middle Aged. Ornithine Decarboxylase / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17172172.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-8833
  • [Journal-full-title] Voprosy pitaniia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vopr Pitan
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; EC 4.1.1.17 / Ornithine Decarboxylase; PQ6CK8PD0R / Ascorbic Acid
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66. Zöller JE, Scheer M: [Current status and prospects of chemoprevention in oral squamous epithelial carcinomas and precancerous lesions]. Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir; 2000 May;4 Suppl 1:S160-8
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  • [Title] [Current status and prospects of chemoprevention in oral squamous epithelial carcinomas and precancerous lesions].
  • Second primary tumors in initially cured patients remain the greatest challenge in therapy for oral squamous cell carcinomas.
  • The second group included 24 patients with premalignant lesions after R0-resection of primary oral squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Biopsies were taken from both groups prior to therapy and after 12 weeks follow-up.
  • These results indicate that the chosen combination has substantial activity in oral premalignant lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / prevention & control. Mouth Neoplasms / prevention & control. Neoplasms, Second Primary / prevention & control. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Humans. Leukoplakia, Oral / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 10938656.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-9417
  • [Journal-full-title] Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie : MKG
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 57
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67. Roth JA, Grammer SF: Gene replacement therapy for non-small cell lung cancer: a review. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am; 2004 Feb;18(1):215-29
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  • [Title] Gene replacement therapy for non-small cell lung cancer: a review.
  • Current therapy such as radiation and chemotherapy controls less than 50% of lung cancers, summoning the development of novel therapeutic strategies that can directly target the underlying mechanisms of tumorigenesis.
  • The clinical trials summarized in this article clearly demonstrate that contrary to initial predictions that gene therapy would not be suitable for cancer, gene replacement therapy is a viable potential addition to the arsenal for cancer.
  • Clinical trials have demonstrated that direct intratumor injection can cause tumor regression or prolonged stabilization of local disease, and the low toxicity associated with gene transfer indicates that tumor suppressor gene replacement can be readily combined with existing and future treatments.
  • Initial concerns that the wide diversity of genetic lesions in cancer cells would prevent the application of gene therapy to cancer appear unfounded; on the contrary, correction of a single genetic lesion has resulted in significant tumor regression.
  • Studies combining transfer of tumor suppressor genes with conventional DNA-damaging treatments indicate that correction of a defect in apoptosis induction can restore sensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy in some resistant tumors, and indications that sensitivity to killing might be enhanced in already sensitive tumors may eventually lead to reduced toxicity from chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
  • The most recent data from the laboratory demonstrating damage to tumor suppressor genes in normal tissue and premalignant lesions even suggest that these genes may someday be useful in early intervention, diagnosis, and even prevention of cancer.
  • At the current rate of biotechnology development, it is only a matter of time until technical limitations that currently prevent the widespread application of gene therapy to cancer are overcome by development of more efficient vectors, discovery of novel genes, and development of combined modality approaches.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / therapy. Genetic Therapy. Lung Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Gene Transfer Techniques. Genes, p53 / physiology. Genetic Vectors. Humans

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  • (PMID = 15005290.001).
  • [ISSN] 0889-8588
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology/oncology clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol. Oncol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 2P50-CA70970-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA7877-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 74
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68. Howell A, Bundred NJ, Cuzick J, Allred DC, Clarke R: Response and resistance to the endocrine prevention of breast cancer. Adv Exp Med Biol; 2008;617:201-11
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  • Ovarian suppression is thought to give lifelong protection and recent data indicate that the effectiveness of Tam continues after cessation of treatment at 5-8 years.
  • The question arises whether the information we have concerning the responsiveness of ERalpha+ cells in TDLU, premalignant lesions, and invasive cancers give an indication of the targets for endocrine prevention.
  • The data also suggest that ERalpha+ DCIS is responsive to estrogen and ED supporting premalignant lesions is a target as does the data from the NSABP P1 trial indicating a marked preventive effect of Tam in women previously diagnosed with atypical ductal hyperplasia and a preventative effect on CIS.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / prevention & control. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Hormone Replacement Therapy


69. Hadjiiski L, Mukherji SK, Gujar SK, Sahiner B, Ibrahim M, Street E, Moyer J, Worden FP, Chan HP: Treatment response assessment of head and neck cancers on CT using computerized volume analysis. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol; 2010 Oct;31(9):1744-51
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  • [Title] Treatment response assessment of head and neck cancers on CT using computerized volume analysis.
  • Our aim was to evaluate the potential usefulness of a computerized system for segmenting lesions in head and neck CT scans and for estimation of volume change of head and neck malignant tumors in response to treatment.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT scans from a pretreatment examination and a post 1-cycle chemotherapy examination of 34 patients with 34 head and neck primary-site cancers were collected.
  • The computerized system was developed in our laboratory.
  • It performs 3D segmentation on the basis of a level-set model and uses as input an approximate bounding box for the lesion of interest.
  • As a reference standard, 1 radiologist outlined full 3D contours for each of the 34 primary tumors for both the pre- and posttreatment scans and a second radiologist verified the contours.
  • RESULTS: The correlation between the automatic and manual estimates for both the pre- to post-treatment volume change and the percentage volume change for the 34 primary-site tumors was 0.95, with an average error of -2.4 ± 8.5% by automatic segmentation.
  • There was no substantial difference and specific trend in the automatic segmentation accuracy for the different types of primary head and neck tumors, indicating that the computerized segmentation performs relatively robustly for this application.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The tumor size change in response to treatment can be accurately estimated by the computerized segmentation system relative to radiologists' manual estimations for different types of head and neck tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiography. Imaging, Three-Dimensional / methods. Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Reproducibility of Results. Sensitivity and Specificity. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20595363.001).
  • [ISSN] 1936-959X
  • [Journal-full-title] AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AJNR Am J Neuroradiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA093517
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS495353; NLM/ PMC3767432
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70. de Jong JS, van Ginkel RJ, Slart RH, Lemstra CL, Paans AM, Mulder NH, Hoekstra HJ: FDG-PET probe-guided surgery for recurrent retroperitoneal testicular tumor recurrences. Eur J Surg Oncol; 2010 Nov;36(11):1092-5
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  • METHODS: Three patients with resectable 2nd or 3rd recurrent testicular cancer based on elevated tumor markers after previous various chemotherapy schedules and resections of residual retroperitoneal tumor masses were included in this study.
  • RESULTS: All patients showed extended adhesions and scar tissue in the retroperitoneal area due to the previous surgeries.
  • Pre-operative PET/CT scan showed a good correlation with intra-operative PET probe-guided detection of recurrent lesions.
  • There was a high target to background ratio (TGB) of 5:1 during the procedure.
  • In one patient, a 2 cm large lesion, which did not show on pre-operative FDG-PET scan, was detected with the PET probe.
  • Histopathologic tissue evaluation demonstrated recurrent vital tumor in all PET probe positive lesions.
  • CONCLUSIONS: PET probe-guided surgery seems to be a promising tool to localize FDG-PET positive lesion in recurrent testicular cancer in hardly accessible surgical locations.
  • PET probe-guided surgery might be a useful technique in surgical oncology for recurrent testicular cancer and has the potential to be applied in surgery of other malignant diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Dysgerminoma / secondary. Dysgerminoma / surgery. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Positron-Emission Tomography. Retroperitoneal Neoplasms / secondary. Retroperitoneal Neoplasms / surgery. Testicular Neoplasms / pathology. Testicular Neoplasms / surgery. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Gamma Rays. Humans. Male. Predictive Value of Tests. Radiopharmaceuticals. Time Factors

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20828977.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2157
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of surgical oncology : the journal of the European Society of Surgical Oncology and the British Association of Surgical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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71. Liao Z, Komaki R, Mason KA, Milas L: Role of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with radiation therapy in lung cancer. Clin Lung Cancer; 2003 May;4(6):356-65
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  • [Title] Role of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with radiation therapy in lung cancer.
  • The enzyme is often overexpressed in premalignant lesions and cancer of the lung.
  • Clinical trials of the combination of selective COX-2 inhibitors with radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or both in patients with lung cancer have been initiated and some preliminary results are available.
  • In this review, we describe the relationship between overexpression of COX-2 and lung cancer, the antitumor effect of selective COX-2 inhibitors, discuss the rationale for using selective COX-2 inhibitors combined with radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and summarize current clinical protocols and initial findings.

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  • (PMID = 14599301.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-7304
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lung cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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72. Lu X, Arbiser JL, West J, Hoedt-Miller M, Sheridan A, Govindarajan B, Harral JW, Rodman DM, Fouty B: Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand can induce apoptosis in subsets of premalignant cells. Am J Pathol; 2004 Nov;165(5):1613-20
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  • [Title] Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand can induce apoptosis in subsets of premalignant cells.
  • During the transformation from a normal to a malignant cell, several mutations are required to bypass the pathways responsible for controlling proliferation.
  • Premalignant cells have acquired some, but not all of these mutations and consequently have not yet attained a malignant phenotype characterized by tumor formation in vivo.
  • Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) can induce apoptosis in malignant cells while sparing normal ones and is currently being considered as adjuvant therapy for various human malignancies.
  • Whether TRAIL is effective in inducing apoptosis in premalignant cells is unclear, however.
  • We studied the effect of TRAIL on two human premalignant cell lines the SV7tert and HA1E cells.
  • Both cell lines had been immortalized by the addition of simian virus 40 large T antigen and the telomerase subunit hTERT, but had not been transformed into malignant cells.
  • These results suggest that TRAIL can induce apoptosis in premalignant cells and suggests a novel therapy for the treatment of premalignant lesions in vivo.

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  • (PMID = 15509531.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9440
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Pathol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL014985; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL48038-09; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL14985-29; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL57282-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Polyomavirus Transforming; 0 / Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Protein Synthesis Inhibitors; 0 / TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / TNFSF10 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 98600C0908 / Cycloheximide; EC 2.7.7.49 / Telomerase; EC 3.4.22.- / CASP8 protein, human; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 8; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1618658
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73. Klass CM, Shin DM: Current status and future perspectives of chemoprevention in head and neck cancer. Curr Cancer Drug Targets; 2007 Nov;7(7):623-32
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  • The five-year survival rate for patients with SCCHN in the United States and other developed countries is still poor, approximately 40%, and even those patients who do not experience recurrence of the original cancer, have a high risk of developing a second primary malignancy.
  • Ever since the last two decades have seen the rise and fall of the results of clinical trials using carotinoids and retinoids as chemopreventive agents, new treatment strategies are needed.
  • Selective and nonselective COX-1/2 inhibitors and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors have shown promising results in cancer therapy and are currently evaluated in chemoprevention trials.
  • However, associated high costs and side effects make these less attractive to patients with premalignant lesions.
  • Since premalignant lesions of the oral cavity are easily accessible for topical treatments, it remains to be seen if there is a role for topical treatments.
  • Current clinical trials using these novel agents for prevention of second primary tumors or treatment of premalignant lesions will further elucidate which agents should be used but also will help to establish the role of chemoprevention in head and neck cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / prevention & control. Drugs, Investigational / therapeutic use. Head and Neck Neoplasms / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 18045067.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-5576
  • [Journal-full-title] Current cancer drug targets
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Cancer Drug Targets
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA112643; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA101244
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Drugs, Investigational
  • [Number-of-references] 181
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74. Kouwenhoven ST, Liefers GJ, van Erkel AR: The pre-operative stratification of patients with colorectal liver metastases: computed tomography arterial portography (CTAP) has no added value. Eur J Surg Oncol; 2010 Jan;36(1):36-42
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  • [Title] The pre-operative stratification of patients with colorectal liver metastases: computed tomography arterial portography (CTAP) has no added value.
  • AIMS: The purpose of this study was to determine if Computed Tomography Arterial Portography (CTAP) has additional value to Contrast Enhanced helical CT (CE-CT) in selecting patients for hepatic surgery or Isolated Hepatic Perfusion/systemic chemotherapy.
  • All CT's were performed in the normal pre-operative work-up of patients with liver metastases in our regular clinical setting and reviewed blinded by a radiologist.
  • For CE-CT and CTAP the number, size (largest diameter) and location of all suspected malignant liver lesions were recorded.
  • The favourable treatment option was determined based on the results of CE-CT and CTAP independently.
  • The therapeutic decision based on CE-CT and CTAP was compared with the definite treatment.
  • For all patients with recorded findings during surgery, consisting of intra-operative ultrasound, liver palpation and histology a standard of reference for lesion detection was available.
  • For these patients detection rates and the fraction of false positive lesions were calculated.
  • Fourteen patients were treated with chemotherapy, 4 with Isolated Hepatic Perfusion (IHP) and 10 with systemic therapy.
  • Based on the findings on CTAP, surgery should be the treatment of choice in 29 patients and 12 patients were classified non-surgical.
  • CONCLUSION: Despite a significantly higher detection rate for hepatic metastases, CTAP has no added value in the therapeutic stratification in candidates for resection of hepatic metastases of colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / radiography. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Portography. Tomography, Spiral Computed. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion. Contrast Media. False Positive Reactions. Female. Hepatectomy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19556096.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2157
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of surgical oncology : the journal of the European Society of Surgical Oncology and the British Association of Surgical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media
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75. Liao Z, Mason KA, Milas L: Cyclo-oxygenase-2 and its inhibition in cancer: is there a role? Drugs; 2007;67(6):821-45
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  • Despite recent improvements in chemotherapy and radiation therapy in cancer management with the addition of biological agents, novel treatment approaches are needed to further benefit patients.
  • The enzyme is commonly expressed in both premalignant lesions and malignant tumours of different types.
  • A growing body of evidence suggests an association of COX-2 with tumour development, aggressive biological tumour behaviour, resistance to standard cancer treatment, and adverse patient outcome.
  • Clinical trials of the combination of selective COX-2 inhibitors with radiotherapy, chemotherapy or both in patients with a number of cancers have been initiated, and preliminary results are encouraging.
  • This review discusses the role of COX-2, its products (prostaglandins) and its inhibitors in tumour growth and treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Cyclooxygenase 2 / physiology. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors / pharmacology. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Delivery Systems. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Humans. Prostaglandins / biosynthesis. Prostaglandins / physiology

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  • (PMID = 17428102.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-6667
  • [Journal-full-title] Drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Prostaglandins; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2
  • [Number-of-references] 233
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76. Brandes AA, Tosoni A, Franceschi E, Reni M, Gatta G, Vecht C: Glioblastoma in adults. Crit Rev Oncol Hematol; 2008 Aug;67(2):139-52
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  • Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant among astrocytic tumours and is associated with a poor prognosis.
  • Surgery aimed to complete resection should be the first therapeutic modality in the management of glioblastoma.
  • Postoperative concomitant chemo-radiation is the standard treatment and consists of 60Gy of external-beam radiotherapy (to be delivered to a target volume including a 2-3cm ring of tissue surrounding the perimeter of the contrast enhancing lesion on pre-operative CT/MRI scans) plus temozolomide (TMZ) administered concomitantly (75mg/m(2) daily) and after radiotherapy (150-200mg/m(2), for 5 days every 4 weeks).
  • At time of recurrence/progression, a nitrosourea-based chemotherapy constitutes a reasonable option, as well as a temozolomide re-challenge for patients without progression during prior temozolomide treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Glioblastoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Neoplasm Staging

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Glioblastoma.
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  • (PMID = 18394916.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-8428
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical reviews in oncology/hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Rev. Oncol. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Number-of-references] 98
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77. Hornung R: Photomedical approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of gynecologic cancers. Curr Drug Targets Immune Endocr Metabol Disord; 2001 Aug;1(2):165-77
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  • [Title] Photomedical approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of gynecologic cancers.
  • Malignant tumors of the female reproductive organs have a high incidence and mortality.
  • Despite modern technology, diagnostics and therapeutics have substantial limitations.
  • Detection of autofluorescence, photosensitizer mediated fluorescence, and near-infrared-spectra are new approaches to diagnose gynecologic malignancies and premalignant lesions.
  • Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently being evaluated for the treatment of gynecologic cancers and precancers.
  • New porphyrin based photosensitizers promise a selective tumor targeting and consequently a selective treatment of surgically not removable cancers.
  • The present article summarizes the role of photomedicine in diagnostics and treatments of malignant disease of the female genital tract.
  • [MeSH-major] Genital Neoplasms, Female / diagnosis. Genital Neoplasms, Female / therapy. Photochemotherapy. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared

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  • (PMID = 12476797.001).
  • [ISSN] 1568-0088
  • [Journal-full-title] Current drug targets. Immune, endocrine and metabolic disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Drug Targets Immune Endocr. Metabol. Disord.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Photosensitizing Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 144
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78. Konturek PC, Rembiasz K, Konturek SJ, Stachura J, Bielanski W, Galuschka K, Karcz D, Hahn EG: Gene expression of ornithine decarboxylase, cyclooxygenase-2, and gastrin in atrophic gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori before and after eradication therapy. Dig Dis Sci; 2003 Jan;48(1):36-46
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  • [Title] Gene expression of ornithine decarboxylase, cyclooxygenase-2, and gastrin in atrophic gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori before and after eradication therapy.
  • Recently, the increased expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), gastrin and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 has been shown to be increased in premalignant lesions in gastric mucosa and to play an essential role in the malignant transformation.
  • The aim of the study is to assess the effect of eradication therapy on atrophic gastritis and analyze the gene expression for ODC, COX-2 and gastrin in gastric mucosa after succesful eradication in patients with atrophic gastritis.
  • The patients were then eradicated with triple therapy consiting of omeprazol (2 x 20 mg), amoxycillin (2 x 1 g) and clarithromycin (2 x 500 mg) for seven days and vitamin C 1 g/day for three months.
  • After triple therapy the successful eradication assessed by UBT was observed in 95% of patients.
  • The expression of COX-2 and ODC was significantly up-regulated in the gastric mucosa of patients with atrophic gastritis and significantly reduced after eradication therapy.
  • (1) Hp eradication leads to the decrease in ODC and COX-2 gene expression in the gastric mucosa, and this may be relevant for the prevention of the Hp-associated gastric carcinogenesis; and (2) gastric atrophy ameliorates upon successful Hp eradication therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Gastric Mucosa / microbiology. Gastrins / genetics. Gastritis, Atrophic / drug therapy. Gastritis, Atrophic / metabolism. Helicobacter Infections / drug therapy. Helicobacter Infections / metabolism. Helicobacter pylori. Isoenzymes / genetics. Ornithine Decarboxylase / genetics. Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Amoxicillin / therapeutic use. Anti-Ulcer Agents / therapeutic use. Clarithromycin / therapeutic use. Cyclooxygenase 2. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Gene Expression. Humans. Male. Membrane Proteins. Middle Aged. Omeprazole / therapeutic use. Peroxidases / genetics. RNA, Messenger / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 12645788.001).
  • [ISSN] 0163-2116
  • [Journal-full-title] Digestive diseases and sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dig. Dis. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Ulcer Agents; 0 / Gastrins; 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 804826J2HU / Amoxicillin; EC 1.11.1.- / Peroxidases; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 1.14.99.1 / PTGS2 protein, human; EC 1.14.99.1 / Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases; EC 4.1.1.17 / Ornithine Decarboxylase; H1250JIK0A / Clarithromycin; KG60484QX9 / Omeprazole
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79. Saba NF, Choi M, Muller S, Shin HJ, Tighiouart M, Papadimitrakopoulou VA, El-Naggar AK, Khuri FR, Chen ZG, Shin DM: Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in tumor progression and survival of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Cancer Prev Res (Phila); 2009 Sep;2(9):823-9
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  • Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathways may have significant implications for the prevention and treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
  • COX-2 is overexpressed in both premalignant lesions and invasive HNSCC.
  • We examined COX-2 expression by immunohistochemistry in normal tissues, different stages of premalignant lesions, and carcinoma in situ (CIS).
  • Tissue specimens were obtained from the following: premalignant lesions from 25 subjects enrolled in a biochemoprevention trial, tumor samples collected at diagnosis from 38 HNSCC patients enrolled in an induction chemotherapy trial, and normal control tissues from 10 noncancer, nonsmoking subjects.
  • COX-2 was expressed in early and intermediate stages of premalignant lesions, increasing first in the basal and parabasal layers, then lower spinous, and upper spinous layers.
  • COX-2 expression in tumors from patients treated with induction chemotherapy was correlated with overall survival after controlling for clinical variables.
  • These findings elucidate the differential expression pattern of COX-2 in stages of head and neck premalignant lesions and invasive carcinoma, supporting the rationale for COX-2 inhibition as an important strategy for cancer chemoprevention.