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1. Stoner J, Martin G, O'Mara K, Ehlers J, Tomlanovich M: Amiodarone and bretylium in the treatment of hypothermic ventricular fibrillation in a canine model. Acad Emerg Med; 2003 Mar;10(3):187-91
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  • [Title] Amiodarone and bretylium in the treatment of hypothermic ventricular fibrillation in a canine model.
  • Despite mixed experimental data, some authors view bretylium as the drug of choice in hypothermic VF.
  • OBJECTIVES: To compare defibrillation rates from hypothermic VF after drug therapy with amiodarone, bretylium, and placebo.
  • Thirty anesthetized dogs were mechanically ventilated and instrumented to monitor coronary perfusion pressure (CPP), rectal core temperature, and electrocardiogram (ECG).
  • Ventricular fibrillation was induced as needed with a transthoracic AC current.
  • Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was defined as a sustainable ECG rhythm generating a corresponding arterial pressure tracing lasting a minimum of 15 minutes.
  • RESULTS: CPR was adequate based on CPP > 15 mm Hg in all animals.
  • Mean (+/-SD) CPP was 35.3 +/- 18.8 mm Hg with an overall lower trend in the amiodarone group (p = 0.06).
  • [MeSH-major] Amiodarone / therapeutic use. Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / therapeutic use. Bretylium Compounds / therapeutic use. Ventricular Fibrillation / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Dogs. Hypothermia, Induced. Random Allocation

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  • (PMID = 12615580.001).
  • [ISSN] 1069-6563
  • [Journal-full-title] Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acad Emerg Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents; 0 / Bretylium Compounds; N3RQ532IUT / Amiodarone; RZR75EQ2KJ / bretylium
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2. Takahashi M, Yamamoto J, Aoyama Y, Soejima Y, Akiba D, Nishizawa S: Efficacy of multi-staged surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy for successful treatment of atypical choroid plexus papilloma in an infant: case report. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo); 2009 Oct;49(10):484-7
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  • [Title] Efficacy of multi-staged surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy for successful treatment of atypical choroid plexus papilloma in an infant: case report.
  • A 12-month-old girl presented with a rare atypical choroid plexus papilloma manifesting as conscious disturbance and vomiting.
  • Only partial removal of the tumor was performed because of excessive intraoperative hemorrhage at the first surgery.
  • The histological diagnosis was atypical choroid plexus papilloma.
  • To control the intraoperative hemorrhage, embolization of the feeding artery was performed before the second surgery, and the tumor was macroscopically totally removed.
  • MR imaging disclosed a small residual tumor which showed relatively rapid growth.
  • Two months later, MR imaging showed a cystic lesion with a small nodule adjacent to the midbrain, indicating dissemination of the tumor.
  • The lesion was successfully treated with chemotherapy.
  • Atypical choroid plexus papilloma was recently defined in the classification of the World Health Organization, so clinical data based on these criteria are lacking to establish the therapeutic strategy.
  • Total resection of atypical choroid plexus papilloma is the most reliable treatment at present.
  • However, postoperative chemotherapy should be considered for recurrence or dissemination.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain / surgery. Lateral Ventricles / surgery. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / drug therapy. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cerebral Arteries / pathology. Cerebral Arteries / physiopathology. Craniotomy. Embolization, Therapeutic. Female. Humans. Infant. Intraoperative Complications / etiology. Intraoperative Complications / physiopathology. Intraoperative Complications / therapy. Lethargy / etiology. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology. Neurosurgical Procedures. Postoperative Hemorrhage / etiology. Postoperative Hemorrhage / physiopathology. Postoperative Hemorrhage / therapy. Reoperation. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Ventriculostomy. Vomiting / etiology

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  • (PMID = 19855149.001).
  • [ISSN] 1349-8029
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurologia medico-chirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurol. Med. Chir. (Tokyo)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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3. Wrede B, Hasselblatt M, Peters O, Thall PF, Kutluk T, Moghrabi A, Mahajan A, Rutkowski S, Diez B, Wang X, Pietsch T, Kortmann RD, Paulus W, Jeibmann A, Wolff JEA: Atypical choroid plexus papilloma: clinical experience in the CPT-SIOP-2000 study. J Neurooncol; 2009 Dec;95(3):383-392
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  • [Title] Atypical choroid plexus papilloma: clinical experience in the CPT-SIOP-2000 study.
  • Atypical choroid plexus papilloma (APP) represents a novel intermediate-grade subtype of choroid plexus tumor (CPT), the clinical outcome of which has not been described yet.
  • We present the first analysis of a group of APP patients enrolled in the ongoing CPT-SIOP-2000 study of CPTs.
  • A worldwide registration and a randomized trial for those patients who require chemotherapy started in 2000.
  • After surgery, patients who had undergone complete resection were observed, whereas patients with incompletely resected or metastasized APP were treated with six chemotherapy courses (etoposide and vincristine, combined with either carboplatin or cyclophosphamide).
  • Of the 106 patients with a centrally confirmed CPT histology, 30 had APP, 42 CPP and 34 CPC.
  • APP patients were significantly younger (median = 0.7 years) than patients with CPP or CPC (both medians = 2.3 years).
  • Complete resection was achieved in 68 (64%) patients (79% in CPP, 63% in APP, and 47% in CPC).
  • Metastases were present at diagnosis in 17% of APP patients, 5% of CPP patients, and 21% of CPC patients.
  • All nine APP patients who received postoperative chemotherapy showed an early response after two cycles: two had complete remission, four had partial response, and three had stable disease.
  • In the treatment group, one patient with a metastasized tumor and incompletely resected APP died.
  • While APP was defined histologically, median percentages of both the Ki-67/MIB-1 proliferation marker and the p53 tumor suppressor protein increased across the three histological subtypes (from CPP to APP and then CPC), suggesting that the subtypes comprise an ordinal categorization of increasingly severe CPT tumors.
  • This ordering was reiterated by clinical outcome in the 92 patients treated per the study protocol, with 5-year EFS rates of 92% in 39 CPP patients, 83% in 24 APP patients, and 28% in 29 CPC patients.
  • APP responded favorably to chemotherapy.
  • The intermediate position of APP between CPP and CPC was supported by the clinical data.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / drug therapy. Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / mortality. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / drug therapy. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Gadolinium. Humans. Infant. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Registries. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19543851.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7373
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00500890
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA083932
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; AU0V1LM3JT / Gadolinium; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
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4. Vercellini P, Viganò P, Somigliana E, Abbiati A, Barbara G, Fedele L: Medical, surgical and alternative treatments for chronic pelvic pain in women: a descriptive review. Gynecol Endocrinol; 2009 Apr;25(4):208-21
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  • [Title] Medical, surgical and alternative treatments for chronic pelvic pain in women: a descriptive review.
  • Several causes of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) are recognised, but in many women a definite diagnosis cannot be made.
  • Few randomised controlled trials on treatment of CPP have been conducted.
  • The aim of this descriptive review is to describe the management of CPP, which can focus on treating the pain itself, the underlying cause, or both.
  • Combination drug therapy with medications with different mechanisms of action may improve therapeutic results.
  • Several alternative non-invasive treatments have been proposed including exercise programmes, cognitive and behavioural medicine, physical therapy, dietary modification, massage and acupuncture.
  • Treatment of CPP, generally, requires acceptance of the concept of managing rather than curing symptoms.
  • [MeSH-major] Complementary Therapies. Pelvic Pain / drug therapy. Pelvic Pain / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Chronic Disease. Female. Humans

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  • (PMID = 19296329.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-0766
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Endocrinol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 98
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5. Ortega-Martínez M, Cabezudo-Artero JM, Fernández-Portales I, Pimentel JJ, Gómez de Tejada R: Diffuse leptomeningeal seeding from benign choroid plexus papilloma. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2007 Dec;149(12):1229-36; discussion 1236-7
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  • [Title] Diffuse leptomeningeal seeding from benign choroid plexus papilloma.
  • Choroid plexus papillomas (CPP) are rare intracranial tumours with a favourable long-term outcome after surgical excision.
  • Although they are histologically benign, local recurrences may occasionally occur, but leptomeningeal dissemination is exceptional.
  • We report an unusual example of a fourth ventricle choroid plexus papilloma with diffuse leptomeningeal seeding.
  • Treatment with systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy was ineffective in this patient.
  • We review the literature concerning leptomeningeal dissemination of benign choroid plexus papillomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms / surgery. Fourth Ventricle / surgery. Meningeal Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Seeding. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Biopsy. Disease Progression. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Ki-67 Antigen / analysis. Laminectomy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Meninges / pathology. Reoperation. S100 Proteins / analysis

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  • (PMID = 17924056.001).
  • [ISSN] 0942-0940
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / S100 Proteins
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6. Velázquez-Sánchez C, Ferragud A, Hernández-Rabaza V, Nácher A, Merino V, Cardá M, Murga J, Canales JJ: The dopamine uptake inhibitor 3 alpha-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)metoxy]-tropane reduces cocaine-induced early-gene expression, locomotor activity, and conditioned reward. Neuropsychopharmacology; 2009 Nov;34(12):2497-507
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  • Benztropine (BZT) analogs, a family of high-affinity dopamine transporter ligands, are molecules that exhibit pharmacological and behavioral characteristics predictive of significant therapeutic potential in cocaine addiction.
  • Here, we examined in mice the effects of 3 alpha-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)metoxy]-tropane (AHN-1055) on motor activity, conditioned place preference (CPP) and c-Fos expression in the striatum.
  • Interaction assays showed that cocaine's ability to stimulate locomotor activity was decreased by AHN-1055 treatment, but not by treatment with D-amphetamine.
  • Remarkably, the BZT analog dose-dependently blocked cocaine-induced CPP without producing CPP when given alone, and blocked in conditioned mice cocaine-stimulated early-gene activation in the nucleus accumbens and dorsomedial striatum.
  • These observations provide evidence that AHN-1055 does not behave as a classical psychomotor stimulant and that some of its properties, including attenuation of cocaine-induced striatal c-Fos expression, locomotor stimulation, and CPP, support its candidacy, and that of structurally related molecules, as possible pharmacotherapies in cocaine addiction.
  • [MeSH-major] Benztropine / analogs & derivatives. Cocaine-Related Disorders / drug therapy. Conditioning, Classical / drug effects. Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors / pharmacology. Gene Expression / drug effects. Motor Activity / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Brain / drug effects. Brain / metabolism. Cocaine / pharmacology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Male. Mice. Nomifensine / pharmacology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos / metabolism. Reward. Space Perception / drug effects. Stereotyped Behavior / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 19606084.001).
  • [ISSN] 1740-634X
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuropsychopharmacology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors; 0 / N-methyl-3-(bis(4'-fluorophenyl)methoxy)tropane; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos; 1LGS5JRP31 / Nomifensine; 1NHL2J4X8K / Benztropine; I5Y540LHVR / Cocaine
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7. Steiner T, Pilz J, Schellinger P, Wirtz R, Friederichs V, Aschoff A, Hacke W: Multimodal online monitoring in middle cerebral artery territory stroke. Stroke; 2001 Nov;32(11):2500-6
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  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with large middle cerebral artery infarction and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) who are undergoing invasive intensive care therapy require technical monitoring.
  • Furthermore, the effects of what is considered to be standard antiedema medical treatment are not fully understood.
  • METHODS: ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and partial brain tissue oxygen pressure (PbrO(2)) were continuously measured within the white matter of the frontal lobe unilaterally or bilaterally.
  • We analyzed the effects of antiedema drugs and looked for pattern changes in the PbrO(2) before transtentorial herniation in patients in whom this could not be prevented.
  • A total of 297 antiedema drug administrations were analyzed in 11 patients.
  • Hyper-HAES and mannitol were most often associated with an increase in CPP and PbrO(2), whereas the use of thiopental and tromethamine led to negative or contrary effects, although ICP was decreased in every case.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Multimodal monitoring can be used to monitor antiedema drug effects.
  • Furthermore, this method might help to optimize the timing of invasive therapy in space-occupying infarction.
  • [MeSH-major] Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery / drug therapy. Monitoring, Physiologic / methods. Online Systems
  • [MeSH-minor] Brain Edema / drug therapy. Feasibility Studies. Frontal Lobe / chemistry. Frontal Lobe / physiopathology. Humans. Intracranial Hypertension. Intracranial Pressure / drug effects. Oxygen / analysis. Partial Pressure

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  • (PMID = 11692007.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4628
  • [Journal-full-title] Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stroke
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] S88TT14065 / Oxygen
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8. Armstead WM, Kiessling JW, Kofke WA, Vavilala MS: SNP improves cerebral hemodynamics during normotension but fails to prevent sex dependent impaired cerebral autoregulation during hypotension after brain injury. Brain Res; 2010 May 12;1330:142-50
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  • [Title] SNP improves cerebral hemodynamics during normotension but fails to prevent sex dependent impaired cerebral autoregulation during hypotension after brain injury.
  • Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of morbidity in children and boys are disproportionately represented.
  • Previous studies show that adrenomedullin, a cerebrovasodilator, prevented sex dependent impairment of autoregulation during hypotension after piglet fluid percussion brain injury (FPI).
  • Reductions in pial artery diameter, cortical CBF, and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) concomitant with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) after FPI were greater in male compared to female piglets during normotension which was blunted by SNP.
  • SNP did not prevent reductions in CBF, CPP or autoregulatory index during combined hypotension and FPI in either sex.
  • These data suggest that therapies directed at a purely hemodynamic increase in CPP will fail to improve outcome during combined TBI and hypotension.

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20298682.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-6240
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD057355-03; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD057355; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD57355; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD057355-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cardiovascular Agents; 169D1260KM / Nitroprusside; EC 2.7.11.24 / Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS189580; NLM/ PMC2860054
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9. Serrano-Fabiá A, Albert-Marí A, Almenar-Cubells D, Jiménez-Torres NV: Multidisciplinary system for detecting medication errors in antineoplastic chemotherapy. J Oncol Pharm Pract; 2010 Jun;16(2):105-12
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Medication Errors.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Multidisciplinary system for detecting medication errors in antineoplastic chemotherapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyze medication errors (MEs) in a multidisciplinary system with a Computerized Pharmacotherapy Process (CPP) in cancer patients.
  • DESIGN: A longitudinal, prospective 2-year (January 2003 -to December 2004) cohort study was made in adult patients administered antineoplastic treatment in Services of Oncology and Haematology.
  • MEs were identified by double cross-validation of each stage of the pharmacotherapeutic process (prescription, preparation, dispensing, administration, and follow-up) carried out by the multidisciplinary team (physician, pharmacist, nurse) with CPP assistance.
  • VARIABLES: Number of MEs per 1000 patient-days, percentage according to the stage of the pharmacotherapeutic process and the severity of intercepted ME (scored from 1 = no damage to the patient, to 5 = patient death).
  • RESULTS: A total of 1311 patients were receiving treatment, and MEs were identified in 225.
  • Out of a total of 13,158 patient-days, 276 MEs were detected, equivalent to 20.9 MEs per 1000 patient-days; of these, 16.8 MEs per 1000 patient-days (80%) were intercepted and did not affect any patient.
  • The detected ME distribution according to pharmacotherapeutic stage was: prescription 75.7%, preparation 21.0%, dispensing 1.8%, administration 1.1%, and follow-up 0.4%.
  • The system intercepted 98.9% of all MEs with severity >or=3 (MEs with a potential for causing patient damage).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The multidisciplinary system with a well-established CPP detects 20.9 MEs per 1000 patient-days and intercepts 98.8% of all MEs with a potential for causing patient damage.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Hospitals, University / standards. Interprofessional Relations. Medication Errors / prevention & control. Medication Systems, Hospital / standards

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  • (PMID = 19617304.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-092X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oncology pharmacy practice : official publication of the International Society of Oncology Pharmacy Practitioners
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Oncol Pharm Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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10. Huang SJ, Hong WC, Han YY, Chen YS, Wen CS, Tsai YS, Tu YK: Clinical outcome of severe head injury using three different ICP and CPP protocol-driven therapies. J Clin Neurosci; 2006 Oct;13(8):818-22
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  • [Title] Clinical outcome of severe head injury using three different ICP and CPP protocol-driven therapies.
  • In the past 5 years, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) management has become the standard in the treatment of severe head injuries.
  • Guidelines published in 2000 suggest that CPP should be at least 70 mmHg; however, there is still debate about the optimal CPP.
  • The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of these three widely used therapies: (i) intracranial pressure (ICP) targeted;.
  • (ii) CPP-targeted with CPP >70 mmHg; and (iii) modified CPP-targeted (mCPP) therapy with CPP >60 mmHg.
  • Data, including patient age, sex, initial Glasgow Coma Scale, ICP, CPP, fluid status, amount of mannitol and vasopressor used, daily fluid intake and output, complications and clinical results, were collected from 213 patients with severe head injuries over a 12-year period.
  • Patients were categorized into three groups (ICP, CPP, mCPP) according to the treatment protocol used.
  • The mortality rate was 28.6%, 14.3% and 13.5% in the ICP, CPP, and mCPP groups, respectively.
  • Highest intake/output ratio, amount of vasopressor used and pulmonary complications were seen in the CPP patients.
  • Although CPP-targeted therapy is the most recommended therapeutic protocol, our data show that patients treated with modified CPP-target therapy with CPP >60 mmHg have better clinical outcomes and fewer complications.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain / blood supply. Cerebrovascular Circulation. Craniocerebral Trauma / therapy. Intracranial Hypertension / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Barbiturates / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Hyperventilation. Intracranial Pressure / drug effects. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16908157.001).
  • [ISSN] 0967-5868
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Barbiturates; WQ92Y2793G / barbituric acid
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11. Wrede B, Liu P, Wolff JE: Chemotherapy improves the survival of patients with choroid plexus carcinoma: a meta-analysis of individual cases with choroid plexus tumors. J Neurooncol; 2007 Dec;85(3):345-51
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Chemotherapy improves the survival of patients with choroid plexus carcinoma: a meta-analysis of individual cases with choroid plexus tumors.
  • BACKGROUND: Choroid plexus carcinomas (CPC) are rare brain tumors with a dismal prognosis.
  • Although the role of surgery has been well established, the question of whether chemotherapy improves the prognosis is still under discussion.
  • METHODS: We created a database of all cases of choroid plexus tumors (CPT) reported in the literature up to the year 2004 to determine prognostic factors and different therapeutic modalities.
  • RESULTS: Of 857 documented cases of CPT (median patient age at diagnosis, 3 years), 347 were CPC, 15 atypical choroid plexus papilloma (APP), and 495 choroid plexus papilloma (CPP).
  • The 104 CPC patients who received chemotherapy had a statistically better survival than those without chemotherapy (P = .0004).
  • When subgroups were defined by radiation treatment, chemotherapy remained beneficial in the subgroup of nonirradiated tumors (P = .0001).
  • The benefit of chemotherapy was also significant when the analysis was restricted to the subgroup of patients with less than completely resected CPC (2-year overall survival (OS) 54.8 +/- 7% (standard deviation (SD) vs. 24.4 +/- 7%, P < .0001) and when this subgroup was further divided into smaller subgroups.
  • Likewise, in a multivariate analysis, chemotherapy was highly significantly linked to better prognosis (P = .0001).
  • CONCLUSION: Patients with less than completely resected CPC should receive chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Databases, Bibliographic. Databases, Factual. Female. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17576522.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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12. Celik T, Kayir H, Ceyhan M, Demirtaş S, Coşar A, Uzbay IT: CPP and amlodipine alter the decrease in basal acetylcholine and choline release by audiogenic stimulus in hippocampus of ethanol-withdrawn rats in vivo. Brain Res Bull; 2004 Sep 30;64(3):243-9
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] CPP and amlodipine alter the decrease in basal acetylcholine and choline release by audiogenic stimulus in hippocampus of ethanol-withdrawn rats in vivo.
  • Effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and Ca2+ channel antagonists on extracellular acetylcholine and choline release in the hippocampus of ethanol-withdrawn rats were investigated by in vivo microdialysis.
  • Either an NMDA receptor antagonist (+/-)-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP) or a calcium channel antagonist amlodipine was administered, and 15 min later, an audiogenic stimulus (100 dB, 1 min) was applied to rats.
  • CPP (15 mg/kg) and amlodipine (20 mg/kg) reversed the decrement in acetylcholine and increment in choline release in EW rats.
  • [MeSH-major] Acetylcholine / metabolism. Amlodipine / pharmacology. Ethanol / adverse effects. Hippocampus / drug effects. Piperazines / pharmacology. Substance Withdrawal Syndrome / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Acoustic Stimulation / adverse effects. Alcohol-Induced Disorders, Nervous System / drug therapy. Alcohol-Induced Disorders, Nervous System / metabolism. Alcohol-Induced Disorders, Nervous System / physiopathology. Animals. Body Weight / drug effects. Calcium Channel Blockers / pharmacology. Choline / metabolism. Disease Models, Animal. Down-Regulation / drug effects. Down-Regulation / physiology. Drug Interactions / physiology. Epilepsy, Reflex / chemically induced. Epilepsy, Reflex / drug therapy. Epilepsy, Reflex / physiopathology. Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists / pharmacology. Glutamic Acid / metabolism. Male. Microdialysis. Neural Pathways / drug effects. Neural Pathways / metabolism. Neural Pathways / physiopathology. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Seizures / chemically induced. Seizures / drug therapy. Seizures / physiopathology. Synaptic Transmission / drug effects. Synaptic Transmission / physiology

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  • (PMID = 15464861.001).
  • [ISSN] 0361-9230
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain research bulletin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain Res. Bull.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Calcium Channel Blockers; 0 / Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists; 0 / Piperazines; 100828-16-8 / 3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid; 1J444QC288 / Amlodipine; 3K9958V90M / Ethanol; 3KX376GY7L / Glutamic Acid; N91BDP6H0X / Choline; N9YNS0M02X / Acetylcholine
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13. Chen JH, Liang J, Wang GB, Han JS, Cui CL: Repeated 2 Hz peripheral electrical stimulations suppress morphine-induced CPP and improve spatial memory ability in rats. Exp Neurol; 2005 Aug;194(2):550-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MORPHINE .

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  • [Title] Repeated 2 Hz peripheral electrical stimulations suppress morphine-induced CPP and improve spatial memory ability in rats.
  • Our previous studies have shown that 2 Hz peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) can suppress morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in the rat, although the mechanisms remain unclear.
  • Since CPP involves the mechanism of learning and memory, it is rational to ask whether the suppressive effect of repeated 2 Hz PES on morphine-induced CPP is due to an impairment of the function of spatial learning and memory.
  • Rats were trained with 4 mg/kg morphine, i.p. for 4 days to establish the CPP.
  • Twenty-four hours after the CPP testing, they were given PES at 2 Hz once a day for 1, 3 or 5 days, followed by another CPP testing.
  • The results showed that (1) the morphine-induced CPP was significantly inhibited by 3 or 5 consecutive sessions, but not by single session of 2 Hz PES. (2) A test of spatial leaning and memory ability using the Morris water maze task revealed that 2 Hz PES per se exhibited a promoting, rather than a deteriorating effect on the ability of spatial memory. (3) 2 Hz PES by itself produced a moderate yet significant CPP.
  • The results imply that (a) a low frequency PES can produce a rewarding effect as revealed by the CPP testing, which may account, at least in part, for its suppressive effect on morphine induced CPP, (b) the suppressive effect of PES on morphine induced CPP is not due to a deteriorating effect on the ability of spatial memory.
  • [MeSH-major] Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Electroacupuncture. Maze Learning / drug effects. Memory Disorders / therapy. Morphine Dependence / therapy. Substance Withdrawal Syndrome / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Brain / drug effects. Brain / physiopathology. Disease Models, Animal. Male. Morphine / adverse effects. Narcotics / adverse effects. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Recovery of Function / physiology. Reward. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15890338.001).
  • [ISSN] 0014-4886
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Neurol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Narcotics; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine
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14. Ratanalert S, Phuenpathom N, Saeheng S, Oearsakul T, Sripairojkul B, Hirunpat S: ICP threshold in CPP management of severe head injury patients. Surg Neurol; 2004 May;61(5):429-34; discussion 434-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] ICP threshold in CPP management of severe head injury patients.
  • BACKGROUND: Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is significantly associated with high mortality rate in severe head injury (SHI) patients.
  • METHODS: Treatment protocol in this study consisted of therapeutic maneuvers designed to maximize cerebral profusion pressure (CPP) and control ICP.
  • Twenty-seven patients with severe head injury and intracranial hypertension (ICP >or=20 mm Hg) were enrolled and fourteen cases were allocated to the group of ICP threshold >or=25 mm Hg.
  • Logistic regression identified the presence of basal cisterns on the initial computed tomography (CT) scan as a significant predictor of good outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain / blood supply. Craniocerebral Trauma / complications. Intracranial Hypertension / etiology. Intracranial Hypertension / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Algorithms. Cerebral Hemorrhage, Traumatic / diagnosis. Cerebral Hemorrhage, Traumatic / drug therapy. Cerebral Hemorrhage, Traumatic / etiology. Combined Modality Therapy. Diuretics, Osmotic / therapeutic use. Glasgow Coma Scale. Humans. Mannitol / therapeutic use. Oxygen / therapeutic use. Prospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 15120212.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-3019
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Diuretics, Osmotic; 3OWL53L36A / Mannitol; S88TT14065 / Oxygen
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15. Zheng PZ, Zhao CJ, Du YZ, Chen SJ, Chen Z, Zhang J, Zhang QH, Wang KK: [Establishment of CPP-SOM integrated cDNA microarray technology]. Zhonghua Yi Xue Yi Chuan Xue Za Zhi; 2004 Oct;21(5):422-5

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Establishment of CPP-SOM integrated cDNA microarray technology].
  • OBJECTIVE: To get an insight into the molecular mechanisms of diseases development and targeted therapy at the transcriptome level and search for potential therapeutic targets.
  • METHODS: The present researchers established a cDNA microarray platform and applied component plane presentation integrated self-organizing map (CPP-SOM) to the microarray data obtained from a differentiation model, all trans retinoic acid-induced differentiation in NB4 cells.
  • By CPP-SOM, the researchers were able to not only well classify the regulated genes into functionally distinct categories but also depict transcriptional changes throughout the process of the development of diseases or drug treatment.
  • CONCLUSION: The platform has proven to be steady and reliable, and the CPP-SOM could serve as an important and good tool for analysis of microarray data.
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 15476161.001).
  • [ISSN] 1003-9406
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua yi xue yi chuan xue za zhi = Zhonghua yixue yichuanxue zazhi = Chinese journal of medical genetics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Yi Xue Yi Chuan Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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16. Valencak J, Dietrich W, Raderer M, Dieckmann K, Prayer D, Hainfellner JA, Marosi C: Evidence of therapeutic efficacy of CCNU in recurrent choroid plexus papilloma. J Neurooncol; 2000 Sep;49(3):263-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LOMUSTINE .

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  • [Title] Evidence of therapeutic efficacy of CCNU in recurrent choroid plexus papilloma.
  • A pregnant 33-year old woman developed nystagmus and cerebellar ataxia.
  • A tumor in the roof of the fourth ventricle was diagnosed.
  • The tumor was subtotally removed using microneurosurgical techniques.
  • The histopathological diagnosis was choroid plexus papilloma (CPP).
  • Twenty-one months later, the tumor recurred and was reoperated.
  • Histologically the tumor displayed now increased mitotic activity and pleomorphism.
  • Radiation therapy of the neuroaxis was performed.
  • Within 59 months, the CPP recurred 3 more times with neuroradiological evidence of extensive spinal seeding.
  • After several palliative irradiations, including 2 gamma-knife boosts, the patient was referred to chemotherapy.
  • The course of disease in our patient provides evidence for therapeutic efficacy of CCNU in recurrent CPP.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lomustine / therapeutic use. Papilloma / drug therapy. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Seeding. Pregnancy. Reoperation

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  • (PMID = 11212906.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 7BRF0Z81KG / Lomustine
  • [Number-of-references] 30
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17. Takamatsu Y, Yamamoto H, Ogai Y, Hagino Y, Markou A, Ikeda K: Fluoxetine as a potential pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine dependence: studies in mice. Ann N Y Acad Sci; 2006 Aug;1074:295-302
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Fluoxetine as a potential pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine dependence: studies in mice.
  • The monoamine transporters are the main targets of psychostimulant drugs, including methamphetamine (METH) and cocaine.
  • Interestingly, the rewarding effects of cocaine are retained in dopamine transporter (DAT) knockout (KO) mice, while serotonin transporter (SERT) and DAT double KO mice do not exhibit conditioned place preference (CPP) to cocaine.
  • ) CPP and locomotor sensitization to 1 mg/kg METH (i.p.) in C57BL/6J mice.
  • Fluoxetine treatment before both the conditioning and preference tests abolished METH CPP.
  • A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that METH CPP tended to be lower in mice pretreated with fluoxetine before the preference test than in control mice pretreated with saline before the preference test.
  • These results suggest that fluoxetine, a widely used medication for depression, may be also a useful tool for treating METH dependence.
  • [MeSH-major] Amphetamine-Related Disorders / drug therapy. Dopamine Agents / toxicity. Fluoxetine / therapeutic use. Methamphetamine / toxicity. Motor Activity / drug effects. Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 17105925.001).
  • [ISSN] 0077-8923
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R01 DA11946
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dopamine Agents; 0 / Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors; 01K63SUP8D / Fluoxetine; 44RAL3456C / Methamphetamine
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18. Karim A, Fowler M, McLaren B, Cardenas R, Patwardhan R, Nanda A: Concomitant choroid plexus papillomas involving the third and fourth ventricles: A case report and review of the literature. Clin Neurol Neurosurg; 2006 Sep;108(6):586-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Concomitant choroid plexus papillomas involving the third and fourth ventricles: A case report and review of the literature.
  • Choroid plexus papillomas (CPP) are histopathologically benign and rare central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms arising from the epithelium of the choroid plexus.
  • Third ventricular CPP are uncommon.
  • In this study, we present a case of a 66-year-old woman with complaints of progressive confusion, lethargy, and weakness who was found to have concomitant third and fourth ventricular masses on imaging studies.
  • Pathology from the biopsy and both resections was benign CPP.
  • Multifocal concomitant CPP is rare.
  • Concomitant CPPs may be secondary to mere coincidental tumor occurrence or to biologic seeding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a primary CPP despite otherwise benign histopathology.
  • The primary treatment for CPP is surgical resection.
  • Post-operative chemotherapy or radiation for CPP is of controversial benefit.
  • [MeSH-major] Fourth Ventricle. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / pathology. Third Ventricle

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  • (PMID = 15963638.001).
  • [ISSN] 0303-8467
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical neurology and neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Neurol Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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19. Ramond A, Sartorius E, Mousseau M, Ribuot C, Joyeux-Faure M: Erythropoietin pretreatment protects against acute chemotherapy toxicity in isolated rat hearts. Exp Biol Med (Maywood); 2008 Jan;233(1):76-83
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .

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  • [Title] Erythropoietin pretreatment protects against acute chemotherapy toxicity in isolated rat hearts.
  • The use of chemotherapeutic agents, such as anthracycline or trastuzumab, in oncology is limited by their cardiac toxicity.
  • Doxorubicin exposure decreased left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP; approximately -40% of baseline) and increased end diastolic pressure (EDP; approximately +390% of baseline) and coronary perfusion pressure (CPP; approximately +70% of baseline).
  • Trastuzumab exposure increased CPP and EDP (approximately +70% of baseline for the both) without affecting LVDP.
  • Prior rhEPO treatment significantly prevented doxorubicin-induced deleterious effects on LVDP, EDP, and VT/VF incidence. rhEPO administration also prevented trastuzumab-induced deleterious effects on CPP and EDP.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / toxicity. Antineoplastic Agents / toxicity. Doxorubicin / toxicity. Erythropoietin / therapeutic use. Heart / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Blood Pressure / drug effects. In Vitro Techniques. Protective Agents / therapeutic use. Rats. Recombinant Proteins. Trastuzumab. Ventricular Fibrillation / chemically induced. Ventricular Fibrillation / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 18156309.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-3702
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental biology and medicine (Maywood, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Biol. Med. (Maywood)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Protective Agents; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; P188ANX8CK / Trastuzumab
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20. Utaisincharoen P, Tangthawornchaikul N, Ubol S, Chaisuriya P, Sirisinha S: TNF-alpha induces caspase 3 (CPP 32) dependent apoptosis in human cholangiocarcinoma cell line. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health; 2000;31 Suppl 1:167-70
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  • [Title] TNF-alpha induces caspase 3 (CPP 32) dependent apoptosis in human cholangiocarcinoma cell line.
  • Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a malignant tumor derived from bile duct epithelium, occurs with a higher incidence in tropical countires especially in some areas of Southeast Asian countries such as Thailand.
  • This tumor is relatively resistant to chemotherapy.
  • In this study, molecular mechanism of killing of this tumor by TNF-alpha was investigated.
  • Human cholangiocarcinoma cell line (HuCCA-1) was developed and used as a model for treatment.
  • Activation of HuCCA-1 with TNF-alpha in the present of actinomycin D (1 microg/ml) caused death of the tumor cells.
  • Western blotting analysis of the cells extracted demonstrated the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) within 6-8 hours following TNF-alpha treatment indicating apoptotic death.
  • These results indicate that apoptosis of human cholangiocarcinoma cell line as induced by TNF-alpha treatment is mediated through caspase 3.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Bile Duct Neoplasms / drug therapy. Caspases / drug effects. Cholangiocarcinoma / drug therapy. Tumor Cells, Cultured / drug effects. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11414450.001).
  • [ISSN] 0125-1562
  • [Journal-full-title] The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Southeast Asian J. Trop. Med. Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Thailand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; EC 3.4.22.- / CASP3 protein, human; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases
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21. Sun Y, Perry GN, Yu J, Chen B, Tian Z: Effect of nourishing "Yin"-removing "Fire" Chinese herbal mixture on hypothalamic kisspeptin expression in female precocious rats. J Ethnopharmacol; 2010 Feb 3;127(2):274-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into intact normal (N), central precocious puberty (CPP) model (M), vehicle without CPP (V), CPP model exposed to herbal mixture (HM) and CPP model exposed to saline (S) groups.
  • At postnatal day 5, a single subcutaneous injection of 300 microg of danazol was administered to induce CPP model rats.
  • RESULTS: The day of vaginal opening and establishment of two regular estrous cycles were delayed in the HM group compared with M and S groups (P<0.05, respectively).
  • CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the kisspeptin signaling pathway might be involved in the effect of herbal mixture treatment on CPP.
  • [MeSH-major] Disease Models, Animal. Drugs, Chinese Herbal / therapeutic use. Hypothalamus / drug effects. Hypothalamus / metabolism. Proteins / metabolism. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Down-Regulation / drug effects. Down-Regulation / physiology. Female. Kisspeptins. Ovary / drug effects. Ovary / physiology. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Up-Regulation / drug effects. Up-Regulation / physiology. Uterus / drug effects. Uterus / physiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19931369.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-7573
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of ethnopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Ethnopharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal; 0 / Kiss1 protein, rat; 0 / Kisspeptins; 0 / Proteins; 0 / nourishing Yin-removing Fire
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22. Houchi H, Warnault V, Barbier E, Dubois C, Pierrefiche O, Ledent C, Daoust M, Naassila M: Involvement of A2A receptors in anxiolytic, locomotor and motivational properties of ethanol in mice. Genes Brain Behav; 2008 Nov;7(8):887-98
Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI). Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We aimed to investigate if the increased propensity of A2A(-/-) mice to consume ethanol is associated with an altered sensitivity in the motivational properties of ethanol in the conditioned place preference (CPP) and conditioned taste aversion (CTA) paradigms and with an altered development of sensitization to the locomotor effects of ethanol.
  • Our results show that A2A(-/-) mice produced on a CD1 background displayed a reduced ethanol-induced CPP and an increased sensitivity to the anxiolytic and locomotorstimulant effects of ethanol, but they did not show alteration in ethanol-induced CTA and locomotor sensitization.
  • Ethanol-induced CPP, ethanol consumption and the locomotor effects of ethanol were also tested in A2A(-/-) mice produced on a C57BL/6J background.
  • Our results emphasized the importance of the genetic background because alteration in ethanol consumption and preference, ethanol-induced CPP and locomotor-stimulant effects were not found in knockout mice produced on the alcohol-preferring C57BL/6J genetic background.
  • In conclusion, A2AR deficiency in mice generated on a CD1 background leads to high ethanol consumption that is associated with an increased sensitivity to the locomotor-stimulant/anxiolytic effects of ethanol and a decrease in ethanol-induced CPP.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenosine / metabolism. Alcohol-Induced Disorders, Nervous System / genetics. Brain / drug effects. Ethanol / pharmacology. Receptor, Adenosine A2A / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Anti-Anxiety Agents / pharmacology. Anxiety / drug therapy. Anxiety / genetics. Anxiety / metabolism. Behavior, Animal / drug effects. Behavior, Animal / physiology. Central Nervous System Depressants / pharmacology. Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Conditioning (Psychology) / physiology. Disease Models, Animal. Drug Resistance / drug effects. Drug Resistance / genetics. Genotype. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Mice, Knockout. Motivation. Motor Activity / drug effects. Motor Activity / physiology. Species Specificity

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  • (PMID = 19097273.001).
  • [ISSN] 1601-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Genes, brain, and behavior
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Genes Brain Behav.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Anxiety Agents; 0 / Central Nervous System Depressants; 0 / Receptor, Adenosine A2A; 3K9958V90M / Ethanol; K72T3FS567 / Adenosine
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23. Roma PG, Huntsberry ME, Riley AL: Separation stress, litter size, and the rewarding effects of low-dose morphine in the dams of maternally separated rats. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry; 2007 Mar 30;31(2):429-33
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MORPHINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • One week after weaning, the dams (n=7 per group) underwent a fully unbiased conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure to 1 mg/kg subcutaneous morphine.
  • CPP responses after each conditioning cycle were recorded.
  • Rates of acquisition and asymptotic levels of CPP were comparable in all groups; however, an inverse relationship between litter size and magnitude of morphine CPP was revealed.
  • Although these initial data indicate no differential sensitivity to the rewarding effects of low-dose morphine produced by the stress of litter separation, this assessment of litter size and drug-induced place conditioning in post-weaning litter-separated dams is the first of its kind.
  • Potential effects of other doses, drugs of abuse and post-partum manipulations remain to be evaluated within this emerging etiological model.
  • [MeSH-major] Body Size / drug effects. Maternal Deprivation. Morphine / administration & dosage. Narcotics / administration & dosage. Reward. Stress, Psychological / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Analysis of Variance. Animals. Animals, Newborn. Behavior, Animal / drug effects. Conditioning, Operant / drug effects. Female. In Vitro Techniques. Pregnancy. Rats

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  • (PMID = 17182163.001).
  • [ISSN] 0278-5846
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Narcotics; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine
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24. Hashemi N, Mohammadirad A, Bayrami Z, Khorasani R, Vosough S, Aliahmadi A, Nikfar S, Sharifzadeh M, Kebriaeezadeh A, Abdollahi M: Restoration of morphine-induced alterations in rat submandibular gland function by N-methyl-D-aspartate agonist. Acta Biol Hung; 2006 Sep;57(3):283-94
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CALCIUM, ELEMENTAL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The effects of morphine, 1-aminocyclobutane-cis-1,3-dicarboxylic (ACBD; NMDA agonist) and 3-((R)2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-l-phosphoric acid (CPP; NMDA antagonist) and their concurrent therapy on rat submandibular secretory function were studied.
  • Administration of ACBD (10 mg/kg) and CPP (10 mg/kg) alone did not influence secretion of submandibular glands.
  • In combination therapy, coadministration of CPP with morphine did not influence morphine-induced changes in salivary function while ABCD could restore all morphine-induced changes.
  • In combination treatment, ACBD prevented morphine-induced reduction of flow rate, total protein, calcium, and TGF-beta1 and reached control levels.
  • [MeSH-major] Morphine / adverse effects. N-Methylaspartate / agonists. Submandibular Gland / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 17048692.001).
  • [ISSN] 0236-5383
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta biologica Hungarica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta. Biol. Hung.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 0 / Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists; 0 / Glutamates; 0 / Piperazines; 100828-16-8 / 3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid; 117488-23-0 / 2,4-methanoglutamate; 6384-92-5 / N-Methylaspartate; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine; 9NEZ333N27 / Sodium; RWP5GA015D / Potassium; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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25. Meybohm P, Cavus E, Bein B, Steinfath M, Brand PA, Scholz J, Dörges V: Cerebral metabolism assessed with microdialysis in uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock after penetrating liver trauma. Anesth Analg; 2006 Oct;103(4):948-54
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. OXYGEN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In a porcine model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock, we evaluated the effects of fluid resuscitation versus arginine vasopressin (AVP) combined with hypertonic-hyperoncotic hydroxyethyl starch solution (HHS) on cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and on cerebral metabolism using intracerebral microdialysis.
  • Thirty minutes after drug administration, bleeding was controlled by manual compression, and colloid and crystalloid solutions were administered in both groups.
  • After hemodynamic decompensation, fluid resuscitation resulted in a smaller increase of CPP than did AVP/HHS (mean +/- sem; 24 +/- 5 vs 45 +/- 7 mm Hg; P < 0.01).
  • In conclusion, AVP/HHS proved to be superior to fluid in the initial phase of therapy with respect to CPP and cerebral oxygenation, but was comparable to fluid regarding cerebral metabolism and secondary cell damage in surviving animals.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebral Cortex / metabolism. Cerebrovascular Circulation / physiology. Shock, Hemorrhagic / metabolism. Shock, Hemorrhagic / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Arginine Vasopressin / pharmacology. Carbon Dioxide / blood. Disease Models, Animal. Female. Fluid Therapy / methods. Hemodynamics. Intracranial Pressure. Liver / injuries. Male. Microdialysis. Oxygen / blood. Partial Pressure. Swine. Wounds and Injuries / blood. Wounds and Injuries / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17000810.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-7598
  • [Journal-full-title] Anesthesia and analgesia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anesth. Analg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 113-79-1 / Arginine Vasopressin; 142M471B3J / Carbon Dioxide; S88TT14065 / Oxygen
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26. McCall T, Binning M, Blumenthal DT, Jensen RL: Variations of disseminated choroid plexus papilloma: 2 case reports and a review of the literature. Surg Neurol; 2006 Jul;66(1):62-7; discussion 67-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Variations of disseminated choroid plexus papilloma: 2 case reports and a review of the literature.
  • BACKGROUND: Choroid plexus papillomas are typically considered benign lesions, but histology is not always predictive of their behavior.
  • We present 2 cases that illustrate the wide diversity with which choroid plexus papillomas can disseminate.
  • CASE DESCRIPTIONS: The patient described in case 1 had a primary fourth ventricular choroid plexus papilloma that produced diffuse cystic subarachnoid and leptomeningeal lesions.
  • Patient 2 also had a primary fourth ventricular tumor but with subsequent suprasellar and spinal drop metastases.
  • Patient 2 has been treated with several modalities, including radiation therapy and chemotherapy, with slowing of symptom progression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Variations of choroid plexus papilloma dissemination include intraventricular, subarachnoid, and leptomeningeal nodules or cystic lesions, and intraparenchymal locations.
  • There is no consensus on the most effective treatment for choroid plexus papilloma metastases; surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy may all yield benefits.
  • The prognosis for patients with disseminated choroid plexus papilloma can range from prolonged stable disease and symptoms to death within months.
  • [MeSH-major] Choroid Plexus / pathology. Choroid Plexus / surgery. Meningeal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Meningeal Neoplasms / therapy. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / diagnosis. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Arachnoid / pathology. Arachnoid / physiopathology. Arachnoid / surgery. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Pia Mater / pathology. Pia Mater / physiopathology. Pia Mater / surgery. Subarachnoid Space / pathology. Subarachnoid Space / physiopathology. Subarachnoid Space / surgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16793445.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-3019
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 34
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27. Glantz L, Godovic G, Lekar M, Kramer M, Eidelman LA: Efficacy of transdermal nitroglycerin combined with etodolac for the treatment of chronic post-thoracotomy pain: an open-label prospective clinical trial. J Pain Symptom Manage; 2004 Mar;27(3):277-81
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NITROGLYCERIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy of transdermal nitroglycerin combined with etodolac for the treatment of chronic post-thoracotomy pain: an open-label prospective clinical trial.
  • Chronic post-thoracotomy pain (CPP) is associated with surgical intercostal nerve injury.
  • Like other forms of neuropathic pain, there is no ideal treatment.
  • The present study investigated the efficacy of NTG combined with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug etodolac for the treatment of CPP.
  • NTG, 5 mg/day, was added to the treatment.
  • A significant reduction in VAS was observed on day 14 of treatment (from 66.7 +/- 11 to 42.1 +/- 5, P< 0.05).
  • We conclude that NTG added to etodolac appears to be effective for the treatment of CPP, with minimal side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / administration & dosage. Etodolac / administration & dosage. Nitroglycerin / administration & dosage. Pain, Postoperative / drug therapy. Thoracotomy / adverse effects. Vasodilator Agents / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Cutaneous. Aged. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 15038339.001).
  • [ISSN] 0885-3924
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pain and symptom management
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pain Symptom Manage
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Vasodilator Agents; 2M36281008 / Etodolac; G59M7S0WS3 / Nitroglycerin
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28. Zhao RJ, Woo RS, Jeong MS, Shin BS, Kim DG, Kim KW: Orphanin FQ/nociceptin blocks methamphetamine place preference in rats. Neuroreport; 2003 Dec 19;14(18):2383-5
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Orphanin FQ/nociceptin (NOC) has been reported to regulate dopaminergic neurotransmission in rewarding pathway, and to suppress the development of conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by certain addictive drugs.
  • In this study, we investigated the effect of NOC on CPP induced by repeated administration of methamphetamine (MAP) in rats.
  • Repeated administration of MAP (1 mg/kg, i.p.) induced substantial CPP.
  • MAP-induced CPP was completely suppressed by NOC (10 nmol, i.c.v.).
  • ), an antagonist of the NOC receptor, antagonized the suppressive effect of NOC on MAP-induced CPP.
  • These results suggest that NOC blocks MAP-induced CPP by activation of the NOC receptor.
  • [MeSH-major] Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Methamphetamine / antagonists & inhibitors. Methamphetamine / pharmacology. Opioid Peptides / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Behavior, Addictive / drug therapy. Behavior, Addictive / psychology. Male. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 14663196.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-4965
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroreport
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuroreport
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Opioid Peptides; 0 / nociceptin; 44RAL3456C / Methamphetamine
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29. Fishbain DA, Cutler RB, Cole B, Lewis J, Rosomoff RS, Rosomoff HL: Medico-legal rounds: medico-legal issues and alleged breaches of "standards of medical care" in opioid rotation to methadone: a case report. Pain Med; 2003 Jun;4(2):195-201
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHADONE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • 1) To present an example of a medico-legal problem that developed as a result of a decision to rotate a chronic pain patient (CPP) to methadone in order to taper the CPP from oxycodone;.
  • METHODS: This is a case report of a CPP treated at a regional hospital pain clinic.
  • Methadone rotation was used in order to taper the CPP from oxycodone because of addictive disease.
  • RESULTS: During the rotation process, the CPP expired.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics, Opioid / adverse effects. Medication Errors / legislation & jurisprudence. Methadone / adverse effects. Opioid-Related Disorders. Pain / drug therapy. Pain Clinics / standards. Quality of Health Care / legislation & jurisprudence. Quality of Health Care / standards
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Autopsy. Chronic Disease. Decision Making. Expert Testimony. Florida. Humans. Male. Malpractice / legislation & jurisprudence. Oxycodone / adverse effects. Oxycodone / therapeutic use. Psychiatry

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  • [CommentIn] Pain Med. 2004 Mar;5(1):109-10 [14996244.001]
  • [CommentIn] Pain Med. 2003 Jun;4(2):202-5 [12873270.001]
  • (PMID = 12873269.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-2375
  • [Journal-full-title] Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pain Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Legal Cases
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; CD35PMG570 / Oxycodone; UC6VBE7V1Z / Methadone
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30. Arellanes-García L, Navarro-López L, Recillas-Gispert C: Pars planitis in the Mexican Mestizo population: ocular findings, treatment, and visual outcome. Ocul Immunol Inflamm; 2003 Mar;11(1):53-60
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  • [Title] Pars planitis in the Mexican Mestizo population: ocular findings, treatment, and visual outcome.
  • PURPOSE: To describe the clinical manifestations of classic pars planitis (CPP) in Mexican patients.
  • We report here the most frequent complications, medical and surgical treatment, and visual prognosis.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective, descriptive case series examined the clinical features, complications, and treatment (medical and surgical) of CPP patients seen at the Inflammatory Eye Disease Clinic from January 1990 to September 1999.
  • Periocular corticosteroids were used in 97.5% of cases, systemic corticosteroids in 68.1%, and other immunosuppressive drugs in 21.3%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: CPP in the Mexican population is more frequent in males and usually presents in patients less than 14 years of age.
  • Treatment comprises periocular and systemic corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Pars Planitis / complications. Pars Planitis / drug therapy. Visual Acuity
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Adolescent. Adult. Anti-Inflammatory Agents / therapeutic use. Cataract / etiology. Child. Child, Preschool. Eye Diseases / etiology. Female. Glucocorticoids. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Macular Edema / etiology. Male. Mexico / epidemiology. Retinal Vasculitis / etiology. Retrospective Studies. Vision Disorders / etiology. Vitreous Body / pathology

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  • (PMID = 12854027.001).
  • [ISSN] 0927-3948
  • [Journal-full-title] Ocular immunology and inflammation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ocul. Immunol. Inflamm.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
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31. Stergiou GS, Efstathiou SP, Argyraki CK, Gantzarou AP, Roussias LG, Mountokalakis TD: Clinic, home and ambulatory pulse pressure: comparison and reproducibility. J Hypertens; 2002 Oct;20(10):1987-93
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The objective of this study was to compare mean values and reproducibility of PP obtained in the clinic (CPP), at home (HPP) and with ambulatory monitoring (APP) and to evaluate potential implications for trials aiming to assess drug effects on PP.
  • METHODS: A total of 393 hypertensive subjects [mean age 51.5 +/- 11.5 (SD) years, 59% men, 35% treated] measured CPP (two visits), HPP (6 days) and APP (24 h).
  • The reproducibility of PP was assessed using the SD of differences (SDD) between measurements in 133 untreated subjects who had repeated CPP (five visits), HPP (6 days) and APP measurements (two occasions).
  • RESULTS: There was no difference between mean CPP (51.0 +/- 13.3 mmHg) and HPP (50.2 +/- 11.0) whereas APP (48.8 +/- 8.4) was lower than both CPP [mean difference 2.3 +/- 10.3 mmHg; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2, 3.3; P < 0.01] and HPP (1.5 +/- 7.8; 95% CI, 0.7, 2.3; P < 0.01).
  • The SDD between repeated measurements was about 10 mmHg for CPP (one visit), 5.2 mmHg for HPP (2 days) and 4 mmHg for APP (24-h).
  • For a parallel comparative trial aiming to detect a difference of 3 mmHg PP in the effect of two drugs, 415 subjects would be required when using CPP, compared to 127 using HPP and 63 using APP.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that although differences among mean values of CPP, HPP and APP are small, differences in their reproducibility are important and should be taken into account in the design of trials assessing drug effects on PP.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Circadian Rhythm / drug effects. Circadian Rhythm / physiology. Female. Humans. Hypertension / diagnosis. Hypertension / drug therapy. Hypertension / physiopathology. Male. Middle Aged. Pulse. Reproducibility of Results. Statistics as Topic. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12359977.001).
  • [ISSN] 0263-6352
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Hypertens.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antihypertensive Agents
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32. Krstevska-Konstantinova M, Jancevska A, Gucev Z: Autoimmune thyroiditis and diabetes mellitus type 1 after long-term gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment for central precocious puberty: evolution or coincidence? J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab; 2010 Apr;23(4):403-6
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Diabetes Type 1.

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  • [Title] Autoimmune thyroiditis and diabetes mellitus type 1 after long-term gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment for central precocious puberty: evolution or coincidence?
  • Very few abnormalities in endocrine function have been reported during long term gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) treatment in girls.
  • Most authors agree that this therapy is safe and effective.
  • We present an unusual outcome of long term GnRHa therapy in two girls with central precocious puberty(CPP) of idiopathic or organic origin.
  • They have received monthly depot injections of triptorelin acetate for a time period of 8 years.
  • Another girl with a hypothalamic hamartoma developed diabetes mellitus at the age of 9 years.
  • Both of these girls were early diagnosed for CPP, at 6 months and 8 months respectively, and given GnRHa treatment.
  • So far, it is not known whether these autoimmune diseases are related to the GnRHa treatment or are simply a coincidence.
  • However, we suggest a closer monitoring of girls with CPP who have had a long period of treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / etiology. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy. Thyroiditis, Autoimmune / etiology. Triptorelin Pamoate / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Female. Hamartoma / complications. Hamartoma / drug therapy. Humans. Luteolytic Agents / therapeutic use. Pituitary Diseases / complications. Pituitary Diseases / drug therapy


33. Meltzer-Brody SE, Zolnoun D, Steege JF, Rinaldi KL, Leserman J: Open-label trial of lamotrigine focusing on efficacy in vulvodynia. J Reprod Med; 2009 Mar;54(3):171-8
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  • OBJECTIVE: Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) affects 15% of women and has a high rate of psychiatric comorbidity.
  • Vulvodynia, a vulvar pain syndrome that includes vulvar vestibulitis, is the most common subtype of CPP.
  • This study examined the efficacy of lamotrigine for the treatment of CPP using an open-label design.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Forty-three women with CPP were recruited from a specialty pelvic pain clinic.
  • Of these, 31 completed 8 weeks of active treatment.
  • In particular, women with vulvodynia-type CPP (N = 17) had robust reductions in pain and mood symptoms.
  • CONCLUSION: CPP is a heterogeneous disorder, with psychiatric comorbidity and poor treatment response.
  • This open-label study suggests that treatment with lamotrigine in women with the vulvodynia subtype of CPP may be helpful in addressing both the pain and mood symptoms associated with this disorder.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics / therapeutic use. Pelvic Pain / drug therapy. Pelvic Pain / psychology. Triazines / therapeutic use. Vulvar Diseases / drug therapy. Vulvar Diseases / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Anxiety / drug therapy. Anxiety / epidemiology. Comorbidity. Depression / drug therapy. Depression / epidemiology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Pain Measurement / drug effects. Pain Measurement / psychology. Psychiatric Status Rating Scales. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19370903.001).
  • [ISSN] 0024-7758
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of reproductive medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Reprod Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / K23 HD053631
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics; 0 / Triazines; U3H27498KS / lamotrigine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS580758; NLM/ PMC4676413
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34. Toussaint M, Delair B, Foulon C, Lempereur N, Vaccher C, Maurice T, Melnyk P: Tic hydantoin sigma-1 agonist: pharmacological characterization on cocaine-induced stimulant and appetitive effects. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol; 2009 Jul;19(7):504-15
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. COCAINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tic hydantoin sigma-1 agonist: pharmacological characterization on cocaine-induced stimulant and appetitive effects.
  • The most active enantiomer 4, facilitated CPP acquisition but failed to substitute for cocaine.
  • When CPP was acquired with cocaine and then extinguished, 4 provoked reactivation of CPP.
  • Preliminary ADME properties are in favour of an optimal therapeutic development.
  • Such Tic-hydantoin compound may serve as a new effective agonist therapy in cocaine addiction.
  • [MeSH-major] Appetitive Behavior / drug effects. Cocaine / pharmacology. Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors / pharmacology. Hydantoins / pharmacology. Hyperkinesis / chemically induced. Receptors, sigma / agonists
  • [MeSH-minor] Analysis of Variance. Animals. Behavior, Animal / drug effects. Cellulose, Oxidized / pharmacology. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid / methods. Conditioning, Operant / drug effects. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Ethylenediamines / pharmacology. Extinction, Psychological / drug effects. Locomotion / drug effects. Male. Mice. Protein Binding / drug effects. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 19249191.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-7862
  • [Journal-full-title] European neuropsychopharmacology : the journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Neuropsychopharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cellulose, Oxidized; 0 / Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Ethylenediamines; 0 / Hydantoins; 0 / INTERCEED; 0 / Receptors, sigma; 138356-20-4 / BD 1047; I5Y540LHVR / Cocaine
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35. Benturquia N, Le Marec T, Scherrmann JM, Noble F: Effects of nitrous oxide on dopamine release in the rat nucleus accumbens and expectation of reward. Neuroscience; 2008 Aug 13;155(2):341-4
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MORPHINE .

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  • Recently we have shown that nitrous oxide (N2O) was able to block the expression of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in mice.
  • Because dopamine (DA) has also been associated with the positive place conditioning we hypothesize that exposure to N2O would be significantly associated with a modification of extracellular level of DA.
  • Levels of DA, in the nucleus accumbens (Nac), in awake and freely moving rats during positive place conditioning after morphine chronic treatment has been measured by microdialysis.
  • Expression of morphine-induced CPP was totally abolished in mice and rats exposed to N2O.
  • In conclusion we showed the capacity of N2O to block the expression of morphine-induced CPP in mice and in rats.
  • [MeSH-major] Dopamine / metabolism. Morphine Dependence / drug therapy. Nitrous Oxide / pharmacology. Nucleus Accumbens / drug effects. Reward
  • [MeSH-minor] Analgesics, Opioid / pharmacology. Animals. Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Conditioning (Psychology) / physiology. Drug Interactions. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred Strains. Microdialysis. Morphine / pharmacology. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Spatial Behavior / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 18571333.001).
  • [ISSN] 0306-4522
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroscience
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuroscience
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine; K50XQU1029 / Nitrous Oxide; VTD58H1Z2X / Dopamine
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36. Esmaeili B, Basseda Z, Dehpour AR: Antagonism of muscarinic M1 receptors by dicyclomine inhibits the consolidation of morphine-associated contextual memory. Brain Res Bull; 2008 Jul 1;76(4):380-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DICYCLOMINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • M1 muscarinic receptor has been shown to be involved in cognitive functions of the brain.
  • Conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm involves memory for the association between environmental stimuli and the rewarding properties produced by a treatment.
  • Using a balanced CPP design, we studied the possible involvement of M1 muscarinic receptors on the acquisition, expression and consolidation of morphine place conditioning in male mice.
  • Subcutaneous administration of morphine sulphate-induced CPP in a dose-dependent manner.
  • Using a 6-day schedule of conditioning, it was found that dicyclomine, an M1 muscarinic antagonist, significantly reduced the time spent by mice in the morphine compartment when given immediately, but not 6h, after each conditioning session (consolidation).
  • It had no effect when administered 30 min before each conditioning session during CPP training period (acquisition) or 30 min before testing for place preference in the absence of morphine (expression).
  • It is concluded that M1 muscarinic receptors may play a time-dependent role in the consolidation of reward-related memory of morphine.
  • [MeSH-major] Dicyclomine / pharmacology. Learning / drug effects. Memory / drug effects. Morphine / pharmacology. Receptor, Muscarinic M1 / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Brain / drug effects. Brain / metabolism. Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Conditioning (Psychology) / physiology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Interactions / physiology. Male. Mice. Morphine Dependence / drug therapy. Morphine Dependence / metabolism. Muscarinic Antagonists / pharmacology. Narcotics / pharmacology. Reward. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 18502314.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2747
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain research bulletin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain Res. Bull.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Muscarinic Antagonists; 0 / Narcotics; 0 / Receptor, Muscarinic M1; 4KV4X8IF6V / Dicyclomine; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine
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37. Bertelloni S, Mul D: Treatment of central precocious puberty by GnRH analogs: long-term outcome in men. Asian J Androl; 2008 Jul;10(4):525-34
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of central precocious puberty by GnRH analogs: long-term outcome in men.
  • In boys, central precocious puberty (CPP) is the appearance of secondary sex characteristics driven by pituitary gonadotropin secretion before the age of 9 years.
  • In the last years, relevant improvements in the treatment of CPP have been achieved.
  • Because CPP is rare in boys, the majority of papers on this issue focus on girls and do not address specific features of male patients regarding end results and safety.
  • In the present paper, recent advances of CPP management with GnRH analogs in men are summarized.
  • End results in untreated and treated patients are also reviewed by an analysis of the recently published literature on treatment of CPP in men.
  • The available data indicate that therapy with GnRH analogs can improve final height into the range of target height without significant adverse short-term and long-term effects, but longer follow-up of larger series of patients is still required to draw definitive conclusions.
  • [MeSH-major] Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / analogs & derivatives. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / therapeutic use. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Body Height / drug effects. Body Height / physiology. Child. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. Male. Sex Characteristics. Treatment Outcome


38. Xiao HP, Gu MN, Xiao JF, Xu X, Zhao ZL: [Effects of hypertonic sodium chloride hydroxyethyl starch 40 injection in treatment of acute intracranial hypertension complicated by hemorrhagic shock in dogs]. Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao; 2008 Mar;28(3):385-8

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Effects of hypertonic sodium chloride hydroxyethyl starch 40 injection in treatment of acute intracranial hypertension complicated by hemorrhagic shock in dogs].
  • OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of hypertonic sodium chloride hydroxyethyl starch 40 injection (HSH) in treatment of acute intracranial hypertension complicated by hemorrhagic shock in dogs, and explore the mechanism of the effects of HSH.
  • Canine models of acute intracranial hypertension complicated by hemorrhagic shock were established by epidural balloon inflation with saline and rapid discharge of the arterial blood.
  • During the shock and resuscitationperiod, the intracranial pressure (ICP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) of the dogs were monitored, and the serum sodium level and plasma osmolality were measured at 30 min, 1 h and 4 h after the resuscitation.
  • RESULTS: All dogs had similar MAP, CPP, and ICP before resuscitation (P>0.05).
  • The CPP was also significantly increased after resuscitation (P<0.01), and in HS group, CPP decreased significantly after 2 h (P<0.01), and HSH group maintained the high CPP after 4 h.
  • CONCLUSION: In dogs with acute intracranial hypertension and hemorrhagic shock, HSH can effectively resuscitate hemorrhagic shock and decrease ICP, and the effect is longer-lasting than that of HS.
  • [MeSH-major] Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives / therapeutic use. Intracranial Hypertension / drug therapy. Saline Solution, Hypertonic / therapeutic use. Shock, Hemorrhagic / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Animals. Dogs. Female. Male. Plasma Substitutes / administration & dosage. Plasma Substitutes / therapeutic use. Random Allocation. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18359696.001).
  • [ISSN] 1673-4254
  • [Journal-full-title] Nan fang yi ke da xue xue bao = Journal of Southern Medical University
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives; 0 / Plasma Substitutes; 0 / Saline Solution, Hypertonic
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39. Sadler R, Herzig V, Schmidt WJ: Repeated treatment with the NMDA antagonist MK-801 disrupts reconsolidation of memory for amphetamine-conditioned place preference. Behav Pharmacol; 2007 Nov;18(7):699-703
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DIZOCILPINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Repeated treatment with the NMDA antagonist MK-801 disrupts reconsolidation of memory for amphetamine-conditioned place preference.
  • Long-lasting drug-associated memories can contribute to relapse; therefore these memories must be inactivated to enable sustainable success in addiction therapy.
  • As drug associations are usually acquired over several conditioning events, we assume that an effective treatment should be repeatedly applied to achieve persistent effects.
  • In this study, we examine whether 10 repeated memory reactivation tests followed by systemic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) administrations can disrupt memory reconsolidation in rats, leading to a reduction of well-established amphetamine-conditioned place preference (CPP).
  • We found that immediate (but not 60-min delayed) administration of MK-801 after the tests reduced amphetamine-CPP expression after at least four treatments.
  • These effects were specific to CPP expression as no MK-801-induced change in locomotion was observed during all tests.
  • We discuss these results as being caused by MK-801 disrupting memory reconsolidation and we propose the applied repeated-treatment regimen as a new therapeutic research strategy to persistently disrupt drug-associated memories.
  • [MeSH-major] Amphetamine / pharmacology. Central Nervous System Stimulants / pharmacology. Conditioning, Operant / drug effects. Dizocilpine Maleate / pharmacology. Memory / drug effects. Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Behavior, Animal / drug effects. Male. Motor Activity / drug effects. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 17912055.001).
  • [ISSN] 0955-8810
  • [Journal-full-title] Behavioural pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Behav Pharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Central Nervous System Stimulants; 0 / Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate; 6LR8C1B66Q / Dizocilpine Maleate; CK833KGX7E / Amphetamine
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40. Toumba M, Bacopoulou I, Savva SC, Skordis N: Efficacy of combined treatment with growth hormone and gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue in children with poor prognosis of adult height. Indian Pediatr; 2007 Jul;44(7):497-502
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Growth Disorders.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy of combined treatment with growth hormone and gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue in children with poor prognosis of adult height.
  • OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to study the role of combination therapy of growth hormone and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues in girls with idiopathic central precocious puberty (CPP) or idiopathic short stature (ISS).
  • METHODS: Five girls with CPP (median age 9.1 y, pubertal stage 2-3) (3 of them previously treated with GnRH analogue (GnRHa) for 16.2 +/- 0.3 months) and 8 girls with ISS (median age 11.4 y, pubertal stage 2-3) (previously treated with GH for 10.95 +/- 1.42 months), were treated with recombinant human GH (0.33 mg/kg/week) and GnRHa (3.75 mg/28 days) for 22 months.
  • RESULTS: Height of girls with CPP improved from - 1.3 to - 0.2 SDS and height for BA from - 2.1 to - 0.6 SDS (P = 0.042).
  • CONCLUSION: Combined treatment improves height and PAH in CPP.
  • [MeSH-major] Body Height / drug effects. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / analogs & derivatives. Growth Disorders / drug therapy. Growth Hormone / therapeutic use. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Algorithms. Bone Development / drug effects. Child. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17684302.001).
  • [ISSN] 0019-6061
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian Pediatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone; 9002-72-6 / Growth Hormone
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41. Meybohm P, Cavus E, Bein B, Steinfath M, Weber B, Hamann C, Scholz J, Dörges V: Small volume resuscitation: a randomized controlled trial with either norepinephrine or vasopressin during severe hemorrhage. J Trauma; 2007 Mar;62(3):640-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. OXYGEN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of hypertonic-hyperoncotic hydroxyethyl starch solution (HHS) combined with either norepinephrine (NE) or arginine vasopressin (AVP) on cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and brain metabolism after hemorrhagic shock.
  • After 30 minutes of therapy, bleeding was controlled by manual compression and all surviving animals were observed for 1 hour.
  • RESULTS: After hemodynamic decompensation, AVP resulted in a significantly higher increase of CPP (mean +/- SD; 47 +/- 19 versus 28 +/- 9 mm Hg; p < 0.01) and cerebral venous partial pressure of oxygen (66 +/- 8 versus 49 +/- 9 mm Hg; p < 0.05) compared with NE after 10 minutes of therapy.
  • Brain metabolism was found comparable in both groups at any time.
  • CONCLUSIONS: AVP was comparable to NE with respect to hemodynamics and blood gases, as well as brain metabolism in surviving animals throughout the study period.
  • [MeSH-major] Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives / therapeutic use. Norepinephrine / therapeutic use. Plasma Substitutes / therapeutic use. Resuscitation / methods. Shock, Hemorrhagic / therapy. Vasoconstrictor Agents / therapeutic use. Vasopressins / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Brain / metabolism. Cardiac Output / drug effects. Cerebrovascular Circulation / drug effects. Microdialysis. Oxygen / blood. Sus scrofa

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  • (PMID = 17414341.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5282
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of trauma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Trauma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives; 0 / Plasma Substitutes; 0 / Vasoconstrictor Agents; 11000-17-2 / Vasopressins; S88TT14065 / Oxygen; X4W3ENH1CV / Norepinephrine
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42. Chiu WT, Lin TJ, Lin JW, Huang SJ, Chang CK, Chen HY: Multicenter evaluation of propofol for head-injured patients in Taiwan. Surg Neurol; 2006;66 Suppl 2:S37-42
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. PROPOFOL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: The present study was a multicenter, retrospective study which aimed to evaluate the efficacy of propofol, a new choice of pharmacotherapy in head-injured patients.
  • Data on patients' demographics, laboratory data, GCS score, ICP, CPP, concurrent medications, and therapeutic outcomes were collected.
  • Mean CPP for the first 5 days in the ICU was 71.10 +/- 15.32 mm Hg in the propofol group and 43.20 +/- 29.92 mm Hg in the nonpropofol group (P<.001).
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Injuries / drug therapy. Brain Injuries / mortality. Hypnotics and Sedatives / therapeutic use. Propofol / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Female. Glasgow Coma Scale. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Taiwan / epidemiology. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17071254.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-3019
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hypnotics and Sedatives; YI7VU623SF / Propofol
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43. Hummel M, Schroeder J, Liu-Chen LY, Cowan A, Unterwald EM: An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the mu opioid receptor attenuates cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and reward in mice. Neuroscience; 2006 Oct 13;142(2):481-91
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  • For the conditioned place preference (CPP) study, mice received five i.c.v. infusions of mismatch ODN or MOR AS ODN (days 1-5).
  • An unbiased counterbalanced conditioning procedure was used where mice were conditioned with saline (4 ml/kg, i.p.) and cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) on alternate days for four sessions (days 3-6).
  • Mice were tested on day 7 for CPP.
  • Immediately following testing, [3H]DAMGO (D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5-enkephalin) receptor binding to brain homogenates was conducted.
  • [MeSH-major] Cocaine-Related Disorders / drug therapy. Cocaine-Related Disorders / physiopathology. Oligodeoxyribonucleotides, Antisense / therapeutic use. Receptors, Opioid, mu / physiology. Reward
  • [MeSH-minor] Analysis of Variance. Animals. Behavior, Animal. Conditioning, Operant / drug effects. Drug Administration Routes. Drug Interactions. Enkephalin, Ala(2)-MePhe(4)-Gly(5)- / pharmacokinetics. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Morphine / pharmacology. Narcotics / pharmacology. Protein Binding / drug effects. Radiography / methods. Time Factors. Tritium / pharmacokinetics

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  • (PMID = 16893609.001).
  • [ISSN] 0306-4522
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroscience
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuroscience
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / DA 09580; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / P30 DA 13429; United States / PHS HHS / / T32 07237
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Narcotics; 0 / Oligodeoxyribonucleotides, Antisense; 0 / Receptors, Opioid, mu; 10028-17-8 / Tritium; 100929-53-1 / Enkephalin, Ala(2)-MePhe(4)-Gly(5)-; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine
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44. Hirsch HJ, Gillis D, Strich D, Chertin B, Farkas A, Lindenberg T, Gelber H, Spitz IM: The histrelin implant: a novel treatment for central precocious puberty. Pediatrics; 2005 Dec;116(6):e798-802
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The histrelin implant: a novel treatment for central precocious puberty.
  • OBJECTIVE: Standard treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP) consists of intramuscular or subcutaneous administration of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (GnRHa) at 3- to 4-week intervals.
  • Recently, a subcutaneous implant was developed that releases the GnRHa histrelin at an average rate of 65 microg/day.
  • The aims of this study were to determine if a histrelin implant would suppress gonadotropin and estradiol (E2) in girls with CPP for 1 year and to compare the suppression to standard treatment.
  • METHODS: We studied 11 girls with CPP to determine if the histrelin implant can maintain long-term gonadotropin suppression.
  • Mean age at diagnosis was 6 years (range: 2-9 years).
  • Implants were inserted subcutaneously under local anesthesia, and depot GnRHa treatment was discontinued.
  • GnRH-STs were performed before depot GnRHa treatment, immediately before implant insertion, at the 6- and 9-month visits for each patient and the 12- and 15-month visit for those girls followed for 15 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The histrelin implant consistently suppresses clinical and laboratory parameters of puberty for 1 year and is a promising new technique for treating CPP without the pain and inconvenience of monthly injections.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Implants. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / analogs & derivatives. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 16322137.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-4275
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatrics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Implants; 0 / Gonadotropins, Pituitary; 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone; H50H3S3W74 / histrelin
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45. Herzig V, Schmidt WJ: Repeated-testing of place preference expression for evaluation of anti-craving-drug effects. Amino Acids; 2005 May;28(3):309-17
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  • [Title] Repeated-testing of place preference expression for evaluation of anti-craving-drug effects.
  • In addiction research, the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm is a widely used animal model of conditioned reward.
  • Usually, CPP development is studied, while only few studies examine CPP expression.
  • In the present study, the suitability of a schedule allowing repeated testing of CPP expression was evaluated.
  • This schedule consisted of four repeated applications of a sequence of drug- (i.e. cocaine or morphine), saline- and anti-craving-drug- (i.e. acamprosate, naloxone, their joint administration or saline as internal control) tests.
  • Methodologically, the repeated-testing-schedule produced stable CPP expression in both groups over 12 subsequent tests.
  • In conclusion, it is suggested as a useful method to study effects of anti-craving-drugs on CPP expression, thereby reducing the overall number of experimental animals.
  • The evaluation of the anti-craving-drug effects revealed that neither acamprosate and naloxone given separately nor their combined administration significantly reduced cocaine- or morphine-CPP expression.
  • Thus, we suggest that these anti-craving-drugs are unlikely to be effective for relapse prevention in cocaine- or morphine-addicts.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavior, Animal / drug effects. Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Naloxone / administration & dosage. Narcotic Antagonists / administration & dosage. Opioid-Related Disorders / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Alcohol Deterrents. Analgesics, Opioid / administration & dosage. Analgesics, Opioid / adverse effects. Anesthetics, Local / administration & dosage. Anesthetics, Local / adverse effects. Animals. Cocaine / administration & dosage. Cocaine / adverse effects. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Male. Morphine / administration & dosage. Morphine / adverse effects. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Taurine / analogs & derivatives

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  • (PMID = 15791393.001).
  • [ISSN] 0939-4451
  • [Journal-full-title] Amino acids
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Amino Acids
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Alcohol Deterrents; 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 0 / Narcotic Antagonists; 1EQV5MLY3D / Taurine; 36B82AMQ7N / Naloxone; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine; I5Y540LHVR / Cocaine; N4K14YGM3J / acamprosate
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46. Russo SJ, Festa ED, Fabian SJ, Gazi FM, Kraish M, Jenab S, Quiñones-Jenab V: Gonadal hormones differentially modulate cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in male and female rats. Neuroscience; 2003;120(2):523-33
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  • In the present study, conditioned place preference (CPP), a measure of non-contingent reward, was used to determine the effects of endogenous gonadal hormones and of estrogen and progesterone replacement on cocaine reward.
  • Although both intact and gonadectomized male and female rats showed a significant CPP for cocaine, ovariectomy attenuated the magnitude of CPP.
  • These alterations coincided with a decrease in serum levels of corticosterone.
  • In ovariectomized rats, pretreatment with progesterone inhibited cocaine CPP while estrogen plus progesterone potentiated the magnitude of CPP.
  • [MeSH-major] Cocaine / pharmacology. Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Estrogens / pharmacology. Progesterone / pharmacology. Sex Characteristics
  • [MeSH-minor] Analysis of Variance. Anesthetics, Local / pharmacology. Animals. Behavior, Animal. Biogenic Monoamines / metabolism. Cesarean Section / methods. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid / instrumentation. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid / methods. Corticosterone / blood. Drug Interactions. Exploratory Behavior / drug effects. Exploratory Behavior / physiology. Female. Hormone Replacement Therapy / methods. Male. Motor Activity / drug effects. Motor Activity / physiology. Nucleus Accumbens / drug effects. Nucleus Accumbens / metabolism. Radioimmunoassay / methods. Rats. Rats, Inbred F344. Reaction Time. Reward. Time Factors. Ventral Tegmental Area / drug effects. Ventral Tegmental Area / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 12890521.001).
  • [ISSN] 0306-4522
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroscience
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuroscience
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / DA12136; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM60654; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / NS-41073; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / RR-03037
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 0 / Biogenic Monoamines; 0 / Estrogens; 4G7DS2Q64Y / Progesterone; I5Y540LHVR / Cocaine; W980KJ009P / Corticosterone
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47. Stocchetti N, Rossi S, Zanier ER, Colombo A, Beretta L, Citerio G: Pyrexia in head-injured patients admitted to intensive care. Intensive Care Med; 2002 Nov;28(11):1555-62
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  • (b) to elucidate the relationships between pyrexia and neurological severity, length of stay in the ICU, intracranial hypertension, and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP); and (c) to describe the effects of antipyretic therapy on temperature, intracranial pressure (ICP) and CPP.
  • PATIENTS: 110 patients with traumatic brain injury.
  • Various antipyretic therapies were used in 66 patients.
  • Pharmacological treatment was slightly effective (mean temperature reduction 0.58+/-0.7 degrees C) but caused a significant drop in CPP (6.5+/-12.5 mmHg).
  • Its incidence is higher in more severe cases and is correlated with a longer ICU stay.
  • It may affect ICP, but its contribution is difficult to assess when other major causes of increased intracranial volume are present.
  • Antipyretic therapy is poorly effective for controlling body temperature and may be deleterious for CPP.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics, Non-Narcotic / therapeutic use. Craniocerebral Trauma / complications. Fever / drug therapy. Fever / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chi-Square Distribution. Female. Humans. Intensive Care Units / statistics & numerical data. Intracranial Pressure. Length of Stay / statistics & numerical data. Logistic Models. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Statistics, Nonparametric

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  • (PMID = 12415441.001).
  • [ISSN] 0342-4642
  • [Journal-full-title] Intensive care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Intensive Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Non-Narcotic
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48. Pollack AE, Haisley EC: NMDA glutamate receptor stimulation is required for the expression of D2 dopamine mediated responses in apomorphine primed 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Brain Res; 2001 Apr 6;897(1-2):213-6
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  • Pretreatment with NMDA glutamate antagonists MK-801 or CPP dose-dependently attenuates these quinpirole-mediated responses.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Behavior, Animal / drug effects. Brain Chemistry / drug effects. Denervation. Dizocilpine Maleate / pharmacology. Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists / pharmacology. Male. Oxidopamine. Parkinson Disease / drug therapy. Parkinson Disease / metabolism. Piperazines / pharmacology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos / metabolism. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Sympatholytics

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  • (PMID = 11282380.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-8993
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dopamine Agonists; 0 / Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos; 0 / Receptors, Dopamine D2; 0 / Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate; 0 / Sympatholytics; 100828-16-8 / 3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid; 6LR8C1B66Q / Dizocilpine Maleate; 8HW4YBZ748 / Oxidopamine; N21FAR7B4S / Apomorphine
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49. Wang R, Zhang Y, Qing H, Liu M, Yang P: The extinction of morphine-induced conditioned place preference by histone deacetylase inhibition. Neurosci Lett; 2010 Oct 11;483(2):137-42
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  • In this study, we will examine the effect of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors on extinction of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP).
  • To exclude the effect of repeated NaBut injections themselves on morphine-CPP in the absence of extinction session, rats received injection of either NaBut or vehicle for 8 days.
  • We found that HDAC inhibition during nonconfined extinction or confined extinction consolidation can facilitate extinction of morphine-induced CPP.
  • We also showed that the extinction of drug seeking via HDAC inhibition modulates extinction learning such that reinstatement behavior is significantly attenuated.
  • There is no effect of repeated NaBut injections themselves on morphine-CPP in the absence of extinction session.
  • In conclusion, our results extend earlier reports on the ability of HDACi to modify the behavioral effects of drugs of abuse.
  • Our increasing understanding of these epigenetic mechanisms will provide key answers to basic processes in drug addiction and hopefully provide insight into designing improved treatments for drug addiction.
  • [MeSH-major] Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Conditioning (Psychology) / physiology. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Extinction, Psychological / drug effects. Histone Deacetylase 1 / antagonists & inhibitors. Morphine Dependence / drug therapy. Protein Processing, Post-Translational / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Analgesics, Opioid / pharmacology. Animals. Behavior, Animal / drug effects. Behavior, Animal / physiology. Disease Models, Animal. Male. Morphine / pharmacology. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20691756.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-7972
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroscience letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosci. Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine; EC 3.5.1.98 / Hdac1 protein, rat; EC 3.5.1.98 / Histone Deacetylase 1
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50. Hirsch HJ, Lahlou N, Gillis D, Strich D, Rosenberg-Hagen B, Chertin B, Farkas A, Hartman H, Spitz IM: Free alpha-subunit is the most sensitive marker of gonadotropin recovery after treatment of central precocious puberty with the histrelin implant. J Clin Endocrinol Metab; 2010 Jun;95(6):2841-4
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  • [Title] Free alpha-subunit is the most sensitive marker of gonadotropin recovery after treatment of central precocious puberty with the histrelin implant.
  • BACKGROUND: Gonadotropin free alpha-subunit (FAS) levels paradoxically increase during GnRH agonist (GnRHa) treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP).
  • OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine whether FAS levels remain elevated during treatment with the implant, to assess the dynamics of FAS after removal, and to ascertain the reliability of FAS for monitoring gonadotropin secretion.
  • METHODS: Ten girls with CPP were studied.
  • Duration of implant treatment ranged from 18-63 months with repeated implant removals and insertions of new implants.
  • LH, FSH, E(2), and FAS were measured before implant insertion in the two naive patients and during treatment, and in all girls before and after implant removal.
  • RESULTS: FAS levels were 0.2 and 0.4 ng/ml (normal, <0.6 ng/ml) in the two naive girls and increased to 2.4 and 5.1 ng/ml within 2-5 d of insertion.
  • FAS level (mean +/- SD) in all 10 girls during histrelin implant treatment was 1.19 +/- 0.49 ng/ml and rapidly decreased to 0.31 +/- 0.12 ng/ml within 1 wk of implant removal (P < 0.03).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Compared to LH, FSH, and E(2), FAS responds more rapidly to implant removal and represents the most sensitive indicator of gonadotropin recovery after histrelin implant treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Glycoprotein Hormones, alpha Subunit / metabolism. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / analogs & derivatives. Gonadotropins / metabolism. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy. Puberty, Precocious / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Delayed-Action Preparations. Drug Implants. Estradiol / blood. Female. Follicle Stimulating Hormone. Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Human / blood. Humans. Hydrogels. Luteinizing Hormone / blood. Recovery of Function

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  • (PMID = 20339028.001).
  • [ISSN] 1945-7197
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0 / Drug Implants; 0 / Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Human; 0 / Glycoprotein Hormones, alpha Subunit; 0 / Gonadotropins; 0 / Hydrogels; 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol; 9002-67-9 / Luteinizing Hormone; 9002-68-0 / Follicle Stimulating Hormone; H50H3S3W74 / histrelin
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51. Braun K, Ehemann V, Wiessler M, Pipkorn R, Didinger B, Mueller G, Waldeck W: High-resolution flow cytometry: a suitable tool for monitoring aneuploid prostate cancer cells after TMZ and TMZ-BioShuttle treatment. Int J Med Sci; 2009;6(6):338-47
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  • [Title] High-resolution flow cytometry: a suitable tool for monitoring aneuploid prostate cancer cells after TMZ and TMZ-BioShuttle treatment.
  • If metastatic prostate cancer gets resistant to antiandrogen therapy, there are few treatment options, because prostate cancer is not very sensitive to cytostatic agents.
  • Temozolomide (TMZ) as an orally applicable chemotherapeutic substance has been proven to be effective and well tolerated with occasional moderate toxicity especially for brain tumors and an application to prostate cancer cells seemed to be promising.
  • Unfortunately, TMZ was inefficient in the treatment of symptomatic progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC).
  • The reasons could be a low sensitivity against TMZ the short plasma half-life of TMZ, non-adapted application regimens and additionally, the aneuploid DNA content of prostate cancer cells suggesting different sensitivity against therapeutical interventions e.g. radiation therapy or chemotherapy.
  • The modular-composed carrier consists of a transmembrane transporter (CPP), connected to a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) cleavably-bound, which in turn was coupled with TMZ.
  • The NLS-sequence allows an active delivery of the TMZ into the cell nucleus after transmembrane passage of the TMZ-BioShuttle and intra-cytoplasm enzymatic cleavage and separation from the CPP.
  • This TMZ-BioShuttle could contribute to improve therapeutic options exemplified by the hormone refractory prostate cancer.
  • The high-resolution flow cytometric analysis showed to be an appropriate system for a better detection and distinction of several cell populations dependent on their different DNA-indices as well as changes in proliferation of cell populations after chemotherapeutical treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Aneuploidy. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / administration & dosage. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Drug Monitoring / methods. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Flow Cytometry / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Drug Delivery Systems. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 19946604.001).
  • [ISSN] 1449-1907
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Med Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 85622-93-1 / temozolomide
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2781174
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Flow Cytometry / Prostate Cancer Cells / TMZ-BioShuttle
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52. Fishbain DA, Lewis JE, Gao J, Cole B, Rosomoff RS: Alleged medical abandonment in chronic opioid analgesic therapy: case report. Pain Med; 2009 May-Jun;10(4):722-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. OXYCODONE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Alleged medical abandonment in chronic opioid analgesic therapy: case report.
  • 1) present details of a chronic pain patient (CPP) on chronic opioid analgesic therapy (COAT), who diverted her opioids and was terminated from treatment, and subsequently committed suicide;.
  • METHODS: This is a case report of a CPP treated by a pain physician who demonstrated aberrant drug-related behaviors and required large doses of controlled-release oxycodone.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics, Opioid / adverse effects. Malpractice / legislation & jurisprudence. Pain, Intractable / drug therapy. Physician-Patient Relations. Refusal to Treat / legislation & jurisprudence. Suicide / legislation & jurisprudence
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdominal Pain / drug therapy. Abdominal Pain / etiology. Abdominal Pain / physiopathology. Adult. Alcoholism / complications. Alprazolam / administration & dosage. Crime. Drug Administration Schedule. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Hypnotics and Sedatives / administration & dosage. Opioid-Related Disorders / etiology. Opioid-Related Disorders / psychology. Oxycodone / administration & dosage. Oxycodone / adverse effects. Pancreatitis, Chronic / complications. Pancreatitis, Chronic / physiopathology. Patient Compliance. Self Medication / psychology


53. Llena C, Forner L, Baca P: Anticariogenicity of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate: a review of the literature. J Contemp Dent Pract; 2009;10(3):1-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CALCIUM, ELEMENTAL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • AIM: This review of the literature examines the role of the natural components of saliva in maintaining tooth mineralization and the role of different casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate-based (CPP-ACP) compounds in controlling demineralization/remineralization and their clinical applications.
  • BACKGROUND: A group of peptides, known as CPP, have been shown to stabilize calcium and phosphate preserving them in an amorphous or soluble form known as amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP).
  • Calcium and phosphate are essential components of enamel and dentine and form highly insoluble complexes, but in the presence of CPP they remain soluble and biologically available.
  • This CPP-ACP complex applied to teeth by means of chewing-gum, toothpaste, lozenges, mouth rinses, or sprays is able to adhere to the dental biofilm and enamel hydroxyapatite providing bioavailable calcium and phosphate ions.
  • REVIEW RESULTS: Significantly high levels of calcium and phosphate have been found in both biofilm and subsurface incipient caries lesions and in lower level demineralization of enamel or dentine surfaces previously treated with CPP-ACP based compounds.
  • When placed on the surface of a tooth with early carious lesions, pastes with CPP-ACP complexes can prevent tooth demineralization and improve enamel remineralization and enhance fluoride activity.
  • CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Use of CPP-ACP based compounds offers a potential for use in the prevention of dental caries.
  • [MeSH-major] Cariostatic Agents / therapeutic use. Caseins / therapeutic use. Dental Caries / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Biofilms. Calcium / pharmacokinetics. Dental Enamel / metabolism. Dental Plaque / chemistry. Dentin / metabolism. Humans. Phosphates / pharmacokinetics. Saliva / physiology. Tooth Erosion / prevention & control. Tooth Remineralization / methods. Xerostomia / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19430620.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-3711
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of contemporary dental practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Contemp Dent Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cariostatic Agents; 0 / Caseins; 0 / Phosphates; 0 / casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate nanocomplex; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
  • [Number-of-references] 31
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54. Kang L, Wang D, Li B, Hu M, Zhang P, Li J: Mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant, attenuates morphine dependence and withdrawal in Sprague-Dawley rats. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse; 2008;34(5):541-52
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The effects of mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant, on morphine withdrawal and morphine conditioned place preference (CPP) were investigated in rats.
  • The expression of morphine-induced CPP was significantly blocked by mirtazapine (10 or 30 mg/kg, i.p.
  • ), while chronic treatment with mirtazapine (1 or 10 mg/kg, i.p. once, daily, for six consecutive days) significantly attenuated the acquisition of morphine CPP.
  • Our results demonstrated that mirtazapine attenuates morphine withdrawal and morphine-induced CPP in rats and suggest that mirtazapine may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of opiate dependence.
  • [MeSH-major] Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic / pharmacology. Mianserin / analogs & derivatives. Morphine Dependence / drug therapy. Substance Withdrawal Syndrome / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Conditioning, Operant / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Male. Morphine / adverse effects. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Serotonin Receptor Agonists / administration & dosage. Serotonin Receptor Agonists / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 18618337.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-9891
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of drug and alcohol abuse
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic; 0 / Serotonin Receptor Agonists; 250PJI13LM / Mianserin; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine; A051Q2099Q / mirtazapine
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55. Isaac H, Patel L, Meyer S, Hall CM, Cusick C, Price DA, Clayton PE: Efficacy of a monthly compared to 3-monthly depot GnRH analogue (goserelin) in the treatment of children with central precocious puberty. Horm Res; 2007;68(4):157-63
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. GOSERELIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy of a monthly compared to 3-monthly depot GnRH analogue (goserelin) in the treatment of children with central precocious puberty.
  • AIMS: To compare the efficacy of goserelin 10.8 mg (Zoladex LA-ZLA) administered 9-12 weekly with 3.6 mg (Zoladex-Z) given monthly in suppressing pubertal development, and effect on body mass index (BMI).
  • METHODS: Children with central precocious puberty (CPP) treated with Z (n = 34) or ZLA (n = 28) were studied retrospectively.
  • Pubertal scores and BMI SDS during 24 months' treatment were compared.
  • RESULTS: To attain adequate pubertal suppression, more patients on ZLA than Z required increase in injection frequency (p = 0.02) and this was so for 7/8 patients with a structural aetiology for CPP on ZLA and 2/8 on Z.
  • Children with CPP had an elevated BMI at the onset of therapy and ZLA had a transient positive influence on BMI.
  • [MeSH-major] Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / analogs & derivatives. Goserelin / administration & dosage. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Body Height / drug effects. Body Mass Index. Child. Delayed-Action Preparations. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Growth and Development / drug effects. Humans. Male. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 17356292.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0046
  • [Journal-full-title] Hormone research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Horm. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0F65R8P09N / Goserelin; 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
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56. Bordman R, Jackson B: Below the belt: approach to chronic pelvic pain. Can Fam Physician; 2006 Dec;52(12):1556-62
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pelvic Pain.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: To present a practical approach to the symptom complex called chronic pelvic pain (CPP).
  • Chronic pelvic pain is defined as nonmenstrual pain lasting 6 months or more that is severe enough to cause functional disability or require medical or surgical treatment.
  • MAIN MESSAGE: While the source of pain in CPP can be gynecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, or psychoneurologic, 4 conditions account for most CPP: endometriosis, adhesions, interstitial cystitis, and irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Nonnarcotic analgesics are first-line therapy for pain relief; hormonal therapies are beneficial if the pain has a cyclical component.
  • CONCLUSION: Although caring for patients with CPP can be challenging and frustrating, family physicians are in an ideal position to manage and coordinate their care.
  • [MeSH-major] Pelvic Pain / diagnosis. Pelvic Pain / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdominal Pain / etiology. Adult. Chronic Disease. Cystitis, Interstitial / complications. Cystitis, Interstitial / diagnosis. Cystitis, Interstitial / drug therapy. Endometriosis / complications. Endometriosis / diagnosis. Endometriosis / drug therapy. Female. Humans. Irritable Bowel Syndrome / complications. Irritable Bowel Syndrome / diagnosis. Irritable Bowel Syndrome / therapy. Physical Examination

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  • (PMID = 17279236.001).
  • [ISSN] 1715-5258
  • [Journal-full-title] Canadian family physician Médecin de famille canadien
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can Fam Physician
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1783755
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57. Abes S, Moulton H, Turner J, Clair P, Richard JP, Iversen P, Gait MJ, Lebleu B: Peptide-based delivery of nucleic acids: design, mechanism of uptake and applications to splice-correcting oligonucleotides. Biochem Soc Trans; 2007 Feb;35(Pt 1):53-5
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Accordingly, splicing correction by CPP-conjugated steric-block ON analogues is inefficient in the absence of endosomolytic agents.
  • They offer promising leads for the development of efficient cellular delivery vectors for therapeutic steric-block ON analogues.
  • [MeSH-minor] Alternative Splicing. Cell Membrane / metabolism. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. Cytoplasm / metabolism. Drug Delivery Systems. Gene Transfer Techniques. Genetic Therapy / methods. Genomics / methods. Humans. Models, Biological

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  • (PMID = 17233600.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-5127
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical Society transactions
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Soc. Trans.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / MC/ U105178803
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Nucleic Acids; 0 / Oligonucleotides; 0 / Peptides
  • [Number-of-references] 22
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58. Zhou J, Fan J, Hsieh JT: Inhibition of mitogen-elicited signal transduction and growth in prostate cancer with a small peptide derived from the functional domain of DOC-2/DAB2 delivered by a unique vehicle. Cancer Res; 2006 Sep 15;66(18):8954-8
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Inhibition of mitogen-elicited signal transduction and growth in prostate cancer with a small peptide derived from the functional domain of DOC-2/DAB2 delivered by a unique vehicle.
  • Differentially expressed in ovarian cancer-2/disabled 2 (DOC-2/DAB2) protein, often lost in prostate cancer and other cancer types, is a part of homeostatic machinery in normal prostate epithelium.
  • In this study, we further synthesized peptide based on the functional proline-rich domain and examined its biological function in prostate cancer using cell-permeable peptide (CPP) as a delivery system.
  • Taken together, we conclude that a functional peptide derived from proline-rich domain in DOC-2/DAB2 has growth-inhibitory activity as its native protein, and CPP seems to be an efficient delivery system in prostate cancer cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing / pharmacology. MAP Kinase Signaling System / drug effects. Oligopeptides / pharmacology. Peptide Fragments / pharmacology. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Cell Growth Processes / drug effects. Cell Growth Processes / physiology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Membrane Permeability / drug effects. Cell Membrane Permeability / physiology. Drug Design. Humans. Male. Molecular Sequence Data. Protein Structure, Tertiary. Tumor Suppressor Proteins

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  • (PMID = 16982733.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing; 0 / DAB2 protein, human; 0 / Oligopeptides; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / R11 peptide; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins
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59. Leung MC, Meredith IT, Cameron JD: Aortic stiffness affects the coronary blood flow response to percutaneous coronary intervention. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol; 2006 Feb;290(2):H624-30
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Aortic mechanical indexes measured included central pulse-wave velocity (cPWV) and central pulse pressure (cPP).
  • With the adjustment for age and gender, resting and hyperemic CBF were inversely related to cPWV irrespective of the presence of stenosis (resting: before PCI, r2 = 0.452, P < 0.01; after PCI, r2 = 0.261, P = 0.043; hyperemic: before PCI r2 = 0.503, P = 0.005; after PCI r2 = 0.500, P = 0.002), whereas they were related to cPP in absence of stenosis (resting: r2 = 0.368, P = 0.022; hyperemic: r2 = 0.370, P = 0.016).
  • A stiff aorta is associated with a reduction in CBF, a lower hyperemic CBF response, and may reduce the improvement in hyperemic CBF after successful PCI.
  • [MeSH-major] Angina Pectoris / physiopathology. Angina Pectoris / therapy. Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary. Aorta / physiopathology. Coronary Circulation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenosine / pharmacology. Aged. Blood Flow Velocity. Blood Pressure. Blood Volume / drug effects. Coronary Stenosis / complications. Elasticity. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pulse. Vasodilator Agents / pharmacology

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  • [CommentIn] Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2006 Mar;290(3):H1311 [16467460.001]
  • (PMID = 16143654.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-6135
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vasodilator Agents; K72T3FS567 / Adenosine
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60. Herzig V, Schmidt WJ: Anti-craving drugs acamprosate and naloxone do not reduce expression of morphine conditioned place preference in isolated and group-housed rats. Neurosci Lett; 2005 Feb 10;374(2):119-23
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ACAMPROSATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Anti-craving drugs acamprosate and naloxone do not reduce expression of morphine conditioned place preference in isolated and group-housed rats.
  • Relapse prevention in clean addicts is a great challenge for addiction-therapy.
  • As strong cravings often precede relapse, anti-craving drugs seem to be a promising way for addicts to stay clean.
  • Naloxone and acamprosate are two candidates for anti-craving drugs that are already used for relapse prevention in alcoholic patients.
  • However, it has to be figured out if both drugs are also effective in opiate-addicts.
  • In order to evaluate their effectiveness, a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm was used in rats conditioned to 10 mg/kg, i.p., morphine.
  • As acamprosate and naloxone have been suggested to selectively affect different types of craving (withdrawal-craving versus reward-craving), we have tried to modulate craving-behaviour by maintaining two groups of rats under different conditions (isolated versus group-housed).
  • Thereafter, the effectiveness of acamprosate (200 mg/kg, i.p.) and naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) in reducing morphine-CPP expression was evaluated.
  • As a result, isolation produced a weak reduction in morphine-CPP development.
  • Furthermore, acamprosate and naloxone had no effect on morphine-CPP expression.
  • Based on the present results, we assume that the anti-craving drugs acamprosate and naloxone may not be effective for relapse prevention in opiate-addicts.
  • [MeSH-major] Alcohol Deterrents / pharmacology. Conditioning, Operant / drug effects. Morphine / pharmacology. Naloxone / pharmacology. Narcotic Antagonists / pharmacology. Narcotics / pharmacology. Taurine / analogs & derivatives. Taurine / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Analysis of Variance. Animals. Behavior, Animal. Drug Interactions. Locomotion / drug effects. Male. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Social Isolation. Spatial Behavior / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 15644276.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-3940
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroscience letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosci. Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Alcohol Deterrents; 0 / Narcotic Antagonists; 0 / Narcotics; 1EQV5MLY3D / Taurine; 36B82AMQ7N / Naloxone; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine; N4K14YGM3J / acamprosate
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61. Hobbs A, Foster P, Prescott C, Scotland R, Ahluwalia A: Natriuretic peptide receptor-C regulates coronary blood flow and prevents myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury: novel cardioprotective role for endothelium-derived C-type natriuretic peptide. Circulation; 2004 Sep 7;110(10):1231-5
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Natriuretic peptide receptor-C regulates coronary blood flow and prevents myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury: novel cardioprotective role for endothelium-derived C-type natriuretic peptide.
  • BACKGROUND: Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury complicates myocardial infarction and stroke by exacerbating tissue damage and increasing risk of mortality.
  • We have recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor in the mesenteric resistance vasculature and described a novel signaling pathway involving activation of natriuretic peptide receptor C (NPR-C), which plays a pivotal role in the regulation of local blood flow.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: CNP and (Cys18)-atrial natriuretic factor (4-23) amide (cANF(4-23)) elicited dose-dependent decreases in coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) that were blocked by Ba(2+) and ouabain in the isolated Langendorff rat heart.
  • CNP and cANF(4-23) reduced infarct size after 25 minutes of global ischemia and 120 minutes of reperfusion, maintaining CPP and left ventricular pressure at preischemic values.
  • Moreover, this newly defined pathway represents a protective mechanism against I/R injury and a novel target for therapeutic intervention in ischemic cardiovascular disorders.
  • [MeSH-major] Coronary Circulation / drug effects. Natriuretic Peptide, C-Type / physiology. Receptors, Atrial Natriuretic Factor / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acetylcholine / pharmacology. Animals. Atrial Natriuretic Factor / pharmacology. Atrial Natriuretic Factor / therapeutic use. Barium / pharmacology. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Endothelium, Vascular / secretion. Male. Myocardial Infarction / drug therapy. Myocardial Infarction / pathology. Myocardial Reperfusion Injury / prevention & control. NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester / pharmacology. Nitric Oxide / physiology. Ouabain / pharmacology. Peptide Fragments / pharmacology. Peptide Fragments / therapeutic use. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Signal Transduction. Vasodilation / drug effects. Vasodilator Agents / pharmacology. Vasodilator Agents / therapeutic use


62. Wolff JE, Sajedi M, Brant R, Coppes MJ, Egeler RM: Choroid plexus tumours. Br J Cancer; 2002 Nov 4;87(10):1086-91

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Choroid plexus tumours.
  • Choroid plexus tumours are rare epithelial brain tumours and limited information is available regarding their biology and the best treatment.
  • A meta-analysis was done to determine prognostic factors and the influence of various treatment modalities.
  • A thorough review of the medical literature (1966-1998) revealed 566 well-documented choroid plexus tumours.
  • These were entered into a database, which was analysed to determine prognostic factors and treatment modalities.
  • Most patients with a supratentorial tumour were children, while the most common sites in adults were the fourth ventricle and the cerebellar pontine angle.
  • Cerebellar pontine angle tumours were more frequently benign.
  • Histology was the most important prognostic factor, as one, five, and 10-year projected survival rates were 90, 81, and 77% in choroid plexus-papilloma (n=353) compared to only 71, 41, and 35% in choroid plexus-carcinoma respectively (P<0.0005).
  • Surgery was prognostically relevant for both choroid plexus-papilloma (P=0.0005) and choroid plexus-carcinoma (P=0.0001).
  • Radiotherapy was associated with significantly better survival in choroid plexus-carcinomas.
  • Eight of 22 documented choroid plexus-carcinomas responded to chemotherapy.
  • Relapse after primary treatment was a poor prognostic factor in choroid plexus-carcinoma patients but not in choroid plexus-papilloma patients.
  • Treatment of choroid plexus tumours should start with radical surgical resection.
  • This should be followed by adjuvant treatment in case of choroid plexus-carcinoma, and a "wait and see" approach in choroid plexus-papilloma.
  • [MeSH-major] Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / mortality

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 Cancer Research UK
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  • (PMID = 12402146.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2376189
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63. Lampit M, Golander A, Guttmann H, Hochberg Z: Estrogen mini-dose replacement during GnRH agonist therapy in central precocious puberty: a pilot study. J Clin Endocrinol Metab; 2002 Feb;87(2):687-90
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Central precocious puberty.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Estrogen mini-dose replacement during GnRH agonist therapy in central precocious puberty: a pilot study.
  • During GnRH agonist therapy of patients with central precocious puberty (CPP), growth is sometimes suppressed to subnormal velocity.
  • The working hypotheses were that estrogen levels are suppressed by GnRH agonist therapy below normal prepubertal levels, that such suppression is responsible for the slow growth of girls with CPP during GnRH agonist therapy, and that a mini-dose of estrogen replacement will normalize growth.
  • The present pilot study examined growth and bone maturation over 2 yr in 13 patients with CPP and compared therapy with a combination of GnRH agonist and 8 microg conjugated equine estrogen (group 1) to therapy with GnRH agonist alone (group 2).
  • Both groups had adequate suppression of gonadotropins, and E2 levels were below detection levels of our assay throughout the study period.
  • In group 1 patients the ratio of the change in bone age/change in chronological age decreased from 1.2 +/- 0.7 to 0.75 +/- 0.3, and in group 2 patients it decreased to 0.6 +/- 0.3 and 0.4 +/- 0.2 (P < 0.05) during the first and second years of therapy, respectively.
  • It is concluded on a pilot basis that estrogen suppression is responsible for the slow growth of girls with CPP during GnRH agonist therapy and that a mini-dose of estrogen replacement is safe and effective for at least 24 months in maintaining normal prepubertal growth without acceleration of bone maturation or pubertal development.
  • The current pilot results do not suggest an indication or provide a justification for such therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Estrogen Replacement Therapy. Estrogens, Conjugated (USP) / administration & dosage. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / agonists. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Determination by Skeleton. Aging / physiology. Animals. Body Height / drug effects. Child. Child, Preschool. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Growth. Horses. Humans. Pilot Projects

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  • (PMID = 11836305.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-972X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrogens, Conjugated (USP); 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
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64. Bidwell GL 3rd, Raucher D: Cell penetrating elastin-like polypeptides for therapeutic peptide delivery. Adv Drug Deliv Rev; 2010 Dec 30;62(15):1486-96
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cell penetrating elastin-like polypeptides for therapeutic peptide delivery.
  • Current treatment of solid tumors is limited by side effects that result from the non-specific delivery of drugs to the tumor site.
  • Alternative targeted therapeutic approaches for localized tumors would significantly reduce systemic toxicity.
  • Peptide therapeutics are a promising new strategy for targeted cancer therapy because of the ease of peptide design and the specificity of peptides for their intracellular molecular targets.
  • However, the utility of peptides is limited by their poor pharmacokinetic parameters and poor tissue and cellular membrane permeability in vivo.
  • This review article summarizes the development of elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) as a potential carrier for thermally targeted delivery of therapeutic peptides (TP), and the use of cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to enhance the intracellular delivery of the ELP-fused TPs.
  • CPP-fused ELPs have been used to deliver a peptide inhibitor of c-Myc function and a peptide mimetic of p21 in several cancer models in vitro, and both polypeptides are currently yielding promising results in in vivo models of breast and brain cancer.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20478348.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-8294
  • [Journal-full-title] Advanced drug delivery reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA113813; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R43 CA135799; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R43 CA135799-01A2; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA113813-01A2
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cell-Penetrating Peptides; 0 / Peptides; 9007-58-3 / Elastin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS206184; NLM/ PMC2964383
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65. Manoharan C, Singh J: Evaluation of polyanhydride microspheres for basal insulin delivery: Effect of copolymer composition and zinc salt on encapsulation, in vitro release, stability, in vivo absorption and bioactivity in diabetic rats. J Pharm Sci; 2009 Nov;98(11):4237-50
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The potential of poly 1,3-bis-(p-carboxyphenoxy) propane-co-sebacic acid (p(CPP:SA)) microspheres was investigated for controlled delivery of basal insulin.
  • CPP:SA copolymers with molar compositions of 20:80, 40:60, and 50:50 were synthesized, characterized, and used in the fabrication of microspheres by water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique.
  • Insulin encapsulation efficiency (EE) and in vitro release kinetics were influenced by the molar ratios of CPP:SA copolymer.
  • Increasing CPP content and addition of zinc oxide increased EE, reduced burst release, and prolonged insulin in vitro release over a month.
  • Dimer aggregates were observed for insulin encapsulated in CPP:SA 50:50 microspheres and addition of zinc oxide prevented dimer formation.
  • Subcutaneous administration of CPP:SA 50:50 microspheres in diabetic rats controlled insulin release over a month, and the released insulin was bioactive as determined by lowering blood glucose levels.
  • The results indicate that CPP:SA microspheres controlled insulin release in vitro and in vivo over a month and the released insulin was conformationally and chemically stable, and bioactive.
  • [MeSH-minor] Absorption. Animals. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Chemistry, Pharmaceutical. Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental / drug therapy. Drug Carriers / chemistry. Drug Compounding. Drug Delivery Systems. Drug Stability. Insulin, Long-Acting. Kinetics. Male. Microscopy, Electron, Scanning. Molecular Structure. Molecular Weight. Particle Size. Polymers / chemical synthesis. Polymers / chemistry. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Technology, Pharmaceutical / methods

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association
  • (PMID = 19472196.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-6017
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pharmaceutical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pharm Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Hypoglycemic Agents; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Insulin, Long-Acting; 0 / Polyanhydrides; 0 / Polymers; 0 / Zinc Compounds
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66. Yu LL, Wang XY, Zhao M, Liu Y, Li YQ, Li FQ, Wang X, Xue YX, Lu L: Effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant in consolidation and reconsolidation of methamphetamine reward memory in mice. Psychopharmacology (Berl); 2009 Jun;204(2):203-11
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. d-METHAMPHETAMINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine whether rimonabant, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, would disrupt the consolidation and reconsolidation of methamphetamine-related reward memory, using conditioned place preference paradigm (CPP).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Separate groups of male Kunming mice were trained to acquire methamphetamine CPP.
  • Vehicle or rimonabant (1 mg/kg or 3 mg/kg, i.p.) was given at different time points: immediately after each CPP training session (consolidation), 30 min before the reactivation of CPP (retrieval), or immediately after the reactivation of CPP (reconsolidation).
  • Methamphetamine CPP was retested 24 h and 1 and 2 weeks after rimonabant administration.
  • RESULTS: Rimonabant at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg significantly inhibited the consolidation of methamphetamine CPP.
  • Only high-dose rimonabant (3 mg/kg) disrupted the retrieval and reconsolidation of methamphetamine CPP.
  • Rimonabant had no effect on methamphetamine CPP in the absence of methamphetamine CPP reactivation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that cannabinoid CB1 receptors play a major role in methamphetamine reward memory, and cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists may be a potential pharmacotherapy to manage relapse associated with drug-reward-related memory.
  • [MeSH-major] Central Nervous System Stimulants / pharmacology. Memory / drug effects. Methamphetamine / pharmacology. Piperidines / pharmacology. Pyrazoles / pharmacology. Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1 / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Male. Mice. Reward

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  • (PMID = 19148622.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2072
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychopharmacology (Berl.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Central Nervous System Stimulants; 0 / Piperidines; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1; 44RAL3456C / Methamphetamine; RML78EN3XE / rimonabant
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67. Jacka MJ, Zygun D: Survey of management of severe head injury in Canada. Can J Neurol Sci; 2007 Aug;34(3):307-12
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  • OBJECTIVE: To determine: 1. the degrees of consensus and disagreement among Canadian critical care clinicians regarding the appropriateness (benefit exceeding risk) of common therapeutic manoeuvres in patients with severe closed head injury (CHI), and 2. the frequency with which clinicians employed these manoeuvres.
  • In a scenario of diffuse axonal injury (DAI), clinicians agreed strongly that fever reduction, early enteral feeding, intensive glucose control, and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP)-directed management were appropriate.
  • The appropriateness ratings of the interventions considered in the scenario of an intracranial contusion mirrored the DAI scenario.
  • The correlation between CPP-guided therapy and the use of the EVD was weak.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This survey has described current practice with regard to treatment of patients with severe CHI.
  • Suggested priorities for evaluation include the use of osmotic diuretics, anticonvulsants, and intracranial manometry.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Injuries / therapy. Critical Care / methods. Head Injuries, Closed / therapy. Health Care Surveys. Neurology / methods. Neurosurgery / methods. Practice Patterns, Physicians' / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anticonvulsants / therapeutic use. Canada / epidemiology. Diffuse Axonal Injury / drug therapy. Diffuse Axonal Injury / physiopathology. Diuretics, Osmotic / therapeutic use. Female. Hematoma, Epidural, Cranial / drug therapy. Hematoma, Epidural, Cranial / physiopathology. Hematoma, Epidural, Cranial / surgery. Humans. Hypothermia, Induced / utilization. Intensive Care Units. Intracranial Hypertension / diagnosis. Intracranial Hypertension / prevention & control. Intracranial Hypertension / therapy. Male. Malnutrition / prevention & control. Malnutrition / therapy. Middle Aged. Risk Assessment

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  • (PMID = 17803027.001).
  • [ISSN] 0317-1671
  • [Journal-full-title] The Canadian journal of neurological sciences. Le journal canadien des sciences neurologiques
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can J Neurol Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticonvulsants; 0 / Diuretics, Osmotic
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68. Pelissier T, Infante C, Constandil L, Espinosa J, Lapeyra CD, Hernández A: Antinociceptive effect and interaction of uncompetitive and competitive NMDA receptor antagonists upon capsaicin and paw pressure testing in normal and monoarthritic rats. Pain; 2008 Jan;134(1-2):113-27
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CAPSAICIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We assessed whether intrathecal administration of the uncompetitive and competitive NMDA receptor antagonists ketamine and (+/-)CPP, respectively, could produce differential modulation on chemical and mechanical nociception in normal and monoarthritic rats.
  • In addition, the antinociceptive interaction of ketamine and (+/-)CPP on monoarthritic pain was also studied using isobolographic analysis.
  • Four weeks later, the antinociceptive effect of intrathecal administration of the drugs alone or combined was evaluated by using the intraplantar capsaicin and the paw pressure tests.
  • Ketamine (0.1, 1, 10, 30, 100, 300 and 1000 microg i.t.) and (+/-)CPP (0.125, 2.5, 7.5, 12.5, 25 and 50 microg i.t.) produced significantly greater dose-dependent antinociception in the capsaicin than in the paw pressure test.
  • Combinations produced synergy of a supra-additive nature in the capsaicin test, but only additive antinociception in paw pressure testing.
  • The efficacy of the drugs, alone or combined, is likely to depend on the differential sensitivity of tonic versus phasic pain and/or chemical versus mechanical pain to NMDA antagonists.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics / therapeutic use. Arthritis, Experimental / drug therapy. Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists / therapeutic use. Pain / drug therapy. Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Binding, Competitive. Capsaicin / toxicity. Drug Interactions / physiology. Drug Therapy, Combination. Injections, Spinal. Pain Measurement / drug effects. Pain Measurement / methods. Physical Stimulation / methods. Pressure. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Vocalization, Animal / drug effects. Vocalization, Animal / physiology

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  • (PMID = 17517475.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-6623
  • [Journal-full-title] Pain
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pain
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics; 0 / Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists; 0 / Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate; S07O44R1ZM / Capsaicin
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69. Eun JS, Bae K, Yun YP, Hong JT, Kwon HN, Oh KW: Inhibitory effects of paeonol on morphine-induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference in mice. Arch Pharm Res; 2006 Oct;29(10):904-10
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MORPHINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The inhibitory effects of paeonol, a major compound of Paeoniae radix, on the development of locomotor sensitization, conditioned place preference (CPP) and dopamine receptor supersensitivity induced by the repeated administration of morphine were investigated through behavioral experiments.
  • Repeated administration of morphine develops sensitization (reverse tolerance), a progressive enhancement of locomotion, which is used as a model for studying the drug-induced drug-seeking behaviors, and CPP, which is used as a model for studying drug reinforcement.
  • Paeonol inhibited morphine-induced hyperlocomotion, sensitization and CPP.
  • In addition, paeonol inhibited the development of postsynaptic dopamine receptors supersensitivity, which may be an underlying common mechanism that mediates the morphine-induced dopaminergic behaviors such as sensitization and CPP.
  • These results provide evidence that paeonol exerts anti-dopaminergic activity, and it is suggested that paeonol may be useful for the prevention and therapy of these adverse actions of morphine.
  • [MeSH-major] Acetophenones / pharmacology. Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Morphine / antagonists & inhibitors. Motor Activity / drug effects. Spatial Behavior / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Animals. Behavior, Animal / drug effects. Dopamine Antagonists / administration & dosage. Dopamine Antagonists / pharmacology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Injections, Subcutaneous. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred ICR. Paeonia / chemistry. Plant Roots / chemistry. Receptors, Dopamine / physiology

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  • (PMID = 17121187.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-6269
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pharmacal research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Pharm. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Acetophenones; 0 / Dopamine Antagonists; 0 / Receptors, Dopamine; 3R834EPI82 / paeonol; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine
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70. Heger S, Müller M, Ranke M, Schwarz HP, Waldhauser F, Partsch CJ, Sippell WG: Long-term GnRH agonist treatment for female central precocious puberty does not impair reproductive function. Mol Cell Endocrinol; 2006 Jul 25;254-255:217-20
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term GnRH agonist treatment for female central precocious puberty does not impair reproductive function.
  • Depot gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (GnRHa) therapy is the treatment of choice for patients with central precocious puberty (CPP).
  • The present study was performed on 46 women, former CPP patients, 12.5+/-3.7 years after the discontinuation of treatment with depot GnRHa.
  • In a structured interview, we assessed general health status, clinical signs possibly associated with hyperandrogenism, menstrual cycle, gynaecological diseases and reproductive function.
  • It appears that long-term treatment with depot GnRHa is safe and does not impair reproductive function.
  • The risk of former CPP patients to develop hirsutism and/or polycystic ovary syndrome does not seem to be increased compared to the normal population but this issue needs to be addressed in further long-term follow-up studies.
  • [MeSH-major] Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / agonists. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / therapeutic use. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy. Reproduction / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Androgens / adverse effects. Body Height / drug effects. Body Mass Index. Body Weight / drug effects. Delayed-Action Preparations / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Routes. Female. Fertility / drug effects. Follow-Up Studies. Genital Diseases, Female / etiology. Health Status. Humans. Hyperandrogenism / diagnosis. Interviews as Topic. Long-Term Care. Menstrual Cycle / drug effects. Triptorelin Pamoate / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 16757104.001).
  • [ISSN] 0303-7207
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular and cellular endocrinology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cell. Endocrinol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgens; 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone; 57773-63-4 / Triptorelin Pamoate
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71. Tao PL, Liang KW, Sung WY, Wu YT, Huang EY: Nalbuphine is effective in decreasing the rewarding effect induced by morphine in rats. Drug Alcohol Depend; 2006 Sep 15;84(2):175-81
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm in rats, we demonstrated that co-administration of nalbuphine (1mg/kg, i.p.) with morphine (5mg/kg, i.p.) during conditioning could completely block the CPP induced by morphine.
  • All of these results suggest nalbuphine could have a great potential as a pharmacotherapy for opiate abuse.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavior, Animal / drug effects. Morphine / antagonists & inhibitors. Nalbuphine / pharmacology. Narcotic Antagonists / pharmacology. Reward
  • [MeSH-minor] 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic Acid / metabolism. Animals. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid. Conditioning (Psychology). Drug Tolerance. Homovanillic Acid / metabolism. Locomotion / drug effects. Male. Narcotics / administration & dosage. Narcotics / pharmacokinetics. Nucleus Accumbens / drug effects. Nucleus Accumbens / metabolism. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 16517095.001).
  • [ISSN] 0376-8716
  • [Journal-full-title] Drug and alcohol dependence
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drug Alcohol Depend
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Narcotic Antagonists; 0 / Narcotics; 102-32-9 / 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic Acid; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine; L2T84IQI2K / Nalbuphine; X77S6GMS36 / Homovanillic Acid
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72. Petta CA, Ferriani RA, Abrao MS, Hassan D, Rosa E Silva JC, Podgaec S, Bahamondes L: Randomized clinical trial of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system and a depot GnRH analogue for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain in women with endometriosis. Hum Reprod; 2005 Jul;20(7):1993-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LEVONORGESTREL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Randomized clinical trial of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system and a depot GnRH analogue for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain in women with endometriosis.
  • BACKGROUND: The objective of this multicentre randomized, controlled clinical trial was to compare the efficacy of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) and a depot-GnRH-analogue in the control of endometriosis-related pain over a period of six months.
  • METHODS: Eighty-two women, 18 to 40 years of age (mean 30 years), with endometriosis, dysmenorrhoea and/or CPP, were randomized using a computer-generated system of sealed envelopes into either LNG-IUS (n = 39) or GnRH analogue (n = 43) treatment groups at three university centres.
  • Daily scores of endometriosis-associated CPP were evaluated using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), daily bleeding score was calculated from bleeding calendars, and improvement in quality of life was evaluated using the Psychological General Well-Being Index Questionnaire (PGWBI).
  • RESULTS: CPP decreased significantly from the first month throughout the six months of therapy with both forms of treatment and there was no difference between the groups (P > 0.999).
  • In both treatment groups, women with stage III and IV endometriosis showed a more rapid improvement in the VAS pain score than women with stage I and II of the disease (P < 0.002).
  • LNG-IUS users had a higher bleeding score than GnRH-analogue users at all time points of observation with 34% and 71% of patients in the LNG-IUS and GnRH-analogue groups, respectively, reporting no bleeding during the first treatment month, and 70% and 98% reporting no bleeding during the sixth month.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Both, the LNG-IUS and the GnRH-analogue were effective in the treatment of CPP-associated endometriosis, although no differences were observed between the two treatments.
  • This device could therefore become the treatment of choice for CPP-associated endometriosis in women who do not wish to conceive.
  • [MeSH-major] Endometriosis / drug therapy. Leuprolide / administration & dosage. Levonorgestrel / administration & dosage. Pelvic Pain / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15790607.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-1161
  • [Journal-full-title] Human reproduction (Oxford, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Reprod.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone; 5W7SIA7YZW / Levonorgestrel; EFY6W0M8TG / Leuprolide
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73. Strojan P, Popović M, Surlan K, Jereb B: Choroid plexus tumors: a review of 28-year experience. Neoplasma; 2004;51(4):306-12

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Choroid plexus tumors: a review of 28-year experience.
  • The aims of the study were to review the patients with choroid plexus tumor (CPT) treated in Slovenia between 1972-1999, to calculate the incidence of CPTs, and to evaluate treatment results in respect to tumor histology and mode of therapy.
  • Twelve patients (7 females, 5 males), 0.8-43 years old (median 6.1 years; <15 years: 10/12,83%) with CPT, representing 0.36% of all intracranial tumors registered during the period under study, were identified.
  • There were eight papillomas (CPPs) and four carcinomas (CPCs) with no difference in age distribution between the groups.
  • Of seven patients with gross tumor resection in CPP group, one patient died of postoperative meningitis and one had local recurrence 1.6 years after surgery; the latter is disease-free 17.9 years after re-operation.
  • In the CPC-group, only the patient who received adjuvant BEP chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation following incomplete surgery is alive with no signs of disease after 6.5 years.
  • Ten-year disease-specific survival for all CPTs and for CPP subgroup was 73% and 100%, respectively.
  • In Slovenia, CPTs represent 0.36% of intracranial tumors.
  • In CPPs, the treatment of choice is surgery alone.
  • For CPCs, adjuvant multiagent chemotherapy and craniospinal radiotherapy following surgery should be considered.
  • [MeSH-major] Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis. Brain Neoplasms / epidemiology. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Carcinoma / diagnosis. Carcinoma / epidemiology. Carcinoma / therapy. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / diagnosis. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / epidemiology. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / therapy. Recurrence. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15254663.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-2685
  • [Journal-full-title] Neoplasma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neoplasma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Slovakia
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74. McDonald C, Carter BS: Medical management of increased intracranial pressure after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Neurosurg Clin N Am; 2002 Jul;13(3):335-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Medical management of increased intracranial pressure after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage.
  • There are several medical therapies available to lower unacceptable ICP.
  • We advocate the stepwise institution of these therapies to maintain adequate CPP.
  • At every step in the process, consideration of definitive surgical intervention (e.g., hemicraniectomy, clot evacuation) should be entertained.
  • At this time, we cannot recommend hypothermia as a routine last step of therapy given the complications and lack of clinical effect described previously.
  • Research into this therapy continues, however.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Edema / drug therapy. Brain Edema / etiology. Diuretics, Osmotic / therapeutic use. Intracranial Pressure. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / complications. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / surgery

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  • (PMID = 12486922.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-3680
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurg. Clin. N. Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Diuretics, Osmotic
  • [Number-of-references] 27
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75. Mascia L, Andrews PJ, McKeating EG, Souter MJ, Merrick MV, Piper IR: Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in severe brain injury: the role of pressure autoregulation during cerebral perfusion pressure management. Intensive Care Med; 2000 Feb;26(2):202-5
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. OXYGEN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in severe brain injury: the role of pressure autoregulation during cerebral perfusion pressure management.
  • OBJECTIVE: To ascertain if norepinephrine can be used as part of the cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) management to increase arterial blood pressure (MAP) without causing cerebral hyperemia after severe head injury (HI).
  • INTERVENTIONS: CPP management ( = 70 mmHg).
  • Pressure autoregulation (assessed by norepinephrine infusion) was defined intact if % CPP/%CVR < or = 2.
  • Norepinephrine increased CPP by 33 % (+/- 4).
  • CONCLUSIONS: During CPP management norepinephrine can be used to increase MAP without potentiating hyperemia if pressure autoregulation is preserved.
  • The assessment of pressure autoregulation should be considered as a guide for arterial pressure-oriented therapy after HI.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Injuries / drug therapy. Brain Injuries / physiopathology. Cerebrovascular Circulation. Intracranial Pressure / drug effects. Norepinephrine / therapeutic use. Vasoconstrictor Agents / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Analysis of Variance. Blood Flow Velocity / drug effects. Blood Flow Velocity / physiology. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Blood Pressure / physiology. Female. Glasgow Coma Scale. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Intensive Care Units. Male. Middle Aged. Oxygen / metabolism. Prospective Studies. Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial

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  • (PMID = 10784309.001).
  • [ISSN] 0342-4642
  • [Journal-full-title] Intensive care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Intensive Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vasoconstrictor Agents; S88TT14065 / Oxygen; X4W3ENH1CV / Norepinephrine
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76. El-Gaidi MA, Eissa EM: Infantile intracranial neoplasms: characteristics and surgical outcomes of a contemporary series of 21 cases in an Egyptian referral center. Pediatr Neurosurg; 2010;46(4):272-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Infantile intracranial neoplasms: characteristics and surgical outcomes of a contemporary series of 21 cases in an Egyptian referral center.
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the demographic, clinical, radiological, pathological and surgical features and outcomes of infantile intracranial neoplasms, the second most common neoplasm in infants.
  • RESULTS: Out of 451 patients with primary intracranial neoplasms (age 0-14 years), 21 infants (<1 year) underwent surgery, representing 4.7% of total cases.
  • The most common tumor was choroid plexus papilloma (23.8%), followed by teratoma (19%) then astrocytoma and ependymoma (14.3% each).
  • Three patients received chemotherapy, but none received radiotherapy.
  • The statistically significant predictors of prognosis were the extent of resection and tumor grade.
  • CONCLUSION: Although the prognosis for infantile intracranial neoplasms is worse than for older children, an overall promising outcome with low operative morbidity and mortality was achieved using gross total excision and appropriate adjuvant chemotherapy as part of a multidisciplinary approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / mortality. Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / mortality. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Astrocytoma / drug therapy. Astrocytoma / mortality. Astrocytoma / surgery. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Egypt / epidemiology. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Ependymoma / mortality. Ependymoma / surgery. Female. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Male. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / mortality. Medulloblastoma / surgery. Morbidity. Neurilemmoma / drug therapy. Neurilemmoma / mortality. Neurilemmoma / surgery. Prognosis. Quality of Life. Referral and Consultation / statistics & numerical data. Retrospective Studies. Teratoma / drug therapy. Teratoma / mortality. Teratoma / surgery

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 21160236.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0305
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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77. Udy A, Boots R, Senthuran S, Stuart J, Deans R, Lassig-Smith M, Lipman J: Augmented creatinine clearance in traumatic brain injury. Anesth Analg; 2010 Dec;111(6):1505-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Augmented creatinine clearance in traumatic brain injury.
  • BACKGROUND: Hypertonic saline and/or norepinephrine infusion are routinely used to achieve a desired cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
  • METHODS: This was an observational cohort study in TBI patients older than 16 years with normal serum creatinine concentrations, requiring maintenance of CPP.
  • Demographic data, use of vasoactive medications, fluid balance, feeding regimen, and hemodynamic variables were recorded throughout the study period.
  • The mean maximum CrCl was 179 mL/min/1.73 m(2) while receiving CPP therapy (95% confidence interval [CI], 159-198), returning to a mean of 111 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (95% CI, 91-131; P < 0.001) when measured after discharge from the intensive care unit.
  • The mean CrCl in the intensive care unit while not receiving CPP therapy was 150 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (95% CI, 134-167; P = 0.03).
  • The mean time to reach peak CrCl while receiving active treatment was 4.7 days (95% CI, 3.0-6.4).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Augmented CrCls are common in TBI patients receiving active management of CPP and persist even after discontinuation of such therapy.
  • Further work is needed to clarify the impact of such clearances on renally excreted drugs in this setting.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenergic alpha-Agonists / administration & dosage. Brain Injuries / therapy. Creatinine / urine. Fluid Therapy. Norepinephrine / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biomarkers / urine. Female. Humans. Intensive Care Units. Intracranial Pressure / drug effects. Male. Queensland. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Up-Regulation. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 21048095.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-7598
  • [Journal-full-title] Anesthesia and analgesia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anesth. Analg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic alpha-Agonists; 0 / Biomarkers; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine; X4W3ENH1CV / Norepinephrine
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78. Shahrokhi N, Khaksari M, Soltani Z, Mahmoodi M, Nakhaee N: Effect of sex steroid hormones on brain edema, intracranial pressure, and neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury. Can J Physiol Pharmacol; 2010 Apr;88(4):414-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of sex steroid hormones on brain edema, intracranial pressure, and neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury.
  • Recent studies have reported that estrogen and progesterone have a neuroprotective effect after traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the mechanism(s) for this effect have not yet been elucidated.
  • The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of sex steroid hormones on changes in brain edema, intracranial pressure (ICP), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) after TBI in ovariectomized (OVX) rats.
  • ICP was measured in the spinal cord, and CPP was calculated by subtracting the mean arterial pressure (MAP) from ICP.
  • The results revealed that brain water content after TBI was lower (p < 0.001) in the estrogen and progesterone groups than in the vehicle group.
  • The CPP in the estrogen and progesterone groups increased after 24 h compared with vehicle (p < 0.001).
  • In conclusion, pharmacological doses of estrogen and progesterone improved ICP, CPP, and neurological scores after TBI in OVX rats, which implies that these hormones play a neuroprotective role in TBI.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Edema / drug therapy. Brain Injuries / drug therapy. Estrogens / therapeutic use. Intracranial Pressure / drug effects. Progesterone / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Female. Nervous System Diseases. Ovariectomy. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20555409.001).
  • [ISSN] 1205-7541
  • [Journal-full-title] Canadian journal of physiology and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrogens; 4G7DS2Q64Y / Progesterone
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79. Lewis KA, Eugster EA: Experience with the once-yearly histrelin (GnRHa) subcutaneous implant in the treatment of central precocious puberty. Drug Des Devel Ther; 2009;3:1-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Experience with the once-yearly histrelin (GnRHa) subcutaneous implant in the treatment of central precocious puberty.
  • In 2007, a hydrogel histrelin implant was approved for the treatment of children with central precocious puberty (CPP).
  • Children with CPP commonly have reduced height potential due to premature closure of the epiphyseal growth plates from exposure to sex steroids.
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa) treatment halts puberty and allows for improvement of adult height.
  • A hydrogel implant delivery system utilizing the potent GnRHa, histrelin, was first developed for use in men with prostate cancer.
  • A once yearly histrelin subcutaneous implant was subsequently developed for the treatment of children with CPP.
  • Studies to date have demonstrated safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of this treatment option in patients treated up to 2 years.
  • Cost of this treatment seems comparable to somewhat higher than the commonly used GnRHa treatment option, depot leuprolide.
  • While long term studies are needed to establish continued efficacy and safety beyond 2 years of treatment, the histrelin implant appears to be an attractive option for GnRHa treatment in patients with CPP.

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  • (PMID = 19920916.001).
  • [ISSN] 1177-8881
  • [Journal-full-title] Drug design, development and therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drug Des Devel Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2769233
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; central precocious puberty / gonadotropin-releasing-hormone analogs / histrelin / implant
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80. Nabhan ZM, Feezle LK, Kunselman AR, Johnson NB, Lee PA: Normal adult height among girls treated for central precocious puberty with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog therapy. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab; 2009 Apr;22(4):309-16
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Normal adult height among girls treated for central precocious puberty with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog therapy.
  • AIM: To evaluate adult height (AH) among girls with central precocious puberty (CPP) treated with gonadotropin releasing hormone analog (GnRHa) and to assess the impact of posttreatment growth on AH.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Medical records of girls with CPP were reviewed.
  • There was a significant difference between AH and predicted adult height (PAH) at the initiation of therapy (p = 0.005).
  • Using univariate analysis, the only factor associated with AH was total growth after discontinuation of therapy.
  • Growth after discontinuation of therapy was variable and often greater than expected.
  • Both age and skeletal age at the end of therapy had strong linear relationships with growth after therapy explaining 60% of this growth.
  • CONCLUSION: This report confirms that AH is normal among females with CPP treated in a timely fashion with GnRHa.
  • The lack of predictability of growth after discontinuation of therapy suggests that the decision to stop treatment should be individualized.
  • [MeSH-major] Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / analogs & derivatives. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / therapeutic use. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19554804.001).
  • [ISSN] 0334-018X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric endocrinology & metabolism : JPEM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
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81. Fenton BW, Palmieri PA, Durner C, Fanning J: Quantification of abdominal wall pain using pain pressure threshold algometry in patients with chronic pelvic pain. Clin J Pain; 2009 Jul-Aug;25(6):500-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a syndrome involving 1 or more pain generating organs in the pelvis, which includes pain from the lower anterior abdominal wall.
  • In this study, pain pressure threshold (PPT) testing of the lower anterior abdominal wall in CPP patients was performed to determine the range and distribution of values at each site, and the clinical utility of using PPT in a definition of MFPS.
  • METHODS: Fifty-six patients evaluated in a CPP specialty clinic underwent PPT algometry of 14 sites on the lower anterior abdominal wall.
  • These values were described and evaluated before and after treatment.
  • PPT values were also evaluated in patients found to be drug seeking.
  • After trigger point injection there was a 75% improvement in PPT, and response to medical therapy resulted in a 60% improvement.
  • A composite measure was able to distinguish drug-seeking patients with statistical accuracy.
  • DISCUSSION: PPT testing can be used to evaluate MFPS in CPP patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Pain / diagnosis. Abdominal Pain / etiology. Abdominal Wall / physiopathology. Pain Threshold / physiology. Pelvic Pain / complications. Pressure
  • [MeSH-minor] Analysis of Variance. Chronic Disease. Humans. Pain Measurement / methods. ROC Curve. Sensation

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  • (PMID = 19542798.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-5409
  • [Journal-full-title] The Clinical journal of pain
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin J Pain
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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82. Biala G, Budzynska B, Staniak N: Effects of rimonabant on the reinstatement of nicotine-conditioned place preference by drug priming in rats. Behav Brain Res; 2009 Sep 14;202(2):260-5
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MORPHINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effects of rimonabant on the reinstatement of nicotine-conditioned place preference by drug priming in rats.
  • Drug addiction is a chronic disorder characterized by a relatively high rate of relapse even after long period of abstinence.
  • In the present study, we used the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm to investigate the establishment, extinction, reinstatement and cross-reinstatement of nicotine-induced place conditioning in rats.
  • Nicotine produced a place preference to the initially less-preferred compartment paired with its injections during conditioning (0.5mg/kg, i.p., three drug sessions).
  • Once established, nicotine CPP was extinguished by repeated testing.
  • Following this extinction phase, the reinstatement of CPP was investigated.
  • These priming injections of both drugs induced a marked preference for the compartment previously paired with nicotine.
  • Furthermore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist rimonabant (0.5, 1 and 2mg/kg, i.p.) in blocking the reinstatement of nicotine-induced CPP provoked by nicotine and morphine.
  • It was shown that rimonabant attenuated the reinstatement of nicotine-conditioned response induced by both drugs.
  • The outcome of our studies may suggest that CB1 receptor antagonists may become a promising target for effective pharmacotherapy of tobacco addiction and polydrug abuse.
  • [MeSH-major] Central Nervous System Agents / administration & dosage. Conditioning, Classical / drug effects. Morphine / administration & dosage. Nicotine / administration & dosage. Nicotinic Agonists / administration & dosage. Piperidines / administration & dosage. Pyrazoles / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Analysis of Variance. Animals. Extinction, Psychological. Male. Random Allocation. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1 / antagonists & inhibitors. Spatial Behavior / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 19463710.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-7549
  • [Journal-full-title] Behavioural brain research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Behav. Brain Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Central Nervous System Agents; 0 / Nicotinic Agonists; 0 / Piperidines; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1; 158681-13-1 / rimonabant; 6M3C89ZY6R / Nicotine; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine
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83. Kunz GJ, Sherman TI, Klein KO: Luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol suppression and growth in girls with central precocious puberty: is more suppression better? Are pre-injection LH levels useful in monitoring treatment? J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab; 2007 Nov;20(11):1189-98
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol suppression and growth in girls with central precocious puberty: is more suppression better? Are pre-injection LH levels useful in monitoring treatment?
  • CONTEXT: Girls with central precocious puberty (CPP) are treated with gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues to suppress puberty.
  • Gonadotropin levels are used to monitor treatment, since estradiol is difficult to measure at low levels.
  • OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that in girls treated for CPP, estradiol levels (by ultrasensitive bioassay) would correlate with the rate of skeletal maturation and linear growth velocity.
  • We also compared pre- and post-injection LH levels for monitoring treatment.
  • DESIGN: Thirty girls with CPP were followed for up to 2 years during treatment with leuprolide acetate depot at a dose of 0.3 mg/kg/28 days.
  • RESULTS: Estradiol levels were suppressed to below the detection limit in three-quarters of the girls and did not correlate with the rate of skeletal maturation or linear growth.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Greater LH suppression may improve height outcome in girls treated for CPP with GnRH analogues.
  • Pre-injection LH levels may be useful for monitoring treatment.
  • Further investigation is needed, with longer treatment duration, a range of doses, and ultimately final height.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Monitoring / methods. Estradiol / blood. Fertility Agents, Female / therapeutic use. Growth / drug effects. Leuprolide / therapeutic use. Luteinizing Hormone / blood. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Body Height / drug effects. Bone and Bones / metabolism. Bone and Bones / pathology. Bone and Bones / radiography. Child. Child, Preschool. Delayed-Action Preparations. Female. Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18183790.001).
  • [ISSN] 0334-018X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric endocrinology & metabolism : JPEM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0 / Fertility Agents, Female; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol; 9002-67-9 / Luteinizing Hormone; EFY6W0M8TG / Leuprolide
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84. Toshniwal GR, Dureja GP, Prashanth SM: Transsacrococcygeal approach to ganglion impar block for management of chronic perineal pain: a prospective observational study. Pain Physician; 2007 Sep;10(5):661-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Chronic Perineal Pain (CPP) has been effectively managed by ganglion impar block.
  • METHODS: In this prospective study, 16 consecutive patients who required ganglion impar block for CPP were followed for two months.
  • The Visual Analogue Scale for pain (VAS) at presentation time required for the pain to reduce by 50% to be considered effective and VAS was recorded at different time points during 2-month follow-up, and time required to perform the procedure, number of attempts, and any complications were also noted.
  • RESULTS: All the blocks were effective with a mean duration of 12+/-3 minutes for 50% reduction in VAS.
  • The mean duration required to perform the procedure in neurolytic block patients was 7.8+/-2 minutes and 5.7+/-1 minutes in therapeutic block patients.
  • CONCLUSION: A transsacrococcygeal approach for a ganglion impar block is a technically feasible and safe technique.
  • We recommend this technique for neurolysis or radiofrequency ablation of the ganglion impar and for diagnostic blocks, especially when the diagnosis and further plan of management is dependent on the response of the diagnostic block.
  • [MeSH-major] Autonomic Nerve Block / methods. Ganglia, Sympathetic / surgery. Pelvic Pain / drug therapy. Pelvic Pain / surgery. Sacrococcygeal Region / surgery

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  • [CommentIn] Pain Physician. 2007 Nov;10(6):780-1; author reply 781 [17987103.001]
  • (PMID = 17876362.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-3159
  • [Journal-full-title] Pain physician
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pain Physician
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Sclerosing Solutions; 339NCG44TV / Phenol; X4W7ZR7023 / Methylprednisolone; Y8335394RO / Bupivacaine
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85. Lottes AE, Rundell AE, Geddes LA, Kemeny AE, Otlewski MP, Babbs CF: Sustained abdominal compression during CPR raises coronary perfusion pressures as much as vasopressor drugs. Resuscitation; 2007 Dec;75(3):515-24
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Sustained abdominal compression during CPR raises coronary perfusion pressures as much as vasopressor drugs.
  • OBJECTIVES: This study investigated sustained abdominal compression as a means to improve coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and compared the resulting CPP augmentation with that achieved using vasopressor drugs.
  • METHOD: During electrically induced ventricular fibrillation in anesthetized, 30kg juvenile pigs, Thumper CPR was supplemented at intervals either by constant abdominal compression at 100-500mmHg using an inflated contoured cuff or by the administration of vasopressor drugs (epinephrine, vasopressin, or glibenclamide).
  • CPP before and after cuff inflation or drug administration was the end point.
  • RESULTS: Sustained abdominal compression at >200mmHg increases CPP during VF and otherwise standard CPR by 8-18mmHg.
  • The effect persists over practical ranges of chest compression force and duty cycle and is similar to that achieved with vasopressor drugs.
  • Constant abdominal compression also augments CPP after prior administration of epinephrine or vasopressin.
  • CONCLUSIONS: During CPR noninvasive abdominal compression with the inflatable contoured cuff rapidly elevates the CPP, sustains the elevated CPP as long as the device is inflated, and is immediately and controllably reversible upon device deflation.
  • Physical control of peripheral vascular resistance during CPR by abdominal compression has some advantages over pharmacological manipulation and deserves serious reconsideration, now that the limitations of pressor drugs during CPR have become better understood, including post-resuscitation myocardial depression and the need for intravenous access.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation / methods. Coronary Circulation / drug effects. Coronary Circulation / physiology. Vascular Resistance / physiology. Vasoconstrictor Agents / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdomen. Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Pressure. Sus scrofa. Ventricular Fibrillation / therapy

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  • (PMID = 17630090.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-9572
  • [Journal-full-title] Resuscitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Resuscitation
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIBIB NIH HHS / EB / NGAR21EB001540
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vasoconstrictor Agents
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86. Fishbain DA, Lewis JE, Cole B, Rosomoff RS, Rosomoff HL: Medicolegal rounds: medicolegal issues and alleged breaches of standards of medical care in a patient motor vehicle accident allegedly related to chronic opioid analgesic therapy. J Opioid Manag; 2007 Jan-Feb;3(1):16-20
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHADONE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Medicolegal rounds: medicolegal issues and alleged breaches of standards of medical care in a patient motor vehicle accident allegedly related to chronic opioid analgesic therapy.
  • The objective of this medicolegal case report is to present the details of the case of a chronic pain patient (CPP) who was placed on chronic opioid analgesic therapy (COAT) and was involved in a motor vehicle accident, alleged in litigation to be related to COAT.
  • We aim to present both the plaintiffs and defendant's expert witnesses' opinions on whether the defendant physician fell below the "standard" in allowing the CPP to drive.
  • [MeSH-major] Accidents, Traffic / legislation & jurisprudence. Analgesics, Opioid / administration & dosage. Automobile Driving / standards. Methadone / therapeutic use. Pain / drug therapy. Pain, Intractable / drug therapy. Quality of Health Care / standards
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chronic Disease. Expert Testimony. Florida. Humans. Male. Malpractice / legislation & jurisprudence. Pain Clinics / standards

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  • (PMID = 17367090.001).
  • [ISSN] 1551-7489
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of opioid management
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Opioid Manag
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Legal Cases
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; UC6VBE7V1Z / Methadone
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87. Mori T, Sasaki J, Aoyama Y, Sera T: Regulation of cancer-related growth factor expression by artificial zinc-finger proteins. Nucleic Acids Symp Ser (Oxf); 2006;(50):291-2

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  • One attractive approach to anticancer therapy is repression of expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, which is a potent target for prevention of tumor growth.
  • We demonstrated ATFs fused to CPPs, designated CPP-ATFs or designed regulatory proteins (DRPs), could penetrate into mammalian cells and transiently repress expression of a reporter gene, which was under control of the VEGF promoter/5'-UTR.
  • We discuss gene-regulatory properties of CPP-ATFs in detail.
  • [MeSH-minor] Gene Expression / drug effects. Genes, Reporter. Humans. Neoplasms / blood supply. Zinc Fingers

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  • (PMID = 17150932.001).
  • [ISSN] 1746-8272
  • [Journal-full-title] Nucleic acids symposium series (2004)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nucleic Acids Symp Ser (Oxf)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / PTD4-ATF protein; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
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88. Gupta B, Torchilin VP: Transactivating transcriptional activator-mediated drug delivery. Expert Opin Drug Deliv; 2006 Mar;3(2):177-90
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  • [Title] Transactivating transcriptional activator-mediated drug delivery.
  • However, the TATp remains the most popular CPP used for a variety of purposes.
  • This review article attempts to bring together the available data on TAT-mediated intracellular uptake of a broad range of molecules and nanoparticles.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Carriers. Gene Products, tat / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies. Arginine / chemistry. Cell Membrane / metabolism. Genetic Therapy. Humans. Nanostructures. Peptides / administration & dosage. Peptides / chemistry. Protein Transport

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  • (PMID = 16506946.001).
  • [ISSN] 1742-5247
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on drug delivery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Drug Deliv
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Gene Products, tat; 0 / Peptides; 94ZLA3W45F / Arginine
  • [Number-of-references] 120
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89. Szendei G, Hernádi Z, Dévényi N, Csapó Z: Is there any correlation between stages of endometriosis and severity of chronic pelvic pain? Possibilities of treatment. Gynecol Endocrinol; 2005 Aug;21(2):93-100
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pelvic Pain.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Is there any correlation between stages of endometriosis and severity of chronic pelvic pain? Possibilities of treatment.
  • We report herein findings on 181 patients, suffering from pelvic endometriosis confirmed by histology, whose main symptom was chronic pelvic pain (CPP).
  • The short form of the McGill pain questionnaire was used for the evaluation of CPP.
  • After the first operative intervention, therapy with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog was given for 6 months.
  • Second-look laparoscopy was performed 8-10 weeks after the end of GnRH-analog treatment, which was followed by a non-conventionally administered, monophasic oral contraceptive (OC) treatment.
  • In the long term, 118 patients received the non-conventionally administered, monophasic OC treatment, which contained a third-generation progestogen, to be taken continuously for at least 6 months.
  • The other 63 patients who did not receive OC treatment for one reason or another were evaluated as a control group.
  • We analyzed data on CPP before the first surgical intervention, then following therapy with the GnRH analog at the second-look operation, and then after 6, 12, 18 and 24 months.
  • We also reviewed potential causes of CPP, especially focused on endometriosis.
  • No correlation was found between the stage of endometriosis according to R-AFS score and the severity of CPP.
  • At the 24-month follow-up after second-look laparoscopy, the non-conventionally administered monophasic OC treatment was found not only to significantly reduce pain scores, but also the required radical operative solution (hysterectomy plus bilateral adnexectomy) for CPP by OC users.
  • [MeSH-major] Contraceptives, Oral, Combined / therapeutic use. Endometriosis / drug therapy. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / therapeutic use. Pelvic Pain / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Administration Schedule. Dysmenorrhea / drug therapy. Dyspareunia / drug therapy. Female. Humans. Laparoscopy. Pain Measurement. Secondary Prevention

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  • (PMID = 16109595.001).
  • [ISSN] 0951-3590
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Endocrinol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contraceptives, Oral, Combined; 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
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90. Pillai A, Rajeev K, Chandi S, Unnikrishnan M: Intrinsic brainstem choroid plexus papilloma. Case report. J Neurosurg; 2004 Jun;100(6):1076-8
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  • [Title] Intrinsic brainstem choroid plexus papilloma. Case report.
  • The authors report an intrinsic brainstem lesion that was diagnosed initially as a pontine cavernoma, which finally proved to be a choroid plexus papilloma.
  • Choroid plexus papillomas are rare tumors of the central nervous system and are usually intraventricular in location.
  • The occurrence of this tumor in an intraparenchymal location is extremely rare, and its occurrence within the brainstem is previously unreported.
  • The authors also report a trial of chemotherapy with lomustine in the management of the residual tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Stem Neoplasms / pathology. Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / pathology. Glioma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Lomustine / therapeutic use. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 15200124.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 7BRF0Z81KG / Lomustine
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91. Ide S, Minami M, Satoh M, Uhl GR, Sora I, Ikeda K: Buprenorphine antinociception is abolished, but naloxone-sensitive reward is retained, in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. Neuropsychopharmacology; 2004 Sep;29(9):1656-63
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  • In contrast, buprenorphine retained its ability to establish a conditioned place preference (CPP) in homozygous MOR-KO, although the magnitude of place preference was reduced as the number of copies of wild-type mu-opioid receptor genes was reduced.
  • The remaining CPP of buprenorphine was abolished by pretreatment with the nonselective opioid antagonist naloxone, but only partially blocked by pretreatment with either the delta-selective opioid antagonist naltrindole or the kappa-selective opioid antagonist norbinaltorphimine.
  • These data, and biochemical confirmation of buprenorphine actions as a partial delta-, mu-, and kappa-agonist, support the ideas that mu-opioid receptors mediate most of analgesic properties of buprenorphine, but that mu- and delta- and/or kappa-opioid receptors are each involved in the rewarding effects of this drug.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics, Opioid / antagonists & inhibitors. Analgesics, Opioid / pharmacology. Buprenorphine / antagonists & inhibitors. Buprenorphine / pharmacology. Conditioning, Operant / drug effects. Naloxone / pharmacology. Narcotic Antagonists / pharmacology. Pain / drug therapy. Pain / genetics. Receptors, Opioid, mu / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. CHO Cells. Cricetinae. Cyclic AMP / metabolism. DNA, Complementary / genetics. Hot Temperature. Humans. Mice. Mice, Knockout. Pain Measurement / drug effects. Radioligand Assay. Reaction Time / drug effects. Receptors, Opioid, delta / agonists. Receptors, Opioid, delta / genetics. Receptors, Opioid, kappa / agonists. Receptors, Opioid, kappa / genetics. Reward

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  • (PMID = 15100703.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-133X
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuropsychopharmacology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 0 / DNA, Complementary; 0 / Narcotic Antagonists; 0 / Receptors, Opioid, delta; 0 / Receptors, Opioid, kappa; 0 / Receptors, Opioid, mu; 36B82AMQ7N / Naloxone; 40D3SCR4GZ / Buprenorphine; E0399OZS9N / Cyclic AMP
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92. Baxter N, Black J, Duffy S: The effect of a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogue as first-line management in cyclical pelvic pain. J Obstet Gynaecol; 2004 Jan;24(1):64-6
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  • [Title] The effect of a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogue as first-line management in cyclical pelvic pain.
  • Preliminary data shows a decrease in pain scores from before to after treatment which is statistically significant (P<0.0001) as well as a general improvement in other symptoms.
  • Therefore, it is beneficial to treat women with CPP with GnRH analogues as first-line management to relieve painful symptoms, avoid surgical risks and save money.
  • [MeSH-major] Endometriosis / drug therapy. Leuprolide / administration & dosage. Pelvic Pain / drug therapy. Periodicity
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chronic Disease. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Injections, Subcutaneous. Laparoscopy / methods. Longitudinal Studies. Pain Measurement. Patient Satisfaction. Pilot Projects. Prospective Studies. Sampling Studies. Severity of Illness Index. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14675984.001).
  • [ISSN] 0144-3615
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology : the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Obstet Gynaecol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EFY6W0M8TG / Leuprolide
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93. Micillo M, Salerno M, Officioso A, Perna E, Gasparini N, Pisaturo L, Di Maio S: Near final height after GnRH agonist treatment in central precocious puberty. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab; 2000 Jul;13 Suppl 1:787-90
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  • [Title] Near final height after GnRH agonist treatment in central precocious puberty.
  • The impact of treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP) with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) on final height remains controversial.
  • We analyzed the long term results of 23 girls with CPP treated with triptorelin or leuprolide.
  • Their "near final height" (NFH) assessed at a bone age of at least 14 years and expressed as SDS, was compared either with predicted height before treatment (PAH) or with parental height (TH).
  • The NFH of the 23 girls (-0.9 +/- 1.0 SDS) was not different either from PAH (-0.85 +/- 1.5 SDS) or from TH (-0.5 +/0.6 SDS).
  • Earlier treated girls reached a NFH (-0.97 +/- 1.0 SDS) not different from later treated girls (-0.91 +/- 1.0 SDS; p = ns) and both groups reached parental height (NFH - TH = -0.44 +/- 1 and -0.09 +/- 0.83 SDS, respectively).
  • [MeSH-major] Body Height / drug effects. Brain Diseases / complications. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / agonists. Puberty, Precocious / drug therapy. Puberty, Precocious / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone Development. Child. Female. Humans. Leuprolide / therapeutic use. Triptorelin Pamoate / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 10969922.001).
  • [ISSN] 0334-018X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric endocrinology & metabolism : JPEM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone; 57773-63-4 / Triptorelin Pamoate; EFY6W0M8TG / Leuprolide
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94. Lang EW, Chesnut RM: A bedside method for investigating the integrity and critical thresholds of cerebral pressure autoregulation in severe traumatic brain injury patients. Br J Neurosurg; 2000 Apr;14(2):117-26
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  • [Title] A bedside method for investigating the integrity and critical thresholds of cerebral pressure autoregulation in severe traumatic brain injury patients.
  • To avoid ischaemic secondary insults after severe head injury (SHI) it would be helpful to know the relationship between cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and intracranial pressure (ICP).
  • Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was varied to detect changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) indicative of intact AR.
  • Three types of responses were observed:.
  • (3) MAP elevation lowers ICP; Changes between types 1/2 and type 3 suggests AR breakpoints.
  • Varying response types and breakpoints were observed between and within patients.
  • Lower AR breakpoints were seen from 60 to 80 mmHg CPP, upper breakpoints were as high as 112.
  • CPP monitoring achieves a twofold utility in targeted therapy:.
  • Although the precise relationship between pAR breakpoints and the adequacy of cerebral perfusion to meet metabolic needs remains unclear, a technique such as described here is simple and has much to offer in targeting therapy toward specific pathophysiological processes in traumatic brain injury.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Injuries / physiopathology. Homeostasis / physiology. Intracranial Pressure / physiology. Point-of-Care Systems
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Blood Pressure / physiology. Cerebrovascular Circulation / drug effects. Cerebrovascular Circulation / physiology. Glasgow Coma Scale. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Phenylephrine / pharmacology. Vasoconstrictor Agents / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 10889883.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-8697
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vasoconstrictor Agents; 1WS297W6MV / Phenylephrine
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95. Bhutada P, Mundhada Y, Bansod K, Rathod S, Hiware R, Dixit P, Umathe S, Mundhada D: Inhibitory effect of berberine on the motivational effects of ethanol in mice. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry; 2010 Dec 1;34(8):1472-9
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  • It is believed that drug-induced rewarding effects play an important role in the development of substance dependence.
  • Recently, berberine was reported to inhibit the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine, morphine, and nicotine.
  • Therefore, we studied the effect of berberine on locomotor sensitization, conditioned place preference (CPP), and ethanol drinking preference in mice.
  • In another set of experiment, treatment with berberine (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the induction and expression of ethanol-induced CPP in mice.
  • [MeSH-major] Alcohol Drinking / drug therapy. Berberine / pharmacology. Ethanol / antagonists & inhibitors. Ethanol / pharmacology. Motivation / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Conditioning (Psychology) / physiology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Motor Activity / drug effects. Motor Activity / physiology. Random Allocation

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20713115.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-4216
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0I8Y3P32UF / Berberine; 3K9958V90M / Ethanol
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96. Narotam PK, Puri V, Roberts JM, Taylon C, Vora Y, Nathoo N: Management of hypertensive emergencies in acute brain disease: evaluation of the treatment effects of intravenous nicardipine on cerebral oxygenation. J Neurosurg; 2008 Dec;109(6):1065-74
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  • [Title] Management of hypertensive emergencies in acute brain disease: evaluation of the treatment effects of intravenous nicardipine on cerebral oxygenation.
  • This study explores the effect of nicardipine on regional brain tissue O(2) (PbtO(2)) during treatment of acute hypertensive emergencies.
  • All patients had a parenchymal PbtO(2) and intracranial pressure bolt inserted following resuscitation.
  • Intravenous nicardipine (5-15 mg/hour) was titrated to systolic BP < 160 mm Hg, diastolic BP < 90 mm Hg, mean arterial BP (MABP) 90-110 mm Hg, and PbtO(2) > 20 mm Hg.
  • Physiological parameters-intracranial pressure, PbtO(2), central venous pressure, systolic BP, diastolic BP, MABP, fraction of inspired O(2), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP)-were compared before infusion, at 4 hours, and at 8 hours using a t-test.
  • RESULTS: Sixty episodes of hypertension were reported in 30 patients (traumatic brain injury in 13 patients; aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in 11; intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage in 3 and 1, respectively; arteriovenous malformation in 1; and hypoxic brain injury in 1).
  • Nicardipine was effective in 87% of the patients (with intravenous beta blockers in 4 patients), with a 19.7% reduction in mean 4-hour MABP (115.3 +/- 13.1 mm Hg preinfusion vs 92.9 +/- 11.40 mm Hg after 4 hours of therapy, p < 0.001).
  • No deleterious effect on mean PbtO(2) was recorded (26.74 +/- 15.42 mm Hg preinfusion vs 27.68 +/- 12.51 mm Hg after 4 hours of therapy, p = 0.883) despite significant reduction in CPP.
  • Less dependence on normobaric hyperoxia was achieved at 8 hours (0.72 +/- 0.289 mm Hg preinfusion vs 0.626 +/- 0.286 mm Hg after 8 hours of therapy, p < 0.01).
  • Subgroup analysis revealed that 12 patients had low pretreatment PbtO(2) (10.30 +/- 6.49 mm Hg), with higher CPP (p < 0.001) requiring hyperoxia (p = 0.02).
  • In this group, intravenous nicardipine resulted in an 83% improvement in 4- and 8-hour PbtO(2) levels (18.1 +/- 11.33 and 19.59 +/- 23.68 mm Hg, respectively; p < 0.01) despite significant reductions in both mean MABP (120.6 +/- 16.65 vs 95.8 +/- 8.3 mm Hg, p < 0.001) and CPP (105.00 +/- 20.7 vs 81.2 +/- 15.4 mm Hg, p < 0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous nicardipine is effective for the treatment of hypertensive neurological emergencies and has no adverse effect on PbtO(2).
  • [MeSH-major] Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Brain Injuries / physiopathology. Cerebral Hemorrhage / physiopathology. Hypertension / drug therapy. Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations / physiopathology. Nicardipine / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Aged. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Blood Pressure / physiology. Brain / metabolism. Female. Humans. Hypoxia, Brain / physiopathology. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Oxygen / metabolism. Prospective Studies


97. Scherma M, Panlilio LV, Fadda P, Fattore L, Gamaleddin I, Le Foll B, Justinová Z, Mikics E, Haller J, Medalie J, Stroik J, Barnes C, Yasar S, Tanda G, Piomelli D, Fratta W, Goldberg SR: Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis by cyclohexyl carbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-3-yl ester (URB597) reverses abuse-related behavioral and neurochemical effects of nicotine in rats. J Pharmacol Exp Ther; 2008 Nov;327(2):482-90
eScholarship, California Digital Library, University of California. Full text from University of California eScholarship .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Emerging evidence suggests that the rewarding, abuse-related effects of nicotine are modulated by the endocannabinoid system of the brain.
  • For example, pharmacological blockade or genetic deletion of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors can reduce or eliminate many abuse-related behavioral and neurochemical effects of nicotine.
  • These previous studies have used systemically administered CB(1) receptor agonists and antagonists and gene deletion techniques, which affect cannabinoid CB(1) receptors throughout the brain.
  • We found that URB597, at a dose (0.3 mg/kg) that had no behavioral effects by itself, prevented development of nicotine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) and acquisition of nicotine self-administration.
  • URB597 also reduced nicotine-induced reinstatement in both CPP and self-administration models of relapse.
  • Furthermore, in vivo microdialysis showed that URB597 reduced nicotine-induced dopamine elevations in the nucleus accumbens shell, the terminal area of the brain's mesolimbic reward system.
  • These findings suggest that FAAH inhibition can counteract the addictive properties of nicotine and that FAAH may serve as a new target for development of medications for treatment of tobacco dependence.
  • [MeSH-major] Amidohydrolases / antagonists & inhibitors. Arachidonic Acids / metabolism. Benzamides / pharmacology. Carbamates / pharmacology. Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Dopamine / analysis. Nicotine / pharmacology. Nucleus Accumbens / drug effects. Polyunsaturated Alkamides / metabolism. Tobacco Use Disorder / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Endocannabinoids. Hydrolysis. Male. Motor Activity / drug effects. Rats. Rats, Long-Evans. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Reward. Self Administration

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  • (PMID = 18725543.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-0103
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / N01 DA059909; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z01 DA000003-22; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z99 DA999999
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Arachidonic Acids; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Carbamates; 0 / Endocannabinoids; 0 / Polyunsaturated Alkamides; 0 / cyclohexyl carbamic acid 3'-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-yl ester; 6M3C89ZY6R / Nicotine; EC 3.5.- / Amidohydrolases; EC 3.5.1.- / fatty-acid amide hydrolase; UR5G69TJKH / anandamide; VTD58H1Z2X / Dopamine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS80206; NLM/ PMC2663803
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98. Turk DC, Swanson KS, Gatchel RJ: Predicting opioid misuse by chronic pain patients: a systematic review and literature synthesis. Clin J Pain; 2008 Jul-Aug;24(6):497-508
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pain.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • However, a minority may develop aberrant drug behaviors.
  • OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the evidence of published strategies for identifying at-risk patients to guide clinicians' decisions and practices for prescribing opioid treatment for chronic pain patients (CPP).
  • Studies were limited to human studies in the English language related to screening for predictors of aberrant drug behaviors in CPP who were prescribed long-term opioids.
  • We included studies reviewing, developing measures, or investigating outcomes related to screening for aberrant opioid behaviors in CPP.
  • RESULTS: We identified 6 published articles addressing clinician-based predictors of substance misuse of opioids and 9 published studies evaluating the predictive ability of clinical interviews and self-report measures for aberrant opioid behaviors in CPP.
  • CONCLUSION: Review of the published studies reveals that no one procedure or set of predictor variables is sufficient to identify CPP at-risk for opioid misuse or abuse.
  • Strong predictors include a personal history of illicit drug and alcohol abuse.
  • Prospective studies, especially ones with CPP who have not already been started on chronic opioid therapy, are needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics, Opioid / adverse effects. Opioid-Related Disorders / etiology. Pain / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chronic Disease. Humans. MEDLINE / statistics & numerical data. Predictive Value of Tests

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  • (PMID = 18574359.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-5409
  • [Journal-full-title] The Clinical journal of pain
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin J Pain
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / 5K23GM071400-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid
  • [Number-of-references] 64
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99. Petrone C, Hall G, Langman M, Filiaggi MJ: Compaction strategies for modifying the drug delivery capabilities of gelled calcium polyphosphate matrices. Acta Biomater; 2008 Mar;4(2):403-13
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Vancomycin .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Compaction strategies for modifying the drug delivery capabilities of gelled calcium polyphosphate matrices.
  • Calcium polyphosphates (CPPs) have shown potential as drug delivery matrices, particularly in treating bone-related chronic diseases such as osteomyelitis, where maintenance of sufficient bactericidal concentrations at the infected bone site is essential.
  • The objective of this study was to incorporate an additional compaction step as part of a gelling protocol to optimize CPP matrix properties while enhancing their drug delivery capabilities.
  • Vancomycin-loaded CPP powders were produced using a previously established gelling and drying protocol, G1, and then subsequently compacted at prescribed levels (30, 113 or 452MPa) before subjecting to an additional gelling and drying protocol (G2).
  • The compaction regelling protocol did, however, eliminate the burst release phenomena observed with the G1 disks and further extended the release of vancomycin into a clinically acceptable therapeutic range of 3weeks.
  • The ability to modulate this release profile to a limited extent by altering compaction stress, particle size distribution and regelling time was also demonstrated.
  • Overall, the compaction regelling protocol described here, when used in conjunction with an initial gelling step to achieve matrix drug loading, enhances the flexibility and long-term drug delivery capability of this CPP matrix.
  • [MeSH-major] Biocompatible Materials. Calcium Phosphates. Drug Delivery Systems
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Bacterial Agents / administration & dosage. Compressive Strength. Gels. Humans. Materials Testing. Microscopy, Electron, Scanning. Osteomyelitis / drug therapy. Vancomycin / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 17997374.001).
  • [ISSN] 1742-7061
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta biomaterialia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Biomater
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Biocompatible Materials; 0 / Calcium Phosphates; 0 / Gels; 6Q205EH1VU / Vancomycin
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100. Peroni D, Negro A, Bähr M, Dietz GP: Intracellular delivery of Neuroglobin using HIV-1 TAT protein transduction domain fails to protect against oxygen and glucose deprivation. Neurosci Lett; 2007 Jun 27;421(2):110-4
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. GLUCOSE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a heme protein that is primarily localised in the retina and the brain.
  • It has been reported that its overexpression protects neurons from hypoxia in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that the rapid modulation of the Ngb level in the nerve cells may be a promising stroke treatment strategy.
  • We constructed a human recombinant Ngb fused to the cell penetrating peptide (CPP) derived from HIV-1 TAT.
  • The two neuronal cell lines RGC-5 and SH-SY5Y were subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) after pre-treatment with TAT-Ngb.
  • In both cell types, however, the treatment with the TAT-Ngb fusion protein did not show any effect on cell viability.
  • Alternatively, intracellular delivery of Ngb by the TAT/CPP might not have beneficial effects in the treatment of ischemic pathology.
  • [MeSH-major] Anoxia / drug therapy. Gene Products, tat / physiology. Globins / therapeutic use. Glucose / deficiency. Nerve Tissue Proteins / therapeutic use. Transduction, Genetic / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line. Cell Survival / drug effects. HIV-1 / physiology. Humans. Neuroblastoma. Protein Structure, Tertiary / physiology. Rats. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / therapeutic use. tat Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - HIV.
  • HIV InSite. treatment guidelines - Human Herpesvirus-8 .
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  • (PMID = 17566657.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-3940
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroscience letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosci. Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Gene Products, tat; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 0 / neuroglobin; 0 / tat Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus; 9004-22-2 / Globins; IY9XDZ35W2 / Glucose
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