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1. Chaigneau L, Guardiola E, N'Guyen T, Dufresne A, Stein U, Villanueva C, Thiery-Vuillemin A, Lorchel F, Pivot X: [Induction chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer]. Bull Cancer; 2006 Jul;93(7):677-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Induction chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer].
  • [Transliterated title] Chimiothérapie d'induction chez les patients présentant un cancer des voies aérodigestives supérieures.
  • Despite a high level of activity on the primary tumor, no study has demonstrated a survival benefit suggesting the use of neoadjvant chemotherapy.
  • One can consider that the only benefit of such strategy is for larynx preservation in patients with operable hypopharnx or larynx cancer.
  • Nevertheless, recently the well established preservation strategy based on induction chemotherapy following according to the activity by radiotherapy has been knocked over by a strategy developed by Forastiere et al. using primary concomitant chemoradiotherapy.
  • However, the lack of benefit reported by neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been thwarted by the recent results provided by the EORTC study which assessed the survival benefit of neoadjuvant chemotherapy by docetaxel-cisplatin-fluorouracile.
  • Interestingly, since 2002 the clearly established strategies for patients with advanced head and neck cancer have been challenged and new options are emerging.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Remission Induction

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  • (PMID = 16873076.001).
  • [ISSN] 1769-6917
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin du cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull Cancer
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 36
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2. Holsinger FC, Lin HY, Bassot V, Laccourreye O: Platin-based exclusive chemotherapy for selected patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and pharynx. Cancer; 2009 Sep 1;115(17):3909-18
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  • [Title] Platin-based exclusive chemotherapy for selected patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and pharynx.
  • BACKGROUND: The current study was conducted to determine the long-term outcomes of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and pharynx who were treated with platin-based exclusive chemotherapy (EC) after they achieved a complete clinical response (CCR) to induction chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: One hundred forty-two who achieved a CCR after platin-based induction chemotherapy were treated exclusively with additional chemotherapy, and 98.6% were followed for a minimum of 3 years or until death.
  • The main causes of death were metachronous second primary tumors (n = 27) and intercurrent disease (n = 21).
  • In multivariate analysis, primary tumor arising outside the glottic larynx (P = .0001) and a Charlson comorbidity index >1 (P = .0001) were associated with a statistically significant reduction in survival.
  • Salvage treatment resulted in an observed final local control rate of 93% that varied from 97.2% in patients who had glottic cancer to 88.7% in patients who had tumor originating from other sites (P = .097).
  • Combined chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (PF) allowed for the successful modulation of local therapy in 54.9% of patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: For selected patients, EC may provide long-term, durable disease control.
  • For patients who developed recurrent disease after EC, this approach did not diminish survival and maintained function in the majority of patients.
  • Future work should be directed toward select markers of response to PF chemotherapy with which to identify those patients who are suited optimally for this approach.

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  • (PMID = 19551883.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K12 CA88084; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K12 CA088084-09; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA097007; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K12 CA088084; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA97007
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Platinum Compounds; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS124415; NLM/ PMC3851301
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3. Chung MK, Jeong HS, Park SG, Jang JY, Son YI, Choi JY, Hyun SH, Park K, Ahn MJ, Ahn YC, Kim HJ, Ko YH, Baek CH: Metabolic tumor volume of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography predicts short-term outcome to radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in pharyngeal cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 2009 Sep 15;15(18):5861-8
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  • [Title] Metabolic tumor volume of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography predicts short-term outcome to radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in pharyngeal cancer.
  • PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate whether metabolic tumor volume (MTV) measured from [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) predicts short-term outcome to radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy and disease-free survival (DFS) in patients with pharyngeal cancers.
  • Short-term outcome was assessed using the treatment response evaluation by the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and recurrence events during follow-up (complete response/no recurrence or residual disease/recurrence).
  • A cutoff of 40 mL for the MTV was the best discriminative value for predicting treatment response.
  • By univariate analyses, patients with MTV > 40 mL showed a significantly lower number of complete response/no recurrence than did patients with MTV < or =40 mL [68.2% versus 87.8%; hazard ratio (HR), 3.34; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.09-10.08; P = 0.03], as is the same in tumor-node-metastasis stage (87.5% for I-II versus 90% for III versus 63.8% for IV; P = 0.02).
  • The standardized uptake value for the primary tumor did not show any correlation with treatment outcome or DFS.
  • CONCLUSION: MTV has a potential value in predicting short-term outcome and DFS in patients with pharyngeal cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Positron-Emission Tomography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Predictive Value of Tests. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Burden. Young Adult

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  • [CommentIn] Clin Cancer Res. 2010 Mar 15;16(6):1968; author reply 1968-9 [20215538.001]
  • (PMID = 19737951.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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4. Montero EH, Trufero JM, Romeo JA, Terré FC: Comorbidity and prognosis in advanced hypopharyngeal-laryngeal cancer under combined therapy. Tumori; 2008 Jan-Feb;94(1):24-9
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  • [Title] Comorbidity and prognosis in advanced hypopharyngeal-laryngeal cancer under combined therapy.
  • AIMS AND BACKGROUND: The success of combined treatment in head and neck cancer resides largely in its completion, which can be compromised when the patient's general health status is precarious.
  • The objective of this investigation was to study the role of comorbidity as a prognostic factor in a large, homogeneous population affected by locally advanced pharyngeal-laryngeal cancer, under a combined protocol treatment.
  • The a priori hypothesis is that comorbidity strongly conditions overall survival and specific overall survival in these patients and can aid in the selection and individualization of treatments.
  • Of the original 114 patients selected, 15 were withdrawn because the tumor spread to maxillofacial areas, or due to the lack of attendance at the clinic, incomplete clinical data or coexistent primary tumors.
  • The group under analysis consisted of the 99 remaining patients affected by stage III and IV laryngeal and/or hypopharyngeal cancers that had not received previous treatments.
  • In the multivariate analysis, tumor staging, neoadjuvant chemotherapy response and comorbidity (RR = 1.55 and 1.44 for overall and specific overall survival, respectively) present themselves as three prognostic factors independent of overall and specific overall survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The role of comorbidity as an independent prognostic factor in patients affected by laryngeal and/or hypopharyngeal cancer treated with chemo-radiotherapy should be taken into account in the tailoring of treatments and the improvement of therapeutic results.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / epidemiology. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / epidemiology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Comorbidity. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Spain / epidemiology. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 18468331.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8916
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumori
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumori
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Tamura K, Yoshinaga T, Tanino M, Kimura T, Yamada N, Nishimura M, Fukuda S, Nishihara H, Shindoh M, Tanaka S: Hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma producing both granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and parathyroid hormone-related protein. Pathol Int; 2008 Oct;58(10):652-6
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  • Laryngoscopy indicated hypopharyngeal tumor histologically diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).
  • A combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy was performed for 2 months, and the hypopharyngeal lesion completely regressed.
  • After 4 months, fever, anorexia, and malaise appeared, and chest X-ray and CT indicated two large tumors in the right lung.
  • Subsequently, positron emission tomography (PET) showed multiple metastases to several organs including the liver, spine, skull, and thigh.
  • Two months after readmission, the patient died with no success of chemotherapy.
  • At autopsy, the lung tumor was clearly positive for both G-CSF and PTHrP on immunohistostaining.
  • Retrospectively, examination showed that the primary pharyngeal tumor was focally positive for these two cytokines.
  • Thus, a certain population of hypopharyngeal cancer producing G-CSF and PTHrP, spread to various organs and contributed to the rapid progression and poor prognosis.
  • This case is presented with a discussion of several other cases in the literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / blood. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / metabolism. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Deglutition Disorders / pathology. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / metabolism. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 18801086.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
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6. Qiu W, Tong GX, Manolidis S, Close LG, Assaad AM, Su GH: Novel mutant-enriched sequencing identified high frequency of PIK3CA mutations in pharyngeal cancer. Int J Cancer; 2008 Mar 1;122(5):1189-94
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  • [Title] Novel mutant-enriched sequencing identified high frequency of PIK3CA mutations in pharyngeal cancer.
  • We previously reported 4 PIK3CA mutations in 38 head and neck cancer samples, 3 of which were identified in 6 pharyngeal cancer samples.
  • To determine the mutation frequency of PIK3CA in pharyngeal cancer, we studied 24 additional cases of pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in this study.
  • Using both direct genomic DNA sequencing and novel mutant-enriched sequencing methods developed specifically for the 3 hot-spot mutations (H1047R, E545K and E452K) of PIK3CA, we detected 5 mutations of PIK3CA in the 24 pharyngeal cancers (20.8%).
  • We showed that the mutant-enriched sequencing method for the H1047R hot-spot mutation can identify the mutation in a mixed population of mutant and wild-type DNA sequences at 1:360 ratios.
  • These novel mutant-enriched sequencing methods allow the detection of the PIK3CA hot-spot mutations in clinical specimens which often contain limited tumor tissues (i.e., biopsy specimens).
  • The data further support that oncogenic PIK3CA may play a critical role in pharyngeal carcinogenesis, and the mutant-enriched sequencing methods for PIK3CA are sensitive and reliable ways to detect PIK3CA mutations in clinical samples.
  • Because PIK3CA and its pathway are potential targets for chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and frequent somatic mutation of PIK3CA has been identified in many human cancer types (e.g., breast cancer, colorectal cancer), the abilities to detect PIK3CA mutations with enhanced sensitivities have great potential impacts on target therapies for many cancer types.

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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  • (PMID = 17990317.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0215
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA095434-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109525-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K01 CA095434-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA095434-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA109525-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA109525-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109525; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109525-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K01 CA095434; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA095434; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K01 CA095434-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA Primers; EC 2.7.1.- / Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; EC 2.7.1.137 / PIK3CA protein, human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS150987; NLM/ PMC2792983
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7. Sugimoto T, Matano S, Nishijima H, Kakuta K, Inamura K, Okamura T, Munemoto S, Satoh S: [Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for localized refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma--report of two cases]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2007 Jan;34(1):125-8
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  • Lymphoma enlarged even after the fourth courses of chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP).
  • The second case had a pharyngeal tumor and bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy.
  • Chemotherapy consisted of mitoxantrone, methotrexate, ifosfamide,and prednisolone (MMIP).
  • The dose of radiation to the involved sites was 40 Gy.
  • The first case received chemotherapy three days after radiotherapy was started.
  • The second case was treated with chemotherapy, and radiotherapy was begun one day after.
  • One case received two courses of chemotherapy after chemo-radiotherapy, and the other received no additional chemotherapy.
  • Both cases achieved complete remission after the combined therapy, however, lymphoma in one case recurred three months after the therapy.
  • It is possible that this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is effective for localized DLBCL which did not disappear after standard chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, B-Cell / radiotherapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / radiotherapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. Humans. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Mitoxantrone / administration & dosage. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Radiotherapy Dosage. Recurrence. Remission Induction. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 17220687.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; BZ114NVM5P / Mitoxantrone; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; CHOP protocol; MMIP protocol
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8. Cetinayak O, Akman F, Kentli S, Duzen M, Eyiler F, Sen M, Kinay M: Assessment of treatment-related thyroid dysfunction in patients with head and neck cancer. Tumori; 2008 Jan-Feb;94(1):19-23
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  • [Title] Assessment of treatment-related thyroid dysfunction in patients with head and neck cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess thyroid dysfunction in head and neck cancer patients who have received external beam radiotherapy according to radiotherapy fields and dose, tumor site and other local or systemic treatments retrospectively and prospectively and propose a follow-up schedule.
  • Group I (n = 345) consisted of surgically treated 153 laryngeal, 80 nasopharyngeal and 112 oral cavity/oropharyngeal carcinoma patients; these patients were evaluated retrospectively for treatment-related thyroid dysfunction using their data files.
  • Group II included 33 patients with head and neck cancer who were evaluated prospectively.
  • Thyroid function tests were performed at the beginning of the radiotherapy and every three months after the radiotherapy course, and thyroid dysfunction regarding surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy was evaluated.
  • At the time of analysis, 29 (87.8%) patients were euthyroidic, 2 (6.1%) patients had subclinical and 2 (6.1%) patients had clinical hypothyroidism.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Even after a short follow-up, the incidence of thyroid dysfunction was 12.2% in head and neck cancer patients treated with combined surgery and radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypothyroidism / etiology. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Laryngectomy / adverse effects. Male. Prospective Studies. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Radiotherapy Dosage. Retrospective Studies. Thyroid Function Tests

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  • (PMID = 18468330.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8916
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumori
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumori
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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9. Kohno N: The role of chemotherapy for advanced oro and hypopharyngeal cancer. Auris Nasus Larynx; 2004 Jun;31(2):113-8
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  • [Title] The role of chemotherapy for advanced oro and hypopharyngeal cancer.
  • Although important progress continuous to be made in the treatment of oro and hypopharyngeal cancer, the 5-year survival rate for all this disease has remained at less than 30% for the past 30 years.
  • In the early 1980s, chemotherapy was introduced with high expectation of reducing in the incidence of distant metastases and increasing the possibility of local control.
  • This article explores the use of chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pharyngeal cancer.
  • Thus, the efficacy of chemotherapy are reviewed and treatment options for advanced pharyngeal cancer are made.
  • In these cases, the possibility of instituting adjuvant chemotherapy with an active treatment regimen may be taken into account depending on the condition of the patient and the tumor.
  • Patients with surgically resectable tumors are given 1-2 cycles of induction chemotherapy.
  • Cases who respond to the induction chemotherapy are subsequently given concurrent chemoradiotherapy.
  • The cases who do not respond to the induction chemotherapy are treated with radical surgery.
  • Patients with unresectable carcinoma are given concurrent chemoradiotherapy because local treatment should be performed in such patients as early as possible.
  • In principle, concurrent regimens should be supplemented with adjuvant chemotherapy in all cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15121218.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-8146
  • [Journal-full-title] Auris, nasus, larynx
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Auris Nasus Larynx
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Number-of-references] 35
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10. Tsukuda M: [Preoperative chemotherapy for patients with advanced head and neck cancer]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2001 Nov;28(12):1806-13
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  • [Title] [Preoperative chemotherapy for patients with advanced head and neck cancer].
  • Cases with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have clinically advanced tumors.
  • The curative treatments for advanced HNSCC are radiotherapy and/or surgical resection.
  • However, standard treatment alone is less successful for advanced HNSCC.
  • Accordingly, two modalities using chemotherapy are applied as preoperative treatment for HNSCC.
  • First, multi-drug chemotherapy has been administered as neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC).
  • Therefore, the development of intensive chemotherapy regimen with a high CR rate including taxanes is ongoing.
  • On the other hand, organ preservation modality has been under investigation using combined radiotherapy with NAC regimen with a dose reduction of administered chemotherapeutic drugs or a new chemotherapy regimen including taxanes (concomitant or concurrent chemoradiotherapy).
  • In this strategy, impact chemotherapy with almost the same anti-tumor effect as NAC and with a potential of radiation sensitizer is necessary.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Taxoids
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bridged Compounds / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Preoperative Care. Radiotherapy Dosage. Remission Induction

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  • (PMID = 11729472.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Bridged Compounds; 0 / Taxoids; 1605-68-1 / taxane; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Number-of-references] 19
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11. Magné N, Pivot X, Marcy PY, Chauvel P, Courdi A, Dassonville O, Poissonnet G, Vallicioni J, Ettore F, Falewee MN, Milano G, Santini J, Lagrange JL, Schneider M, Demard F, Bensadoun RJ: [Concomitant bifractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil in locally progressive, non-resectable epidermoid carcinomas of the pharynx: ten years experience at the Antoine Lacassagne center]. Cancer Radiother; 2001 Aug;5(4):413-24
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  • [Title] [Concomitant bifractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil in locally progressive, non-resectable epidermoid carcinomas of the pharynx: ten years experience at the Antoine Lacassagne center].
  • [Transliterated title] Radiothérapie bifractionnée et chimiothérapie par cisplatine et 5-fluoro-uracile concomitantes dans les carcinomes épidermoïdes localement évolués non résécables du pharynx: dix ans d'expérience au centre Antoine Lacassagne.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center's experience in a treatment by concomitant bid radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • All of them had stage IV, unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx and they received continuous bid radiotherapy (two daily fractions of 1.2 Gy, 5 days a week, with a 6-h minimal interval between fractions).
  • Total radiotherapy dose was 80.4 Gy on the oropharynx and 75.6 Gy on the hypopharynx.
  • Two or three chemotherapy courses of cisplatin (CP)-5-fluorouracil (5FU) were given during radiotherapy at 21-day intervals (third not delivered after the end of the radiotherapy).
  • This toxicity was significant but manageable with optimised supportive care, and never led to interruption of treatment for more than 1 week, although there were two toxic deaths.
  • Overall global survival at 1 and 2 years was 72% and 50% respectively, with a median follow-up of 17 months.
  • Prognostic factors for overall survival were the Karnofsky index (71% survival at 3 years for patients with a Karnofsky index of 90-100% versus 30% for patients with a Karnofsky index of 80% versus 0% for patients with a Karnofsky index of 60-70%, p = 0.0001) and tumor location (55% at 3 years for oropharynx versus 37% for panpharynx versus 28% for hypopharynx, p = 0.009).
  • CONCLUSION: These results confirm the efficacy of concomitant bid radiotherapy and chemotherapy in advanced unresectable tumor of the pharynx.
  • The improvement in results will essentially depend on our capacity to restore in a good nutritional status the patients before beginning this heavy treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose Fractionation. Enteral Nutrition. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Karnofsky Performance Status. Male. Middle Aged. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Neutropenia / radionuclide imaging. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Radiodermatitis / etiology. Stomatitis / chemically induced. Stomatitis / prevention & control. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11521390.001).
  • [ISSN] 1278-3218
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer radiothérapie : journal de la Société française de radiothérapie oncologique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Radiother
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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12. Velich N, Vaszilkó M, Cséplo K, Szigeti K, Németh Z, Barabás J, Szabó G: [Survival prospects of mesopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated primarily with intraarterial chemotherapy. A retrospective study]. Orv Hetil; 2006 Jan 22;147(3):127-31
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  • [Title] [Survival prospects of mesopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated primarily with intraarterial chemotherapy. A retrospective study].
  • BACKGROUND: The radical removal of mesopharyngeal tumors necessitates very extensive, aggressive surgery.
  • In certain cases, therefore, they strive to ensure the quality of life of these patients by means of two other possibilities in the complex treatment: chemotherapy and irradiation; in this way, over radicality can be avoided.
  • AIM: One of the elements of the complex therapy may be intraarterial chemotherapy.
  • The present work relates to a study of the effects and side-effects of primary intraarterial chemotherapy administrated in the period 1995-2000, and the overall survival of the patients.
  • PATIENTS AND METHOD: Remission was attained in a total of 30 patients who participated in primary intraarterial chemotherapy.
  • Treatment was performed by retrograde cannulation of the external carotid artery and the administration of a relatively low dose of drug for a relatively long time (5-14 days).
  • The intra-arterial chemotherapy was supplemented with other modes of treatment.
  • RESULTS: A clinically observable degree of tumor regression was detected in 83.3% of the cases after the intraarterial treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / mortality. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Disease Progression. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial. Leucovorin / administration & dosage. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 16515032.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6002
  • [Journal-full-title] Orvosi hetilap
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orv Hetil
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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13. Yamamoto Y, Kino Y, Ohara K, Onuma S, Asai K, Kobayashi T, Kono T, Kasai S: [A case report of advanced cardiac cancer showing a complete response to TS-1 as neoadjuvant chemotherapy]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2004 Apr;31(4):579-83
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  • [Title] [A case report of advanced cardiac cancer showing a complete response to TS-1 as neoadjuvant chemotherapy].
  • A 69-year-old female had complaints of vomiting, appetite loss and feeling of pharyngeal obstruction.
  • She was diagnosed with a 3'-shaped advanced cardiac cancer with esophageal invasion.
  • The tumor was T3 (SE) N2, Stage IIIB indicating a poor prognosis.
  • After informed consent, TS-1 was administrated as preoperative chemotherapy.
  • Chemotherapy with TS-1 was very effective, and the tumor noticeably decreased.
  • Histopathological findings revealed that the primary tumor and lymph node had become scarred and fibrous, indicating a complete response (Grade 3).
  • In the future, TS-1 can be expected to display efficacy in neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer who have poor prognoses.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Cardia. Oxonic Acid / therapeutic use. Pyridines / therapeutic use. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tegafur / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Combinations. Female. Gastrectomy. Humans. Remission Induction

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  • (PMID = 15114703.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Pyridines; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid
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14. Salama JK, Stenson KM, List MA, Mell LK, Maccracken E, Cohen EE, Blair E, Vokes EE, Haraf DJ: Characteristics associated with swallowing changes after concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2008 Oct;134(10):1060-5
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  • [Title] Characteristics associated with swallowing changes after concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To define factors that acutely influenced swallowing function prior to and during concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • DESIGN: A summary score from 1 to 7 (the swallowing performance status scale [SPS]) of oral and pharyngeal impairment, aspiration, and diet, was assigned to each patient study by a single senior speech and swallow pathologist, with higher scores indicating worse swallowing.
  • Generalized linear regression models were formulated to asses the effects of patient factors (performance status, smoking intensity, amount of alcohol ingestion, and age), tumor factors (primary site, T stage, and N stage), and treatment-related factors (radiation dose, use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, response to induction chemotherapy, postchemoradiotherapy neck dissection, and preprotocol surgery) on the differences between SPS score before and after treatment.
  • PATIENTS: The study included 95 patients treated under a multiple institution, phase 2 protocol who underwent a videofluorographic oropharyngeal motility (OPM) study to assess swallowing function prior to and within 1 to 2 months after the completion of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • Patients with T3 or T4 tumors (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15-0.95; P = .04) and a performance status of 1 or 2 (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.15-0.91; P = .03) were less likely to have worsening of swallowing after chemoradiotherapy.
  • Only T stage (T3 or T4) was associated with improved swallowing after treatment (OR, 8.96; 95% CI, 1.9-41.5; P < .001).
  • CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, improved swallowing function over baseline is associated with advanced T stage.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Deglutition Disorders / etiology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy, High-Energy / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Confidence Intervals. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Neck Dissection / adverse effects. Neck Dissection / methods. Neoplasm Staging. Odds Ratio. Probability. Quality of Life. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment

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  • (PMID = 18936351.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-361X
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of otolaryngology--head & neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Laccourreye O, Veivers D, Hans S, Ménard M, Brasnu D, Laccourreye H: Chemotherapy alone with curative intent in patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the pharyngolarynx classified as T1-T4N0M0 complete clinical responders. Cancer; 2001 Sep 15;92(6):1504-11
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  • [Title] Chemotherapy alone with curative intent in patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the pharyngolarynx classified as T1-T4N0M0 complete clinical responders.
  • BACKGROUND: The current studies documented the results achieved with chemotherapy alone with curative intent in a series of 67 patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the pharyngolarynx classified as T1-T4N0M0 complete clinical responders after a platin-based induction chemotherapy regimen.
  • METHODS: Group I consisted of 36 patients with tumors originating from the glottis.
  • Group II consisted of 31 patients with tumors originating from sites within the pharyngolarynx other than the glottis.
  • Statistical analyses of survival, local control, lymph node control, distant metastasis, and second primary tumor rates were based on the Kaplan-Meier life-table method.
  • Local control rates after salvage treatment were 100% in Group I patients and 83% in Group II patients.
  • Laryngeal preservation rates after salvage treatment were 100% in Group I patients and 64% in Group II patients.
  • The 10-year actuarial estimate for patients without metachronous second primary tumors was 56.4% in Group I and 46.1% in Group II.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The current report 1) contradicts the old dogma of nonchemocurability for invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract and 2) suggests that the use of a platin-based chemotherapy-alone regimen with curative intent in patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the pharyngolarynx who are classified as T1-T4N0M0 complete clinical responders after receiving an induction chemotherapy regimen is best indicated when the tumor originates from the glottis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasms, Second Primary. Platinum / administration & dosage. Salvage Therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 11745228.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 49DFR088MY / Platinum; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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16. Bensadoun RJ, Bénézery K, Dassonville O, Magné N, Poissonnet G, Ramaïoli A, Lemanski C, Bourdin S, Tortochaux J, Peyrade F, Marcy PY, Chamorey E, Vallicioni J, Seng H, Alzieu C, Géry B, Chauvel P, Schneider M, Santini J, Demard F, Calais G: French multicenter phase III randomized study testing concurrent twice-a-day radiotherapy and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (BiRCF) in unresectable pharyngeal carcinoma: Results at 2 years (FNCLCC-GORTEC). Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2006 Mar 15;64(4):983-94
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  • [Title] French multicenter phase III randomized study testing concurrent twice-a-day radiotherapy and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (BiRCF) in unresectable pharyngeal carcinoma: Results at 2 years (FNCLCC-GORTEC).
  • Twice-daily radiation: two fractions of 1.2 Gy/day, 5 days per week, with no split (D1-->D46).
  • Total tumor doses: 80.4 Gy/46 day (oropharynx), 75.6 Gy/44 day (hypopharynx).
  • Chemotherapy (arm B): Cisplatin 100 mg/m2 (D1, D22, D43); 5FU, continuous infusion (D1-->D5), 750 mg/m2/day cycle 1; 430 mg/m2/day cycles 2 and 3.
  • Enteral nutrition through gastrostomy tube was more frequent in arm B before treatment and at 6 months (p < 0.01).
  • At 24 months, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and specific survival (SS) were significantly better in arm B.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Dose Fractionation. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / adverse effects. France. Humans. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Neck Dissection. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Prospective Studies. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 16376489.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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17. Lecanu JB, Monceaux G, Périé S, Angelard B, St Guily JL: Conservative surgery in T3-T4 pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma: an alternative to radiation therapy and to total laryngectomy for good responders to induction chemotherapy. Laryngoscope; 2000 Mar;110(3 Pt 1):412-6
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  • [Title] Conservative surgery in T3-T4 pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma: an alternative to radiation therapy and to total laryngectomy for good responders to induction chemotherapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the possibility of preservation of the larynx after neoadjuvant chemotherapy by performing a conservative surgery instead of total laryngectomy initially planned, in patients with previously untreated laryngeal and piriform sinus squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).
  • METHODS: A total of 115 patients treated at Tenon Hospital with induction chemotherapy from 1985 to 1995, all with initial indication of radical surgery, were available for the study.
  • The clinical tumor response was evaluated after three cycles of chemotherapy.
  • According to this response, to preserve laryngeal functions, some patients had a modification of the treatment initially planned: radiation therapy essentially for complete responders, and conservative surgery for some partial responders.
  • RESULTS: Of 69 patients with laryngeal cancer, 14 were treated by partial laryngectomy and 19 by radiation therapy; of 46 patients with piriform sinus cancer, 8 were treated by partial surgery and 12 by radiation therapy; the other patients were treated as was initially planned (total laryngectomy with partial pharyngectomy).
  • Overall survival rates, estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, were not statistically different between the three treatment groups.
  • CONCLUSION: This report is a retrospective study, but these results suggest the possibility of using conservative surgery, instead of initially planned total laryngectomy, for good responders to induction chemotherapy with a small residual tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Laryngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Laryngectomy. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Linear Models. Lymph Node Excision. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Patient Care Planning. Pharyngectomy. Remission Induction. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 10718429.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-852X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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18. Muramatsu Y, Hasegawa Y, Fukano H, Ogawa T, Namuba M, Mouri K, Fujimoto Y, Matsuura H, Takai Y, Mori M: Metallothionein immunoreactivity in head and neck carcinomas; special reference to clinical behaviors and chemotherapy responses. Anticancer Res; 2000 Jan-Feb;20(1A):257-64
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  • [Title] Metallothionein immunoreactivity in head and neck carcinomas; special reference to clinical behaviors and chemotherapy responses.
  • Metallothionein (MT), has selectively binding affinity for heavy metal ions and over expression of MT has a potential against resistance for CDDP anticancer agents and radiation treatment.
  • The role of MT immunoreactivity of squamous cell carcinoma in oral and pharyngeal regions (n = 28) and in the maxillary sinus region (n = 3) was evaluated for distribution patterns of MT and clinicopathologic behaviors.
  • All the sections were examined in 400x and counted for MT positive cells over 5 fields of tumor growing foci.
  • MT immunoreactivity was expressed in both tumor cell cytoplasm and nuclei, and showed heterogeneous localization in tumor epithelial cells and in the stroma.
  • Immunohistochemical localizations showed mosaic patterns as the highest MT staining tumor cells intermingled with negative or low staining cells in neoplastic foci, and in stromal cells.
  • In oral and pharyngeal carcinomas (n = 28), MT positive cell index in treated cases (n = 11) was 17.85% and that in non treated tumors (n = 17) was 25.19%.
  • Among histological grading in oral and pharyngeal SCCs, MT index of well differentiated SCC (n = 9) was 17.04%, of moderately differentiated SCC (n = 13) 21.92% and poorly differentiated SCC (n = 6) was 31.06%.
  • There is no significant correlation of positive index of metallothionein between treated and untreated samples taken in oral and pharyngeal SCCs.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / chemistry. Head and Neck Neoplasms / chemistry. Metallothionein / analysis. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / chemistry. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Cell Differentiation. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Gingival Neoplasms / chemistry. Gingival Neoplasms / pathology. Gingival Neoplasms / therapy. Humans. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / chemistry. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms / chemistry. Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms / pathology. Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms / therapy. Middle Aged. Mouth Mucosa / chemistry. Tongue Neoplasms / chemistry. Tongue Neoplasms / pathology. Tongue Neoplasms / therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 10769664.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] GREECE
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 9038-94-2 / Metallothionein; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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19. Matsumura R, Ohta H, Kusuki S, Yoshida H, Sato E, Hashii Y, Uehara S, Oue T, Fukuzawa M, Ishida H, Ozono K: Retropharyngeal neuroblastoma in an infant: management without surgery. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2010 May;32(4):e160-3
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  • We report a 3-month-old infant with retropharyngeal neuroblastoma presenting with airway compression, which had an unresectable localized tumor without N-myc amplification.
  • He was promptly treated with chemotherapy, resulting in a dramatic resolution.
  • Subsequently, he received no surgical intervention and is well without evidence of recurrence 10 months after completion of chemotherapy.
  • Thus, it might be better to treat unresectable, localized disease accompanied by life-threatening symptoms with chemotherapy alone.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Neuroblastoma / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Retropharyngeal Abscess / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Genes, myc / genetics. Humans. Infant. Male. Positron-Emission Tomography. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20445413.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-3678
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Lin YT, Wang LF, Hsu YC: Curcuminoids suppress the growth of pharynx and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells through induced apoptosis. J Agric Food Chem; 2009 May 13;57(9):3765-70
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  • [Title] Curcuminoids suppress the growth of pharynx and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells through induced apoptosis.
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the common malignant cancers in China, and radiotherapy or chemotherapy is the main therapy method for NPC.
  • Curcuminoids (or curcumin), natural antioxidants, have been recently shown to produce a potent chemopreventive action against several types of cancer.
  • In the present study, the antiproliferation and induced apoptosis effects of curcuminoids have been investigated in Detroit 562 cells (human pharynx carcinoma) and HONE-1 (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma) cells.
  • Results indicated that curcuminoids have produced an inhibition of cell proliferation as well as the activation of apoptosis in these cancer cells.
  • By these approaches, apoptosis was induced by curcuminoids in the pharynx and nasopharyngeal cancer cells via caspase-3-dependent pathway.
  • However, a different dependency has been observed, whereas proliferation inhibition and apoptosis depend upon the amount of curcuminoid treatment in the cancer cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Division / drug effects. Curcumin / pharmacology. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacology. Caspases / metabolism. Cell Line, Tumor. DNA Fragmentation. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. NF-kappa B / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 19317462.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-5118
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of agricultural and food chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Agric. Food Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / NF-kappa B; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases; IT942ZTH98 / Curcumin
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21. Laccourreye O, Hans S, Ménard M, Garcia D, Brasnu D, Holsinger FC: Transoral lateral oropharyngectomy for squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar region: II. An analysis of the incidence, related variables, and consequences of local recurrence. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2005 Jul;131(7):592-9
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  • INTERVENTIONS: A total of 131 (81.9%) of the 166 patients received preoperative induction chemotherapy.
  • Fifty-one patients (30.7%) underwent postoperative radiation therapy.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Local and regional recurrence, distant metastasis, second primary tumors, and survival.
  • In univariate analysis, 7 variables were significantly associated with an increased risk of local failure: increasing T classification; positive margins of resection; poor clinical response to induction chemotherapy; tumor spread to the posterior pillar, posterior pharyngeal wall, and contralateral soft palate; and invasion of the junction between the tonsil and soft palate.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Oropharynx / surgery. Tonsillar Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Logistic Models. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasms, Second Primary. Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures / methods

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  • (PMID = 16027281.001).
  • [ISSN] 0886-4470
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of otolaryngology--head & neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Bromberg JE, Niermeijer JM, Hart W: [Clinical reasoning and decision making in practice. A man with unilateral attacks of muscular rigidity following neck surgery for a malignant tumor]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd; 2003 Oct 25;147(43):2118-22
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  • [Title] [Clinical reasoning and decision making in practice. A man with unilateral attacks of muscular rigidity following neck surgery for a malignant tumor].
  • [Transliterated title] Klinisch denken en beslissen in de praktijk. Een man met eenzijdige aanvalsgewijze spierverstijvingen na een halsoperatie wegens maligniteit.
  • A 54-year-old man with a history of generalised tonic clonic seizures presented with complaints of daily unilateral stiffening of the limbs, preceded by paraesthesia.
  • Two years before he had been treated with surgery and radiotherapy for a laryngo-pharyngeal carcinoma.
  • In combination with the medical history, tetany was found to be the correct diagnosis.
  • He was treated with levothyroxine, magnesium, calcium, and vitamin D and recovered in a few weeks' time.
  • Hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism are common complications after treatment (surgery, radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy) for laryngo-pharyngeal carcinoma and other malignancies in the neck region.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / complications. Hypoparathyroidism / etiology. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / complications. Tetany / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Calcium / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Magnesium / therapeutic use. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Thyroxine / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome. Vitamin D / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 14619202.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-2162
  • [Journal-full-title] Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd
  • [Language] dut
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1406-16-2 / Vitamin D; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium; Q51BO43MG4 / Thyroxine; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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23. Senderowicz AM: Novel small molecule cyclin-dependent kinases modulators in human clinical trials. Cancer Biol Ther; 2003 Jul-Aug;2(4 Suppl 1):S84-95
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  • Aberrations in cell cycle control occurs in the majority of human malignancies due to inactivation of tumor suppressor gene Rb by the phosphorylation induced by "hyperactive" cyclin-dependent kinases.
  • Thus, it is quite reasonable to design cdk modulators for the prevention and treatment of human neoplasms.
  • The first example of a direct small molecule cdk modulator tested in the clinic, flavopiridol, is a pan-cdk inhibitor that not only promotes cell cycle arrest but also halts transcriptional elongation, promotes apoptosis, induces differentiation and has antiangiogenic properties.
  • Based on these encouraging results, a Phase 3 trial comparing standard combination chemotherapy versus combination chemotherapy plus flavopiridol is currently under investigation.
  • Phase 2 trials and Phase I trials in combination with standard chemotherapy is being planned with these agents.
  • Although these small molecules are directed towards a very prevalent cause of carcinogenesis, we need to test them in advanced clinical trials to determine the future of this class of agents for the prevention and therapy of human malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclin-Dependent Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / enzymology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenosine Triphosphate / chemistry. Adenosine Triphosphate / metabolism. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Binding Sites. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Cell Division / drug effects. Clinical Trials as Topic. Humans. Models, Biological. Models, Chemical. Retinoblastoma Protein / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 14508085.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-4047
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer biology & therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Biol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Retinoblastoma Protein; 8L70Q75FXE / Adenosine Triphosphate; EC 2.7.11.22 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinases
  • [Number-of-references] 204
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24. Lazarus CL, Logemann JA, Pauloski BR, Rademaker AW, Larson CR, Mittal BB, Pierce M: Swallowing and tongue function following treatment for oral and oropharyngeal cancer. J Speech Lang Hear Res; 2000 Aug;43(4):1011-23
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  • [Title] Swallowing and tongue function following treatment for oral and oropharyngeal cancer.
  • This study examined tongue function and its relation to swallowing in 13 subjects with oral or oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy and 13 age- and sex-matched control subjects.
  • All subjects with head and neck cancer were evaluated pretreatment and 2 months posttreatment.
  • No significant differences were found for the tongue function measures pre- and 2 months posttreatment in the group with head and neck cancer.
  • Significantly higher tongue strength was observed in the control than in the group with head and neck cancer both pre- and posttreatment.
  • Significant correlations of tongue strength and endurance and some swallow measures were found pre- and posttreatment for the group with head and neck cancer and for the control group.
  • These correlations included oral and pharyngeal temporal swallow measures and oropharyngeal swallow efficiency.
  • Pretreatment differences between the 2 groups in tongue strength were likely related to tumor bulk, pain, and soreness.
  • Two-month posttreatment differences were likely related to radiation +/- chemotherapy changes to the oral and pharyngeal mucosa.
  • [MeSH-major] Deglutition Disorders. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / complications. Tongue / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 11386468.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-4388
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Speech Lang. Hear. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01CA40007
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Barium Radioisotopes
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25. Rothschild S, Studer G, Seifert B, Huguenin P, Glanzmann C, Davis JB, Lütolf UM, Hany TF, Ciernik IF: PET/CT staging followed by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) improves treatment outcome of locally advanced pharyngeal carcinoma: a matched-pair comparison. Radiat Oncol; 2007 Jun 09;2:22
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  • [Title] PET/CT staging followed by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) improves treatment outcome of locally advanced pharyngeal carcinoma: a matched-pair comparison.
  • BACKGROUND: Impact of non-pharmacological innovations on cancer cure rates is difficult to assess.
  • It remains unclear, whether outcome improves with 2- [18-F]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and integrated computer tomography (PET/CT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for curative treatment of advanced pharyngeal carcinoma.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty five patients with stage IVA oro- or hypopharyngeal carcinoma were staged with an integrated PET/CT and treated with definitive chemoradiation with IMRT from 2002 until 2005.
  • To estimate the impact of PET/CT with IMRT on outcome, a case-control analysis on all patients with PET/CT and IMRT was done after matching with eighty six patients treated between 1991 and 2001 without PET/CT and 3D-conformal radiotherapy with respect to gender, age, stage, grade, and tumor location with a ratio of 1:2.
  • RESULTS: PET/CT and treatment with IMRT improved cure rates compared to patients without PET/CT and IMRT.
  • CONCLUSION: PET/CT in combination with IMRT and chemotherapy for pharyngeal carcinoma improve oncological therapy of pharyngeal carcinomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma / radiotherapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Positron-Emission Tomography / methods. Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Conformal / methods. Reproducibility of Results. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17559684.001).
  • [ISSN] 1748-717X
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiation oncology (London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiat Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1924526
  • [General-notes] NLM/ Original DateCompleted: 20070806
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26. Sanders KW, Fowler MR, Milner J, Stucker FJ, Nathan CO: Aggressive fibromatosis of the parapharyngeal space: two cases and treatment recommendations. Ear Nose Throat J; 2004 Apr;83(4):262, 264, 266 passim
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  • [Title] Aggressive fibromatosis of the parapharyngeal space: two cases and treatment recommendations.
  • Aggressive fibromatosis is an uncommon tumor that is locally aggressive but not malignant.
  • Therefore, its classification falls between the benign and malignant neoplasms of soft-tissue origin.
  • The treatment of choice is wide surgical excision, which is often difficult.
  • Nonsurgical treatment includes radiation and chemotherapy, both of which are usually reserved for recurrences.
  • We describe two cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the parapharyngeal space, and we review the available treatment options.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibromatosis, Aggressive / diagnosis. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Pharynx / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Connective Tissue / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male. Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures. Recurrence


27. Senderowicz AM: Novel direct and indirect cyclin-dependent kinase modulators for the prevention and treatment of human neoplasms. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2003 Jul;52 Suppl 1:S61-73
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  • [Title] Novel direct and indirect cyclin-dependent kinase modulators for the prevention and treatment of human neoplasms.
  • Abnormalities in the cell cycle are responsible for the majority of human neoplasias.
  • Most abnormalities occur due to hyperphosphorylation of the tumor suppressor gene Rb by the key regulators of the cell cycle, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs).
  • Thus, a pharmacological CDK inhibitor may be useful in the prevention and/or treatment of human neoplasms.
  • The first phase I trial of a CDK inhibitor, flavopiridol, has been completed.
  • Concentrations between 300 and 500 n M-necessary to inhibit CDK-were achieved safely.
  • Phase II trials with infusional flavopiridol and phase I infusional trials in combination with standard chemotherapy are being completed with encouraging results.
  • Phase II/III trials using this 1-h schedule in several tumor types including non-small-cell lung cancer, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma, and head and neck cancer are being conducted worldwide.
  • In the initial UCN-01 clinical trial (continuous infusion for 72 h), a prolonged half-life of about 600 h (100 times longer than in preclinical models) was observed.
  • Another patient with refractory anaplastic large-cell lymphoma had no evidence of disease at >4 years.
  • Bone marrow and tumor samples obtained from some patients revealed loss in adducin phosphorylation, a substrate of PKC.
  • " Moreover, it is still unclear which pharmacodynamic endpoint reflects loss of CDK activity in tissue samples from patients in these trials.
  • Despite these caveats, we feel that CDKs are sensible targets for cancer therapy and that there are several small-molecule CDK modulators in clinical trials with encouraging results.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclin-Dependent Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Alkaloids / administration & dosage. Animals. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Clinical Trials as Topic. Flavonoids / administration & dosage. Humans. Piperidines / administration & dosage. Staurosporine / analogs & derivatives. Tumor Cells, Cultured


28. Büntzel J, Glatzel M, Kuttner K, Weinaug R, Fröhlich D: Amifostine in simultaneous radiochemotherapy of advanced head and neck cancer. Semin Radiat Oncol; 2002 Jan;12(1 Suppl 1):4-13
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  • [Title] Amifostine in simultaneous radiochemotherapy of advanced head and neck cancer.
  • The authors discuss the results of 3 studies of their group reflecting the possible role of amifostine in simultaneous radiochemotherapy (RCT) of advanced head and neck cancer.
  • A control group (n = 14) received simultaneous RCT of the head and neck region with an irradiation dose of 60 Gy and 2 cycles of carboplatin (700 mg/m(2) cumulative dose).
  • Twenty-five patients received the same basic therapy and an additional 500-mg dose of amifostine before each chemotherapy.
  • In a controlled intensification trial (1997 through 1999), the authors included 76 consecutive patients (69 men, 7 women) with pharyngeal cancer (oropharynx, n = 33; hypopharynx, n = 43).
  • The tumors were characterized as unresectable and locally advanced without distant metastasis.
  • All patients received a conventional radiotherapy (2-Gy single dose, daily fractionation) up to doses of 60 Gy and an additional 10 Gy as a boost in the tumor-infiltrated region.
  • If the tumor volume was less than 20 cm(3), we observed an increased 1-year overall survival rate (91% v 71%) and time to progression (17 months v 10 months).
  • If the tumor volume was greater than 20 cm(3), we observed comparable treatment results in both groups (1-year survival rate, 60% v 61%; time to progression, 13 months v 12 months).
  • All patients were treated by surgery or radio(chemo)therapy because of an advanced head and neck cancer.
  • A total of 218 of 531 patients received the antineoplastic therapy without cytoprotection.
  • Amifostine could be integrated in simultaneous radiochemotherapy of advanced head and neck cancer patients.
  • Selective cytoprotection could decrease the main acute toxicities (mucositis, xerostomia, dysphagia) as well as late side effects (xerostomia, loss of taste, fibrosis) of this form of combined treatment.
  • The enhanced therapeutic index may be changed into a prognostic benefit for selected patients with unresectable tumors, if the volume is smaller than 20 cm(3).
  • [MeSH-major] Amifostine / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiation-Protective Agents / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carboplatin / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Edema / etiology. Esophageal Stenosis / etiology. Female. Fibrosis. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiation Injuries / pathology. Radiotherapy Dosage. Taste Disorders / etiology. Xerostomia / etiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 11917277.001).
  • [ISSN] 1053-4296
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in radiation oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Radiat Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiation-Protective Agents; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; M487QF2F4V / Amifostine
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29. Dirix P, Abbeel S, Vanstraelen B, Hermans R, Nuyts S: Dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma: dose-effect relationships for the swallowing structures. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2009 Oct 1;75(2):385-92
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .

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  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Consecutive patients, treated with radiotherapy (70-72 Gy) and concomitant chemotherapy (cisplatinum 100 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) between 2004 and 2007, were examined.
  • RESULTS: A total of 53 disease-free patients were evaluated; mean follow-up was 20.4 months (range, 6-45 months).
  • The volume of the middle pharyngeal constrictor muscle receiving > or =50 Gy (p = 0.04), the mean dose to this structure (p = 0.02) and to the supraglottic larynx (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with late swallowing problems at univariate analysis, along with tumor localization (p = 0.008), T-classification (p = 0.02), and pretreatment swallowing problems (p = 0.01).
  • CONCLUSION: These findings motivate further efforts to reduce the dose to the swallowing structures, especially to the pharyngeal constrictor muscles and the larynx.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Deglutition Disorders / etiology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Deglutition / drug effects. Deglutition / radiation effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Female. Humans. Larynx / drug effects. Larynx / radiation effects. Male. Middle Aged. Pharyngeal Muscles / drug effects. Pharyngeal Muscles / radiation effects. Quality of Life. Radiation Injuries / complications


30. Serrano GB, Fúnez FA, López RG, Crespo CV, Nicolás VD, Naranjo SD, Barrilero AE: [Bladder lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma. Bibliographic review and case report]. Arch Esp Urol; 2008 Jul-Aug;61(6):723-9
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  • [Transliterated title] Carcinoma vesical linfoepiteuoma- like: revisión de la literatura y aportación de un nuevo caso.
  • OBJECTIVE: Lymphoepithelial-carcinoma or lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma is a rare tumour, the histology of which remembers nasal pharyngeal is lymphoepitheliomas.
  • We present a new case of bladder lymphoepithelial carcinoma and performed a review of all published cases, with the aim of defining its characteristics and try to obtain a therapeutic and prognostic guide applicable to this disease.
  • METHODS: We reviewed the literature related to lymphoepithelial carcinoma and epidemiological characteristics, treatments administered, and outcomes of the 56 published cases (including ours) have been analyzed, both globally and as a function of histological subtypes following the classification of Amin et al.
  • RESULTS: 56 cases have been described, 40 males and 16 women, with a mean age of 69 years.
  • Nineteen of the pure subtype (33.9%), 20 of the predominant type (35.7%) and 11 focal (19.6%) were diagnosed, without any indications of histology in six of them (10.7%).
  • Regarding tumor stages: 10.7% (6) were T1, 57.1% (32) T2, and 30.4% (17) T3.
  • 42.9% did not receive any adjuvant treatment, 30.4% received chemotherapy, and 19.6% radiotherapy.
  • Overall survival was 67.9%, 64.3% disease-free, with a mean and median follow up of 34.5 and 25 months respectively.
  • 83% of the pure receive adjuvant treatment, whereas 60% of the predominant and 63% of the focal types did not receive any adjuvant treatment.
  • Disease-free survival for stages T2/T3 was 87.5% for the pure with a median follow up of 39 months, 75% for the predominant with a median follow-up of 22 months and 0% for the focal with a median followup of 18 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Currently, no specific therapeutic protocol can be established for patients with bladder lymphoepithelial carcinoma, although taking into consideration the apparent good outcome of the pure and predominant subtypes and the bad outcome of the focal subtype, it seems that TUR may be a good alternative in selected patients with pure our predominant histology, even with infiltrative stages.
  • Oppositely, radical treatment with cystectomy and systemic adjuvant treatment seems to be the best choice for focal subtypes.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18705195.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-0614
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivos españoles de urología
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Esp. Urol.
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Number-of-references] 18
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31. Borrás-Blasco J, Nuñez-Cornejo C, Gracia-Perez A, Rosique-Robles JD, Casterá MD, Viosca E, Abad FJ: Parapharyngeal abscess in a patient receiving etanercept. Ann Pharmacother; 2007 Feb;41(2):341-4
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  • OBJECTIVE: To report a case of parapharyngeal abscess associated with Streptococcus viridans in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis receiving treatment with etanercept.
  • CASE SUMMARY: A 40-year-old man diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis had received treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, methotrexate, and deflazacort.
  • Six months prior to admission, the patient had a Disease Activity Score of 3.4; clinicians decided to start treatment with etanercept.
  • Treatment with etanercept plus methotrexate was started.
  • Six months after etanercept therapy was started, the patient presented to our emergency department with a swelling of his neck, odynophagia, otalgia, and trismus.
  • Etanercept treatment was suspended.
  • The patient's condition improved with antibiotic therapy; he was discharged 5 days after admission.
  • DISCUSSION: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha plays an essential role in the immune-mediated response to infection.
  • In our patient, the most possible cause of parapharyngeal abscess was considered to be etanercept because of the temporal relationship between exposure to the drug and onset of symptoms.
  • Etanercept was the only drug administered before the abscess developed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients initiated on etanercept therapy should be closely monitored for the development of tuberculosis and other infections.
  • During treatment, all febrile or novel illnesses should be evaluated promptly.
  • [MeSH-major] Abscess / etiology. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / adverse effects. Immunoglobulin G / adverse effects. Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Pharyngeal Diseases / etiology. Streptococcal Infections / etiology. Viridans Streptococci / isolation & purification
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Etanercept. Humans. Male. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / administration & dosage. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17227824.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-6270
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Immunoglobulin G; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; OP401G7OJC / Etanercept
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32. Ishikawa M, Kitayama J, Kaizaki S, Sako A, Nakao K, Sugawara M, Nagawa H: Diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma metastatic to mediastinal lymph nodes by endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Acta Otolaryngol; 2005 Sep;125(9):1014-7
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  • [Title] Diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma metastatic to mediastinal lymph nodes by endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
  • We report the case of a patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma who was diagnosed as having metastasis in mediastinal lymph nodes and successfully underwent systemic chemotherapy without surgery.
  • A 61-year-old male with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented with odynophagia.
  • Pharyngoscopy showed a mass in the left inferior pharyngeal mucosa, and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed only chronic gastritis, with no sign of esophageal disease.
  • Chest CT confirmed the presence of a non-enhancing 20-mm soft tissue mass in the paraesophageal area, with increased attenuation compared with the adjacent esophagus.
  • Two passes were made with a 21-gauge fine needle and the patient tolerated the procedure well, without complications.
  • Cytological findings were compatible with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma from a nasopharyngeal tumor, and the clinical stage was determined as T3N2bM1 (stage IVC) because of mediastinal lymph node metastasis.
  • We thus determined the nodal status of a head and neck tumor by means of EUS-FNA.
  • In conclusion, EUS-FNA is a safe and reliable technique for evaluation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and is especially valuable for head and neck tumors with suspected metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Biopsy, Needle. Carcinoma / secondary. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16193595.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6489
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oto-laryngologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otolaryngol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Norway
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33. Chen X, Ji T, Yao L, Yang J, Deng J, Zhang Z: [Correlation of the expression of MDR genes and MDR genes-coded product with prognosis in laryngopharyngeal malignant melanoma]. Lin Chuang Er Bi Yan Hou Ke Za Zhi; 2002 Sep;16(9):459-61
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  • The relationship between GST-pi, Topo II, Pgp and clinicopathological features, prognosis of the tumors were also analyzed.
  • The positive rates of Pgp, GST-pi and Topo II were not correlated with sex,age, size of tumor and Clark's grade, Breslow's grade (P > 0.05), but AJC grade and prognosis (P < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSION: Expression of Pgp,GST-pi and Topo II may be the chief mechanism of multi-drug resistance.
  • Detection of multi-drug resistance genes is of necessity and feasibility when predicting the effect of chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] DNA Topoisomerases, Type II / biosynthesis. Genes, MDR / genetics. Glutathione S-Transferase pi / biosynthesis. Laryngeal Neoplasms / metabolism. Melanoma / metabolism. P-Glycoprotein / biosynthesis. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15515530.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Lin chuang er bi yan hou ke za zhi = Journal of clinical otorhinolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lin Chuang Er Bi Yan Hou Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / P-Glycoprotein; EC 2.5.1.18 / Glutathione S-Transferase pi; EC 5.99.1.3 / DNA Topoisomerases, Type II
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34. Tong CC, Luk MY, Chow SM, Ngan KC, Lau WH: Cervical nodal metastases from occult primary: undifferentiated carcinoma versus squamous cell carcinoma. Head Neck; 2002 Apr;24(4):361-9
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  • This study attempted to compare the clinical course of two different histologic findings of this disease entity.
  • Those with histologic findings other than squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or undifferentiated carcinoma (UDC) and lymphadenopathies at the supraclavicular fossa alone or below the clavicles at the time of diagnosis were excluded.
  • There were 45 patients identified with a mean follow-up of 36 months (range, 4-110 months).
  • Treatment modality included surgery (S) alone in 1 patient (2%), radiotherapy (RT) alone in 24 patients (53%), and combined modality in 20 patients (45%). (Twelve patients (27%) had combined S and RT, 8 patients (18%) had combined chemotherapy and RT.
  • For those patients treated by radical RT, the RT field covered both sides of the neck and the potential mucosal primary (PMP) sites, including the entire pharyngeal axis.
  • The median radiation doses to the lymph nodes and the PMP were 65 Gy (range, 60-70 Gy) and 60 Gy (range, 40-70 Gy), respectively.
  • RESULTS: At the time of analysis, ultimate control of disease above the clavicles according to N stage, treatment intent, and histologic type was as follows: N1s, 7 of 7 (100%); N2s, 15 of 26 (58%); N3s, 1 of 12 (8%); radical intent, 19 of 28 (68%); palliative intent, 3 of 17 (18%); UDC, 11 of 13 (85%); SCC,11 of 32 (34%).
  • Eleven patients remained alive and disease free, with a median follow-up of 79 months (range, 27-110 months).
  • The 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) for the radical treatment group and the palliative treatment group were 67% and 18%, respectively (p =.0011).
  • No significant difference in the 5-year DSS was observed on the basis of treatment modality in the radically treated group: 63% for RT alone vs 75% for S + RT (p =.711).
  • Our results in local control, emergence of primary tumor, and DSS are comparable with other published data.
  • However, disease control of advanced nodal stage remains poor; more aggressive treatment approaches, like the use of concurrent chemoradiation or altered fractionation scheme, should be explored.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / secondary. Carcinoma / therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / pathology. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Protocols. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Lymph Nodes / surgery. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Lymphatic Metastasis / prevention & control. Lymphatic Metastasis / radiotherapy. Male. Middle Aged. Neck / pathology. Neck / surgery. Radiotherapy / methods. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  • (PMID = 11933178.001).
  • [ISSN] 1043-3074
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & neck
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Li CQ, Guo ZM, Liu WW, Zhang Q, Yang AK, Yang L: [Clinical analysis of myoepithelial carcinoma of head and neck]. Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2010 Feb;45(2):124-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical feature, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of myoepithelial carcinoma (MC) in the head and neck.
  • METHODS: Clinical data of 11 patients which were confirmed by pathology and immunohistochemistry in Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University from Jan.
  • There were 5 cases in parotid gland, 1 in hard palate, 1 in maxillary sinus, 1 in pharyngeal recess, 1 in bucca cavioris, 1 in scalp, and 1 in gingiva.
  • The median age at diagnosis was 37 years (range: 14 - 60 years).
  • RESULTS: All cases were operated, 4 underwent surgery alone, 2 underwent surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, 2 received surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy, 3 underwent surgery plus adjuvant chemoradiation.
  • There was spindle cell type in 5 cases, clear cell type, plasmacytoid cell type in 2 cases, epithelioid cell type, mixed type in 1 case.
  • The median follow-up time was 40 months.
  • AS to the last follow-up time, 8 patients died.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The characteristics of the tumor were rapidly enlarging, invading the surrounding regions, high rates of lymph node metastasis, high rates of distance metastasis.
  • MC was a sort of malignant tumor.
  • Chemotherapy and radiotherapy may be effective after operation.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms. Myoepithelioma
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20398508.001).
  • [ISSN] 1673-0860
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Chinese journal of otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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36. Sparano A, Kreiger P, Kazahaya K: Malignant rhabdoid tumor of the parapharyngeal space. Ear Nose Throat J; 2009 Mar;88(3):E24-6
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  • [Title] Malignant rhabdoid tumor of the parapharyngeal space.
  • Malignant rhabdoid tumor has been a somewhat controversial entity since it was first described in 1978 as a possible sarcomatous variant of Wilms tumor.
  • Eventually, however, it was found to be a distinct neoplastic tumor with histologic characteristics similar to those of rhabdomyosarcoma.
  • Malignant rhabdoid tumors affect children.
  • Associated mortality is significant, even with combined-modality treatment regimens.
  • We describe the case of a large extrarenal malignant rhabdoid tumor of the parapharyngeal space with extension to the infratemporal fossa and skull base in a previously healthy 2-year-old girl who had presented with a cervical mass and ipsilateral Horner syndrome.
  • The patient underwent complete surgical extirpation of the lesion and received adjunctive cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and she remained disease-free at 9 months of follow-up.
  • Given the age group of the patients that these neoplasms most commonly affect and given the neoplasms' resemblance to rhabdomyosarcoma and other small round-cell tumors of the head and neck, discussion of the associated clinical pathology, imaging characteristics, histopathologic features, and mode of management are of particular importance, especially so in view of the uncommon location of the tumor in this specific case.
  • Such a discussion may help lead to minimization of misdiagnosis and maximization of therapeutic benefit.
  • [MeSH-major] Pharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Necrosis / pathology. Voice Disorders / diagnosis. Voice Disorders / etiology

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  • (PMID = 19291622.001).
  • [ISSN] 1942-7522
  • [Journal-full-title] Ear, nose, & throat journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ear Nose Throat J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Guo X, Shi YC, Fei SZ, Pan ZM: [Cervical lymph node metastasis of hypopharyngeal carcinoma]. Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2005 Oct;40(10):779-83

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: One hundred and eight hypopharyngeal carcinoma patients who accepted treatments in the 1st Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University from 1985 to 2000 were reviewed retrospectively.
  • All of them accepted surgical treatment without pre-operative chemotherapy or radiotherapy.
  • Stage was made according to the standard of International Union Against Cancer (UICC) in 1992.
  • Specimens of the patients were carefully examined to confirm the primary site of the tumor and the distribution of cervical lymph node metastasis.
  • Pathological differentiations of the tumor were classified into high, middle and low category.
  • RESULTS: The rates of lymph node metastasis of was 45.8% for patients with TI and T2 disease, 79.8% for those with T3 and T4, and 75.0% (81/108)for the whole patients(P < 0.05).
  • Patients with pyriform sinus cancer occupied 92.6% (100/108) of all the cases.
  • Cervical lymph node metastasis rate of pyriform sinus cancer and posterior pharyngeal wall cancer were 74. 0% and 87.
  • Cervical lymph node metastasis rate of patients with the high, middle and low differentiation tumor were 72.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Lymph Nodes / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16408732.001).
  • [ISSN] 1673-0860
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Chinese journal of otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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38. Zackrisson B, Mercke C, Strander H, Wennerberg J, Cavallin-Ståhl E: A systematic overview of radiation therapy effects in head and neck cancer. Acta Oncol; 2003;42(5-6):443-61
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  • [Title] A systematic overview of radiation therapy effects in head and neck cancer.
  • A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU).
  • This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for head and neck cancer is based on data from 39 randomized trials and 1 meta-analysis.
  • The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 79 174 patients.
  • Substantial evidence indicates that the tumour effect of radiotherapy can be increased by the concomitant administration of chemotherapeutic agents, particularly cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil.
  • There is moderate evidence of a survival benefit of radiation combined with concomitant chemotherapy compared to radiation alone.
  • There is substantial evidence in published studies for an increased frequency of severe acute side effects as a result of concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • COMMENT: The general quality of studies and the lack of information on serious side effects indicate a need for large, well-designed clinical studies with a reasonable follow-up.
  • There is strong evidence that larynx preservation is possible in 50% of the patients surviving for 5 years with hypopharyngeal cancers when treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical radiotherapy There is a non-significant trend for the overall survival being lower in non-surgically treated patients than in those treated with primary surgery and postoperative radiotherapy Nasopharynx.
  • There is moderate evidence that patients with nasopharyngeal carcinomas of the endemic type benefit from therapy with a combination of chemotherapy and radical radiotherapy.
  • There is some evidence that certain schedules of altered fractionation improve tumour control without increasing severe late side effects.
  • There is some evidence that nervous tissues are more susceptible to damage by altered fractionation.
  • There is moderate evidence that accelerated hyperfractionation may reduce the frequency of serious late side effects while retaining a similar tumour effect as conventional radiotherapy Hypoxic cell sensitizers.
  • Most reported trials reject the usefulness of nitroimidazole derivatives for sensitization of hypoxic tumour cells.
  • There is some evidence that patients with tumours in the pharynx and larynx may benefit from sensitization by nimorazole.
  • Prophylactic treatment of side effects.
  • There is insufficient evidence that radioprotective agents do not spare tumour tissue.
  • Both methods are well established and have independently proved to be effective in the treatment of certain head and neck cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachytherapy / methods. Head and Neck Neoplasms / mortality. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Dose Fractionation. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Radiation Injuries. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Sweden. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14596506.001).
  • [ISSN] 0284-186X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Norway
  • [Number-of-references] 43
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39. Budach V: TPF sequential therapy: when and for whom? Oncologist; 2010;15 Suppl 3:13-8
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  • [Title] TPF sequential therapy: when and for whom?
  • Concurrent chemoradiation is a standard approach for the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
  • However, sequentially administered chemotherapy and radiotherapy/chemoradiation may be an effective alternative for some patients.
  • Although chemoradiation is a highly effective treatment approach, it is associated with high incidences of severe acute toxicities, including mucositis.
  • In a retrospective analysis of three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trials, pharyngeal dysfunction was seen in 27% of patients and feeding tube dependence and laryngeal dysfunction were each seen in approximately 12% of patients.
  • Sequential administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, with a doublet cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (PF) induction chemotherapy regimen, is associated with less acute severe mucositis than concomitantly administered cisplatin and radiotherapy.
  • Data from randomized trials indicate that TPF sequential therapy may be an effective alternative to concurrent chemoradiation for some patients.
  • TPF is well tolerated, although it is associated with a higher incidence of hematologic adverse events than with PF, including neutropenia and neutropenia-related complications.
  • Patients suitable for treatment with a TPF-based sequential administration approach include those with a good performance status, no contraindication to cisplatin or taxanes, and locally advanced oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, or laryngeal cancer with a high tumor load.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Taxoids / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 21036884.001).
  • [ISSN] 1549-490X
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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40. Schwartz DL, Hutcheson K, Barringer D, Tucker SL, Kies M, Holsinger FC, Ang KK, Morrison WH, Rosenthal DI, Garden AS, Dong L, Lewin JS: Candidate dosimetric predictors of long-term swallowing dysfunction after oropharyngeal intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2010 Dec 1;78(5):1356-65
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • PURPOSE: To investigate long-term swallowing function in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and to identify novel dose-limiting criteria predictive for dysphagia.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Thirty-one patients with Stage IV oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma enrolled on a Phase II trial were prospectively evaluated by modified barium swallow studies at baseline, and 6, 12, and 24 months post-IMRT treatment.
  • Candidate dysphagia-associated organs at risk were retrospectively contoured into original treatment plans.
  • Thirteen patients (42%) received concurrent chemotherapy during IMRT.
  • Mean dose to glottic larynx for the cohort was limited to 18 Gy (range, 6-39 Gy) by matching IMRT to conventional low-neck fields.
  • RESULTS: Dose-volume constraints (V30 < 65% and V35 < 35% for anterior oral cavity and V55 < 80% and V65 < 30% for high superior pharyngeal constrictors) predictive for objective swallowing dysfunction were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In the context of glottic laryngeal shielding, we describe candidate oral cavity and superior pharyngeal constrictor organs at risk and dose-volume constraints associated with preserved long-term swallowing function; these constraints are currently undergoing prospective validation.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20646872.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA132281; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA132281
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS575664; NLM/ PMC4034521
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41. Feng FY, Kim HM, Lyden TH, Haxer MJ, Worden FP, Feng M, Moyer JS, Prince ME, Carey TE, Wolf GT, Bradford CR, Chepeha DB, Eisbruch A: Intensity-modulated chemoradiotherapy aiming to reduce dysphagia in patients with oropharyngeal cancer: clinical and functional results. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Jun 1;28(16):2732-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intensity-modulated chemoradiotherapy aiming to reduce dysphagia in patients with oropharyngeal cancer: clinical and functional results.
  • PURPOSE: To assess clinical and functional results of chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC), utilizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to spare the important swallowing structures to reduce post-therapy dysphagia.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a prospective study of weekly chemotherapy (carboplatin dosed at one times the area under the curve [AUC, AUC 1] and paclitaxel 30 mg/m(2)) concurrent with IMRT aiming to spare noninvolved parts of the swallowing structures: pharyngeal constrictors, glottic and supraglottic larynx, and esophagus as well as the oral cavity and major salivary glands.
  • Swallowing was assessed by patient-reported Swallowing and Eating Domain scores, observer-rated scores, and videofluoroscopy (VF) before therapy and periodically after therapy through 2 years.
  • At a median follow-up of 36 months, 3-year disease-free and locoregional recurrence-free survivals were 88% and 96%, respectively.
  • All measures of dysphagia worsened soon after therapy; observer-rated and patient-reported scores recovered over time, but VF scores did not.
  • At 1 year after therapy, observer-rated dysphagia was absent or minimal (scores 0 to 1) in all patients except four: one who was feeding-tube dependent and three who required soft diet.
  • From pretherapy to 12 months post-therapy, the Swallowing and Eating Domain scores worsened on average (+/- standard deviation) by 10 +/- 21 and 13 +/- 19, respectively (on scales of 0 to 100), and VF scores (on scale of 1 to 7) worsened from 2.9 +/- 1.5 (mild dysphagia) to 4.1 +/- 0.9 (mild/moderate dysphagia).
  • CONCLUSION: Chemoradiotherapy with IMRT aiming to reduce dysphagia can be performed safely for OPC and has high locoregional tumor control rates.

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  • (PMID = 20421546.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA059827; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA097248; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA59827; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA97248
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2881852
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42. Zhi K, Ren W, Zhou H, Wen Y, Zhang Y: Management of parapharyngeal-space tumors. J Oral Maxillofac Surg; 2009 Jun;67(6):1239-44
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  • [Title] Management of parapharyngeal-space tumors.
  • PURPOSE: This study evaluated parapharyngeal-space (PPS) tumors in regard to clinical pathological features, preoperative assessment, surgical approaches, perioperative complications, and patterns of recurrence.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of patients with PPS tumors referred to the stomatological hospitals of Sichuan University and Xi'an Jiaotong University between 1990 and 2004.
  • RESULTS: Beginning in 1990 and ending in 2004, 162 patients with PPS tumors were evaluated in our unit.
  • All cases were evaluated with at least a computed tomography scan.
  • The most common class of lesion was salivary-gland neoplasm, accounting for 74 cases (45.68%).
  • The next most common group of tumors was neurogenic, representing 68 cases (41.98%).
  • Only 22 patients (13.58%) presented with malignant disease.
  • Twenty patients with malignant disease underwent adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.
  • Two patients suffered local failure, and 4 patients developed distant metastasis during the observation period.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Surgery is the mainstay treatment for PPS tumors.
  • Surgical approaches were dictated by size of the tumor, its location, its relationship to the great vessels, and suspicion of malignancy.
  • The most common approach was transcervical-transparotid for benign tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / surgery. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoma, Pleomorphic / surgery. Adult. Biopsy, Fine-Needle. Carcinoma / secondary. Carcinoma / surgery. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cranial Nerve Diseases / etiology. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Angiography. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neck Muscles / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Parotid Gland / surgery. Postoperative Complications. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / surgery. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • [CommentIn] J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2010 May;68(5):1209-11; author reply 1212 [20403530.001]
  • (PMID = 19446210.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5053
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Cojocariu OM, Huguet F, Lefevre M, Périé S: [Prognosis and predictive factors in head-and-neck cancers]. Bull Cancer; 2009 Apr;96(4):369-78
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  • [Transliterated title] Facteurs pronostiques et prédictifs des cancers des voies aérodigestives supérieures.
  • The head-and-neck squamous-cell carcinomas (HNSCC) represent in order of frequency the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths among men in France.
  • For this reason, it is necessary to identify prognostic and predictive factors able to help in the choice of the treatment.
  • The clinical factors with a prognostic value are the tumor location, the tumor size and the lymph node status.
  • More recently, the identification of molecular factors has opened the way to new therapies.
  • Thus, the overexpression of EGFR is associated with a poor prognosis.
  • The tumors associated with HPV infection are distinguishable by a better prognosis.
  • 18-alpha-FDG positron emission tomography emerges as a useful tool for the therapeutic evaluation.
  • The evolution of surgical techniques, the development of induction chemotherapy regimen or concurrent ones with radiotherapy and new techniques of conformal irradiation also results in a better locoregional control.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell. Mouth Neoplasms. Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms
  • [MeSH-minor] Anemia / etiology. Cell Hypoxia. Genes, p53 / genetics. Head and Neck Neoplasms / metabolism. Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / virology. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / metabolism. Laryngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / virology. Lymphatic Metastasis. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / metabolism. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / virology. Neoplasm Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism. Neoplasm Staging. Papillomavirus Infections / complications. Papillomavirus Infections / virology. Paranasal Sinuses. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / metabolism. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / virology. Prognosis. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism. Tumor Burden


44. Hutcheson KA, Barringer DA, Rosenthal DI, May AH, Roberts DB, Lewin JS: Swallowing outcomes after radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2008 Feb;134(2):178-83
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  • OBJECTIVE: To describe swallowing physiology and functional outcomes at select intervals after definitive radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma.
  • We also examined associations among patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics and swallowing outcomes.
  • Anderson Cancer Center, Houston.
  • PATIENTS: This study cohort included 40 patients who underwent definitive radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma (from February 2001 to June 2004).
  • We recorded the presence or absence of aspiration (sensate or silent), 5 pharyngeal phase disorders, and 2 structural abnormalities.
  • We also recorded pretreatment dysphagia complaints, feeding tube dependency, T classification, disease site, mucositis grade, and radiotherapy schedule with or without chemotherapy.
  • Pharyngeal phase disorders were observed more frequently than structural abnormalities (P < .01).
  • We found no significant association between the occurrence of aspiration and disease site, T classification, treatment regimen, or pretreatment variables (P > .05).
  • Patient-reported dysphagia before treatment did not predict posttreatment swallowing outcomes (P > .05).
  • [MeSH-major] Deglutition Disorders / epidemiology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Enteral Nutrition. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 18283161.001).
  • [ISSN] 0886-4470
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of otolaryngology--head & neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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45. Issing WJ, Taleban B, Tauber S: Diagnosis and management of carcinoma of unknown primary in the head and neck. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2003 Sep;260(8):436-43
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  • [Title] Diagnosis and management of carcinoma of unknown primary in the head and neck.
  • Carcinoma of unknown primary is defined as the histological diagnosis of metastasis without the detection of a primary tumor.
  • In the literature, the incidence of CUP in all patients with a malignant disease is said to be between 3% and 15%.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma (n=123) was the predominant histopathological finding of the cervical lymph nodes.
  • During the 10-year follow-up, a primary tumor was detected in 36 (21.5%) of the 167 initially diagnosed CUP patients.
  • In over 90% of these cases the tumor was localized in the head and neck region.
  • The most frequent origin of the tumor was the tonsilla palatina (n=7).
  • Primary radiotherapy was the treatment of choice in 28 patients; eight patients received combined radio-chemotherapy as the primary treatment and seven patients were treated with chemotherapy alone.
  • Six patients had no treatment.
  • Comparison of different treatment protocols revealed a significant difference in patient survival: in comparison with primary radiotherapy alone or neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy, the survival rate improved significantly in patients that received a bilateral tonsillectomy in addition to neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy.
  • The treatment of choice in patients with cervical CUP should be a surgical procedure including (radical) neck dissection and diagnostic bilateral tonsillectomy followed by postoperative radiation of the cervical lymph drainage.
  • Bilateral tonsillectomy is especially important and is correlated with a significant improvement of the survival rate in CUP patients.
  • Additional postoperative radiation of the entire pharyngeal and laryngeal mucosa should also be considered in order to treat a possible small primary tumor in this region.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / secondary. Carcinoma / therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / secondary. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / therapy

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  • (PMID = 12684829.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-4477
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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46. Caudell JJ, Schaner PE, Desmond RA, Meredith RF, Spencer SA, Bonner JA: Dosimetric factors associated with long-term dysphagia after definitive radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2010 Feb 1;76(2):403-9
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  • [Title] Dosimetric factors associated with long-term dysphagia after definitive radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
  • PURPOSE: Intensification of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer may lead to increased rates of dysphagia.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: From an institutional database, 83 patients were identified who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, after exclusion of those who were treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary lesion, had locoregional recurrence at any time, had less than 12 months of follow-up, or had postoperative radiotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Mean dose greater than 41 Gy and volume receiving 60 Gy (V(60)) greater than 24% to the larynx were significantly associated with PEG tube dependence and aspiration.
  • V(60) greater than 12% to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor was also significantly associated with increased PEG tube dependence and aspiration.
  • V(65) greater than 33% to the superior pharyngeal constrictor or greater than 75% to the middle pharyngeal constrictor was associated with pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Doses to the larynx and pharyngeal constrictors predicted long-term swallowing complications, even when controlled for other clinical factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Deglutition Disorders / etiology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Catheterization / utilization. Deglutition. Esophageal Stenosis / etiology. Esophageal Stenosis / therapy. Female. Gastrostomy / utilization. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pharyngeal Diseases / etiology. Pharyngeal Diseases / therapy. Radiotherapy Dosage. Retrospective Studies. Tumor Burden. Young Adult


47. Taillade L, Alexandre I, Billemont B, Meric JB, Sultan-Amar V, Rixe O: [Angiogenesis: a new therapeutic target of thoracic and laryngopharyngeal carcinoma]. Bull Cancer; 2009;96 Suppl 1:S45-55
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  • [Title] [Angiogenesis: a new therapeutic target of thoracic and laryngopharyngeal carcinoma].
  • [Transliterated title] L'angiogenèse: une nouvelle cible thérapeutique des cancers thoraciques et ORL.
  • Angiogenesis or new blood vessel formation is a complex and fundamental event in the process of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination.
  • These molecules directly inhibit VEGF or the kinase activity of its receptor (VEGFR) and represent a significant therapeutic progress in several solid tumors types.
  • First clinical studies of antiangiogenic agents in thoracic and laryngopharyngeal carcinomas have shown promise mainly in combination with other therapies (chemotherapy, other targeted therapies or radiotherapy).
  • Besides common antiangiogenic therapies-induced adverse events, risks of bleeding caused by tumor necrosis mainly in squamous cell lung carcinomas have been observed during early clinical trials.
  • Assessment of surrogate markers of target inhibition could allow a better selection of patients able to benefit from antiangiogenic treatments eventually combined with chemotherapy or molecules targeting others metabolic pathways.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Lung Neoplasms / blood supply. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms / blood supply. Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / blood supply. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mesothelioma / blood supply. Mesothelioma / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / blood supply. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19433373.001).
  • [ISSN] 1769-6917
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin du cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull Cancer
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor
  • [Number-of-references] 49
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48. Caudell JJ, Schaner PE, Meredith RF, Locher JL, Nabell LM, Carroll WR, Magnuson JS, Spencer SA, Bonner JA: Factors associated with long-term dysphagia after definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2009 Feb 1;73(2):410-5
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  • [Title] Factors associated with long-term dysphagia after definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer.
  • PURPOSE: The use of altered fractionation radiotherapy (RT) regimens, as well as concomitant chemotherapy and RT, to intensify therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer can lead to increased rates of long-term dysphagia.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: We identified 122 patients who had undergone definitive RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, after excluding those who had been treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary, had Stage I-II disease, developed locoregional recurrence, had <12 months of follow-up, or had undergone postoperative RT.
  • The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were correlated with a composite of 3 objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence at the last follow-up visit; aspiration on a modified barium swallow study or a clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; or the presence of a pharyngoesophageal stricture.
  • On univariate analysis, the primary site (p = 0.01), use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), RT schedule (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of composite long-term dysphagia.
  • The use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), primary site (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.02) remained significant on multivariate analysis.
  • CONCLUSION: The addition of concurrent chemotherapy to RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer resulted in increased long-term dysphagia.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Deglutition Disorders / etiology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Analysis of Variance. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy / adverse effects. Constriction, Pathologic / diagnosis. Constriction, Pathologic / etiology. Esophageal Stenosis / diagnosis. Esophageal Stenosis / etiology. Female. Gastrostomy / utilization. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pharyngeal Diseases / diagnosis. Pharyngeal Diseases / etiology. Pneumonia, Aspiration / diagnosis. Radiotherapy Dosage. Regression Analysis. Tumor Burden. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 18635320.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Rades D, Stoehr M, Meyners T, Bohlen G, Nadrowitz R, Dunst J, Schild SE, Wroblewski J, Albers D, Schmidt R, Alberti W, Tribius S: Evaluation of prognostic factors and two radiation techniques in patients treated with surgery followed by radio(chemo)therapy or definitive radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Strahlenther Onkol; 2008 Apr;184(4):198-205
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  • [Title] Evaluation of prognostic factors and two radiation techniques in patients treated with surgery followed by radio(chemo)therapy or definitive radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Conventional radiotherapy (RT) still is the standard technique for head-and-neck cancer in many centers worldwide, whereas other centers replaced this technique by 3-D conformal RT, which is associated with more appropriate dose distributions.
  • This study compared both techniques for overall survival (OS), metastases-free survival (MFS), loco-regional control (LC), and toxicity in stage III/IV head-and-neck cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data of 345 patients irradiated for stage III/IV squamous cell head-and-neck cancer were retrospectively analyzed.
  • Eleven further potential prognostic factors were investigated: age, gender, performance status, tumor site, grading, T-stage, N-stage, AJCC-stage, chemotherapy, surgery, pre-RT hemoglobin.
  • CONCLUSION: Both RT techniques resulted in similar treatment outcomes.
  • Outcome was associated with gender, performance status, tumor stage, and pre-RT hemoglobin.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Radiotherapy Dosage. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18398584.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-7158
  • [Journal-full-title] Strahlentherapie und Onkologie : Organ der Deutschen Röntgengesellschaft ... [et al]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Strahlenther Onkol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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50. Schmidt M, Schler G, Gruensfelder P, Hoppe F: Differential gene expression in a paclitaxel-resistant clone of a head and neck cancer cell line. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2006 Feb;263(2):127-34
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  • [Title] Differential gene expression in a paclitaxel-resistant clone of a head and neck cancer cell line.
  • The anti-neoplastic drug paclitaxel (taxol), which is known to block cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle through stabilization of microtubules, is meanwhile commonly used for chemotherapy of advanced head and neck cancer.
  • Chemotherapy is primarily used in order to preserve laryngeal and/or pharyngeal structures.
  • Although paclitaxel generally seems to be a powerful agent, it failed to reach a loco-regional tumor control in a sufficient percentage of patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Genes, MDR / genetics. Head and Neck Neoplasms / genetics. Interferon-Stimulated Gene Factor 3, gamma Subunit / genetics. RNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Tubulin / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Blotting, Western. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / genetics. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Cell Line, Tumor. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / genetics. Humans. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use. Tubulin Modulators / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 16380805.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-4477
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / IRF9 protein, human; 0 / Interferon-Stimulated Gene Factor 3, gamma Subunit; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Tubulin; 0 / Tubulin Modulators; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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51. Jacob R, Shafiei N, Nagel G, Welkoborsky HJ, Mann W, Kaina B: MGMT activity in mucosal epithelium and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Anticancer Res; 2010 Jul;30(7):2561-6
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  • The data suggest that MGMT becomes down-regulated due to smoking in non-cancerous pharyngeal mucosa.
  • The low MGMT activity in early dysplastic mucosal lesions may increase the risk for tumour development.
  • Since some advanced carcinomas showed low MGMT activity, chemotherapy with O(6)-alkylating agents might be an alternative option.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / enzymology. DNA Modification Methylases / metabolism. DNA Repair Enzymes / metabolism. Head and Neck Neoplasms / enzymology. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20682983.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; EC 2.1.1.- / DNA Modification Methylases; EC 2.1.1.63 / MGMT protein, human; EC 6.5.1.- / DNA Repair Enzymes
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52. Basić-Jukić N, Bubić-Filipi L, Prgomet D, Djanić Hadzibegović A, Bilić M, Kovac L, Kastelan Z, Pasini J, Mokos I, Basić-Koretić M, Kes P: Head and neck malignancies in Croatian renal transplant recipients. Bosn J Basic Med Sci; 2010 Apr;10 Suppl 1:S37-9
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  • Renal transplantation is associated with increased incidence of cancer.
  • Demographic data, localization and disease outcome were evaluated in patients who developed cancer.
  • Twenty one patients (1.7%) developed 27 head and neck malignancies.
  • The average time from transplantation to development of cancer was 56.8 months.
  • Of cutaneous malignancies, 88.9% were basal cell carcinoma; one patient had Merkell-cell carcinoma and one patient developed squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Six cases of basocellular skin cancer were recorded in one fair-skin patient.
  • Noncutaneous malignancies involved the oral cavity (2 cases of Kaposi's sarcoma and one pharyngeal cancer) and the thyroid gland in 3 patients each.
  • Two patients had post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder occurring at the head and neck.
  • One patient had brain tumor.
  • Radical surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy were necessary in 33.3% of patients.
  • None of the patients died from cancer.
  • An increased incidence of cancer occurring in the head and neck was recorded.
  • Careful skin examination and oral examination is mandatory for discovering cancer before dissemination.
  • Sirolimus is safe alternative to calcineurin-based immunosuppression in patients who developed head and neck malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / complications. Head and Neck Neoplasms / etiology. Kidney Transplantation / methods. Renal Insufficiency / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Brain Neoplasms / complications. Croatia. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunosuppression. Lymphoproliferative Disorders / etiology. Mouth Neoplasms / complications. Skin Neoplasms / complications. Thyroid Neoplasms / complications. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20433429.001).
  • [ISSN] 1840-4812
  • [Journal-full-title] Bosnian journal of basic medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bosn J Basic Med Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Bosnia and Herzegovina
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53. Studer G, Zwahlen RA, Graetz KW, Davis BJ, Glanzmann C: IMRT in oral cavity cancer. Radiat Oncol; 2007;2:16
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  • [Title] IMRT in oral cavity cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Except for early T1,2 N0 stages, the prognosis for patients with oral cavity cancer (OCC) is reported to be worse than for carcinoma in other sites of the head and neck (HNC).
  • The aim of this work was to assess disease outcome in OCC following IMRT.Between January 2002 and January 2007, 346 HNC patients have been treated with curative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich.
  • Fifty eight of these (16%) were referred for postoperative (28) or definitive (30) radiation therapy of OCC.40 of the 58 OCC patients (69%) presented with locally advanced T3/4 or recurred lesions.
  • Doses between 60 and 70 Gy were applied, combined with simultaneous cisplatin based chemotherapy in 78%.
  • RESULTS: OCC patients treated with postoperative IMRT showed the highest local control (LC) rate of all assessed treatment sequence subgroups (92% LC at 2 years).
  • Definitively irradiated patients revealed poorest LC rates with approximately 30 and 40% following 3DCRT and IMRT, respectively.T1 stage resulted in an expectedly significantly higher LC rate (95%, n = 19, p < 0.05) than T2-4 and recurred stages (LC approximately 50-60%, n = 102).Analyses according to the diagnosis revealed significantly lower LC in OCC following definitive IMRT than that in pharyngeal tumors treated with definitive IMRT in the same time period (43% vs 82% at 2 years, p < 0.0001), while the LC rate of OCC following postoperative IMRT was as high as in pharyngeal tumors treated with postoperative IMRT (>90% at 2 years).
  • CONCLUSION: Postoperative IMRT of OCC resulted in the highest local control rate of the assessed treatment subgroups.
  • In conclusion, generous indication for IMRT following surgical treatment is recommended in OCC cases with unfavourable features like tight surgical margin, nodal involvement, primary tumor stage >T1N0, or already recurred disease, respectively.Loco-regional outcome of OCC following definitive IMRT remained unsatisfactory, comparable to that following definitive 3DCRT.
  • [MeSH-major] Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cohort Studies. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Imaging, Three-Dimensional. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Recurrence. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17430599.001).
  • [ISSN] 1748-717X
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiation oncology (London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiat Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1855346
  • [General-notes] NLM/ Original DateCompleted: 20070803
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54. MacDermed D, Thurber L, George TI, Hoppe RT, Le QT: Extranodal nonorbital indolent lymphomas of the head and neck: relationship between tumor control and radiotherapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2004 Jul 1;59(3):788-95
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  • [Title] Extranodal nonorbital indolent lymphomas of the head and neck: relationship between tumor control and radiotherapy.
  • The tumor head-and-neck location was Waldeyer's ring, 14; salivary glands, 16; thyroid, 4; and other sites, 6.
  • Patients received combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy.
  • Local therapy included surgery alone in 6 patients, radiotherapy alone in 7, and surgery plus radiotherapy in 12.
  • Multivariate analysis revealed that significant prognostic factors for survival were tumor site (favoring salivary and thyroid, p = 0.02) and age (favoring younger, p = 0.04).
  • Patients with salivary and thyroid primary tumors had better survival compared with others.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Lymphoma, Follicular / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / drug therapy. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / radiotherapy. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Radiotherapy Dosage. Retrospective Studies. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / drug therapy. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / pathology. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / surgery. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 15183482.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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55. Pugnale N, Waridel F, Bouzourène H, Boubaker A, Pugnale M, Gaillard RC, Gomez F: Pharyngeal pituitary non-functioning adenoma with normal intra-sellar gland: massive tumor shrinkage on octreotide therapy. Eur J Endocrinol; 2003 Mar;148(3):357-64
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  • [Title] Pharyngeal pituitary non-functioning adenoma with normal intra-sellar gland: massive tumor shrinkage on octreotide therapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: Functioning or non-functioning ectopic tumors may develop from pharyngeal pituitary remnants.
  • They constitute <1% of all obstructive pharyngeal masses and they have a strong tendency to bleed.
  • We report a case of a non-functioning ectopic pituitary adenoma of the rhino-pharynx studied over a long-term somatostatin analog treatment.
  • PATIENT AND TREATMENT: A 60-Year-old woman presented with severe posterior epistaxis.
  • On immunostaining, tumor cells were positive for pancytokeratins MNF 116 and C11, epithelial membrane antigen, chromogranin and neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and negative for synaptophysin, desmin, actin, estrogen and progesterone receptors, all anterior pituitary hormones and human chorionic gonadotropin.
  • Blood levels of the above hormones and tumor markers were normal, except for a moderate elevation of NSE (33.8 microg/l, normal value <12 microg/l).
  • It was concluded that this was a non-functioning pituitary adenoma of the rhino-pharynx.
  • Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) disclosed intense tracer uptake in the tumor, indicating high somatostatin receptor content.
  • Therapy with long-acting octreotide was started, 20 mg per Month i.m.
  • Repeated endoscopic examinations showed rapid tumor reduction, the mass shrinkage being almost complete at 3 Months.
  • This was confirmed by MRI, while SRS showed markedly decreased uptake in the residual tumor and the intra-sellar pituitary, and NSE became normal.
  • CONCLUSION: Pharyngeal pituitary remnant adenomas are rare, but they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of bleeding or obstructive masses of the rhino-pharynx.
  • As we show for the first time in this location, octreotide can exert prolonged and marked anti-tumoral effects in non-functioning adenoma.

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  • (PMID = 12611618.001).
  • [ISSN] 0804-4643
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of endocrinology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Endocrinol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Pituitary Hormones; RWM8CCW8GP / Octreotide
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56. Lanza L, Rizzi L, Durso D, Occhini A, Benazzo M, Tinelli C: Integrated treatment in locally advanced carcinoma of the oropharynx. J Surg Oncol; 2000 May;74(1):75-8
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  • [Title] Integrated treatment in locally advanced carcinoma of the oropharynx.
  • The last treatment decision generally depends on the stage of the lesion and the patient's general status.
  • Oropharyngeal tumor is generally treated by integrated treatments.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively studied 115 patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal tumors treated in our institution with combined therapies compare the results in two different groups of patients (surgery plus radiotherapy and chemotherapy plus radiotherapy).
  • RESULTS: The 3-year overall survival rate in patients who underwent surgery plus radiotherapy was 82% and in those who underwent chemotherapy plus radiotherapy was 49%.
  • CONCLUSION: The results suggest that surgery followed by radiotherapy seems to be the best treatment in the case of locally advanced oropharyngeal tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Oropharynx. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 10861614.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4790
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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57. Shelygin IuA, Alekseev MV, Rybakov EG, Pankratov AA, Pliushinskaia AD: [Experimental foundation of using intraoperative endopelvic cisplatin with hyperthermia for rectal cancer]. Vopr Onkol; 2010;56(2):191-5
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  • [Title] [Experimental foundation of using intraoperative endopelvic cisplatin with hyperthermia for rectal cancer].
  • Previously, significant increase in survival in locally-advanced rectal cancer as a result of heated intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy was reported.
  • Our study used cisplatin 0.5 mg/ml (0.05 per cent solution) in the culture of pharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma (PEC) cells (HEP-2) and A-549 culture of lung carcinoma cells.
  • That was followed by death of tumor cells.
  • C, 1 hr) did not influence either the cytostatic or therapeutic effect of cisplatin in vivo.That procedure inhibited tumor growth by 7-8% and the effect did not wear off until day 11 or longer.
  • Survival in LLC-bearing mice rose by 26% which pointed to the advantages offered by heated cytostatic chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Hyperthermia, Induced. Rectal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Animals. Carcinoma, Lewis Lung / therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Cell Line, Tumor. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Colorimetry. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Intraoperative Period. Lung Neoplasms / therapy. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 20552896.001).
  • [ISSN] 0507-3758
  • [Journal-full-title] Voprosy onkologii
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vopr Onkol
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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58. Frank SJ, Rosenthal DI, Petsuksiri J, Ang KK, Morrison WH, Weber RS, Glisson BS, Chao KS, Schwartz DL, Chronowski GM, El-Naggar AK, Garden AS: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from unknown head-and-neck primary site: M. D. Anderson Cancer Center outcomes and patterns of failure. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2010 Nov 15;78(4):1005-10
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  • [Title] Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from unknown head-and-neck primary site: M. D. Anderson Cancer Center outcomes and patterns of failure.
  • PURPOSE: Conventional therapy for cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from an unknown primary can cause considerable toxicity owing to the volume of tissues to be irradiated.
  • In the present study, hypothesizing that using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) would provide effective treatment with minimal toxicity, we reviewed the outcomes and patterns of failure for head-and-neck unknown primary cancer at a single tertiary cancer center.
  • Anderson Cancer Center between 1998 and 2005.
  • The patient and treatment characteristics were extracted and the survival rates calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method.
  • RESULTS: Of the 52 patients, 5 presented with Stage N1, 11 with Stage N2a, 23 with Stage N2b, 6 with Stage N2c, 4 with Stage N3, and 3 with Stage Nx disease.
  • A total of 26 patients had undergone neck dissection, 13 before and 13 after IMRT; 14 patients had undergone excisional biopsy and presented for IMRT without evidence of disease.
  • Finally, 14 patients had received systemic chemotherapy.
  • All patients underwent IMRT to targets on both sides of the neck and pharyngeal axis.
  • The median follow-up time for the surviving patients was 3.7 years.
  • The 5-year actuarial rate of primary mucosal tumor control and regional control was 98% and 94%, respectively.
  • Only 3 patients developed distant metastasis with locoregional control.
  • The 5-year actuarial disease-free and overall survival rate was 88% and 89%, respectively.
  • CONCLUSION: The results of our study have shown that IMRT can produce excellent outcomes for patients who present with cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from an unknown head-and-neck primary tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary. Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Dose Fractionation. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neck Dissection / methods. Remission Induction / methods. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20207504.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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59. Hashibe M, Ritz B, Le AD, Li G, Sankaranarayanan R, Zhang ZF: Radiotherapy for oral cancer as a risk factor for second primary cancers. Cancer Lett; 2005 Apr 08;220(2):185-95
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  • [Title] Radiotherapy for oral cancer as a risk factor for second primary cancers.
  • We evaluated the impact of therapeutic radiation for oral cancer on the risk of second primary cancers with data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program for 1973-1999.
  • Among 30,221 first primary oral squamous cell carcinoma patients, 6163 (20.4%) patients developed a second primary cancer, 5042 of which were metachronous.
  • Patients treated with radiation only (RR=1.64, 95%CI=1.18-2.29) or radiation with surgery (RR=1.49, 95%CI=1.07, 2.06) had elevated risks of developing a second primary tumor, whereas patients treated with surgery only did not appear to be at increased risk (RR=1.28, 95%CI=0.93, 1.76).
  • Consistent with an expected latent period between radiation exposure and tumor occurrence, radiation became a risk factor after 10 years of follow-up for solid cancers of the oral cavity (RR=2.8, 95%CI=1.5, 5.2), pharynx (RR=5.9, 95%CI=1.7, 20.7), esophagus (RR=3.9, 95%CI=1.1, 13.4) and lung (RR=1.5, 95%CI=1.0, 2.4), and after 1-5 years of follow-up for second primary leukemia (RR=2.5, 95%CI=1.0, 6.7).
  • Radiotherapy for oral cancer appears to be a risk factor for second primary tumors.
  • Further studies that account for chemotherapy and examine frequency and duration of radiotherapy would be of interest in confirming the observed association.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Esophageal Neoplasms / etiology. Lung Neoplasms / etiology. Mouth Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / etiology. SEER Program / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. DNA Damage. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Leukemia, Radiation-Induced. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Factors. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 15766594.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-3835
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16042; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009142; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA77954; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA11386; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA90833; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES11667; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA78314; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA09142
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
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60. Gallo A, Suriano M, Simonelli M, Ralli G, de Vincentiis M: Recurrent malignant schwannoma of the parapharyngeal space in neurofibromatosis type 1. Ear Nose Throat J; 2003 Nov;82(11):862-5
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  • [Title] Recurrent malignant schwannoma of the parapharyngeal space in neurofibromatosis type 1.
  • Malignant schwannoma is an aggressive tumor that carries a poor prognosis despite wide excision, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy.
  • Malignant schwannoma of the parapharyngeal space is an uncommon finding; to our knowledge, only four cases have been described in the literature during the past 30 years, and only one of them involved a patient who had clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis type 1.
  • In this article, we describe a new case of malignant schwannoma of the parapharyngeal space in a patient who had clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis type 1.
  • Following resection of the tumor and a total parotidectomy, the diagnosis was made on the basis of histology and immunohistochemistry.
  • The patient underwent postoperative chemotherapy with carboplatin and UP16.
  • However, 5 months following surgery, the tumor recurred and metastasized.
  • The IVA2 regimen slowed tumor growth, but 13 months after the initiation of therapy, the patient died of neoplastic cachexia.
  • Although chemotherapy is generally ineffective in most cases of malignant schwannoma, we did experience some positive results with the IVA2 protocol.
  • Therefore, we recommend that this combination be considered as a first-line adjuvant therapy following surgery or as a first-line therapy for patients with inoperable tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Neurilemmoma / complications. Neurilemmoma / pathology. Neurofibromatosis 1 / complications. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / complications. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local


61. Senderowicz AM: Small-molecule cyclin-dependent kinase modulators. Oncogene; 2003 Sep 29;22(42):6609-20
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  • The tumor suppressor gene Rb is an important component in the G(1)/S transition and its function is abnormal in most human neoplasms.
  • Therefore, modulation of cdk's may have an important use for the therapy and prevention of human neoplasms.
  • The first example of a direct small-molecule cdk modulator tested in the clinic, flavopiridol, is a pan-cdk inhibitor that not only promotes cell cycle arrest but also halts transcriptional elongation, promotes apoptosis, induces differentiation, and has antiangiogenic properties.
  • The median overall survival for the 20 patients who received treatment was 7.5 months, a survival similar to that obtained in a randomized trial of four chemotherapy regimens containing platinum analogues in combination with taxanes or gemcitabine, or with gefitinib, a recently approved EGFR inhibitor for the treatment of advanced lung cancer.
  • Based on these encouraging results, a phase III trial comparing standard combination chemotherapy versus combination chemotherapy plus flavopiridol is currently under investigation.
  • Although these small molecules are directed towards a very prevalent cause of carcinogenesis, we need to test them in advanced clinical trials to determine the future of this class of agents for the prevention and therapy of human malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclin-Dependent Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Genes, Retinoblastoma. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Cycle / genetics. Cell Cycle / physiology. Cell Division / genetics. Cell Division / physiology. Clinical Trials as Topic. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Humans


62. Klaassen I, Braakhuis BJ: Anticancer activity and mechanism of action of retinoids in oral and pharyngeal cancer. Oral Oncol; 2002 Sep;38(6):532-42
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  • [Title] Anticancer activity and mechanism of action of retinoids in oral and pharyngeal cancer.
  • Epidemiological studies indicate that a low intake of vitamin A is associated with an increased risk of squamous cancer.
  • In vitro studies on cancer cells show that exposure to retinoids results in the inhibition of growth, by blocking the cell cycle or by inducing apoptosis.
  • With respect to the clinical efficacy of retinoids some positive effects have been observed in early stage oral and oropharyngeal cancer.
  • Administration of retinoids has been shown to elicit responses in leukoplakia, a premalignant lesion of the oral mucosa that frequently develops into invasive cancer.
  • Furthermore, it has been possible with a retinoid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, to delay or inhibit the development of second primary tumors in patients who have been curatively treated for a first primary tumor in the oral cavity or oropharynx.
  • Recent trials, however, failed to show protective effects on the development of second primary tumors.
  • Because of the short duration of the response, the intrinsic resistance to retinoids and the toxic side effects, the treatment with this class of compounds has not become a standard therapy.
  • This knowledge can be used to develop novel tumor-selective strategies.
  • This review gives an update on the role of retinoids in oral and oropharyngeal cancer and their precursor lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Mouth Neoplasms / prevention & control. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / prevention & control. Retinoids / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Leukoplakia, Oral / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 12167430.001).
  • [ISSN] 1368-8375
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Retinoids
  • [Number-of-references] 107
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63. Kawano T, Nagai K, Iwai T: A case of cancer on the pharyngoesophageal junction treated by ambulatory endoscopic mucosectomy. Surg Endosc; 2002 May;16(5):871-2
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  • [Title] A case of cancer on the pharyngoesophageal junction treated by ambulatory endoscopic mucosectomy.
  • A 52-year-old man underwent endoscopy because of discomfort in the hypopharyngeal region, and a 1.5-cm tumor was found on the pharyngoesophageal junction.
  • In 1992, the patient was treated for advanced cervicothoracic esophageal cancer by preoperative chemotherapy and esophagectomy with radical lymph adenectomy and right thoracotomy.
  • Reconstruction with a gastric substitute by cervical esophagogastrostomy was performed and postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy followed.
  • Histologically, the esophageal tumor had invaded the adventitia and showed metastases to regional lymph nodes and vascular involvement with a free surgical margin.
  • Therefore, we tried to resect another primary tumor on the pharyngoesophageal junction by the endoscopic mucosectomy technique with an esophageal multipurpose tube (np-EEM).
  • The tumor was resected on August 21, 1996, but follow-up endoscopy revealed residual or another primary tumor on the pharyngoesophageal junction in October 1996.
  • No problems occurred during or after tumor resection.
  • Both treatments were performed without hospitalization, and the patient returned to his normal daily life on the day following tumor resection.
  • Follow-up examinations have shown no sign of cancer recurrence on the pharyngoesophageal junction for more than 4 years.
  • [MeSH-major] Ambulatory Surgical Procedures / methods. Endoscopy / methods. Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery. Mucous Membrane / surgery. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Esophagoscopy / methods. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms, Second Primary / surgery

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  • (PMID = 11997847.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2218
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Endosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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64. Magné N, Pivot X, Bensadoun RJ, Guardiola E, Poissonnet G, Dassonville O, Francoual M, Formento JL, Demard F, Schneider M, Milano G: The relationship of epidermal growth factor receptor levels to the prognosis of unresectable pharyngeal cancer patients treated by chemo-radiotherapy. Eur J Cancer; 2001 Nov;37(17):2169-77
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  • [Title] The relationship of epidermal growth factor receptor levels to the prognosis of unresectable pharyngeal cancer patients treated by chemo-radiotherapy.
  • The aim of this study was to analyse prognostic factors for time to treatment failure (TTF) and overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable cancer of the pharynx.
  • A twice daily (b.i.d.) radiotherapy with concomitant cisplatin-5-fluorouracil chemotherapy was administered to 77 consecutive patients (68 males, 9 females; median age: 56 years).
  • The studied factors were: age, gender, tumour differentiation, tumour volume, initial hemoglobin level, karnofsky index (KI), primary tumour location, T, N, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) level in the tumour (fmol/mg protein).
  • In order to select subgroups with different outcomes, a stratification of patients was performed based on the EGFR value: patients with tumour EGFR levels <35 fmol/mg protein, between 35 and 275 fmol/mg protein and >275 fmol/mg protein had 95%, 51% and 16% 3 year OS rates, respectively (log rank test; P=0.0001).
  • Interestingly, for patients exhibiting a complete response (CR) after concomitant b.i.d. chemo-radiotherapy, patients with EGFR levels <35 fmol/mg protein were all alive at 3 years; in contrast, there was only 70 and 13% 3 year survival rates for patients with EGFR tumour levels between 35 and 275 fmol/mg protein and above 275 fmol/mg protein, respectively.
  • EGFR determination appears to be a powerful prognostic parameter in unresectable pharyngeal cancer patients treated by concomitant chemo-radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / metabolism. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Logistic Models. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism. Prognosis. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11677103.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
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65. Mevio E, Sbrocca M, Gorini E, Artesi L, Mullace M, Castelli A, Migliorini L: Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the pharynx. Acta Otorhinolaryngol Belg; 2003;57(1):79-81
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  • [Title] Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the pharynx.
  • Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is the most common soft-tissue sarcoma of late adult life, but is relatively uncommon in the head and neck region.
  • Only one case of the tumor occurring in the pharynx has been reported.
  • Histologically it is sometimes hard to distinguish this tumor from some sarcomas and pleomorphic carcinomas.
  • The treatment of choice is a large surgical resection, while radiotherapy and chemotherapy are reserved for recurrences.
  • For more than 1 year postoperatively, there has been no evidence of the disease or metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / pathology. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / radiography. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiography
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 12642957.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6497
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oto-rhino-laryngologica Belgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otorhinolaryngol Belg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Belgium
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66. Kato T, Duffey DC, Ondrey FG, Dong G, Chen Z, Cook JA, Mitchell JB, Van Waes C: Cisplatin and radiation sensitivity in human head and neck squamous carcinomas are independently modulated by glutathione and transcription factor NF-kappaB. Head Neck; 2000 Dec;22(8):748-59
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  • BACKGROUND: Response to neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been used to predict overall response to chemoradiation therapy and to select patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for organ preservation therapy in NCI and VA cooperative group trials.
  • METHODS: We examined human HNSCC lines to define the relationship of cisplatin and radiation sensitivity to intracellular GSH and NF-kappaB and determined whether HNSCC could be sensitized to these modalities by lowering the concentration of glutathione with L-buthionine sulfoximine or inhibiting activation of NF-kappaB by expression of a degradation-resistant mutant inhibitor-kappaBalpha.
  • Resistance to cisplatin correlated with intracellular GSH, and depletion of GSH by treatment with L-BSO sensitized UM-SCC-9 cells to cisplatin but not radiation.
  • Expression of a mutant Inhibitor-kappaB after gene transfer inhibited NF-kappaB and sensitized UM-SCC-9 cells to radiation but not cisplatin.
  • These results highlight the need to define molecular determinants of chemotherapy and radiation sensitivity for use in the selection of patients and as novel targets for therapy in future chemoradiation therapy trials for organ preservation in patients with HNSCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Glutathione / metabolism. NF-kappa B / metabolism. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Base Sequence. Cell Survival. Cisplatin / pharmacology. DNA, Complementary / analysis. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / genetics. Humans. Molecular Sequence Data. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Radiation Dosage. Radiation Tolerance. Reference Values. Sensitivity and Specificity. Tumor Cells, Cultured / drug effects. Tumor Cells, Cultured / radiation effects

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  • (PMID = 11084634.001).
  • [ISSN] 1043-3074
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & neck
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / DC-00016
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Complementary; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / NF-kappa B; GAN16C9B8O / Glutathione; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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67. Spencer SA, Harris J, Wheeler RH, Machtay M, Schultz C, Spanos W, Rotman M, Meredith R: RTOG 96-10: reirradiation with concurrent hydroxyurea and 5-fluorouracil in patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2001 Dec 1;51(5):1299-304
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  • [Title] RTOG 96-10: reirradiation with concurrent hydroxyurea and 5-fluorouracil in patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck.
  • PURPOSE: Patients with recurrent squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCH&N) are generally treated with systemic chemotherapy.
  • This study was undertaken to explore the feasibility and toxicity, and estimate the therapeutic impact of, reirradiation (RRT) with concurrent hydroxyurea and 5-fluorouracil.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: The eligibility requirements included SCH&N presenting as a second primary or recurrence > or =6 months after definitive RT to > or =45 Gy, with > or =75% of the tumor volume within the previous field.
  • The cumulative spinal cord dose was limited to 50 Gy, and measurable disease was required.
  • A cycle consisted of 5 days, Monday through Friday, of 1.5-Gy twice-daily repeated RT, with the fractions separated by > or =6 h, with 1.5 g of hydroxyurea given 2 h and 300 mg/m2 of a 5-fluorouracil IV bolus given 30 min before each second daily fraction.
  • The median prior radiation dose was 61.2 Gy.
  • Grade 3 acute pharyngeal toxicity was seen in 17%.
  • Six patients died of treatment-related toxicity.
  • Two died of hemorrhage from the tumor site without thrombocytopenia.
  • With a median follow-up of 16.3 months for living patients, the estimated median overall survival was 8.2 months and the estimated 1-year survival rate 41.7%.
  • The 1-year survival rate for patients with a second primary was 54% compared with 38% for patients with recurrence (p = 0.083).
  • CONCLUSION: Repeated RT with concurrent chemotherapy as given in this study is a feasible approach for selected, previously irradiated patients with SCH&N and may produce increased median and 1-year survival rates compared with systemic chemotherapy trials reported in the literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Hydroxyurea / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11728690.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; X6Q56QN5QC / Hydroxyurea
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68. Courtois A, Foehrenbach H, Maszelin P, De Dreuille O, Garcia D, Kossowski M, Merlet P, Gaillard JF, Poncet JL: [Positron emission tomography in head and neck oncology: five cases]. Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac; 2001 Sep;118(4):254-60
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  • [Title] [Positron emission tomography in head and neck oncology: five cases].
  • [Transliterated title] La tomographie à émission de positons en oncologie ORL. Une revue à propos de 5 cas.
  • FDG-PET (18-fluoro-desoxyglucose positron emission tomography) is a fonctionnal imaging method based on the high rate of glycolysis in different types of cancer-cells.
  • For primary assessment of cervicofacial carcinomas, different imaging techniques such as CT and MRI have improved tumor staging.
  • Although 18-FDG-PET cannot replace these techniques used to monitor size and structural changes in tumors and lymph nodes, it will be helpful in following their metabolic activity.
  • This diagnostic tool consequently is greatly helpful for detection and post-therapeutic evaluation of head and neck carcinomas and their recurrence.
  • 18-FDG-PET is currently under evaluation as a tool for detecting cervical lymph nodes and early assessment of response to chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Tomography, Emission-Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Lymphatic Metastasis / radionuclide imaging. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radionuclide imaging. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / radionuclide imaging. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Prognosis. Radiopharmaceuticals

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  • (PMID = 11679846.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-438X
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales d'oto-laryngologie et de chirurgie cervico faciale : bulletin de la Société d'oto-laryngologie des hôpitaux de Paris
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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69. Eisbruch A, Shewach DS, Bradford CR, Littles JF, Teknos TN, Chepeha DB, Marentette LJ, Terrell JE, Hogikyan ND, Dawson LA, Urba S, Wolf GT, Lawrence TS: Radiation concurrent with gemcitabine for locally advanced head and neck cancer: a phase I trial and intracellular drug incorporation study. J Clin Oncol; 2001 Feb 01;19(3):792-9
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  • [Title] Radiation concurrent with gemcitabine for locally advanced head and neck cancer: a phase I trial and intracellular drug incorporation study.
  • PURPOSE: To examine the feasibility and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of once-weekly gemcitabine at doses predicted in preclinical studies to produce radiosensitization, concurrent with a standard course of radiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer.
  • Tumor incorporation of gemcitabine triphosphate (dFdCTP) was measured to assess whether adequate concentrations were achieved at each dose level.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with unresectable head and neck cancer received a course of radiation (70 Gy over 7 weeks, 5 days weekly) concurrent with weekly infusions of low-dose gemcitabine.
  • Tumor biopsies were performed after the first gemcitabine infusion (before radiation started), and the intracellular concentrations of dFdCTP were measured.
  • RESULTS: Severe acute and late mucosal and pharyngeal-related DLT required de-escalation of gemcitabine dose in successive patient cohorts receiving dose levels of 300 mg/m(2)/wk, 150 mg/m(2)/wk, and 50 mg/m(2)/wk.
  • The rate of endoscopy- and biopsy-assessed complete tumor response was 66% to 87% in the various cohorts.
  • Tumor dFdCTP levels were similar in patients receiving 50 to 300 mg/m(2) (on average, 1.55 pmol/mg, SD 1.15) but were barely or not detectable at 10 mg/m(2).
  • CONCLUSION: A high rate of acute and late mucosa-related DLT and a high rate of complete tumor response were observed in this regimen at the dose levels of 50 to 300 mg/m(2), which also resulted in similar, subcytotoxic intracellular dFdCTP concentrations.
  • These results demonstrate significant tumor and normal tissue radiosensitization by low-dose gemcitabine.
  • Different regimens of combined radiation and gemcitabine should be evaluated, based on newer preclinical data promising an improved therapeutic ratio.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / adverse effects. Deoxycytidine / adverse effects. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy. Cytosine Nucleotides / metabolism. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 11157033.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 78554
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Cytosine Nucleotides; 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine
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70. Douglas JG, Koh W, Laramore GE: Metastasis to a percutaneous gastrostomy site from head and neck cancer: radiobiologic considerations. Head Neck; 2000 Dec;22(8):826-30
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  • [Title] Metastasis to a percutaneous gastrostomy site from head and neck cancer: radiobiologic considerations.
  • BACKGROUND: The use of percutaneously placed feeding tubes has increased in recent years in an effort to maintain adequate caloric balance in patients receiving combined therapy for head and neck cancers, particularly concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: We report a case of a metastasis to a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy site occurring in a patient with an advanced tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma and review the published literature regarding this subject.
  • RESULTS: Six cases of percutaneous endoscopic site metastases occurring in patients with head and neck primary tumors have been reported in the literature.
  • The interval from performance of the procedure to development of the metastases ranged from 3 to 16 months.
  • Tumor kinetics suggest that a significant tumor burden (10(5)-10(6) cells) would need to be present at the site to manifest a metastatic lesion in such a short time interval.
  • Direct tumor implantation by means of instrumentation at the time of the procedure is most likely explanation for such metastases, although hematogenous seeding cannot be completely discounted.
  • Techniques should be used so as not to disrupt the tumor bed, particularly when gross residual disease is present.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Catheters, Indwelling / adverse effects. Gastrostomy / adverse effects. Neoplasm Seeding. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / secondary

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  • [CommentIn] Head Neck. 2001 Dec;23(12):1080-3 [11774395.001]
  • (PMID = 11084645.001).
  • [ISSN] 1043-3074
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & neck
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Number-of-references] 18
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71. Yamaguchi E, Uchida M, Makino Y, Tachibana M, Sato T, Yamamoto Y, Kawashima K, Araki A, Maruyama R: Tonsillar metastasis of gastric cancer. Clin J Gastroenterol; 2010 Dec;3(6):289-95

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  • [Title] Tonsillar metastasis of gastric cancer.
  • Metastasis from a malignant tumor to the palatine tonsils is rare, with only 100 cases reported in the English-language literature.
  • Tonsillar metastasis from a gastric cancer is very rare.
  • We report here a case of palatine tonsillar metastasis after gastric cancer surgery.
  • The patient was an 88-year-old woman who had gastric cancer with abdominal wall invasion.
  • She had undergone a distal gastrectomy with abdominal wall resection and D2 lymph node dissection.
  • Histologically, the tumor was primarily a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma.
  • The patient developed pharyngeal discomfort and abdominal pain and was hospitalized during the follow-up period, 1 year 9 months post-operatively.
  • It was diagnosed as a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, a metastasis from gastric cancer.
  • There was a concern of asphyxiation due to hemorrhage of the tumor; however, the tumor dislodged approximately 10 days after biopsy and tonsillar recurrence was not observed.
  • In the literature there are cases with tonsillar metastases where surgical treatment, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy were performed and extension of survival was seen.
  • Tonsillar metastasis is a form of systemic metastasis of a malignant tumor, and there is a high risk for asphyxiation from tumor dislodgement or hemorrhage.

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  • (PMID = 21841958.001).
  • [ISSN] 1865-7257
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin J Gastroenterol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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72. Navez ML: [Otolaryngological cancer pain at the after-effects stage]. Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac; 2007 Oct;124 Suppl 1:S39-44
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  • [Title] [Otolaryngological cancer pain at the after-effects stage].
  • [Transliterated title] Douleur des cancers ORL au stade des séquelles.
  • The standards of pharyngolaryngeal tumor treatment have changed over the years in an attempt to prevent laryngeal mutilation (partial surgery, endoscopic surgery, sequential radiotherapy, and chemotherapy).
  • Pain induced by these treatments is frequent and varies from one treatment to another.
  • Pain from mucositis, although nonspecific to otolaryngic cancer, is more frequent and more severe, and prevention and treatment remain poorly defined.
  • Finally, pain coexists with disturbances of basic functions (speech, swallowing, etc.) and the disability generated by treatments.
  • [MeSH-major] Laryngeal Neoplasms / complications. Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases / complications. Pain / etiology. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Postoperative Complications. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 18047863.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-438X
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales d'oto-laryngologie et de chirurgie cervico faciale : bulletin de la Société d'oto-laryngologie des hôpitaux de Paris
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 34
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73. Oh WS, Roumanas E, Beumer J 3rd: Maxillofacial restoration after head and neck tumor therapy. Compend Contin Educ Dent; 2007 Feb;28(2):70-6; quiz 77, 101
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  • [Title] Maxillofacial restoration after head and neck tumor therapy.
  • Oral and pharyngeal cancers are among the leading cancer sites.
  • Surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or combination therapies are common treatment modalities.
  • Radiotherapy and chemotherapy cause significant morbidity and long-term irreversible sequelae in the oral cavity.
  • This article reviews current treatment modalities of tumor therapy, their consequences, and the restoration of maxillofacial defects.
  • [MeSH-major] Dental Implantation, Endosseous. Jaw Neoplasms / rehabilitation. Maxillofacial Prosthesis. Mouth Neoplasms / rehabilitation. Oral Surgical Procedures. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
  • [MeSH-minor] Cranial Irradiation / adverse effects. Dental Implants. Humans. Hyperbaric Oxygenation. Osteoradionecrosis / etiology. Osteoradionecrosis / therapy. Palatal Obturators. Surgical Flaps

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  • (PMID = 17319178.001).
  • [ISSN] 1548-8578
  • [Journal-full-title] Compendium of continuing education in dentistry (Jamesburg, N.J. : 1995)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Compend Contin Educ Dent
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dental Implants
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74. Galli J, De Corso E, Volante M, Almadori G, Paludetti G: Postlaryngectomy pharyngocutaneous fistula: incidence, predisposing factors, and therapy. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2005 Nov;133(5):689-94
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  • [Title] Postlaryngectomy pharyngocutaneous fistula: incidence, predisposing factors, and therapy.
  • Systemic diseases, previous radiotherapy, supraglottic origin of tumor, and concurrent radical neck dissection were significantly associated with PCF.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In presence of a specific risk factor, PCF can be expected; nevertheless, its prevention remains very difficult.
  • Moreover, given the high percentage of spontaneous closure, we suggest the "wait and see" approach for 28 days before proceeding with a surgical approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Cutaneous Fistula / epidemiology. Cutaneous Fistula / therapy. Laryngectomy / adverse effects. Pharyngeal Diseases / epidemiology. Pharyngeal Diseases / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cohort Studies. Combined Modality Therapy. Confidence Intervals. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Incidence. Italy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Logistic Models. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Odds Ratio. Postoperative Complications / diagnosis. Postoperative Complications / therapy. Reoperation. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Severity of Illness Index. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16274794.001).
  • [ISSN] 0194-5998
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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75. Daisne JF, Duprez T, Weynand B, Lonneux M, Hamoir M, Reychler H, Grégoire V: Tumor volume in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma: comparison at CT, MR imaging, and FDG PET and validation with surgical specimen. Radiology; 2004 Oct;233(1):93-100
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  • [Title] Tumor volume in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma: comparison at CT, MR imaging, and FDG PET and validation with surgical specimen.
  • PURPOSE: To compare computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) for delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and to validate results with the macroscopic surgical specimen when available.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with stages II-IV squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiation therapy or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (n = 20) or with total laryngectomy (n = 9) were enrolled.
  • Ten patients had oropharyngeal, 13 had laryngeal, and six had hypopharyngeal tumors.
  • RESULTS: For oropharyngeal tumors and for laryngeal or hypopharyngeal tumors, no significant difference (P >.99) was observed between average GTVs delineated at CT (32.0 and 21.4 cm(3), respectively) or MR imaging (27.9 and 21.4 cm(3), respectively), whereas average GTVs at PET were smaller (20.3 [P </=.10] and 16.4 cm(3) [P </=.01], respectively).
  • In nine patients for whom a surgical specimen was available, no modality adequately depicted superficial tumor extension; this was due to limitations in spatial resolution.
  • However, no modality managed to depict superficial tumor extension.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Tomography, Emission-Computed. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. False Positive Reactions. Female. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Imaging, Three-Dimensional. Laryngectomy. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiopharmaceuticals. Retrospective Studies. Single-Blind Method

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  • [Copyright] Copyright RSNA, 2004
  • [ErratumIn] Radiology. 2005 Jun;235(3):1086
  • (PMID = 15317953.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-8419
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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76. Xiao W, Yi Z: [Combined therapy of advanced tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma and one-stage repair of the defect]. Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Ke Za Zhi; 2002 Feb;37(1):41-3
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  • [Title] [Combined therapy of advanced tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma and one-stage repair of the defect].
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the treatment of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil.
  • The managements were supplemented with preoperative chemotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Through this combined approach, the advanced tonsillar carcinoma could be resected en bloc under direct visual field and keeping 1-1.5 cm safe margin to the tumor.
  • Neck dissection, preoperative chemotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy were supplemental measures.
  • Combined therapy was of great significance in reducing recurrence of the tumor.
  • PM was usually survived and easily obtained, hence, suitable for repairing the pharyngeal defect.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Surgical Flaps. Tonsillar Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pectoralis Muscles / surgery

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  • (PMID = 12768794.001).
  • [ISSN] 0412-3948
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua er bi yan hou ke za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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77. Smith RV, Kotz T, Beitler JJ, Wadler S: Long-term swallowing problems after organ preservation therapy with concomitant radiation therapy and intravenous hydroxyurea: initial results. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2000 Mar;126(3):384-9
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  • [Title] Long-term swallowing problems after organ preservation therapy with concomitant radiation therapy and intravenous hydroxyurea: initial results.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the long-term effects on swallowing function of concomitant continuous infusion hydroxyurea and hyperfractionated radiation therapy used to treat advanced head and neck carcinoma.
  • DESIGN: A prospective evaluation of swallowing function was performed on an inception cohort by analyzing posttreatment videoflouroscopic swallow function studies using radiological descriptors for pharyngeal transport abnormalities and temporal measures of structural movements, as well as by conducting patient interviews to assess alimentation, more than 1 year after tumor treatment (range, 52-124 weeks; median, 70 weeks).
  • RESULTS: Pharyngeal transport dysfunction and anterior segment abnormalities, manifested by epiglottic dysmotility, vallecular residue, laryngeal penetration, or aspiration, were evident in all 10 patients.
  • Posterior segment abnormalities, such as pharyngeal stasis, constrictor dysmotility and piriform residue were documented in 8 patients.
  • Three patients developed late aspiration, and the majority of patients showed persistent or worsened delay in laryngeal movement compared with their earlier posttreatment evaluations.
  • Also, 3 patients developed a hypopharyngeal stricture, and 6 patients continued to require gastrostomy tube supplementation beyond 1 year.
  • CONCLUSION: Prolonged and debilitating functional swallowing abnormalities may occur after this aggressive concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimen.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Deglutition Disorders / etiology. Hydroxyurea / therapeutic use. Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Postoperative Complications / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Fluoroscopy. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Video Recording


78. Wang ZY, Li YX, Wang WH, Jin J, Wang H, Song YW, Liu QF, Wang SL, Liu YP, Qi SN, Fang H, Liu XF, Yu ZH: Primary radiotherapy showed favorable outcome in treating extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma in children and adolescents. Blood; 2009 Nov 26;114(23):4771-6
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  • [Title] Primary radiotherapy showed favorable outcome in treating extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma in children and adolescents.
  • Extranodal nasal-type natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma is rarely observed in children and adolescents.
  • We aim to investigate the clinical features, prognosis, and treatment outcomes in these patients.
  • Among the patients with stage I and II disease, 19 patients received initial radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, and 14 patients received chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy.
  • The 4 patients with stage III and IV disease received primary chemotherapy and radiation of the primary tumor.
  • Children and adolescents with extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma usually presented with early-stage disease, high frequency of B symptoms, good performance, low-risk age-adjusted international prognostic index, and chemoresistance.
  • The complete response rate after initial radiotherapy was 73.7%, which was significantly higher than the response rate after initial chemotherapy (16.7%; P = .002).
  • The corresponding OS and PFS rates for patients with stage I and II disease were 77.6% and 72.3%, respectively.
  • Children and adolescents with early-stage extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma treated with primary radiotherapy had a favorable prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Extranodal NK-T-Cell / radiotherapy. Nose Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Child. China. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated. Remission Induction. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19812381.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0020
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHOP protocol
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79. Yao M, Epstein JB, Modi BJ, Pytynia KB, Mundt AJ, Feldman LE: Current surgical treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Oral Oncol; 2007 Mar;43(3):213-23
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  • [Title] Current surgical treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
  • Historically treatment of head and neck cancers involved surgical resection followed by radiation therapy for advanced tumors.
  • Concurrent chemoradiation therapies have shown equal survival to surgical resection with better preservation of function.
  • However, concurrent therapy does entail significant morbidity, and recent advances have been used to minimize that morbidity.
  • Newer tumor specific medical therapies are anticipated to be less toxic while maintaining a high degree of efficacy.
  • For resectable cancer, transoral laser microsurgery is a new trend in surgery for complete resection of tumors with preservation of function.
  • Advanced reconstructive techniques that allow free transfer of soft tissue and bone from all over the body improve the functional and aesthetic outcomes following major ablative surgery.
  • With these newer therapies and methods of reconstruction, each patient needs to be carefully evaluated to maximize the possibility of cure and level of function, and minimize the morbidity associated with treatment.
  • Combined chemotherapy and radiation protocols are associated with increased acute and chronic toxicities that may affect the quality of life due to the impact upon oral disease and oral function.
  • Oral care providers must be aware of advances in cancer management and implications for patient care to effectively care for these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Head and Neck Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Neck / surgery. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Salvage Therapy / methods. Speech. Surgical Flaps. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16978911.001).
  • [ISSN] 1368-8375
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 108
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80. Righini CA, Bettega G, Lequeux T, Chaffanjeon P, Lebeau J, Reyt E: Use of tubed gastro-omental free flap for hypopharynx and cervical esophagus reconstruction after total laryngo-pharyngectomy. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2005 May;262(5):362-7

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  • The tubed gastro-omental free flap (TGO) offers an alternative procedure in selective cases.
  • Five patients had previously received systemic chemotherapy and external irradiation at curative doses, and three had undergone previous surgery.
  • Four patients died of loco-regional tumor evolution or distant metastatic disease.
  • The TGO offers a safe method of reconstructing the pharyngoesophageal segment in a surgical field compromised of previous multimodal therapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Cutaneous Fistula / etiology. Cutaneous Fistula / surgery. Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery. Humans. Larynx / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Omentum / surgery. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures. Retrospective Studies. Stomach / surgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15378313.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-4477
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
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81. Swaak-Kragten AT, de Wilt JH, Schmitz PI, Bontenbal M, Levendag PC: Multimodality treatment for anaplastic thyroid carcinoma--treatment outcome in 75 patients. Radiother Oncol; 2009 Jul;92(1):100-4
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  • [Title] Multimodality treatment for anaplastic thyroid carcinoma--treatment outcome in 75 patients.
  • Tumor stage was IVA in 9%, IVB in 51%, and IVC in 40%.
  • Before 1988 adjuvant treatment consisted of conventional radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy (CT).
  • This consists of locoregional RT in 46 fractions of 1.1 Gy, given twice daily, followed by prophylactic irradiation of the lungs (PLI) in 5 daily fractions of 1.5 Gy.
  • Acute toxicity in the protocol group was significantly higher than in the nonprotocol group, with 46% versus 11% grade 3 pharyngeal and/or esophageal toxicity.
  • CONCLUSION: Despite the ultimately dismal prognosis of ATC-patients, multimodality treatment significantly improved local control and improved the median survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Thyroid Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19328572.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0887
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiotherapy and oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiother Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
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82. Amornphimoltham P, Patel V, Leelahavanichkul K, Abraham RT, Gutkind JS: A retroinhibition approach reveals a tumor cell-autonomous response to rapamycin in head and neck cancer. Cancer Res; 2008 Feb 15;68(4):1144-53
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  • [Title] A retroinhibition approach reveals a tumor cell-autonomous response to rapamycin in head and neck cancer.
  • Emerging evidence supporting the activation of the Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling network in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) progression has provided the rationale for exploring the therapeutic potential of inhibiting this pathway for HNSCC treatment.
  • Indeed, rapamycin, a clinically relevant mTOR inhibitor, promotes the rapid regression of HNSCC-tumor xenografts in mice.
  • However, rapamycin does not affect the growth of HNSCC cells in vitro, thus raising the possibility that, as for other cancer types, rapamycin may not target cancer cells directly but may instead act on a component of the tumor microenvironment, such as tumor-associated vasculature.
  • Here, we used a retroinhibition approach to assess the contribution of cancer cell-autonomous actions of rapamycin to its antitumor activity in HNSCC.
  • A rapamycin-resistant form of mTOR (mTOR-RR) was expressed in HNSCC cells while retaining the wild-type (rapamycin-sensitive) mTOR (mTOR-WT) alleles in host-derived endothelial and stromal cells.
  • This reverse pharmacology strategy also enabled monitoring the direct consequences of inhibiting mTOR in cancer cells within the complex tumor microenvironment, which revealed that mTOR controls the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) and the consequent expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and a glucose transporter, Glut-1, in HNSCC cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sirolimus / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Growth Processes / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor. Endothelial Cells / drug effects. Endothelial Cells / pathology. Female. Humans. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit / metabolism. Mice. Mice, Nude. Mutation. Protein Kinases / genetics. Protein Kinases / metabolism. Signal Transduction / drug effects. TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 18281490.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7445
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z01 DE000558-17
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / HIF1A protein, human; 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit; EC 2.7.- / Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.1.1 / MTOR protein, human; EC 2.7.1.1 / TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases; EC 2.7.1.1 / mTOR protein, mouse; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS401094; NLM/ PMC3443567
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83. Senderowicz AM: Cell cycle modulators for the treatment of lung malignancies. Clin Lung Cancer; 2003 Nov;5(3):158-68
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  • [Title] Cell cycle modulators for the treatment of lung malignancies.
  • It has become clear in the past decade that most human malignancies, including lung neoplasms, have aberrations in cell cycle control.
  • The tumor suppressor gene retinoblastoma is an important player in the G1/S transition and its function is abnormal in most human neoplasms.
  • Thus, modulation of CDKs may have an important use for the therapy and prevention of human neoplasms.
  • The first example of a direct small-molecule CDK modulator tested in the clinic, flavopiridol, is a pan-CDK inhibitor that not only promotes cell cycle arrest but also halts transcriptional elongation, promotes apoptosis, induces differentiation, and has antiangiogenic properties.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Cycle / physiology. Lung Neoplasms / physiopathology. Lung Neoplasms / therapy. Staurosporine / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis / genetics. Cyclin-Dependent Kinases / drug effects. Cyclin-Dependent Kinases / genetics. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Genes, Retinoblastoma / drug effects. Genes, Retinoblastoma / genetics. Humans. Phosphorylation / drug effects. Protein Kinase C / drug effects. Protein Kinase C / genetics. Tumor Cells, Cultured / cytology. Tumor Cells, Cultured / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 14667271.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-7304
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lung cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 7BU5H4V94A / 7-hydroxystaurosporine; EC 2.7.11.13 / Protein Kinase C; EC 2.7.11.22 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinases; H88EPA0A3N / Staurosporine
  • [Number-of-references] 160
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84. Mo Y, Gan Y, Song S, Johnston J, Xiao X, Wientjes MG, Au JL: Simultaneous targeting of telomeres and telomerase as a cancer therapeutic approach. Cancer Res; 2003 Feb 1;63(3):579-85
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  • [Title] Simultaneous targeting of telomeres and telomerase as a cancer therapeutic approach.
  • Telomerase, responsible for telomere synthesis, is expressed in approximately 90% of human tumor cells but seldom in normal somatic cells.
  • This study evaluated the hypothesis that simultaneous shortening of telomeres and inhibition of telomerase results in synergistic and tumor-selective cytotoxicity.
  • In telomerase-positive human pharynx FaDu tumor cells, paclitaxel caused telomere erosion (first detected at 1 h) and apoptosis.
  • FaDu xenograft tumors (i.e., reduced residual tumor size, enhanced apoptotic cell fraction, and prolonged survival time), without enhancing host toxicity.
  • These results demonstrate that combined use of agents targeting both telomere and telomerase yielded synergistic activity selective for tumors that depend on telomerase for telomere maintenance.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. Paclitaxel / pharmacology. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / genetics. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. RNA, Antisense / administration & dosage. Telomerase / antagonists & inhibitors. Telomere / drug effects. Zidovudine / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Synergism. Humans. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Osteosarcoma / enzymology. Osteosarcoma / genetics. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 12566299.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA77091
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Antisense; 4B9XT59T7S / Zidovudine; EC 2.7.7.49 / Telomerase; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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85. Patel V, Lahusen T, Leethanakul C, Igishi T, Kremer M, Quintanilla-Martinez L, Ensley JF, Sausville EA, Gutkind JS, Senderowicz AM: Antitumor activity of UCN-01 in carcinomas of the head and neck is associated with altered expression of cyclin D3 and p27(KIP1). Clin Cancer Res; 2002 Nov;8(11):3549-60
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  • Altered and deregulated cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) activity is now believed to play a major role in the pathogenesis of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), thus providing a suitable cellular target for therapeutic intervention.
  • UCN-01 (7-hydroxy-staurosporine), a known protein kinase C and cdk modulator, demonstrates antiproliferative and antitumor properties in many experimental tumor models and may represent a potential candidate to test in HNSCC.
  • Cell cycle analysis revealed that UCN-01 treatment of HNSCC cells for 24 h leads to a G1 block with a concomitant loss of cells in S and G2-M and the emerging sub-G1 cell population, confirmed to be apoptotic by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling analysis.
  • Total sustained abolition of tumor growth (P < 0.00001) was obtained with only one cycle of UCN-01 treatment.
  • Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling staining of xenograft samples revealed a higher incidence of apoptosis in treated tissues when compared with control.
  • Additional tissue analysis demonstrated that elevated p27(KIP1) with minimal increase in p21(WAF1) and reduced cyclin D3 levels were readily detected in those animals treated with UCN-01, similar to those observed in HNSCC cells.
  • Thus, UCN-01 exhibits both in vitro and in vivo antitumor properties in HNSCC models, and these effects are associated with a decrease in cyclin D3 and an increase in p27(KIP1) protein levels, thus providing appropriate surrogate markers to follow treatment efficacy in vivo and, therefore, a suitable drug candidate for treating HNSCC patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Alkaloids / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. CDC2-CDC28 Kinases. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Cell Cycle Proteins / biosynthesis. Cyclins / biosynthesis. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Proto-Oncogene Proteins. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] 3T3 Cells. Animals. Apoptosis. Cell Cycle. Cyclin D3. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27. Cyclin-Dependent Kinases / metabolism. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Flow Cytometry. G1 Phase. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Inhibitory Concentration 50. Kinetics. Mice. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Transplantation. Prognosis. Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / metabolism. S Phase. Staurosporine / analogs & derivatives. Time Factors. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 12429646.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Alkaloids; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / CCND3 protein, human; 0 / CDKN1A protein, human; 0 / Ccnd3 protein, mouse; 0 / Cdkn1a protein, mouse; 0 / Cdkn1b protein, mouse; 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / Cyclin D3; 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21; 0 / Cyclins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 147604-94-2 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27; 7BU5H4V94A / 7-hydroxystaurosporine; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; EC 2.7.11.22 / CDC2-CDC28 Kinases; EC 2.7.11.22 / CDK2 protein, human; EC 2.7.11.22 / CDK4 protein, human; EC 2.7.11.22 / Cdk2 protein, mouse; EC 2.7.11.22 / Cdk4 protein, mouse; EC 2.7.11.22 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2; EC 2.7.11.22 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4; EC 2.7.11.22 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinases; H88EPA0A3N / Staurosporine
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86. Hazarika P: Solitary malignant schwanoma of para pharyngeal space-a case report and review of literature. Indian J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2003 Oct;55(4):277-80
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  • [Title] Solitary malignant schwanoma of para pharyngeal space-a case report and review of literature.
  • Malignnant Schwannom is an aggressive tissue tumor that is more cnmitutnh found m assoiiatiun with Ion Recklinghausens disease.
  • The solitary tumors although rarer have a better prognosis when compared to those associated witk tan Recklinghausens disease.
  • Parupharyngeui tumors are rare and a majority af these are benign salivary or neurogenie tumors, A malignant Schwannoma at this site is very infrequent with only four earn reported so far.
  • The tase of a 16 year old girl with a parapharynccal malignant Schwnnaomu is presented Jor its rarity and our experience in dealing with it. .A combined modallty oftretument with surttery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy Was used.

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  • [Cites] Arch Otolaryngol. 1979 May;105(5):267-70 [435150.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 1991 Oct;101(10):1044-9 [1921630.001]
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  • (PMID = 23120001.001).
  • [ISSN] 2231-3796
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of otolaryngology and head and neck surgery : official publication of the Association of Otolaryngologists of India
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3451183
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Malignant Schwannoma / Parapharyngeal Space Tumors
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87. Lu X, Hu C, Ji Q, Shen C, Feng Y: Squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to cervical lymph nodes from an unknown primary site: the impact of radiotherapy. Tumori; 2009 Mar-Apr;95(2):185-90
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • AIMS AND BACKGROUND: Cervical lymph node metastases of squamous cell carcinoma from an unknown primary site constitute about 5% of the total head and neck cancer, cases.
  • The management of these patients is still a therapeutic challenge.
  • Radiotherapy was delivered to the bilateral neck and pharyngeal mucosa (extensive field) in 11 patients (18.3%), to the bilateral neck in 24 patients (40.0%), and to the ipsilateral neck in 25 patients (41.7%).
  • Fourteen patients (23.3%) also received chemotherapy.
  • The primary tumor emerged in 23.3% of patients treated with ipsilateral and bilateral neck irradiation and in 12.5% of patients irradiated by extensive field (P = 0.469).
  • Extensive irradiation results in a lower trend of emergence of the primary tumor than when patients are treated with ipsilateral and bilateral irradiation, but there is no significant difference in overall survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Lymph Nodes / radiation effects. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / pathology. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Neck. Neck Dissection. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Radiotherapy / methods

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  • (PMID = 19579864.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8916
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumori
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumori
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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88. Bernbeck B, Schneider DT, Bernbeck B, Koch S, Teske C, Lentrodt J, Harms D, Göbel U, Calaminus G, MAKEI-Study Group: Germ cell tumors of the head and neck: report from the MAKEI Study Group. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2009 Feb;52(2):223-6
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  • [Title] Germ cell tumors of the head and neck: report from the MAKEI Study Group.
  • BACKGROUND: Germ cell tumors (GCTs) of the head and neck region are rare but may pose significant problems for perinatal management as well as surgical and adjuvant therapy.
  • PROCEDURE: Thirty-two prospectively reported patients from the German MAKEI studies (Maligne Keimzelltumoren) were analyzed with regard to perinatal management and long-term survival.
  • RESULTS: Twenty-three tumors were diagnosed around birth and four during the first 3 months of life.
  • All were primarily diagnosed as teratomas, but in two tumors, yolk sac tumor (YST) foci were identified.
  • Four tumors were diagnosed after the first year of life and showed YST as leading histology.
  • Most neonates presented with huge tumors causing external airway obstruction.
  • All tumors were resected (complete resection, 16/26 patients with complete surgical information; incomplete resection, 10/26 patients).
  • Eight tumors including five of six YSTs were treated with chemotherapy.
  • Accordingly, more relapses were observed in pharyngeal than in neck tumors due to incomplete resection.
  • Most patients with antenatal tumor growth are identified by ultrasound and delivered preterm by cesarian section.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / diagnosis. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Endodermal Sinus Tumor / diagnosis. Endodermal Sinus Tumor / therapy. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Perinatal Care. Prospective Studies. Recurrence. Remission Induction. Survival Rate. Teratoma / diagnosis. Teratoma / therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 18937314.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5017
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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89. Mallet Y, Robin YM, Bedoui SE, Fournier C, Penel N, Lefebvre JL: Survival prognostic factors for lateral bucco-pharyngeal junction squamous cell carcinoma. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2008 Jul;265 Suppl 1:S25-8
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  • [Title] Survival prognostic factors for lateral bucco-pharyngeal junction squamous cell carcinoma.
  • This anatomical site gives the tumor ample space to spread in different directions, making tumor management all the more difficult.
  • In the Department of Head and Neck Oncology at the Centre Oscar Lambret, 57 patients with lateral bucco-pharyngeal junction SCC were treated from 1995 to 2000.
  • Description of the tumor was based on clinical and imaging data.
  • Treatment modalities frequently combined surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • Protocol was adapted with the health status and the aggressiveness of the disease.
  • Fifty men and seven women with a mean age of 57 years constitute the patient population.
  • Thirty-one of fifty-seven tumors were categorized as T1 or T2.
  • Tumor extension, growth pathology and degree of differentiation were described.
  • Primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy was delivered to the others.
  • The modality of the different treatments and their results were specified.
  • The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 52.7% and the 3-year overall survival rate was 48.2%.
  • Gender (P=0.008), surgery first versus non-surgical treatment first (P=0.03), spread beyond the midline (P=0.03), and small tumors T1 T2 versus T3 T4 (P=0.003) were predictive factors of overall survival.
  • A Multivariate analysis showed that the type of treatment (surgery first versus no primary surgery P=0.006), and the T (T1, T2 versus T3, T4 P=0.005) were the two predictive factors of the overall survival.
  • All the statuses linked to the population type, tumor extension and tumor differentiation are also discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Mouth Neoplasms / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cheek. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies

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  • [Cites] Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac. 1987;104(1):15-20 [3566046.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Surg. 1996 Dec;172(6):665-70 [8988673.001]
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  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 2003 Jul;113(7):1252-61 [12838028.001]
  • (PMID = 17978830.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-4477
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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90. Durand-Faucher K, Rabinovitch-Chable H, Dzugan H, Charret S, Aubry K, Genet D, Léobon S, Tubiana-Mathieu N, Cook-Moreau J, Rigaud M, Sturtz FG: A quantitative RT-PCR method to determine topoisomerase I mRNA levels in human tissue samples. Clin Chem Lab Med; 2005;43(7):707-14
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  • [Title] A quantitative RT-PCR method to determine topoisomerase I mRNA levels in human tissue samples.
  • Clinical interest has focused on Topo I as it is the molecular target of camptothecin (CPT), used in first and second lines of treatment for different cancer types.
  • Furthermore, it is well demonstrated that the patients who best responded to CPT-based chemotherapy were generally those with the greatest tumoral Topo I expression and/or activity.
  • We developed a sensitive, simple and reproducible method to measure Topo I mRNA expression in human cancer samples.
  • First, we checked the accuracy of the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method by testing intra- and interassay reproducibility of Topo I and G6PDH gene amplification in different cell types.
  • We observed that crossing-points (Cps) were different, depending on the cell type, dilution or cDNA concentration, but that the intra- and interassay Cp standard deviation (SD) never exceeded 0.77% and 1.39% for Topo I amplification, or 1.63% and 2.9% for G6PDH amplification, respectively.
  • Secondly, we used our method to measure Topo I mRNA levels in primary tumor samples obtained from 27 patients with advanced colorectal cancer and 10 patients with pharyngeal/laryngeal cancer.
  • The accuracy of G6PDH as a housekeeping gene was tested by analyzing its correlation with the mRNA level of a second housekeeping gene, porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) in the tumoral samples.
  • We found that the normalized Topo I/G6PDH mRNA ratios were significantly correlated with that of Topo I/PBGD in colorectal tumors (r(2)=0.47, p=0.02) but not in pharyngeal/laryngeal tumors (r(2)=0.35, p=0.3).
  • Neither ratio showed any significant association with clinicopathological parameters, such as gender, age, tumor size, or grade and lymph node status.

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  • (PMID = 16207129.001).
  • [ISSN] 1434-6621
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Chem. Lab. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Complementary; 0 / RNA, Messenger; EC 1.1.1.49 / Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase; EC 2.5.1.61 / Hydroxymethylbilane Synthase; EC 5.99.1.2 / DNA Topoisomerases, Type I
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91. Manceau A, Denis F, Garand G, Garaud P, Beutter P: [Infectious complications after surgery for hypopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas]. Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac; 2003 Sep;120(4):207-15
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  • [Transliterated title] Complications infectieuses après chirurgie carcinologique du pharyngo-larynx.
  • The procedures were performed under rigorous conditions of surgical asepsis and with prolonged antibiotic chemotherapy depending on the type of laryngectomy and past history of external radiotherapy.
  • Statistically significant factors were tumor stage, postoperative hematoma, postoperative lymphorrhea and, to a lesser degree, pharyngeal localization.
  • CONCLUSION: Our rate of infectious complications in oncologic pharyngeal and laryngeal surgery, which is low compared with data in the literature, emphasizes the importance of strict measures of surgical asepsis and prolonged antibiotic chemotherapy as is recommended for so-called contaminated surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / surgery. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Laryngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Laryngectomy / adverse effects. Surgical Wound Infection / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Female. Hematoma / complications. Hematoma / etiology. Humans. Lymphatic Diseases / complications. Lymphatic Diseases / etiology. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 13130296.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-438X
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales d'oto-laryngologie et de chirurgie cervico faciale : bulletin de la Société d'oto-laryngologie des hôpitaux de Paris
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
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92. Feuring-Buske M, Kneba M, Unterhalt M, Engert A, Gramatzki M, Hiller E, Trümper L, Brugger W, Ostermann H, Atzpodien J, Hallek M, Aulitzky E, Hiddemann W: IDEC-C2B8 (Rituximab) anti-CD20 antibody treatment in relapsed advanced-stage follicular lymphomas: results of a phase-II study of the German Low-Grade Lymphoma Study Group. Ann Hematol; 2000 Sep;79(9):493-500
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  • [Title] IDEC-C2B8 (Rituximab) anti-CD20 antibody treatment in relapsed advanced-stage follicular lymphomas: results of a phase-II study of the German Low-Grade Lymphoma Study Group.
  • The median time between primary diagnosis and study entry was 4.6 years (range 0.9-14.7 years).
  • Twenty-three patients tolerated the application of rituximab without adverse events; in 13 cases the infusion rate had to be reduced because of side effects; in two patients the application was stopped because of pharyngeal edema and anaphylactoid reaction.
  • Twenty grade-III/IV side effects were considered to be related to treatment: lymphocytopenia (3), granalocytopenia (1), thrombocytopenia (2), fever (1), hyperglycermia (1), venous thrombosis (1), syncope (1), plasmatic coagulation disorder (1), shortness of breath (2), photosensitivity (1), cardiac failure (1), chills (1), sepsis (1), tumor lysis (1), anemia (1), and pharyngeal edema (1).
  • Eight patients were not eligible for assessment of response because of non-follicular subtypes of low-grade lymphomas (n =6) or early termination of therapy at the first infusion because of severe side effects (n =2).
  • The median time to treatment progression (TTP) was 201 days (range 64-293 days), with five patients experiencing long-lasting remissions of 214-293 days duration.
  • Bulky disease (P=0.058) and/or bone-mar row involvement (P=0.046) were associated with poor response.
  • CONCLUSION: This study confirms the moderate treatment-related toxicity and the high antilymphoma activity of rituximab in patients with relapsed follicular lymphoma.
  • Further studies are needed to determine the role of rituximab in the first-line treatment of these disorders and its combination with conventional chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Follicular / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Recurrence. Rituximab. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11043420.001).
  • [ISSN] 0939-5555
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
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93. Nasr Ben Ammar C, Kochbati L, Lejri N, Chaouache K, Frikha H, Besbes M, Touati S, Ben Abdallah M, Maalej M: [Prognostic value of parapharyngeal extension in nasopharyngeal carcinoma]. Tunis Med; 2009 Dec;87(12):814-7
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  • [Transliterated title] Valeur pronostique de l'extension parapharyngéee dans les carcinomes nasopharyngés.
  • AIM: This study evaluated the prognostic value of the Para pharyngeal space involvement in nasopharyngeal carcinoma T 2 disease (UICC 1997 classification).
  • METHODS: From January 1997 and December2001; 32 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were examined by CT scan and according to the 1997 International Union Against Cancer (UICC) staging system, 15 had stage T2a M0 (G1) and 17 T2bM0(G2).
  • Both neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy were performed for advanced N disease and only radiotherapy for NO.
  • The completely clinical remission after chemotherapy was 12.5% (G1) and 53% (G2), partial remission was 25% (G1) and 35% (G2).
  • Disease free survival rates were 70% for G1 (T2a) and 48% for G2 (T2b).
  • Distant metastasis rates were 26% (G1) vs 6% (G2) and more likely in the presence of advanced N disease.
  • Five years overall survival was 78% (G1) T2a vs. 55% (G2) T2b.The N disease was correlated to metastasis as overall survival was 66.7% for N3 disease vs 85.7% for N0.
  • CONCLUSION: Parapharyngeal tumor involvement affects local and regional tumor failure.
  • Subclassification of T2 disease into T2a/T2b should have an impact on treatment strategies.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / mortality. Carcinoma / pathology. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / mortality. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Nasopharynx / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 20209847.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-4131
  • [Journal-full-title] La Tunisie médicale
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tunis Med
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Tunisia
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94. Dong XR, Zhang T, Fan L, Zhang S, Wu G: Parotid gland metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: case report and review of the literature. J Int Med Res; 2009 Nov-Dec;37(6):1994-9
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  • The current case report presents the history of a 41-year old male with the primary symptom of a right parotid gland mass who was diagnosed with NPC by histopathology in 2006 and was staged as having cT(3)N(2)M(0) disease (stage III, American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system, 2002).
  • Histopathological examination of a partial excision of the mass on the right parotid and the neoplasm in the pharynx nasalis revealed poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma.
  • The patient received radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy.
  • Grade 2 skin reaction, grade 2 oropharyngeal mucositis and grade 3 xerostomia were detected during treatment.
  • The patient achieved a complete clinical response by 1 month after treatment.
  • The primary symptom of parotid gland mass in patients with NPC is commonly misdiagnosed and a pathological analysis can be considered a reliable method for confirming diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Parotid Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Humans. Male. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 20146900.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-0605
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of international medical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Int. Med. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 20
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95. Hinerman RW, Morris CG, Amdur RJ, Lansford CD, Werning JW, Villaret DB, Mendenhall WM: Surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and pharynx. Am J Clin Oncol; 2006 Dec;29(6):613-21
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  • [Title] Surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and pharynx.
  • RESULTS: Five-year local-regional control rates according to site and pathologic American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage were: stage III larynx, 89% versus stage IVA larynx, 85% (P = 0.33); stage III oropharynx/hypopharynx, 76% versus stage IVA oropharynx/hypopharynx, 79% (P = 0.72).
  • Tumor control and survival will hopefully improve further with the addition of chemotherapy to postoperative radiation.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Laryngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17149000.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-453X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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96. Simon C, Goepfert H, Rosenthal DI, Roberts D, El-Naggar A, Old M, Diaz EM Jr, Myers JN: Presence of malignant tumor cells in persistent neck disease after radiotherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx is associated with poor survival. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2006 Apr;263(4):313-8
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  • [Title] Presence of malignant tumor cells in persistent neck disease after radiotherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx is associated with poor survival.
  • Non-surgical therapy consisting of external beam radiation with or without chemotherapy is an effective treatment for patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx with advanced neck disease (N2a or greater).
  • However, many of these patients have to undergo a neck dissection for clinically persistent regional disease.
  • It is reported that nearly 50% of the neck dissection specimens contain residual viable tumor cells that may indicate partial radiation failure and as a consequence poor survival.
  • In order to address the significance of this finding, we conducted a nonrandomized retrospective study, including 35 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy followed by either a radical or modified radical (RND/MRND) or a selective neck dissection (SND) for clinically persistent neck disease 6 weeks after completing therapy for stage III/IV SCC of the oropharynx (base of the tongue =15, tonsil =12, soft palate =7 and pharyngeal wall =1).
  • All neck dissection specimens were reviewed according to histological criteria indicating viable residual tumor.
  • We observed an increased relative risk (RR) for local and regional failures in the patient population with viable cancer cells in the post-irradiation neck specimens (RR=6.7 and 4.1, respectively).
  • The presence of malignant tumor cells in residual disease in the neck correlated with poor disease-specific and overall survival (P =0.03 and P =0.01, respectively).
  • Of note, the extent of neck dissection did not improve the disease-free or overall survival in this patient population (P =0.5 and P =0.6, respectively).
  • In conclusion, the presence of viable cancer cells in radiated neck nodes is a novel prognostic marker for disease-specific survival in patients treated for SCCs of the oropharynx with advanced neck disease and may serve as an identifier for patients who will benefit from post-treatment chemoprevention.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / mortality. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cell Survival. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neck Dissection. Neoplasm, Residual. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 16328403.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-4477
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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97. Liu S, Bugge TH, Leppla SH: Targeting of tumor cells by cell surface urokinase plasminogen activator-dependent anthrax toxin. J Biol Chem; 2001 May 25;276(21):17976-84
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeting of tumor cells by cell surface urokinase plasminogen activator-dependent anthrax toxin.
  • Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) binds pro-urokinase plasminogen activator (pro-uPA) and thereby localizes it near plasminogen, causing the generation of active uPA and plasmin on the cell surface. uPAR and uPA are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors and tumor cell lines, and expression of uPAR and uPA is highly correlated to tumor invasion and metastasis.
  • To exploit these characteristics in the design of tumor cell-selective cytotoxins, we constructed mutated anthrax toxin-protective antigen (PrAg) proteins in which the furin cleavage site is replaced by sequences cleaved specifically by uPA.
  • These uPA-targeted PrAg proteins were activated selectively on the surface of uPAR-expressing tumor cells in the presence of pro-uPA and plasminogen.
  • The activated PrAg proteins caused internalization of a recombinant cytotoxin, FP59, consisting of anthrax toxin lethal factor residues 1-254 fused to the ADP-ribosylation domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A, thereby killing the uPAR-expressing tumor cells.
  • The activation and cytotoxicity of these uPA-targeted PrAg proteins were strictly dependent on the integrity of the tumor cell surface-associated plasminogen activation system.
  • We also constructed a mutated PrAg protein that selectively killed tissue plasminogen activator-expressing cells.
  • These mutated PrAg proteins may be useful as new therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, Bacterial. Bacterial Toxins / metabolism. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Death / drug effects. Drug Delivery Systems. Humans. Mice. Mutation. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / metabolism. Neoplasms / pathology. Plasminogen / metabolism. Recombinant Proteins / metabolism. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 11278833.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9258
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of biological chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biol. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Bacterial; 0 / Bacterial Toxins; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / anthrax toxin; 9001-91-6 / Plasminogen; 99149-95-8 / saruplase; EC 3.4.21.73 / Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator
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98. Hambek M, Solbach C, Schnuerch HG, Roller M, Stegmueller M, Sterner-Kock A, Kiefer J, Knecht R: Tumor necrosis factor alpha sensitizes low epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expressing carcinomas for anti-EGFR therapy. Cancer Res; 2001 Feb 1;61(3):1045-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tumor necrosis factor alpha sensitizes low epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expressing carcinomas for anti-EGFR therapy.
  • Analysis of 1,060 xenotransplants derived from cancer cell lines as wel as spontaneously occurring tumors from the larynx, pharynx, mammary gland, uterine cervix, and vulva revealed that tumor regression induced by treatment with monoclonal antibodies (EMD 55900 and EMD 72000 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) could be enhanced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) treatment in vivo.
  • Moreover, tumor that primarily do not respond to antibody treatment can be made suscep tible by additional TNF-alpha treatment.
  • To investigate the in vivo effects of monoclonal antibodies, we treated tumors derived from cell lines (A431 and Detroit 562) as well as spontaneously occurring squamous cell carci nomas and adenocarcinomas (transplanted on NMRI-nu/nu mice) gener ally with EMD 55900 (40 microg/g mouse) and its humanized version EMD 72000 (40 microg/g mouse).
  • When treated with EMD 55900 and EMD 72000 carcinomas with an EGFR concentration of > or = 70 fmol/mg protein showed significant reduction in tumor size compared with untreated controls.
  • The degree of tumor regression correlated with the EGFR concentration of the tumor.
  • In mice treated with TNF-alpha (0.5 microg/g mouse) and EMD 55900 72000 simultaneously, we observed enhanced antitumor effects up to complete tumor eradication.
  • Carcinomas with an EGFR concentration <70 fmol/mg protein could be made susceptible to treatment with EMD 55900 and EMD 72000 by simultaneous treatment with TNF-alpha, resulting in a significant reduction in tumor size.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / immunology. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Breast Neoplasms / immunology. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Breast Neoplasms / therapy. Cell Division / drug effects. Drug Synergism. Female. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / immunology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / metabolism. Laryngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / immunology. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / metabolism. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / immunology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / metabolism. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / therapy. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 11221831.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
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99. Sanchez-Prieto R, Rojas JM, Taya Y, Gutkind JS: A role for the p38 mitogen-acitvated protein kinase pathway in the transcriptional activation of p53 on genotoxic stress by chemotherapeutic agents. Cancer Res; 2000 May 1;60(9):2464-72
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in sensing damaged DNA and orchestrating the consequent cellular responses.
  • Moreover, inhibition of the p38 MAPK diminished the apoptotic fraction of cells exposed to chemotherapeutic agents and increased cell survival, thus suggesting a role for p38 activation in the apoptotic response to genotoxic stress when elicited by drugs used in cancer therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases / physiology. Transcriptional Activation. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] 3T3 Cells. Animals. Apoptosis. Blotting, Western. Cisplatin / pharmacology. DNA Damage. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Doxorubicin / pharmacology. Flow Cytometry. Fluorescent Antibody Technique. Genes, Reporter. Mice. Phosphorylation. Plasmids. Stress, Physiological. Time Factors. Transfection. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases

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  • (PMID = 10811125.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.11.24 / p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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100. Squarize CH, Castilho RM, Gutkind JS: Chemoprevention and treatment of experimental Cowden's disease by mTOR inhibition with rapamycin. Cancer Res; 2008 Sep 1;68(17):7066-72
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Chemoprevention and treatment of experimental Cowden's disease by mTOR inhibition with rapamycin.
  • Cowden's disease is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of multiple mucocutaneous lesions and benign tumors, and enhanced cancer predisposition.
  • Most Cowden's disease patients harbor inactivating mutations in the PTEN tumor suppressor gene which encodes a lipid phosphatase, PTEN, which restrains the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt signaling pathway.
  • We observed that the epithelial-specific deletion of Pten in mice causes multiple hyperproliferative and tumor lesions that strikingly resemble Cowden's disease.
  • This animal model system provided an opportunity to explore novel therapeutic approaches in Cowden's disease.
  • Furthermore, when administered before disease manifestation, rapamycin can halt the development of Cowden's disease-like lesions, thereby prolonging animal survival.
  • These findings suggest that mTOR inhibition with rapamycin may represent a suitable therapeutic option for the chemoprevention and treatment of Cowden disease patients and others tumor syndromes that involve defective PTEN function.
  • [MeSH-major] Hamartoma Syndrome, Multiple / drug therapy. Hamartoma Syndrome, Multiple / prevention & control. Protein Kinases / drug effects. Sirolimus / pharmacology






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