[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 27 of about 27
1. Kostrzewa JP, Lancaster WP, Iseli TA, Desmond RA, Carroll WR, Rosenthal EL: Outcomes of salvage surgery with free flap reconstruction for recurrent oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Laryngoscope; 2010 Feb;120(2):267-72
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcomes of salvage surgery with free flap reconstruction for recurrent oral and oropharyngeal cancer.
  • OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To evaluate outcomes of salvage surgery with free flap reconstruction for recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx and oral cavity with increased use of chemoradiotherapy.
  • METHODS: All patients undergoing salvage surgery with free flap reconstruction for oropharynx (n = 36) and oral cavity (n = 36) squamous cell carcinomas between January 2001 and January 2008 were obtained.
  • RESULTS: Complications were more frequent in oropharynx than oral cavity tumors (36% and 14%, respectively; P = .05) requiring more secondary procedures (15 for oropharynx vs. six for oral cavity).
  • Median survival overall following salvage surgery was 44.8 months for oral cavity and 53.8 months for oropharynx head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Salvage surgery with free flap reconstruction for recurrent oral and oropharyngeal tumors after chemoradiotherapy has acceptable morbidity and similar cure rates as salvage following radiotherapy without chemotherapy.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Oral cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Oral Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Head Neck. 2007 Jan;29(1):26-32 [17103406.001]
  • [Cites] Head Neck. 2006 Feb;28(2):107-13 [16388526.001]
  • [Cites] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2007 Jan;136(1):98-103 [17210342.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 2007 May;117(5):781-4 [17473668.001]
  • [Cites] Head Neck. 2008 Mar;30(3):281-8 [17764087.001]
  • [Cites] Head Neck. 2008 Nov;30(11):1422-30 [18767179.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2000 Mar 18;355(9208):949-55 [10768432.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 2000 Mar;110(3 Pt 2 Suppl 93):1-18 [10714711.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2008 Dec 1;26(34):5518-23 [18936479.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2003 Nov 27;349(22):2091-8 [14645636.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1998 Jun 18;338(25):1798-804 [9632446.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol). 1998;10(3):155-60 [9704176.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 2005 Apr;115(4):629-39 [15805872.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2005 May 15;103(10):2073-81 [15816049.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 May 20;23(15):3562-7 [15908667.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2005 Jul;131(7):615-9 [16027285.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Oncol. 2005 Aug;28(4):385-92 [16062081.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 2007 Jan;117(1):16-21 [17202924.001]
  • (PMID = 20013840.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-4995
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA142637; None / None / / R01 CA142637-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA142637-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS258253; NLM/ PMC3389788
  •  go-up   go-down


2. Sher DJ, Haddad RI, Norris CM Jr, Posner MR, Wirth LJ, Goguen LA, Annino D, Balboni T, Allen A, Tishler RB: Efficacy and toxicity of reirradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent or second primary head and neck cancer. Cancer; 2010 Oct 15;116(20):4761-8
Faculty of 1000. commentaries/discussion - See the articles recommended by F1000Prime's Faculty of more than 8,000 leading experts in Biology and Medicine. (subscription/membership/fee required).

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy and toxicity of reirradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent or second primary head and neck cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with locally recurrent squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN) are reported to have a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options.
  • This study reported the experience of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) with IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy with or without surgery for locally recurrent SCCHN.
  • METHODS: The current study was a retrospective study of all patients treated at DFCI who were diagnosed with nonmetastatic second primary or recurrent SCCHN and who received reirradiation based on IMRT.
  • Recurrent disease was treated in the oral cavity (4 patients), larynx/hypopharynx (13 patients), oropharynx (7 patients), nasopharynx (2 patients), and neck (9 patients).
  • The median radiation dose was 60 Gray (Gy), and all patients received concurrent chemotherapy.
  • Approximately 91% and 46%, respectively, of all patients developed at least 1 acute and late grade 3 toxicity.
  • Four (11%) late deaths occurred in patients with no evidence of disease (2 aspiration events, 1 oropharyngeal hemorrhage, and 1 infectious death).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy. Retreatment. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] © 2010 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 20572036.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Chao KS, Low DA, Perez CA, Purdy JA: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy in head and neck cancers: The Mallinckrodt experience. Int J Cancer; 2000 Apr 20;90(2):92-103
ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intensity-modulated radiation therapy in head and neck cancers: The Mallinckrodt experience.
  • The purpose of the study was to investigate the feasibility and the optimization of tomotherapy-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with head and neck cancer.
  • From February 1997 to November 1997, 17 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with IMRT.
  • Treatment planning was performed on a Peacock inverse planning system and prescription optimization was used to achieve the best plan for target coverage and parotid sparing.
  • The treatment planning system process has a dosimetric characteristic of delivering different doses to different target structures simultaneously in each daily treatment; therefore, the biological equivalent dose was implemented using the linear-quadratic model to adjust the total dose to the target volume receiving a daily dose of less than 1.9 Gy.
  • All eight patients with gross disease (six in the nasopharynx, two in the tonsil) and one patient with recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma received concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy.
  • All patients completed the prescribed treatment without unexpected interruption.
  • In the best-achievable plan of our studied cohort, only 27% +/- 8% of parotid gland volumes were treated to more than 30 Gy, while an average of 3.3% +/- 0.6% of the target volume received less than 95% of the prescribed dose.
  • The inverse planning system allowed us the freedom of weighting normal tissue-sparing and target coverage to select the best-achievable plan.
  • In summary, a system for patient immobilization, setup verification, and dose optimization for head and neck cancer with parotid sparing without significantly compromising target coverage is being implemented for a tomotherapy-based IMRT plan at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology.
  • Further refining of delivery technology and the inverse planning system, gaining clinical experience to address target definition and dose inhomogeneity within the targets, and understanding the partial volume effect on normal tissue tolerance are needed for IMRT to excel in the treatment of head and neck cancer. Int. J.
  • Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Middle Aged. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiation Dosage. Tonsillar Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Radiation Therapy.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 10814959.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Goldberg SL, Chiang L, Selina N, Hamarman S: Patient perceptions about chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: implications for primary/secondary prophylaxis strategies. Support Care Cancer; 2004 Jul;12(7):526-30
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Patient perceptions about chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: implications for primary/secondary prophylaxis strategies.
  • GOALS: Oral mucositis (OM), the painful inflammation of oropharyngeal tissues, is an economically costly chemotherapy toxicity.
  • Several agents to prevent chemotherapy-induced OM are in development, with most studies conducted among transplantation subjects with a brief well-defined risk period.
  • The potential value of these preventative agents among hematology-oncology populations receiving cyclic standard-dose therapy is unknown.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients receiving standard-dose chemotherapy at an outpatient oncology center over a 2-week time-frame were invited to participate in an anonymous unprompted survey.
  • The survey instrument consisted of six demographic questions and six questions regarding toxicities of chemotherapy.
  • Factors associated with developing OM included number of chemotherapy cycles ( P=0.001), hematologic malignancy ( P=0.02), female gender ( P=0.03), age ( P=0.05), and treatment with anthracyclines ( P=0.001), vinca alkaloids ( P=0.001), cyclophosphamide ( P=0.001), fludarabine ( P=0.01), cis/carboplatin ( P=0.05) and radiotherapy ( P=0.005).
  • Recurrent OM was reported by 87 patients (53%) and was judged similar in severity by 67%, milder by 27% and more severe by 6%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: OM represents a common toxicity of standard-dose chemotherapy occurring in approximately one-third of patients.
  • However, since OM was self-reported by only one-third of patients receiving standard-dose chemotherapy, but over half of those experiencing OM developed recurrent episodes, secondary prophylaxis strategies targeting recurrent OM episodes may be more appropriate.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Mouth Mucosa / drug effects. Stomatitis / chemically induced. Stomatitis / psychology. Stress, Psychological / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / complications. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Severity of Illness Index. Surveys and Questionnaires. Time Factors

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Stress.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2003 Oct 1;98(7):1531-9 [14508842.001]
  • [Cites] Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1989 Dec;68(6):711-6 [2594318.001]
  • [Cites] Support Care Cancer. 2000 Jan;8(1):33-9 [10650895.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2001 Apr 15;19(8):2201-5 [11304772.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Aug;17(8):2446-53 [10561308.001]
  • [Cites] Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002;(1):CD001973 [11869616.001]
  • [Cites] J Dent Educ. 2002 Aug;66(8):903-11 [12214838.001]
  • [Cites] Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 1999 Sep;88(3):273-6 [10503852.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 2001 May;27 Suppl 2:S3-S11 [11436115.001]
  • [Cites] J Pain Symptom Manage. 2001 Jun;21(6):498-505 [11397608.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1998 Jun 1;82(11):2275-81 [9610710.001]
  • (PMID = 15150704.001).
  • [ISSN] 0941-4355
  • [Journal-full-title] Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Support Care Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Kiyota N, Tahara M, Kadowaki S, Fuse N, Doi T, Minami H, Ohtsu A: Systemic chemotherapy with cisplatin plus 5-FU (PF) for recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN): efficacy and safety of a lower dose of PF (80/800) at a single institution in Japan. Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2009 Apr;39(4):225-30
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Systemic chemotherapy with cisplatin plus 5-FU (PF) for recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN): efficacy and safety of a lower dose of PF (80/800) at a single institution in Japan.
  • OBJECTIVE: Prognosis in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is poor, and systemic chemotherapy has an only modest impact on the outcome.
  • Chemotherapy with cisplatin plus 5-FU (PF) is widely used, but the standard dosage, PF (100/1000; cisplatin 100 mg/m(2) day 1 and 5-FU 1000 mg/m(2)/24 h by continuous intravenous infusion on days 1 through 4), is relatively toxic for palliative use, and PF (80/800; cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) day 1 and 5-FU 800 mg/m(2)/24 h by continuous intravenous infusion on days 1 through 5) is more commonly used in Japan, albeit without clear comparative data.
  • METHODS: Thirty of 43 patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer treated with PF in our institution between 2001 and 2006 were analyzed.
  • Entry criteria included histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma and recurrent or metastatic disease.
  • RESULTS: The most common chemotherapy-related Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were nausea (16.6%), anorexia (40%), stomatitis (6.6%) and leukopenia (10%), all of which were manageable.
  • Of the 30 patients, 5 (16.7%) survived more than 2 years, all of whom had primary oropharyngeal cancer.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this retrospective analysis, chemotherapy with PF (80/800) for recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer appeared to have equal efficacy and better safety than PF (100/1000).
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Carcinoma, Squamous Cell.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19211574.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-3621
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  •  go-up   go-down


8. Krempien RC, Grehn C, Haag C, Straulino A, Hensley FW, Kotrikova B, Hofele C, Debus J, Harms W: Feasibility report for retreatment of locally recurrent head-and-neck cancers by combined brachy-chemotherapy using frameless image-guided 3D interstitial brachytherapy. Brachytherapy; 2005;4(2):154-62
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Feasibility report for retreatment of locally recurrent head-and-neck cancers by combined brachy-chemotherapy using frameless image-guided 3D interstitial brachytherapy.
  • PURPOSE: Brachytherapy re-irradiation may offer an alternative re-treatment of recurrent head-and-neck cancer even after previous full dose radiation therapy.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between January 2000 and March 2003, 14 patients with biopsy-proven locally recurrent head-and-neck-cancer were retreated after previous full dose irradiation with combined external beam-brachytherapy with concomitant chemotherapy.
  • Chemoradiotherapy was followed by 2-4 courses of chemotherapy every fourth week starting 4 weeks after the end of brachytherapy.
  • Six weeks after brachytherapy, 1 patient developed localized soft tissue necrosis which did not require surgical intervention.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy in combination with sequential chemotherapy is effective and safe in re-irradiation of locally recurrent oropharyngeal carcinomas and can be offered to patients with curative intent.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Brachytherapy / instrumentation. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy. Equipment Design. Feasibility Studies. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Needles. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Reproducibility of Results. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - CT Scans.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15893270.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-4721
  • [Journal-full-title] Brachytherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brachytherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Agra IM, Carvalho AL, Ulbrich FS, de Campos OD, Martins EP, Magrin J, Kowalski LP: Prognostic factors in salvage surgery for recurrent oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Head Neck; 2006 Feb;28(2):107-13
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic factors in salvage surgery for recurrent oral and oropharyngeal cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Therapeutic decisions in recurrent oral and oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma (SCC) remain controversial.
  • METHODS: Two hundred forty-six consecutive patients who underwent salvage surgery for recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and oropharynx were studied.
  • The tumor sites were lip, 33 cases; oral cavity, 143; oropharynx, 70.
  • The previous treatment was surgery in 73 patients, radiotherapy in 96, combined surgery and radiotherapy in 76, and chemotherapy in one.
  • CONCLUSION: Patients with recurrent oral and oropharyngeal SCC at initial clinical stages (rCS I and II) and with a DFI greater than 1 year had a favorable prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Mouth Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Salvage Therapy

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Oral cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Oral Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  • (PMID = 16388526.001).
  • [ISSN] 1043-3074
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & neck
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


10. de Bree R, van der Putten L, Brouwer J, Castelijns JA, Hoekstra OS, Leemans CR: Detection of locoregional recurrent head and neck cancer after (chemo)radiotherapy using modern imaging. Oral Oncol; 2009 Apr-May;45(4-5):386-93
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Detection of locoregional recurrent head and neck cancer after (chemo)radiotherapy using modern imaging.
  • After radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy differentiation between residual and recurrent head and neck cancer and (chemo)radiation sequelae is often difficult.
  • Potential imaging techniques to detect residual and recurrent locoregional disease after chemoradiation are (serial) CT or MRI and FDG-PET, eventually in combination with specific response criteria or scoring systems.
  • FDG-PET may help to select patients clinically suspected of recurrent laryngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy for direct laryngoscopy under general anaesthesia.
  • It is not yet clear whether FDG-PET can reliable avoid futile routine evaluation by examination under general anaesthesia in oral and oropharyngeal cancer and planned neck dissection when a residual mass persists in the neck after (chemo)radiation.
  • The most reliable scoring criteria and the optimal time interval between completion of radiation and FDG-PET still has to be assessed.
  • [MeSH-minor] Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Mouth Neoplasms / diagnosis. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Positron-Emission Tomography / methods. Prognosis. Radiopharmaceuticals. Recurrence. Sensitivity and Specificity. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods. Treatment Outcome

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19095487.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0593
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
  • [Number-of-references] 63
  •  go-up   go-down


11. Suzuki M, Terada A, Ogawa T, Suzuki H, Hasegawa Y: [Salvage surgery for radiation failure in oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma]. Nihon Jibiinkoka Gakkai Kaiho; 2007 Jun;110(6):461-5
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Oral Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Salvage surgery for radiation failure in oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma].
  • Few reports have covered salvage surgery after radiotherapy, especially with chemotherapy for oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.
  • We analyzed postoperative complications and prognosis after salvage surgery for local recurrence after definitive radiotherapy.
  • Subjects were 37 patients with oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated from 1994 to 2003.
  • The complication rate was significantly high in the reconstructive operation group (p = 0.031) and the chemotherapy group (p = 0.049).
  • We found that salvage surgery after definitive radiotherapy was effective for recurrent oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.
  • We stress the need to pay attention to postoperative complications in reconstructive operation and chemotherapy groups.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Mouth Neoplasms / surgery. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Salvage Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Staging. Survival Rate. Treatment Failure

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Carcinoma, Squamous Cell.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Oral squamous cell carcinoma.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17633115.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6622
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Jibiinkoka Gakkai kaiho
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Jibiinkoka Gakkai Kaiho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  •  go-up   go-down


12. Agra IM, Carvalho AL, Pinto CA, Martins EP, Filho JG, Soares FA, Kowalski LP: Biological markers and prognosis in recurrent oral cancer after salvage surgery. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2008 Jul;134(7):743-9
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Biological markers and prognosis in recurrent oral cancer after salvage surgery.
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prognostic effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in patients with locally recurrent oral carcinoma after salvage surgery.
  • Settings Tertiary center cancer hospital.
  • The previous treatment consisted of surgery in 33 patients (30.0%), radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in 46 patients (41.0%), and surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy in 32 patients (29.0%).
  • The expression of EGFR, matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and vascular endothelial growth factor was analyzed with a tissue microarray immunohistochemical technique.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Overall survival and cancer-specific survival (CSS).
  • In multivariate analysis, only the disease-free interval and the overexpression of EGFR were associated with a higher risk of cancer death.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Lip Neoplasms / pathology. Lip Neoplasms / surgery. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 / analysis. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 / analysis. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Mouth Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / analysis. Salvage Therapy. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / analysis

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Oral cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Oral Cancer.
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18645125.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-361X
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of otolaryngology--head & neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 3.4.24.24 / MMP2 protein, human; EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
  •  go-up   go-down


13. Wutzl A, Ploder O, Kermer C, Millesi W, Ewers R, Klug C: Mortality and causes of death after multimodality treatment for advanced oral and oropharyngeal cancer. J Oral Maxillofac Surg; 2007 Feb;65(2):255-60
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Oral Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mortality and causes of death after multimodality treatment for advanced oral and oropharyngeal cancer.
  • PURPOSE: To analyze mortality and causes of death in patients who received preoperative radiochemotherapy and underwent radical surgery for advanced oral or oropharyngeal cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 222 patients who underwent multimodality treatment from 1990 to 2000 were included in the study.
  • The inclusion criterion was International Union Against Cancer (UICC) disease stage II to IV (T2, 33.3%; T3, 12.6%; T4, 54.1%).
  • Patients received preoperative radiotherapy 50 Gy and concomitant chemotherapy with mitomycin and 5-fluorouracil.
  • Of these, a second cancer in the head and neck region or the lower respiratory tract or the upper digestive tract was found in 7.3%.
  • Although 93% of deaths related to recurrent disease occurred within the first 36 months after surgery, the remaining causes of death did not reveal a specific temporal pattern.
  • CONCLUSION: Favorable survival data were registered for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity who underwent combined treatment protocols.
  • Because recurrent disease is a less common cause of mortality than are other causes, the latter should receive attention during surveillance.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / mortality. Mouth Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cause of Death. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / mortality. Neoplasms, Second Primary / mortality. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / mortality. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Oral cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17236930.001).
  • [ISSN] 0278-2391
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


1
Advertisement
4. Argiris A, Li Y, Forastiere A: Prognostic factors and long-term survivorship in patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer (HNC): An analysis of two Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) randomized trials. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):5514

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic factors and long-term survivorship in patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer (HNC): An analysis of two Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) randomized trials.
  • : 5514 Background: The ECOG conducted two successive phase III randomized trials comparing cisplatin-based doublets (E1393: cisplatin/paclitaxel, low dose vs. cisplatin/paclitaxel, high dose, and E1395: cisplatin/paclitaxel vs. cisplatin/5-FU) in patients (pts) with recurrent or metastatic HNC.
  • These studies found no significant differences in antitumor efficacy between treatment arms.
  • On multivariate analysis, independent unfavorable predictors of objective response were weight loss, performance status (PS) of 1 (vs. 0), residual disease at the primary, site other than oropharyngeal, history of radiation therapy (RT) (P=0.06), and well/moderate tumor differentiation (TD) (P=0.07).
  • Independent prognostic factors for OS were weight loss, PS 1 (vs. 0), poor TD (favorable), oral cavity (OC) or hypopharyngeal (HP) primary, and history of RT, and for time to progression (TTP): poor TD (favorable), OC or HP primary, and history of RT.
  • Response to chemotherapy could also be included in the prognostic models of OS and TTP as an independent predictor.
  • 2-y survivors were more likely to have had a response to chemotherapy, poor TD, white race, PS of 0, and no prior RT.
  • Two out of 49 pts surviving at least 2 ys developed a second primary tumor.
  • A small percentage of pts with recurrent or metastatic HNC achieves long-term survival.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 28014175.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


15. Baskin R, Motl S: Delayed-onset, grade IV neutropenia associated with rituximab therapy in a lymphoma patient: A case report and literature review. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6682

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Delayed-onset, grade IV neutropenia associated with rituximab therapy in a lymphoma patient: A case report and literature review.
  • : 6682 Background: Several cases of delayed-onset (> 4 weeks post therapy) neutropenia associated with rituximab have been reported in lymphoma patients.
  • The majority of patients have been heavily pre-treated with chemotherapy.
  • This is the first report of delayed neutropenia in a patient receiving rituximab as part of first-line therapy.
  • Six weeks after completing therapy, significant neutropenia and thrombocytopenia developed; WBC 700/mm<sup>3</sup>, neutrophil granulocytes 0.320/μL, PLT 71 x 10<sup>3</sup>/μL.
  • Complications included severe mucositis, oropharyngeal infections, weakness, weight loss, and fatigue.
  • Treatment with filgrastim 480 μg daily improved neutrophil and platelet counts and controlled infections.
  • However, discontinuation of filgrastim resulted in an ANC < 1000 and recurrent infections.
  • Grade IV neutropenia developed 3 times.
  • A bone marrow biopsies during filgrastim therapy demonstrated hypercellularity (80%) and no abnormal leukocytes.
  • Pertinent history includes diffuse inflammatory lung disease during chemotherapy, which responded to steroids.
  • Monitoring blood counts for up 8 weeks after rituximab therapy is worthwhile, although the literature reports neutropenia development 24 weeks post rituximab therapy.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 28016421.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


16. Caponigro F, Longo F, Perri F, Ionna F: Docetaxel in the management of head and neck cancer. Anticancer Drugs; 2009 Sep;20(8):639-45
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOCETAXEL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Docetaxel in the management of head and neck cancer.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is a major health problem, and much effort is being made in the different settings of its presentation.
  • Much of the recent progress has been made in locoregionally advanced inoperable disease, mainly with the optimal combination of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and with the introduction of new active drugs, such as docetaxel, in the induction phase of the treatment.
  • The association of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) regimen is now acknowledged as being the gold standard of induction treatment.
  • The subset of patients with recurrent/metastatic disease still carries a grim prognosis.
  • For the time being, new biological therapies have not dramatically changed this scenario, even in combination with conventional treatments.
  • Little is known about the role of docetaxel and, in general, of chemotherapy in the adjuvant setting, even though it is increasingly acknowledged that, beyond a certain risk, concurrent adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is required.
  • The main aim of the research on head and neck cancer probably lies in the identification of biomolecular markers that are able to predict clinical behaviour, thus allowing appropriate treatment tailoring.
  • The identification of human papilloma virus infection as the agent of a particular form of oropharyngeal cancer is an example of this strategy in consideration of the peculiar characteristics.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Taxoids / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19639668.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-5741
  • [Journal-full-title] Anti-cancer drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
  • [Number-of-references] 61
  •  go-up   go-down


17. Martínez-Monge R, Gómez-Iturriaga A, Cambeiro M, Garrán C, Montesdeoca N, Aristu JJ, Alcalde J: Phase I-II trial of perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy in oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. Brachytherapy; 2009 Jan-Mar;8(1):26-33
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I-II trial of perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy in oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: To determine the feasibility of combined perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (PHDRB) and intermediate-dose external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as an alternative to full-dose adjuvant EBRT in patients with unirradiated squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the oral cavity and oropharynx.
  • Patients with Stage III, IVa tumors, and some recurrent cases received concomitant cisplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy during EBRT.
  • Eleven patients (27.5%) developed RTOG Grade 3 or greater toxicity.
  • Four patients (10%) presented complications requiring a major surgical procedure (RTOG 4), and one patient died of bleeding (RTOG 5).
  • Three complications (7.5%) occurred in the perioperative period, and 8 (20.0%) occurred more than 3 months after the completion of the treatment program.
  • CONCLUSIONS: PHDRB can be integrated into the management of patients with resected cancer of the oral cavity who are candidates to receive postoperative radiation or chemoradiation.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachytherapy / adverse effects. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Mouth Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Oral cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Oral Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19041280.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-4721
  • [Journal-full-title] Brachytherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brachytherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


18. Langer CJ, Li Y, Jennings T, DeConti RC, Nair S, Cohen RB, Forastiere AA, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group: Phase II evaluation of 96-hour paclitaxel infusion in advanced (recurrent or metastatic) squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (E3395): a trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. Cancer Invest; 2004;22(6):823-31
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. TAXOL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II evaluation of 96-hour paclitaxel infusion in advanced (recurrent or metastatic) squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (E3395): a trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group.
  • BACKGROUND: Paclitaxel (24-hour infusion) has yielded activity in advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN).
  • Therefore we sought to evaluate paclitaxel by 96-hour infusion in both treatment-naïve and previously treated patients with SCCHN.
  • 1) chemotherapy-naïve;.
  • 2) chemotherapy-exposed, paclitaxel-naïve; and 3) chemotherapy and paclitaxel exposed.
  • Paclitaxel was dosed at 140 mg/m2 (96-hour infusion) every 3 weeks in treatment-naïve patients and at 120 mg/m2 (96 hours) every 3 weeks in previously treated patients.
  • Nearly half the patients had oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal primary sites.
  • There was one treatment-related death due to neutropenic fever/pneumonia.
  • In 15 chemotherapy-naïve patients, two responses (13%) were observed.
  • There were no responses in treatment-exposed patients.
  • Treatment-naïve patients had a median survival of 8.2 months and 1-year survival rate of 20%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Paclitaxel by 96-hour infusion at a dose of 120-140 mg/m2/96 hours is only marginally active in the treatment of SCCHN.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Rate

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Carcinoma, Squamous Cell.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15641479.001).
  • [ISSN] 0735-7907
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA13650; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16116; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA21115; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA23318; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA27525; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA49957; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA66636; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA73590
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
  •  go-up   go-down


19. Iseli TA, Kulbersh BD, Iseli CE, Carroll WR, Rosenthal EL, Magnuson JS: Functional outcomes after transoral robotic surgery for head and neck cancer. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2009 Aug;141(2):166-71
ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Functional outcomes after transoral robotic surgery for head and neck cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate functional outcomes following transoral robotic surgery for head and neck cancer.
  • RESULTS: Tumors were most commonly oropharynx (61%) or larynx (22%) and T1 (35%) or T2 (44%).
  • Many received radiotherapy (22% preoperatively, 41% postoperatively) and chemotherapy (31%).
  • Retained feeding tube was associated with preoperative tube requirement (P=0.017), higher T stage (P=0.043), oropharyngeal/laryngeal site (P=0.034), and recurrent/second primary tumor (P=0.008).
  • Patients with advanced T stage, laryngeal or oropharyngeal site, and preoperative enterogastric feeding may be at increased risk of enterogastric feeding and poor swallowing outcomes.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Deglutition. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hemorrhage / prevention & control. Hospitals, University. Humans. Intubation, Intratracheal / methods. Laryngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Prospective Studies. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Risk Factors. Salvage Therapy

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19643246.001).
  • [ISSN] 0194-5998
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00473564
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


20. Marur S, Forastiere AA: Head and neck cancer: changing epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Mayo Clin Proc; 2008 Apr;83(4):489-501
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Head and neck cancer: changing epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • Head and neck cancers account for less than 5% of all cancers and for less than 3% of all cancer deaths in the United States.
  • More recently, the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer in younger populations has been increasing and is associated with exposure to the human papillomavirus.
  • This subset of patients appears to have a better overall prognosis and to respond better to treatment.
  • Because treatment of head and neck cancers is complex and involves multiple modalities, a multidisciplinary approach is needed.
  • This review focuses on the goal of organ preservation and postoperative treatment of high-risk patients with the concurrent use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
  • This review also highlights recent advances in treatment using molecularly targeted therapies, specifically the role of inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor in locally advanced and recurrent/metastatic squamous cell cancer of the head and neck.
  • Studies in the English language were identified by searching the MEDLINE, EMBASE database (1980-2007) using the search terms head and neck, squamous cell, carcinoma, chemotherapy, radiation, human papillomavirus, epidermal growth factor receptor, and targeted therapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Diagnosis. Humans. Morbidity / trends. Positron-Emission Tomography. Risk Factors. Survival Rate. United States / epidemiology

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [ErratumIn] Mayo Clin Proc. 2008 May;83(5):604
  • (PMID = 18380996.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-6196
  • [Journal-full-title] Mayo Clinic proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mayo Clin. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 77
  •  go-up   go-down


21. Mohammadianpanah M, Vasei M, Mosalaei A, Omidvari S, Ahmadloo N: Malignant spinal cord compression in cancer patients may be mimicked by a primary spinal cord tumour. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl); 2006 Dec;15(5):497-500
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant spinal cord compression in cancer patients may be mimicked by a primary spinal cord tumour.
  • Although it is quite rare, second primary neoplasms in cancer patients may present with the signs and symptoms of malignant spinal cord compression.
  • Primary spinal cord tumours in the cancer patients may be deceptive and considered as the recurrent first cancer.
  • We report such a case of intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord mimicking metatstatic recurrent lymphoma and causing cord compression.
  • A 50-year-old man developed intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord 1.5 years following chemoradiation for Waldeyer's ring lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-minor] Cervical Vertebrae. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / radiotherapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Quadriplegia / etiology

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17177910.001).
  • [ISSN] 0961-5423
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 10
  •  go-up   go-down


22. Hirano K, Nakamura K, Hasegawa M: [Pharmacokinetics and adverse event of TS-1 administered through gastrostomy]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2005 Jun;32(6):859-62
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We administered TS-1 to a patient with advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma who underwent a gastrostomy because of swallowing difficulties.
  • Such a procedure could also be used in patients with naso-gastric feeding tubes.
  • We conclude that the administration of TS-1 through either a gastrostomy or a naso-gastric feeding tube may be a new administration method that can improve the quality of life (QOL) of patients with advanced and/or recurrent head and neck carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Gastrostomy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oxonic Acid / adverse effects. Oxonic Acid / pharmacokinetics. Pyridines / adverse effects. Pyridines / pharmacokinetics. Tegafur / adverse effects. Tegafur / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Deglutition Disorders / etiology. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Combinations. Fluorouracil / blood. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Humans. Informed Consent. Intubation, Gastrointestinal. Male. Middle Aged

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15984532.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Pyridines; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  •  go-up   go-down


23. Turowski B, Zanella FE: Interventional neuroradiology of the head and neck. Neuroimaging Clin N Am; 2003 Aug;13(3):619-45
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Vascular interventions are important and helpful for treatment of various pathologies of the head and neck.
  • Interventional neuroradiology of the head and neck includes image-guided biopsies, vessel occlusion, and local chemotherapy.
  • Knowledge of anatomy, functional relationships between intra- and extracranial vessels, and pathology are the basis for therapeutic success.
  • Neuroradiologic imaging, especially CT and MR imaging, and appropriate analysis of angiographic findings help ensure indication for treatment and plan an intervention.
  • Effective treatment of vascular malformations, such as AV fistulas or angiomas, needs exact occlusion of the fistula or the angiomatous nidus, which is demonstrated in the case of an AV angioma of the base of the tongue.
  • Chemotherapy with local intra-arterial cisplatin combined with intravenous administration of sodium thiosulfate as antidote is indicated as an adjuvant modality in a multimodal regimen of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma or as palliative treatment of recurrent and otherwise untreatable malignant tumors of the head and neck.
  • Examples are a carcinoma of the alveolar ridge, a squamous cell carcinoma of the floor of the mouth, and a nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma.
  • Palliative treatment of a bleeding oropharyngeal cancer is another example of interventional treatment.
  • Selective treatment, either occluding or pharmacologic, may be preoperative, palliative, or curative.
  • The objective is reduction of surgical risk, improvement of quality of life, or curative therapy of a lesion.
  • Thus, the interventional treatment should not be associated with morbidity or mortality.
  • The benefits, risks, and expected damages of neuroradiologic interventions must be balanced during the informed consent procedure with the patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiography. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Neuroradiography. Radiology, Interventional

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 14631695.001).
  • [ISSN] 1052-5149
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroimaging clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuroimaging Clin. N. Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 40
  •  go-up   go-down


24. Biel MA: Photodynamic therapy of head and neck cancers. Methods Mol Biol; 2010;635:281-93
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Photodynamic therapy of head and neck cancers.
  • These patients include a mixture of presentations including primary, recurrent, and metastatic lesions.
  • The predominant histology is squamous cell carcinoma, but other histologies treated include mucosal melanoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, adenocarcinoma, metastatic breast carcinoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma.
  • Several multi-institutional phase II clinical trials evaluating PDT treatment of head and neck cancers have demonstrated the efficacy of this minimally invasive therapy in the treatment of early oropharyngeal primary and recurrent cancers as well as the palliative treatment of refractory head and neck cancers.
  • Of 518 patients treated with Cis, T1, or T2 cancers of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and nasopharynx, 462 (89.1%) obtained a complete clinical response after one PDT treatment.
  • Photodynamic therapy is as effective as conventional therapies for the treatment of early (Cis, T1, T2) squamous cell cancers of the head and neck.
  • It is also a promising therapy to be used in association with surgery to increase tumor-free margins and therefore increase cure rates.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 20552353.001).
  • [ISSN] 1940-6029
  • [Journal-full-title] Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Methods Mol. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


25. Dilkes MG, Benjamin E, Ovaisi S, Banerjee AS: Treatment of primary mucosal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma using photodynamic therapy: results after 25 treated cases. J Laryngol Otol; 2003 Sep;117(9):713-7
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of primary mucosal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma using photodynamic therapy: results after 25 treated cases.
  • The use of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of malignant and non-malignant conditions is increasing.
  • This paper demonstrates the efficacy of a second-generation photosensitizer, Foscan, in the primary treatment of a wide range of mucosal head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.
  • A complete response to primary treatment was seen in 19/21 patients (90 per cent).
  • In laryngeal cancer recurrent after radical radiotherapy, one out of four patients treated obtained a complete response (25 per cent).
  • Six patients (24 per cent) required surgery after photodynamic therapy, for local recurrence or dysplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mesoporphyrins / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy / methods. Photosensitizing Agents / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Mouth Neoplasms / surgery. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Carcinoma, Squamous Cell.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 14561360.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-2151
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of laryngology and otology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Laryngol Otol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mesoporphyrins; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; FU21S769PF / temoporfin
  •  go-up   go-down


26. Gorsky M, Epstein JB: The effect of retinoids on premalignant oral lesions: focus on topical therapy. Cancer; 2002 Sep 15;95(6):1258-64
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The effect of retinoids on premalignant oral lesions: focus on topical therapy.
  • BACKGROUND: Retinoids have been studied as chemopreventive treatment for patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma.
  • The objective of the current report was to review the possible role of topical vitamin A and vitamin A derivatives in the management of patients with oral lesions with a risk of transformation to carcinoma.
  • A complete response was achieved in 10-27% of patients, and a partial response was achieved in 54-90% of patients; however, recurrence of leukoplakia was reported after withdrawing the medication in approximately 50% of patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although the direct application of higher concentrations of retinoic acid results in suppression of oral leukoplakias only, its use in the treatment of patients with recurrent and persistent lesions may be justified for controlling lesions that otherwise may progress.
  • [MeSH-major] Leukoplakia, Oral / drug therapy. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Retinoids / administration & dosage

  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VITAMIN A .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 12216093.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Retinoids; 11103-57-4 / Vitamin A
  • [Number-of-references] 75
  •  go-up   go-down


27. Kancherla RR, Nair JS, Ahmed T, Durrani H, Seiter K, Mannancheril A, Tse-Dinh YC: Evaluation of topotecan and etoposide for non-Hodgkin lymphoma: correlation of topoisomerase-DNA complex formation with clinical response. Cancer; 2001 Feb 1;91(3):463-71
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • These two agents have therapeutic activity in non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • The authors report Phase I data of topotecan and etoposide combination for patients with recurrent or refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma and correlation of topoisomerase-DNA complex formation to clinical response.
  • METHODS: Twenty-two patients with recurrent or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma were treated at four dose levels of topotecan (1 mg/m(2)/day to 2.5 mg/m(2)/day).
  • Oropharyngeal mucositis was dose-limiting.
  • Drug-induced topoisomerase-DNA complex formation was observed throughout the treatment in blood samples of all the patients who responded.
  • However, only 4 of 13 patients, who did not respond, formed covalent complex at all time points.
  • Topoisomerase-DNA complex formation correlated with response to treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. DNA Topoisomerases, Type I / metabolism. DNA Topoisomerases, Type II. DNA, Neoplasm / metabolism. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Topotecan / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antigens, Neoplasm. DNA-Binding Proteins. Female. Humans. Isoenzymes / drug effects. Isoenzymes / genetics. Isoenzymes / metabolism. Male. Middle Aged. RNA, Messenger / drug effects. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Topotecan .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ETOPOSIDE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 11169927.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 7M7YKX2N15 / Topotecan; EC 5.99.1.2 / DNA Topoisomerases, Type I; EC 5.99.1.3 / DNA Topoisomerases, Type II; EC 5.99.1.3 / DNA topoisomerase II alpha; EC 5.99.1.3 / DNA topoisomerase II beta
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement