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Items 1 to 33 of about 33
1. Radu V, Ion D, Serban MB, Ciurea M: Locally aggressive colonic and rectal cancer--clinical trial. J Med Life; 2010 Jul-Sep;3(3):314-9
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Rectal Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Primary locally aggressive colonic and rectal cancers include tumors that are staged T4N1-2Mx on diagnosis, and are often associated with a lower prognosis than earlier cancers.
  • The ability to perform a total resection is based upon anatomical localization and on the fixation of other organs to the lesion.
  • Radical nuanced surgery is the base of treatment of the locally aggressive colon-rectal cancer.
  • The studies have shown that in certain localizations of the colon-rectal cancer, the locally aggressive forms can be better controlled by using multimodal therapy, including radiotherapy, either external or guided intraoperatory radiotherapy and chemotherapy with much better results.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Rectal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Digestive System Surgical Procedures / methods. Female. Humans. Male. Palliative Care. Retrospective Studies. Romania

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  • [Cites] Annu Rev Med. 1997;48:191-202 [9046955.001]
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  • (PMID = 20945823.001).
  • [ISSN] 1844-122X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medicine and life
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Life
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Romania
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3019005
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2. Arroyo V: Review article: hepatorenal syndrome--how to assess response to treatment and nonpharmacological therapy. Aliment Pharmacol Ther; 2004 Sep;20 Suppl 3:49-54; discussion 55-6
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  • [Title] Review article: hepatorenal syndrome--how to assess response to treatment and nonpharmacological therapy.
  • Treatment in patients with type 2 HRS, the most frequent form of HRS, is directed towards managing refractory ascites.
  • Paracentesis is the treatment of choice.
  • Although a rapidly progressive renal failure is the most characteristic manifestation of type 1 HRS, there is failure in other organs such as the liver and the brain.
  • A decrease in cardiac output develops in these patients, associated with a decrease in cardiopulmonary pressures.
  • Since type 1 HRS mainly occurs in patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and massive release of cytokines within the peritoneal cavity, it may be considered as a special form of multiorgan failure of circulatory origin.
  • Not surprisingly, the treatment of choice in type 1 HRS is the combination of vasoconstrictors to reduce arterial vasodilation and plasma volume expansion with albumin to increase cardiac preload.
  • TIPS is also effective in these patients and the combination of pharmacological treatment followed by TIPS may be the most effective approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Hepatorenal Syndrome / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Liver Transplantation / methods. Portasystemic Shunt, Transjugular Intrahepatic / methods. Renal Dialysis / methods. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15335402.001).
  • [ISSN] 0269-2813
  • [Journal-full-title] Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 45
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3. Wu WK, Wong CC, Li ZJ, Zhang L, Ren SX, Cho CH: Cathelicidins in inflammation and tissue repair: Potential therapeutic applications for gastrointestinal disorders. Acta Pharmacol Sin; 2010 Sep;31(9):1118-22
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cathelicidins in inflammation and tissue repair: Potential therapeutic applications for gastrointestinal disorders.
  • These peptides not only have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, but also modulate inflammation by altering cytokine response and chemoattraction of inflammatory cells in diseased tissues.
  • In addition, cathelicidins promote wound healing through stimulation of re-epithelialization and angiogenesis at injured tissues.
  • In conclusion, cathelicidins represent an important group of effector molecules in the innate immune system that operates a complex integration of inflammation and tissue repair in the gastrointestinal mucosa and other organs.
  • [MeSH-major] Cathelicidins / immunology. Cathelicidins / therapeutic use. Gastrointestinal Diseases / drug therapy. Wound Healing / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Humans. Inflammation / drug therapy. Inflammation / immunology

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  • (PMID = 20676121.001).
  • [ISSN] 1745-7254
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta pharmacologica Sinica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Pharmacol. Sin.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cathelicidins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4002301
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4. Chen ZY, Ma YB, Sheng XG, Zhang XL, Xue L, Song QQ, Liu NF, Miao HQ: [Intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with gynecological malignancies after hysterectomy and chemotherapy/radiotherapy]. Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi; 2007 Apr;29(4):305-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cervical Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with gynecological malignancies after hysterectomy and chemotherapy/radiotherapy].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the value of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patient with gynecological malignancies after treatment of hysterectomy and chemotherapy/radiotherapy.
  • METHODS: All 32 patients with cervical or endometrial cancer after hysterectomy received full course IMRT after 1 to 3 cycles of chemotherapy (Karnofsky performance status(KPS) > or =70).
  • Seventeen of these patients underwent postoperative preventive irradiation and the other 15 patients were pelvic wall recurrence and/or retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis, though postoperative radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy had been given after operation.
  • RESULTS: The median dose delivered to the PTV was 56.8 Gy for preventive irradiation, and 60.6 Gy for pelvic wall recurrence or retroperioneal lymph node metastasis irradiation.
  • However, The mean dose irradiated to small intestine, bladder, rectum, kidney and spinal cord was 21.3 Gy, 37.8 Gy, 35.3 Gy, 8.5 Gy, 22.1 Gy, respectively.
  • Fourteen patients presented grade I (11 patients) or II (3 patients) digestive tract side-effects, Five patients developed grade I or II bone marrow depression.
  • CONCLUSION: Intensity modulated radiation therapy can provide a better dose distribution than traditional radiotherapy for both prevention and pelvic wall recurrence or retroperioneal lymph node metastasis.
  • The adjacent organs at risk can well be protected.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Diarrhea / etiology. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Hysterectomy / methods. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Radiotherapy Dosage. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 17760262.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-3766
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua zhong liu za zhi [Chinese journal of oncology]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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5. Oryan A, Sadjjani SM, Azizi S: The effects of benzimidazoles on the larval stage of Toxocara cati in experimentally infected chickens. Trop Biomed; 2009 Apr;26(1):30-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ALBENDAZOLE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Humans and other paratenic hosts are infected by ingesting the infective Toxocara eggs from contaminated soil, unwashed hands, contaminated raw vegetables or ingestion of under-cooked organs and muscle tissues of infected paratenic hosts such as chickens, cattle and sheep.
  • It has been shown that the seroprevalence of toxocariasis in the rural and urban children of southern Iran is high and more than 50% of cats of this area are also infected with T. cati.
  • The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of albendazole and febendazole in experimentally infected chickens with eggs of T. cati by histopathological and digestive methods.
  • No larva was observed at histopathological level in liver, lungs, brain, cardiac and skeletal muscles and other examined organs of either treated or untreated animals.
  • No lesion was seen in other tissues of the infected untreated chickens.
  • Treatment resulted in disappearance of the larvae and disappearance of the gross and histopathologic abnormalities from their organs.
  • No detectable difference was observed in chemosusceptibility of the two drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Anthelmintics / therapeutic use. Benzimidazoles / therapeutic use. Chickens / parasitology. Poultry Diseases / drug therapy. Toxocara / drug effects. Toxocariasis / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Albendazole / administration & dosage. Albendazole / therapeutic use. Animals. Iran. Larva / drug effects. Larva / growth & development. Organ Specificity. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19696725.001).
  • [ISSN] 0127-5720
  • [Journal-full-title] Tropical biomedicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Trop Biomed
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Malaysia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anthelmintics; 0 / Benzimidazoles; F4216019LN / Albendazole
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6. Habara K, Ajiki T, Kamigaki T, Nakamura T, Kuroda Y: High expression of thymidylate synthase leads to resistance to 5-fluorouracil in biliary tract carcinoma in vitro. Jpn J Cancer Res; 2001 Oct;92(10):1127-32
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • To evaluate the effect of chemotherapy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human biliary tract carcinoma, we studied 5-FU sensitivity, thymidylate synthase (TS) content, and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) activity in 4 human biliary tract carcinoma cell lines compared to 12 various digestive carcinoma cell lines of human organs in vitro.
  • 5-FU IC(50) values of biliary tract carcinoma cell lines were significantly higher than those of the carcinoma cell lines of the other digestive organs: 97, 45, 119, and 194 times the concentration of the other digestive, pancreas, colon, and gastric carcinoma cell lines, respectively.
  • TS content of biliary tract carcinoma cell lines was also significantly greater than that of the carcinoma cell lines of the other organs.
  • No difference in DPD activity, however, was recognized between the carcinoma cell lines of each organ.
  • Therefore, in the present study, TS expression was concluded to influence the high resistance to 5-FU of biliary tract carcinoma in comparison with the carcinomas of the other digestive organs.
  • [MeSH-major] Biliary Tract Neoplasms / drug therapy. Biliary Tract Neoplasms / enzymology. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Fluorouracil / pharmacology. Thymidylate Synthase / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colonic Neoplasms / enzymology. Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP). Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. Inhibitory Concentration 50. Oxidoreductases / metabolism. Pancreatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / enzymology. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / enzymology. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 11676864.001).
  • [ISSN] 0910-5050
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of cancer research : Gann
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 1.- / Oxidoreductases; EC 1.3.1.2 / Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP); EC 2.1.1.45 / Thymidylate Synthase; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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7. Pan D, Gunther R, Duan W, Wendell S, Kaemmerer W, Kafri T, Verma IM, Whitley CB: Biodistribution and toxicity studies of VSVG-pseudotyped lentiviral vector after intravenous administration in mice with the observation of in vivo transduction of bone marrow. Mol Ther; 2002 Jul;6(1):19-29
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Lentiviral vectors can confer high levels of gene transfer and transgene expression in a variety of cell types.
  • Nine different organs and bone marrow were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR) assay capable of a broad range of quantitation (5-log fold) to detect as few as one copy of the green fluorescent protein gene (GFP) per 10(5) cells.
  • Between 0 and 1% transgene was detected in all other organs.
  • No significant pathologic lesions were found attributable to vector in any of the tissues examined.
  • The observation of bone marrow transduction after intravenous vector administration suggests the possibility of an in vivo approach to stem cell gene therapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apolipoproteins B / genetics. Apolipoproteins B / metabolism. Digestive System / drug effects. Digestive System / pathology. Green Fluorescent Proteins. Immunochemistry. Leukocytes / metabolism. Luminescent Proteins / genetics. Luminescent Proteins / metabolism. Membrane Glycoproteins / metabolism. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Organ Specificity. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Transduction, Genetic. Transgenes. Viral Envelope Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 12095299.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0016
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / P01-HD32652
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Apolipoproteins B; 0 / G protein, vesicular stomatitis virus; 0 / Luminescent Proteins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Viral Envelope Proteins; 147336-22-9 / Green Fluorescent Proteins
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8. Kawabata R, Doki Y, Ishikawa O, Nakagawa H, Takachi K, Miyashiro I, Tsukamoto Y, Ohigashi H, Sasaki Y, Murata K, Ishiguro S, Imaoka S: Frequent brain metastasis after chemotherapy and surgery for advanced esophageal cancers. Hepatogastroenterology; 2007 Jun;54(76):1043-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Esophageal Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Frequent brain metastasis after chemotherapy and surgery for advanced esophageal cancers.
  • METHODOLOGY: Records of 254 TEC patients who developed recurrent cancers after curative surgery during 1984-2002 revealed 11 patients (4.3%) with symptomatic brain metastasis, which were classified as five without extra-cranial disease (Brain type) and six with other metastatic diseases (Systemic type).
  • RESULTS: Brain metastases were significantly associated with an advanced clinical stage and perioperative chemotherapy, which had been undergone by 73% of the brain metastasis patients, but only 23% for non-brain metastasis patients (p = 0.0008).
  • Comparing to Systemic type, Brain type showed longer duration from esophagectomy to brain metastasis and tended to be more effective for perioperative chemotherapy.
  • All Brain type but only two Systemic type brain metastases were removed by surgery.
  • The average survival after brain metastasis was 17.7 months for the Brain type patients (two alive without tumor recurrence), but only 38.5 days for the Systemic type patients.
  • The histological hallmark of Brain type metastasis was medullary tumor growth with mature tumor vessels, while Systemic type showed invasive tumor growth with naive capillaries.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative brain metastasis in TEC patients is not rare, especially in an advanced clinical stage following perioperative chemotherapy.
  • Surgical removal of brain metastasis might be the most promising treatment unless tumor metastasis in other organs is evident.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis. Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Male. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17629035.001).
  • [ISSN] 0172-6390
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepato-gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatogastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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9. Nikolaeva OD: [Side effects of chemotherapy in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and concomitant diseases]. Lik Sprava; 2003 Apr-Jun;(3-4):74-8
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  • [Title] [Side effects of chemotherapy in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and concomitant diseases].
  • As many as 395 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis concurrent with other illnesses were examined.
  • It has been ascertained that in 57.8 percent of cases there occurs a side effect in the wake of the antituberculous drug administration.
  • The following were recognized as ill effects of the drugs employed--allergic reactions, candidiasis, disbacteriosis, toxic reactions,--in 25.44%, 3.07%, 7.02%, and 64.47% of cases respectively.
  • Revealed in the above series was a marked side effect on the digestive organs, neurotoxic reactions, toxic effect on the cardiovascular system in 28.08%, 15.35%, 10.53% of cases respectively.
  • In 43.42% of cases, the identified side effect necessitates withdrawal of the drug, in 56.58% of cases, the management of the concomitant medical problems, a change in routes of administration of medicines, and combined employment of antihistaminic drugs and hyposensitizing methodological approaches to the management of the condition permitted carrying on with the therapy instituted.

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  • (PMID = 12889365.001).
  • [ISSN] 1019-5297
  • [Journal-full-title] Likars'ka sprava
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lik. Sprava
  • [Language] RUS
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ukraine
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antitubercular Agents
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10. Ando N: [Future perspectives on the standardization of surgical treatment for esophageal cancer]. Nihon Geka Gakkai Zasshi; 2003 May;104(5):390-4
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Esophageal Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Future perspectives on the standardization of surgical treatment for esophageal cancer].
  • The Japanese Society for Esophageal Diseases published guidelines for the treatment of esophageal cancer in December 2002.
  • Radical surgery is indicated for T1N1 and T2,3 disease without M1 metastasis to other organs, which consists of transthoracic esophagectomy through the right chest with mediastinal and abdominal (two-field), and cervical if necessary (three-field) resection, lymphadenectomy, and esophageal reconstruction by pulling up the stomach.
  • A recent Dutch RCT comparing transhiatal and transthoracic esophagectomy reported lower morbidity and a trend toward improved long-term survival in the transhiatal group.
  • The efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy also remains controversial.
  • However, the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery on disease-free survival was confirmed by the Japanese Clinical Oncology Group RCT.
  • [MeSH-major] Digestive System Surgical Procedures / standards. Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 12774522.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-4894
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Geka Gakkai zasshi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nihon Geka Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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11. Toda N, Kishioka S, Hatano Y, Toda H: Interactions between morphine and nitric oxide in various organs. J Anesth; 2009;23(4):554-68
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MORPHINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Interactions between morphine and nitric oxide in various organs.
  • This labile, gaseous molecule is also involved in mechanisms underlying the beneficial and untoward actions of therapeutic agents.
  • This molecule is also involved in the modification of morphine actions on the cardiovascular, digestive, and respiratory systems.
  • Morphine regulates NO bioavailability in various organs.
  • Information concerning interactions between NO and morphine and other opioids in a variety of organs and tissues is quite useful in establishing new strategies for minimizing the noxious and unintended reactions that are frequently encountered during analgesic therapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena / drug effects. Central Nervous System / drug effects. Central Nervous System / metabolism. Central Nervous System / physiology. Digestive System / drug effects. Humans. Immune System / drug effects. Mental Processes / drug effects. Mental Processes / physiology. Muscle, Smooth, Vascular / drug effects. Respiratory System / drug effects

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NITRIC OXIDE .
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  • (PMID = 19921366.001).
  • [ISSN] 1438-8359
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of anesthesia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Anesth
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine
  • [Number-of-references] 144
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12. Ueda Y, Sonoyama T, Itoi H, Fujiwara H, Fuji N, Itoh T, Fujiki H, Yamashita T, Yoshimura T, Harada S, Okugawa K, Yamagishi H: [Locoregional adoptive immunotherapy using LAK cells and IL-2 against liver metastases from digestive tract cancer]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2000 Oct;27(12):1962-5
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Liver Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Locoregional adoptive immunotherapy using LAK cells and IL-2 against liver metastases from digestive tract cancer].
  • We investigated the clinical efficacy of locoregional and systemic adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) with or without interleukin-2 (IL-2) against solid metastatic lesions from digestive tract cancer.
  • Seven of the 18 patients received hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of LAK cells with or without IL-2 against metastatic liver tumors (locoregional therapy group).
  • The remaining 11 patients received systemic transfer of LAK cells with IL-2 against metastatic lesions located in organs other than the liver (systemic therapy group).
  • Three of 7 locoregional therapy group patients showed clinically significant tumor regressions that were evaluated as being equivalent to partial response (PR).
  • Two of the 11 systemic therapy group patients showed significant tumor regressions, but this response rate was much lower than that of the locoregional therapy group.
  • The 2 effective cases in the systemic therapy group were esophageal cancer patients.
  • Locoregional AIT with or without IL-2 against liver metastases from digestive tract cancer could be an effective therapeutic modality in some patients who are refractory to conventional therapies (e.g., chemotherapy and radiotherapy).
  • It is necessary to find a new way to augment the anti-tumor effect of this therapy in combination with prior or concomitant chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Esophageal Neoplasms / pathology. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Immunotherapy, Adoptive. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Killer Cells, Lymphokine-Activated / transplantation. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Liver Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 11086454.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukin-2
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13. Kato H, Miyazaki T, Kuwano H: [The informed consent for surgical procedure of esophageal cancer]. Nihon Geka Gakkai Zasshi; 2007 Jan;108(1):3-9
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Esophageal Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [The informed consent for surgical procedure of esophageal cancer].
  • Methods for the treatment of solid cancers have diversified with advances in medical care technology, but only a few effective methods are available with regard to therapeutic results, safety, and quality of life after surgery.
  • Thus, it is very difficult for patients and their families to understand the diagnosis and symptoms and select a treatment option.
  • The significance of informed consent, in which a physician provides sufficient information on therapeutic methods and the patient understands the information and selects a treatment, is needed in general society.
  • Since chemotherapy and radiotherapy are effective in many cases compared to other cancers of digestive organs, many therapies may be used to treat early to advanced cancers, and the therapeutic methods and choices vary in each stage.
  • Therefore sufficient explanation of symptoms, necessary treatment, and therapeutic methods and their complications and results to patients and their families is necessary.
  • It is important to establish a medical care environment in which patients can fully understand the advantages and disadvantages of treatment options and select the most appropriate one.

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  • (PMID = 17304950.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-4894
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Geka Gakkai zasshi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nihon Geka Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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14. Rosato L, De Tomaa G, Mondini G, Bertone P, Fornari F, Orlassino R: [Neurendocrine tumours of the appendix, colon and rectum: current surgical aspects]. Chir Ital; 2007 Jul-Aug;59(4):445-52
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms deriving from a system of diffuse neuroendocrine cells in organs and tissues, defined as the "diffuse neuroendocrine system".
  • Twenty-three were tumours of the appendix, colon and rectum, corresponding to 55% of all those affecting the digestive tract: 8 appendix (35%), 6 right colon (26%), 4 left colon (17%) and 5 rectum (22%).
  • In the RO-RI cases no relapses occurred and those who were not disease-free were treated with somatostatin analogues and/or chemotherapy.
  • NET of the appendix, colon and rectum are rare, despite being the most frequent among the GEP tumours, and are difficult to diagnose, and therefore sometimes pose problems of surgical therapy, which, when performed in time, may be curative.
  • NET of the appendix measuring <2 cm, localised in the distal part without local infiltration, can be treated by simple appendicectomy and removal of the mesenteriole; otherwise, right hemicolectomy is indicated.
  • The surgical treatment of tumours of the colon, except for well differentiated cases measuring <2 cm with a pedunculate structure such as to allow safe endoscopic removal, consists in radical hemicolectomy with lymphadenectomy.
  • Carcinoids of the rectum measuring <1 cm and 1 cm to 2 cm, in the absence of other negative prognostic factors, can be treated locally by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) or minimally invasive transanal surgery (MITAS).
  • Extensive disease which is no longer curable with surgery alone is treated with chemotherapy and bio-chemotherapy, but it is above all treatment with somatostatin analogues that plays a major role in symptom control.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hormones / therapeutic use. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures. Retrospective Studies. Somatostatin / analogs & derivatives. Somatostatin / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17966763.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-4773
  • [Journal-full-title] Chirurgia italiana
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chir Ital
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hormones; 51110-01-1 / Somatostatin
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15. Maev IV, Samsonov AA, Karmanova EA, Ivanchenko EA: [The use of prokinetics for the correction of motor and tonic digestive disorders]. Klin Med (Mosk); 2009;87(3):49-53

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [The use of prokinetics for the correction of motor and tonic digestive disorders].
  • Abnormal tonic-motor activity is a key component in pathogenesis of many digestive disorders.
  • Secondary disturbance of tonic-motor activity of digestive organs and the accompanying symptoms are known to develop in conjunction with diseases of other organs and systems, diabetes mellitus, Parkinson's disease, myotonic muscular dystrophy, amyloidosis, hyper- and hypothyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, etc.
  • Prokinetics are an important class of medicinal products for the treatment of all clinical forms of dyspepsia.
  • Clinical studies of this drug revealed its high efficiency in patients with functional dyspepsia, chronic gastritis, and diabetic gastroparesis.
  • Inclusion of this drug in therapy improves the outcome of the treatment of disturbed motor activity of the gastrointestinal tract.
  • [MeSH-major] Benzamides / therapeutic use. Benzyl Compounds / therapeutic use. Gastrointestinal Agents / therapeutic use. Gastrointestinal Diseases / drug therapy. Gastrointestinal Motility / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19469257.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-2149
  • [Journal-full-title] Klinicheskaia meditsina
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Klin Med (Mosk)
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Benzyl Compounds; 0 / Gastrointestinal Agents; 81BMQ80QRL / itopride
  • [Number-of-references] 22
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16. Lukaszyk A, Rafińska L, Jaroszewski J, Klein P, Stolzmann W, Pieścikowska I, Sawiński P: Immunocytochemical observations on the organ distribution of exogenous monomeric and dimerized lysozyme. Folia Histochem Cytobiol; 2001;39(4):321-4

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Immunocytochemical observations on the organ distribution of exogenous monomeric and dimerized lysozyme.
  • Using commercial anti-lysozyme antibodies and anti-dimerized lysozyme rabbit serum produced by us we demonstrated by immunohistochemistry, in some organs of rats, the expression of exogenous egg white lysozyme preparations beside the native lysozyme.
  • After oral administration, the egg white lysozyme was detected in intestinal epithelium, proximal and distal tubules of some nephrons, pulmonary alveolar walls and hepatocytes in the 3rd zone of liver acini, whereas native lysozyme was strongly expressed in intestinal and pulmonary macrophages in both the experimental and control animals.
  • It is concluded that the lysozyme preparations administered per os or parenterally are resorbed to blood circulation and distributed among various organs in an active form and maintaining their antigenic specificity.
  • It may speak for their direct anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in respiratory, urinary, digestive and other systems.

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  • (PMID = 11766766.001).
  • [ISSN] 0239-8508
  • [Journal-full-title] Folia histochemica et cytobiologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Folia Histochem. Cytobiol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.2.1.17 / Muramidase
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17. Ishigami S, Natsugo S, Aikou T: [Clinical impact of the Guidelines for Treatment of Gastric Cancer]. Nihon Geka Gakkai Zasshi; 2007 Sep;108(5):253-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Stomach Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Clinical impact of the Guidelines for Treatment of Gastric Cancer].
  • The first edition of the Guidelines for Treatment in Gastric Cancer (TGGC) was published in 2002 and it was revised in 2004.
  • Those were the first Japanese treatment guidelines for any type of cancer.
  • After the responses had been analyzed, problems and improvements in the TGGC were discussed in comparison with the guidelines for cancer treatment in other organs.
  • Based on the questionnaire results, the TGGC have been used sufficiently in clinical practice to serve as a standardized guide for gastric cancer treatment, and thus the initial aims of standardization of treatment and a common understanding among physicians and patients were achieved.
  • 1) Some standard treatments are described in the clinical trial setting.
  • 2) The renewal for chemotherapy is not performed on the basis of new evidence.
  • 3) The announcement of time and contents of new TGGC is necessary by internet.
  • 4) An explanation of the objective index for evidence and recommendation levels is necessary, similar to those in the guidelines for the treatment of cancer in other organs.
  • Japanese physicians have a responsibility to contribute to the evidence for gastric cancer treatment to be considered worldwide.
  • [MeSH-major] Practice Guidelines as Topic. Stomach Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 17907454.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-4894
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Geka Gakkai zasshi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nihon Geka Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Number-of-references] 4
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18. Adham M: Extracorporeal liver support: waiting for the deciding vote. ASAIO J; 2003 Nov-Dec;49(6):621-32
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Meanwhile, documented results of extracorporeal liver perfusion (ECLP) suggested its superiority over conventional treatment.
  • In the present day, the fact that patients die while waiting for LT because of organ shortage led to a renewed interest in liver support as bridge to LT or regeneration.
  • These devices can be classified according to the presence or lack of hepatocytes, whereas biologic devices refers to the presence of cells or other organic and biochemical component.
  • The absence of individual success of early models led to the development of combined hepatocyte free devices, or artificial liver, which are based upon the hemodiabsorption principle (Biologic-DT) or on the "albumin bound toxin hypothesis" (Molecular Adsorbents Recirculating System) with encouraging results.
  • BLD were developed with the use of human hepatoma cell line (C3A) or primary or cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes.
  • Artificial livers lacked any metabolic synthetic activity, the use of human liver for ECLP seems hardly acceptable because of organ shortage, and the accepted use of borderline livers for transplantation is pending trials for the use of xenogenic livers.
  • The use of porcine hepatocytes (BLD or ECLP) raised physiologic and immunologic concerns and particularly the fear of a possible transfer of porcine viral material.
  • Although recent studies clearly demonstrate clinical improvement of patients with the use of recently developed liver support devices, most of reported prospective, controlled, or randomized trials had a small number of patients.
  • To give the deciding vote and avoid previous pitfalls, trials need to be developed with a larger number of patients based upon statistically significant models with the following characteristics:.
  • 1) comprehensive understanding of the acute liver cell failure mechanisms, 2) world wide classification of conditions that require liver support, and 3) a clear definition of treatment success pending patients to LT or recovery without transplantation.

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  • (PMID = 14655724.001).
  • [ISSN] 1058-2916
  • [Journal-full-title] ASAIO journal (American Society for Artificial Internal Organs : 1992)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ASAIO J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 164
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19. Goker H, Haznedaroglu IC, Chao NJ: Acute graft-vs-host disease: pathobiology and management. Exp Hematol; 2001 Mar;29(3):259-77
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • It causes a wide variety of host tissue injuries.
  • Total-body irradiation (TBI) or high-dose chemotherapy regimens cause extensive damage and activation in host tissues, which release inflammatory cytokines and enhance recipient major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens.
  • Recognition of the foreign host antigens by donor T cells and activation, stimulation, and proliferation of T cells is crucial in the afferent phase.
  • The skin, gastrointestinal tract, and liver are major target organs of acute GVHD.
  • Combination drug prophylaxis in GVHD is essential in all patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT.
  • Steroids have remained the standard for the treatment of acute GVHD.
  • Several clinical trials have evaluated monoclonal antibodies or receptor antagonist therapy for steroid-resistant acute GVHD, with different successes in a variety of settings.
  • There are some newer promising agents like mycophenolate mofetil, glutamic acid-lysine-alanine-tyrosine (GLAT), rapamycin, and trimetrexate currently entering in the clinical studies, and other agents are in development.
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antigen Presentation. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Bone Marrow / drug effects. Bone Marrow / immunology. Bone Marrow / pathology. Bone Marrow / radiation effects. Digestive System / drug effects. Digestive System / immunology. Digestive System / pathology. Digestive System / radiation effects. Dogs. Drug Design. Drug Therapy, Combination. Forecasting. HLA Antigens / immunology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / administration & dosage. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Liver / drug effects. Liver / immunology. Liver / pathology. Liver / radiation effects. Lymphocyte Depletion. Lymphokines / physiology. Mice. Models, Biological. Premedication. Radiation Chimera. Radiation Injuries / immunology. Radiation Injuries / pathology. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Receptors, Interleukin-2 / antagonists & inhibitors. Risk Factors. Severity of Illness Index. Skin / drug effects. Skin / immunology. Skin / pathology. Skin / radiation effects. T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic / immunology. T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic / transplantation. Transplantation Conditioning / adverse effects. Transplantation, Homologous / adverse effects. Transplantation, Homologous / immunology. Whole-Body Irradiation / adverse effects

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  • [ErratumIn] Exp Hematol 2001 May;29(5):653
  • (PMID = 11274753.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-472X
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / HLA Antigens; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Lymphokines; 0 / Receptors, Interleukin-2
  • [Number-of-references] 215
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20. Rha SE, Ha HK, Lee SH, Kim JH, Kim JK, Kim JH, Kim PN, Lee MG, Auh YH: CT and MR imaging findings of bowel ischemia from various primary causes. Radiographics; 2000 Jan-Feb;20(1):29-42
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - MRI Scans.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The primary causes of insufficient blood flow to the intestine are diverse and include thromboembolism, nonocclusive causes, bowel obstruction, neoplasms, vasculitis, abdominal inflammatory conditions, trauma, chemotherapy, radiation, and corrosive injury.
  • Computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can demonstrate the ischemic bowel segment and may be helpful in determining the primary cause.
  • Other CT findings include engorgement of mesenteric veins and mesenteric edema, lack of bowel wall enhancement, increased enhancement of the thickened bowel wall, bowel obstruction, and infarction of other abdominal organs.
  • [MeSH-major] Intestines / blood supply. Ischemia / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdominal Injuries / complications. Abdominal Injuries / diagnosis. Diagnosis, Differential. Digestive System Neoplasms / complications. Digestive System Neoplasms / diagnosis. Humans. Intestinal Obstruction / complications. Intestinal Obstruction / diagnosis. Mesenteric Vascular Occlusion / complications. Mesenteric Vascular Occlusion / diagnosis. Vasculitis / complications. Vasculitis / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 10682769.001).
  • [ISSN] 0271-5333
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiographics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Number-of-references] 39
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21. Okamura H, Fujiwara H, Suchi K, Okamura S, Umehara S, Konishi H, Todo M, Kubota T, Ichikawa D, Kikuchi S, Okamoto K, Kuriu Y, Ikoma H, Nakanishi M, Ochiai T, Sakakura C, Kokuba Y, Sonoyama T, Otsuji E: [Surgically resected local recurrence after endoscopic submucosal dissection of esophageal cancer--a case report]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2009 Nov;36(12):2448-50
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  • A 66-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of further examination and a treatment of superficial esophageal cancer.
  • A type 0-IIb+IIa cancer occupying the whole circumference of the lumen of the middle to lower esophagus was revealed.
  • The depth of the invasion was judged to be T1a-EP or LPM by endoscopic ultrasonography, and no metastasis to other organs or lymph nodes was detected.
  • The presence of the residual cancer of the horizontal cut margin could not be judged because en bloc resection could not be achieved.
  • After the operation, he is receiving adjuvant chemotherapy and alive without recurrence.
  • When endoscopic resection of the esophageal cancer is performed to the lesion, which relatively indicated to endoscopic resection or outside the guideline criteria for endoscopic resection, it is important that we choose the appropriate treatment protocol obtaining an informed consent from the patient sufficiently.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Reoperation

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  • (PMID = 20037452.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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22. Ariamkina OL, Savonenkova LN, Sazonov DL, Dzhangarova EV: [Chronic non-specific splanchnopathies in patients with lung tuberculosis]. Klin Med (Mosk); 2009;87(6):60-3
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  • [Title] [Chronic non-specific splanchnopathies in patients with lung tuberculosis].
  • Pathogens isolated in 44.5% of the cases included 16.5% drug-resistant strains; certain patients (7%) developed drug resistance unrelated to the presence or absence of somatic pathology.
  • Half of the patients (40.5%) had tuberculosis concomitant with chronic non-specific diseases; each third patient had several such diseases including gastrointestinal disorders in 28.2% and chronic pathology of other organs or systems in 19.4%.
  • Tuberculosis most frequently associated with dysfunction of upper parts of the digestive tract, alcoholic disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
  • Practically speaking, each tenth death among patients with tuberculosis was due to complications of a chronic non-specific disease.
  • It means that such chronic conditions accompanying tuberculosis not only require additional therapy but also deteriorate the quality of life and prognosis of the underlying pathology.
  • [MeSH-major] Digestive System Diseases / complications. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary / complications

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  • (PMID = 19670721.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-2149
  • [Journal-full-title] Klinicheskaia meditsina
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Klin Med (Mosk)
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
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23. Bai F, Liang J, Wang J, Shi Y, Zhang K, Liang S, Hong L, Zhai H, Lu Y, Han Y, Yin F, Wu K, Fan D: Inhibitory effects of a specific phage-displayed peptide on high peritoneal metastasis of gastric cancer. J Mol Med (Berl); 2007 Feb;85(2):169-80
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  • [Title] Inhibitory effects of a specific phage-displayed peptide on high peritoneal metastasis of gastric cancer.
  • We, therefore, evaluated the feasibility of a peptide, which was obtained by screening a random phage display library, in the treatment of peritoneal metastases of gastric cancer.
  • In this study, a novel cell line, GC9811-P, with a high potential peritoneal metastasis of gastric cancer derived from its parental cell line, GC9811, was established.
  • The isolated phage-displaying peptide, SMSIASPYIALE (named peptide PIII), was obtained after four rounds of selection, showing a tendency to preferentially bind to GC9811-P cells compared with a panel of other gastric cancer cell lines, and preferentially accumulate in peritoneal metastasis tumor tissue in comparison with control organs, peritoneum, liver, pancreas, spleen, lung, and kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Peptides / therapeutic use. Peritoneal Neoplasms / secondary. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. Mice. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Invasiveness / prevention & control. Neoplasm Transplantation. Peptide Library. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 17043801.001).
  • [ISSN] 0946-2716
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of molecular medicine (Berlin, Germany)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Mol. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Peptide Library; 0 / Peptides
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24. Rotimi VO, Al-Sweih NN, Anim JT, Ahmed K, Verghese TL, Khodakhast FB: Influence of in-vivo endotoxin liberation on anti-anaerobic antimicrobial efficacy. J Chemother; 2001 Oct;13(5):510-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Antibiotics.

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  • Evidence of worsening of the outcome of the infections post-therapy was assessed, including histopathological changes in the internal organs.
  • Histological examination of the internal organs of various animals showed variation in the pattern of histopathological changes; grades 3-4 inflammatory changes in the liver were observed in the Fusobacterium-infected animals that were treated with the carbapenems and cefoxitin.
  • Therapy with the other antibiotics did not exacerbate anaerobic sepsis.
  • In this study, bacteremia did not lead to massive endotoxin release and antibiotic therapy appeared not to have negatively influenced the outcome of most of the gram-negative anaerobic infections, except for infections caused by Fusobacterium spp.
  • However, it is conceivable that if the gastrointestinal tract is the source of the endotoxin in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, then the obligate anaerobes like Bacteroides and Fusobacterium species, which are members of the gut flora, may play a major role in the unfavorable outcome of antibiotic therapy in some of these infections.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology. Cephalosporins / pharmacology. Endotoxins / secretion. Gram-Negative Bacteria / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cricetinae. Digestive System / microbiology. Disease Models, Animal. Liver / pathology. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Rats. Shock, Septic / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 11760215.001).
  • [ISSN] 1120-009X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of chemotherapy (Florence, Italy)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Chemother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Cephalosporins; 0 / Endotoxins
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25. Trucco Aguirre E, Olano Gossweiler C, Méndez Pereira C, Isasi Capelo ME, Isasi Capelo ES, Rondan Olivera M: [Celiac disease associated with systemic sclerosis]. Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2007 Nov;30(9):538-40
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Celiac Disease.

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  • Systemic scleroderma (SS) affects the connective tissue, with involvement of multiple organs.
  • Digestive system involvement occurs in 50% of patients.
  • SS is frequently associated with other autoimmune diseases.
  • Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder that affects the digestive system and is trigged by gluten intake.
  • We describe the case of a woman with a diagnosis of SS who presented with weight loss.
  • Because the literature on this topic is scarce, this case is compared with a prior review and some similarities were found.
  • Diagnosis of CD in patients with SS may be difficult but is essential to achieve optimal treatment response in patients with poor quality of life.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Bronchodilator Agents / therapeutic use. Duodenum / pathology. Female. Humans. Lung Diseases / drug therapy. Lung Diseases / etiology. Lung Diseases / physiopathology. Vital Capacity. Weight Loss

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  • (PMID = 17980132.001).
  • [ISSN] 0210-5705
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterología y hepatología
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterol Hepatol
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bronchodilator Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 10
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26. Castro JA, de Mecca MM, Bartel LC: Toxic side effects of drugs used to treat Chagas' disease (American trypanosomiasis). Hum Exp Toxicol; 2006 Aug;25(8):471-9
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  • [Title] Toxic side effects of drugs used to treat Chagas' disease (American trypanosomiasis).
  • (1) via blood sucking vector insects infected with T. cruzi, accounting for 80-90% of transmission of the disease;.
  • (3) other less common forms of infection, eg, from infected food or drinks or via infected organs used in transplants.
  • The acute phase of the disease can last from weeks to months and typically is asymptomatic or associated with fever and other mild nonspecific manifestations.
  • There are two drugs available for the aetiological treatment of Chagas' disease: nifurtimox (Nfx) and benznidazole (Bz).
  • The use of these drugs to treat the acute phase of the disease is widely accepted.
  • However, their use in the treatment of the chronic phase is controversial.
  • The undesirable side effects of both drugs are a major drawback in their use, frequently forcing the physician to stop treatment.
  • The most frequent adverse effects observed in the use of Nfx are: anorexia, loss of weight, psychic alterations, excitability, sleepiness, digestive manifestations such as nausea or vomiting, and occasionally intestinal colic and diarrhoea.
  • Experimental toxicity studies with Nfx evidenced neurotoxicity, testicular damage, ovarian toxicity, and deleterious effects in adrenal, colon, oesophageal and mammary tissue.
  • Both drugs exhibited significant mutagenic effects and were shown to be tumorigenic or carcinogenic in some studies.
  • Other enzymes such as xanthine oxidoreductase or aldehyde oxidase may also be involved.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Chagas Disease / drug therapy. Humans

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  • (PMID = 16937919.001).
  • [ISSN] 0960-3271
  • [Journal-full-title] Human & experimental toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum Exp Toxicol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Nitroimidazoles; 0 / Trypanocidal Agents; M84I3K7C2O / Nifurtimox; YC42NRJ1ZD / benzonidazole
  • [Number-of-references] 60
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27. Roufosse F, Cogan E: [Practical approach to hypereosinophilia]. Rev Med Brux; 2008 Sep;29(4):400-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. PREDNISONE .

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  • Hypereosinophilia is a common clinical finding, and is generally associated with an underlying disease, mainly parasitosis, atopic disorders, drug hypersensitivity, and certain solid and haematological malignancies.
  • Appropriate therapeutic management requires identification of the cause, through careful clinical examination and various technical investigations.
  • Occasionally, thorough diagnostic work-up fails to identify an underlying disorder; the term hypereosinophilic syndrome is used when moderate or severe hypereosinophilia is associated with multi-organ involvement.
  • Indeed, whatever its cause, when the blood eosinophil level is greater than 1500 per microfiter, there is a significant risk of complications directly related to the presence of eosinophils in tissues.
  • The major target organs are the skin, lungs, digestive system, nervous system, and the heart.
  • Reduction of blood eosinophil levels becomes an aim in itself in such cases, and recent studies on pathogenesis of hypereosinophilic syndrome have had an impact on the choice of therapeutic agents used to this end.
  • Imatinib has become first line treatment for a disease variant associated with a somatic mutation involving pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells that generates autonomous tyrosine kinase activity, leading to clonal expansion of eosinophils.
  • For all other patients, gluco-corticoids remain first choice.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypereosinophilic Syndrome / drug therapy. Hypereosinophilic Syndrome / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Benzamides. Eosinophils / pathology. Eosinophils / physiology. Food Hypersensitivity / diagnosis. Glucocorticoids / therapeutic use. Hematologic Diseases / complications. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Leukocyte Count. Mutation. Neoplasms / complications. Parasitic Diseases / complications. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / genetics. Pulmonary Eosinophilia / complications. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 18949995.001).
  • [ISSN] 0035-3639
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue médicale de Bruxelles
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Brux
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Belgium
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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28. Hervé F, Héron F, Levesque H, Marie I: Ascites as the first manifestation of polyarteritis nodosa. Scand J Gastroenterol; 2006 Apr;41(4):493-5
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  • Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis that affects numerous organs, particularly the digestive tract (33-52% of cases).
  • We observed a patient who had developed ascites revealing PAN, and because of suspected malignancy laparotomy and abdominal surgery were performed, including systematic total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophrectomy, submesocolic omontectomy and appendicectomy.
  • The patient had a favourable outcome of clinical manifestations related to PAN after initiation of combined therapy of prednisone and cyclophosphamide.
  • As ascites may precede other signs of PAN, we suggest that when unexplained ascites is noted an evaluation for misdiagnosed vasculitis should be carried out, including a search of the constitutional symptoms (e.g. fever, weight loss).
  • Patients undergoing laparoscopy for peritoneal involvement of unknown origin should also have tissue specimens taken for pathologic studies, notably to exclude an underlying vasculitis.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Appendix / pathology. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Drug Therapy, Combination. Fallopian Tubes / pathology. Female. Humans. Omentum / pathology. Ovary / pathology. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Uterus / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16635920.001).
  • [ISSN] 0036-5521
  • [Journal-full-title] Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Scand. J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Norway
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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29. Dziekońska-Rynko J, Rokicki J, Jablonowski Z: Effects of ivermectin and albendazole against Anisakis simplex in vitro and in guinea pigs. J Parasitol; 2002 Apr;88(2):395-8
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  • Before drug exposure the medium for half of the larvae was adjusted to pH 2.0 with 1 N HCl, whereas the other half was held at pH 7.0.
  • The efficacy of both drugs against L, A. simplex was high in vitro and in vivo against the larvae in different organs of guinea pigs.
  • [MeSH-major] Albendazole / pharmacology. Anisakiasis / drug therapy. Anisakis / growth & development. Anthelmintics / pharmacology. Ivermectin / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Digestive System / parasitology. Guinea Pigs

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  • (PMID = 12054018.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3395
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of parasitology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Parasitol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anthelmintics; 70288-86-7 / Ivermectin; F4216019LN / Albendazole
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30. Varadarajulu S, Schmulewitz N, Wildi SM, Roberts S, Ravenel J, Reed CE, Block M, Hoffman BJ, Hawes RH, Wallace MB: Accuracy of EUS in staging of T4 lung cancer. Gastrointest Endosc; 2004 Mar;59(3):345-8
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  • Patients in this stage have a 5-year survival of less than 5% and generally are offered chemotherapy without surgery.
  • METHODS: The study included all patients with lung cancer who had EUS staging and subsequent staging at surgery, or for whom there was unequivocal confirmation of unresectability (T4) by thoracoscopy, thoracotomy or presence of malignant pleural effusion, or definite invasion of great vessels/adjacent organs on CT.
  • EUS had a sensitivity of 87.5%, specificity of 98%, positive predictive value of 70%, and a negative predictive value of 99% for detecting T4 disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Caution is warranted when unresectability of lung cancer is based solely on tumor invasion into mediastinal soft tissue at EUS.
  • Overstaging occurs when a tumor appears to invade the pleural layer without mediastinal organ invasion.
  • Confirmation of unresectability by other diagnostic modalities is warranted in such instances.
  • [MeSH-major] Endosonography / methods. Lung Neoplasms / diagnostic imaging. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Neoplasm Staging / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pneumonectomy / methods. Predictive Value of Tests. Registries. Retrospective Studies. Sensitivity and Specificity. Survival Analysis. Thoracoscopy / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods

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  • [CommentIn] Gastrointest Endosc. 2004 Mar;59(3):393-5 [14997137.001]
  • [ErratumIn] Gastrointest Endosc. 2004 May;59(6):752. Wildi SF [corrected to Wildi SM]
  • (PMID = 14997129.001).
  • [ISSN] 0016-5107
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastrointest. Endosc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. De Vita S, Quartuccio L, Fabris M: Rituximab in mixed cryoglobulinemia: increased experience and perspectives. Dig Liver Dis; 2007 Sep;39 Suppl 1:S122-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Type II mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome (MCsn) is a systemic vasculitis mainly linked to immune complex deposition in several organs and to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.
  • Therapeutic strategies can target either the viral trigger HCV if present, or pathogenic events downstream the triggering infection, e.g, the proliferating B-cells directly.
  • Antiviral therapy should be considered as first-line treatment in many HCV-positive patients.
  • On the other hand, the other available treatments (such as cytotoxic agents, plasma exchange and steroids) may lead to life-threatening complications and may be difficult to manage in the long term.
  • Based on these results, a multicentre, controlled, randomised, clinical trial is now ongoing to compare RTX versus the best available treatments in some severe MCsn manifestations (i.e. skin ulcers, sensory and/or motor neuropathy and active glomerulonephritis).
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Cryoglobulinemia / drug therapy. Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Autoimmune Diseases / drug therapy. B-Lymphocytes / immunology. Glomerulonephritis / drug therapy. Humans. Rituximab. Syndrome

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  • (PMID = 17936213.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-3562
  • [Journal-full-title] Digestive and liver disease : official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dig Liver Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
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32. Bjerklund Johansen TE, Weidner W: Understanding chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Curr Opin Urol; 2002 Jan;12(1):63-7
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Patients with non-inflammatory chronic pelvic pain syndrome, the largest group of prostatitis patients according to the US National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases classification, are characterized by the absence of objective findings.
  • Nothing thus links the symptoms of this disease to the prostate or other male organs in particular.
  • New information from studies on the inflammatory response in expressed prostatic secretion in patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome and in bladder tissue from patients with interstitial cystitis indicates that complex systems on the cytokine gene expression level may be operating in these diseases.
  • The initial clinical trial reports of drugs that modulate the inflammatory response in interstitial cystitis are met with great interest.
  • [MeSH-minor] Arylsulfonates / therapeutic use. Cytokines / physiology. Female. Histamine Antagonists / therapeutic use. Humans. Male. Mast Cells / physiology. Neurogenic Inflammation / complications. Neurogenic Inflammation / immunology. Placebo Effect. Prostatitis / complications. Prostatitis / drug therapy. Sulfonium Compounds / therapeutic use. Syndrome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Interstitial Cystitis.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pelvic Pain.
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
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  • (PMID = 11753136.001).
  • [ISSN] 0963-0643
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Arylsulfonates; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Histamine Antagonists; 0 / Sulfonium Compounds; C9J89787U1 / suplatast tosilate
  • [Number-of-references] 27
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33. Zuluaga Gómez A, Jiménez Verdejo A: [Retroperitoneal pathology]. Actas Urol Esp; 2002 Jul-Aug;26(7):445-66

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The retroperitoneum is one of the most complex regions of human anatomy as it contains a variety organs and structures from different systems, in particular those belonging to the urinary and digestive tracts and the vascular systems.
  • Thanks to ultrasonography, computerised tomography and magnetic resonance the assessment of retroperitoneal conditions has taken a great leap forwards permitting the anatomical connections and characteristics of the structures in this region to be reliably established.
  • Owing to the location in the retroperitoneal space of the different organs of the digestive tract and the vascular system, a multidisciplinary approach is required involving the different surgical specialties.
  • The urologist performs a large proportion of his surgical activity in this region and must, therefore, have a good knowledge of the different retroperitoneal organs belonging to the urinary tract and also the connections between these and other organs and structures of the retroperitoneal region.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Autoimmune Diseases / complications. Autoimmune Diseases / drug therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Cysts / diagnosis. Cysts / surgery. Diagnostic Imaging / methods. Female. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retroperitoneal Space / pathology. Retroperitoneal Space / surgery. Urologic Surgical Procedures

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  • (PMID = 12224429.001).
  • [ISSN] 0210-4806
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas urologicas espanolas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Urol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 107
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