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1. Freeman KP, Hahn KA, Harris FD, King GK: Treatment of dogs with oral melanoma by hypofractionated radiation therapy and platinum-based chemotherapy (1987-1997). J Vet Intern Med; 2003 Jan-Feb;17(1):96-101
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  • [Title] Treatment of dogs with oral melanoma by hypofractionated radiation therapy and platinum-based chemotherapy (1987-1997).
  • This retrospective study in 39 dogs with incompletely resected oral melanoma examined the efficacy of hypofractionated radiation therapy and platinum-containing chemotherapy.
  • All dogs were completely staged, with the majority of dogs classified as stage 1.
  • Dogs received 6 weekly fractions of 6-gray (Gy) megavoltage irradiation with a cobalt-60 unit or a 4-MeV (megaelectron volts) linear accelerator.
  • Dogs received cisplatin (10-30 mg/m2 IV) or carboplatin (90 mg/m2 IV) chemotherapy 60 minutes before radiation delivery.
  • Durations of local control, metastasis-free survival time, and overall survival time were recorded.
  • By the Kaplan-Meier method, 15% of the dogs had local recurrence within a median time of 139 days.
  • Fifty-one percent of the dogs developed metastatic disease within a median time of 311 days (range, 24-2, 163 days).
  • Median survival time for all 39 dogs was 363 days.
  • The combined use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy in this protocol provided local control consistent with previous studies.
  • Low-dose chemotherapy was used with the intent of enhancing radiation therapy for the local control of an incompletely excised tumor.
  • Survival times were longer than previously reported for dogs with oral malignant melanoma.
  • Additional studies are required to determine whether these results were due to the effects of chemotherapy on microscopic disease or the enhanced local control provided by chemoradiation therapy.

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  • (PMID = 12564733.001).
  • [ISSN] 0891-6640
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of veterinary internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Vet. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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2. Lin CY, Hung HC, Kuo RC, Chiang CP, Kuo MY: Survivin expression predicts poorer prognosis in patients with areca quid chewing-related oral squamous cell carcinoma in Taiwan. Oral Oncol; 2005 Jul;41(6):645-54
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  • [Title] Survivin expression predicts poorer prognosis in patients with areca quid chewing-related oral squamous cell carcinoma in Taiwan.
  • Survivin, a recently characterized novel member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family, is not detectable in most differentiated normal adult tissues but is expressed in a wide range of cancer tissues.
  • Its expression in cancer has been correlated with poor prognosis, cancer progression and drug resistance.
  • We immunohistochemically examined the expression of survivin in 62 cases of oral epithelial dysplasia (ED) and 96 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).
  • Cytoplasmic survivin staining was detected in 60 of the 62 (97%) ED specimens and 94 of the 96 (98%) SCC specimens but not in adjacent normal oral mucosal tissues.
  • In addition, the mean LI for ED cases with further malignant transformation into SCC (45.6+/-8.8%) was higher than those without malignant transformation (30.1+/-16.3%) (p=0.008).
  • No significant correlation was found between the survivin expression and the patients' age, sex, oral habit, cancer location, or STNM status in SCC cases.
  • Kaplan-Meier curves showed oral SCC patients with high survivin expression (LI>25%), advanced stage, larger tumor size, or positive lymph node metastasis had significantly shorter overall survival (p=0.014, 0.012, 0.005 and 0.011, respectively by log-rank test) than others.
  • These results indicate that survivin protein expression may be an important early event in oral carcinogenesis and predicts unfavorable prognosis for oral SCC.
  • Furthermore, the unique expression of survivin in cancer cells but not in most normal adult tissues suggests that modulation of survivin protein expression may provide a novel strategy for the therapy of oral SCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Areca / adverse effects. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Microtubule-Associated Proteins / metabolism. Mouth Neoplasms / metabolism. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins. Male. Mastication. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Precancerous Conditions / metabolism. Prognosis. Survival Analysis


3. Oettle H, Riess H, Raguse JD, Bier J, Gath HJ: Recombinant human erythropoietin in the treatment of head and neck tumour anaemia. Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg; 2001 Apr;30(2):148-55
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  • [Title] Recombinant human erythropoietin in the treatment of head and neck tumour anaemia.
  • At the time of first diagnosis, patients with squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck are often in the advanced stage of their disease, therefore surgery is not a viable option for treatment.
  • These patients also present frequently a high grade of anaemia as a result of either the malignant process itself or of the following therapy.
  • The incidence of anaemia and the need for transfusion depends on several factors, such as the type and intensity of radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy.
  • Multimode therapeutic concepts such as radio-chemotherapy are being applied with increasing frequency, resulting in an ever increasing need for transfusion with great effects on the patient's quality of life.
  • A large number of studies show that recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) is effective in the treatment of tumour-induced anaemia and prevention and correction of chemotherapy and radiotherapy-induced anaemia.
  • The simultaneous application of r-HuEPO with chemotherapy can prevent patients with head and neck tumours from developing anaemia or can reduce the extent of the anaemia and the need for transfusion.
  • Comparable effects were observed both in patients undergoing platinum-based and non-platinum-based chemotherapy.
  • The direct correlation between anaemia, tumour hypoxia and poor response to radio and/or chemotherapy has been clinically proven.
  • Recombinant human erythropoietin administration improves the therapeutic outcome and the patients' prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia / prevention & control. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Erythropoietin / therapeutic use. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Hemoglobins / analysis. Humans. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Quality of Life. Recombinant Proteins. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11405451.001).
  • [ISSN] 0901-5027
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hemoglobins; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin
  • [Number-of-references] 90
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4. Ahn HJ, Na II, Park YH, Cho SY, Lee BC, Lee GH, Koh JS, Lee YS, Shim YS, Kim YK, Kang HJ, Ryoo BY, Yang SH: Role of adjuvant chemotherapy in malignant mucosal melanoma of the head and neck. Oral Oncol; 2010 Aug;46(8):607-11
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  • [Title] Role of adjuvant chemotherapy in malignant mucosal melanoma of the head and neck.
  • The objective of this study was to analyze the role of adjuvant chemotherapy and prognostic factors in malignant mucosal melanoma of the head and neck (HNMM).
  • Thirty-two patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck who received local treatment with or without adjuvant chemotherapy were reviewed.
  • Clinicopathologic parameters including anatomic sites, gender, age (60 vs.>60years), stage, level of invasion, p53 and MDM2 [murine double minute 2] expressions, performance status, and adjuvant chemotherapy were evaluated.
  • The patients' median age was 62years, and 16 (50%) received adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy had prolonged survival (p=0.002), which was also shown in the multivariate Cox regression model (HR, 0.24; p=0.014).
  • Our analysis suggests a significant role of adjuvant chemotherapy and different patterns of p53 and MDM2 expression in HNMM relative to cutaneous melanomas.
  • However, since this study is retrospective and observational, with a small sample size, further studies are needed to confirm the definitive role of adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of malignant mucosal melanoma of the head and neck.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Melanoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mouth Mucosa / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20615750.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0593
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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5. Yu T, Gao QH, Wang XY, Wen YM, Li LJ: Malignant sublingual gland tumors: a retrospective clinicopathologic study of 28 cases. Oncology; 2007;72(1-2):39-44
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  • [Title] Malignant sublingual gland tumors: a retrospective clinicopathologic study of 28 cases.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinicopathologic features and therapeutic efficacy of malignant sublingual gland tumors.
  • Adenoid cystic carcinoma was mainly of the histologic type, and the other histologic classifications included mucoepidermoid carcinoma, myoepithelial carcinoma, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, adenocarcinoma and malignant pleomorphic adenoma.
  • Eleven patients remain alive and well 34-312 months (median 108) after treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Malignant sublingual gland tumors are extremely rare and most are adenoid cystic carcinoma.
  • Surgery is the main treatment option.
  • Postoperative radiation therapy may be adjuvant for selected patients with high-stage and high-grade tumors, or when there is concern about the inadequacy of the resection.
  • The effect of chemotherapy remains elusive.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cause of Death. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / mortality. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / mortality. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 17998789.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0232
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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6. Mücke T, Hölzle F, Kesting MR, Loeffelbein DJ, Robitzky LK, Hohlweg-Majert B, Tannapfel A, Wolff KD: Tumor size and depth in primary malignant melanoma in the oral cavity influences survival. J Oral Maxillofac Surg; 2009 Jul;67(7):1409-15
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  • [Title] Tumor size and depth in primary malignant melanoma in the oral cavity influences survival.
  • PURPOSE: Primary oral malignant melanoma (OMM) is rare, and there are few studies examining the impact of this disease.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten patients with OMM treated at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany, between 1992 and 2002 were analyzed retrospectively.
  • Treatment included wide local excision with or without modified neck dissection, supplemented by radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Five patients were diagnosed with stage I disease, 4 with stage II disease, and 1 with stage III disease at presentation.
  • Early identification of OMM and its treatment by radical surgery comprise the single most important treatment strategy.
  • Any pigmented lesion in the oral cavity not clearly clinically amenable to diagnosis should be excised for histologic confirmation.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19531410.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5053
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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7. Chiappori AA, Haura E, Rodriguez FA, Boulware D, Kapoor R, Neuger AM, Lush R, Padilla B, Burton M, Williams C, Simon G, Antonia S, Sullivan DM, Bepler G: Phase I/II study of atrasentan, an endothelin A receptor antagonist, in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin as first-line therapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 2008 Mar 1;14(5):1464-9
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  • [Title] Phase I/II study of atrasentan, an endothelin A receptor antagonist, in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin as first-line therapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Chemonaive patients with stage IIIB (malignant pleural effusion) and IV non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled.
  • Treatment consisted of paclitaxel (225 mg/m(2)) and carboplatin (area under the curve, 6) administered on day 1 every 3 weeks.
  • A fixed 10 mg daily oral dose ofAtrasentan was administered continuously, starting on day 4 of cycle 1.
  • Efficacy and survival in advanced non-small cell lung cancer were comparable with studies of chemotherapy alone.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Adult. Aged. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Endothelin A Receptor Antagonists. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Prognosis. Pyrrolidines / administration & dosage. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 18316570.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Endothelin A Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Pyrrolidines; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; V6D7VK2215 / atrasentan
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8. Bergman PJ: Canine oral melanoma. Clin Tech Small Anim Pract; 2007 May;22(2):55-60
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  • [Title] Canine oral melanoma.
  • Melanoma is the most common oral malignancy in the dog.
  • Oral and/or mucosal melanoma has been routinely considered an extremely malignant tumor with a high degree of local invasiveness and high metastatic propensity.
  • The World Health Organization staging scheme for dogs with oral melanoma is based on size, with stage I = <2-cm-diameter tumor, stage II = 2- to <4-cm-diameter tumor, stage III = > or = 4cm tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, and stage IV = distant metastasis.
  • Median survival times for dogs with oral melanoma treated with surgery are approximately 17 to 18, 5 to 6, and 3 months with stage I, II, and III disease, respectively.
  • Significant negative prognostic factors include stage, size, evidence of metastasis, and a variety of histologic criteria.
  • Standardized treatments such as surgery, coarse-fractionation radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have afforded minimal to modest stage-dependent clinical benefits and death is usually due to systemic metastasis.
  • Oral melanoma is a spontaneous syngeneic cancer occurring in outbred, immunocompetent dogs and appears to be a more clinically faithful therapeutic model for human melanoma; further use of canine melanoma as a therapeutic model for human melanoma is strongly encouraged.
  • [MeSH-major] Dog Diseases / diagnosis. Dog Diseases / therapy. Melanoma / diagnosis. Melanoma / therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / diagnosis. Mouth Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Combined Modality Therapy / veterinary. Dogs. Neoplasm Staging / veterinary

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  • (PMID = 17591290.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-2867
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical techniques in small animal practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Tech Small Anim Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 58
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9. Dieleman FJ, Dekker AW: [Kahler's disease. Multiple myeloma]. Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd; 2007 May;114(5):228-30
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  • Kahler's disease, multiple myeloma, is a malignant condition of unbridled multiplication of plasma cells in bone marrow.
  • In the final stage of the disease severe renal failure can occur.
  • With the present chemotherapy a good response is seen in 50-70% of patients, but complete response occurs only in a minority of patients.
  • Radiotherapy is often used in addition to chemotherapy.
  • In order to minimize the risk of complications, it is advocated to be in touch with the patients haematologist before starting an invasive oral treatment.
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone Resorption. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Remission Induction. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17552301.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-2200
  • [Journal-full-title] Nederlands tijdschrift voor tandheelkunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd
  • [Language] dut
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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10. Bell RB, Dierks EJ, Homer L, Potter BE: Management and outcome of patients with malignant salivary gland tumors. J Oral Maxillofac Surg; 2005 Jul;63(7):917-28
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management and outcome of patients with malignant salivary gland tumors.
  • PURPOSE: Refined imaging technology, the use of external beam radiation, neutron beam therapy, and chemotherapy, has altered management strategies for patients with salivary gland malignancies during the past 2 decades.
  • Although treatment remains primarily surgical, optimal therapeutic regimens have yet to be fully realized.
  • The purpose of this investigation is to report our experience with the management of patients with a variety of malignant salivary gland neoplasms that were treated with various combinations of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy and to review treatment outcome in an effort to identify predictors of survival and locoregional control.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The records of all patients with malignant salivary gland tumors presenting for treatment at our institution between 1992 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed.
  • Mucoepidermoid carcinoma was the most common neoplasm (n = 40).
  • More than half of the patients presented in early-stage disease (stage I = 36, stage II = 17, stage III = 8, stage IV = 25).
  • Neck dissection was performed in 29% of patients, and more than half (56%) were treated with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy to a dose of 50 to 70 Gy.
  • Patients were, in general, immediately reconstructed at the time of ablation using composite free tissue transfer when appropriate, local/regional rotational flaps, or maxillary obturators.
  • Stage (P = .0017), grade (P = .00044), cervical lymph node metastasis (P = .03), and age (P = .01) proved to make a statistically significant contribution when describing outcome.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The treatment of salivary gland malignancies remains primarily surgical, although adjunctive radiotherapy may play an important role in those patients with advanced-stage disease.
  • This study confirms the contributions of stage, grade, age, and cervical metastasis for describing survival.
  • The benefits of combined modality therapy awaits prospective clinical trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / therapy. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neck Dissection. Neoplasm Invasiveness / prevention & control. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Neoplasm Staging. Proportional Hazards Models. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16003616.001).
  • [ISSN] 0278-2391
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. Altumbabić H, Salkić A, Ramas A, Burgić M, Kasumović M, Brkić F: Pattern of head and neck malignant tumours in a Tuzla ENT clinic--a five year experience. Bosn J Basic Med Sci; 2008 Nov;8(4):377-80
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  • [Title] Pattern of head and neck malignant tumours in a Tuzla ENT clinic--a five year experience.
  • Head and neck neoplasia can affect certain fundamental functions, including eating, drinking, speaking and respiration.
  • One overriding factor in deciding on treatment policy is the tendency for head and neck malignancy to be limited to the primary site and regional lymph nodes with surgery and chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • The most common sites for head and neck malignancies were found to be in the larynx (26,1%), oral cavity (21,7%), the thyroid gland (14,64 %) and the neck (8,51%).
  • The histopathological tumour types found in this work were mostly squamous cell carcinoma (72,09%), papillary carcinoma (12,2%), while many other minor histopathological variants accounted for 13%.
  • The most patients were presented with stage I and stage III of disease (27% and 28,3%), and 19,9% with stage IV.

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  • (PMID = 19125712.001).
  • [ISSN] 1512-8601
  • [Journal-full-title] Bosnian journal of basic medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bosn J Basic Med Sci
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Bosnia and Herzegovina
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12. Lewis KD, Gibbs P, O'Day S, Richards J, Weber J, Anderson C, Zeng C, Baron A, Russ P, Gonzalez R: A phase II study of biochemotherapy for advanced melanoma incorporating temozolomide, decrescendo interleukin-2 and GM-CSF. Cancer Invest; 2005;23(4):303-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Metastatic malignant melanoma remains a very difficult disease to treat.
  • Previous phase II studies using biochemotherapy (combination of platinum-containing chemotherapy with IL-2 and IFNalpha) have shown response rates of about 50%.
  • Temozolomide is an oral alkylating agent that has equivalent activity to dacarbazine, but it has the advantage of CNS penetration.
  • We report the results of a phase II study using a novel biochemotherapy regimen containing temozolomide, cisplatin, decrescendo IL-2, IFNalpha, and GM-CSF in the treatment of stage IV melanoma.
  • Prior chemotherapy or IL-2 was not permitted.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Melanoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / administration & dosage. Brain Neoplasms / mortality. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Eye Neoplasms / drug therapy. Eye Neoplasms / mortality. Eye Neoplasms / pathology. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. Humans. Interleukin-2 / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Reproducibility of Results. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / mortality. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 16100942.001).
  • [ISSN] 0735-7907
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA46934
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / Interleukin-2; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor; 85622-93-1 / temozolomide
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13. Imai T, Onose J, Hasumura M, Ueda M, Takizawa T, Hirose M: Sequential analysis of development of invasive thyroid follicular cell carcinomas in inflamed capsular regions of rats treated with sulfadimethoxine after N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)nitrosamine-initiation. Toxicol Pathol; 2004 Mar-Apr;32(2):229-36
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  • A 2-stage thyroid follicular carcinogenesis model in rats initiated with N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)nitrosamine (DHPN) is widely used to detect modifying effects of chemicals on thyroid carcinogenesis.
  • A number of goitrogens are known to strongly promote carcinogenesis, and the carcinomas often originate adjacent to the thyroid capsule and show invasive growth into the capsule or adjacent tissues.
  • In DHPN-SDM-treated rats, multiple focal hyperplasias and adenomas developed in thyroid follicular parenchyma at weeks 4 to 6.
  • Focal hyperplasias/adenomas adjacent to the capsule progressively developed to invasive carcinomas at weeks 6 to 10.
  • In thyroid parenchyma, malignant lesions were seldom observed.
  • With SDM-treatment alone, although no neoplastic lesions were observed, capsular thickening with inflammation and epithelial migration resulted in intracapsular residual follicles.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma, Follicular / chemically induced. Carcinogens / toxicity. Nitrosamines / toxicity. Sulfadimethoxine / toxicity. Thyroid Gland / drug effects. Thyroid Neoplasms / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoma / chemically induced. Adenoma / pathology. Administration, Oral. Animals. Biomarkers, Tumor. Cytoskeletal Proteins / metabolism. Drug Therapy, Combination. Hyperplasia. Injections, Subcutaneous. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Rats. Rats, Inbred F344. Trans-Activators / metabolism. Water Supply. beta Catenin

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  • (PMID = 15200161.001).
  • [ISSN] 0192-6233
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicologic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicol Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Ctnnb1 protein, rat; 0 / Cytoskeletal Proteins; 0 / Nitrosamines; 0 / Trans-Activators; 0 / beta Catenin; 30CPC5LDEX / Sulfadimethoxine; 4J072HB2ND / diisopropanolnitrosamine
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14. Oueslati Z, Ben Miled M, Hammoud M, Touati S, Lachkham A, Gamoudi A, Mokni N, El Benna F, Boussen H, El May A, Ladgham A: [Sarcomatoid carcinomas of the upper airways]. Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord); 2008;129(3):191-5
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  • [Transliterated title] Carcinomes sarcomatoïdes des voies aéro-digestives supérieures.
  • INTRODUCTION: The sarcomatoid carcinoma of the superior aerodigestive tracts is a rare malignant tumour which presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.
  • Tumoral locations were as follows: larynx: 6, hypopharynx: 1, oropharynx: 1, nasopharynx: 1, oral cavity: 2.
  • Four patients were first seen at an advanced stage.
  • This left 9 patients and among them 7 received a curative treatment: 5 by surgery alone, 1 by surgery and radiotherapy, 1 by radiotherapy, 1 by chemo-radiotherapy for the nasopharyngeal lesion and 1 by chemotherapy alone.
  • Two patients died from their disease before treatment.
  • Its treatment and natural evolution remain controversial.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / mortality. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / pathology. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Second Primary / mortality. Neoplasms, Second Primary / therapy. Retrospective Studies. Smoking / adverse effects. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 19694162.001).
  • [ISSN] 0035-1334
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue de laryngologie - otologie - rhinologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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15. Puduvalli VK, Yung WK, Hess KR, Kuhn JG, Groves MD, Levin VA, Zwiebel J, Chang SM, Cloughesy TF, Junck L, Wen P, Lieberman F, Conrad CA, Gilbert MR, Meyers CA, Liu V, Mehta MP, Nicholas MK, Prados M, North American Brain Tumor Consortium: Phase II study of fenretinide (NSC 374551) in adults with recurrent malignant gliomas: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium study. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Nov 1;22(21):4282-9
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  • [Title] Phase II study of fenretinide (NSC 374551) in adults with recurrent malignant gliomas: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium study.
  • PURPOSE: Fenretinide induces apoptosis in malignant gliomas in vitro.
  • This two-stage phase II trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of fenretinide in adults with recurrent malignant gliomas.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-two patients with anaplastic gliomas (AG) and 23 patients with glioblastoma (GBM) whose tumors had recurred after radiotherapy and no more than two chemotherapy regimens were enrolled.
  • The trial was closed after the first stage because of the inadequate activity at the fenretinide doses used.
  • CONCLUSION: Fenretinide was inactive against recurrent malignant gliomas at the dosage used in this trial.

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  • (PMID = 15514370.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062407; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062426; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000079; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA097767; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR03186; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR0865; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR003186; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000056; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00079; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01CA62407-08; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16672; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00042; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000865; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01CA62421; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062399; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00056; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00633; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000633; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062405; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062412; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA62455; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01CA62399; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA62426; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA097767-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA62422; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062421; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA097767-02; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000042; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01CA62405; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA062422; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA62399; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA62412
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 187EJ7QEXL / Fenretinide
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS278296; NLM/ PMC3820102
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16. Kohrt H, Advani R: Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma: current concepts in biology and treatment. Leuk Lymphoma; 2009 Nov;50(11):1773-84
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  • [Title] Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma: current concepts in biology and treatment.
  • The World Health Organization classifies NK-cell tumors into three types, extranodal NK/T-cell lymphomas (ENKL, nasal and non-nasal), NK-cell leukemias, and a blastic variant (CD4-positive, CD56-positive hematodermic neoplasms).
  • We focus our review to the current concepts in biology and treatment of ENKL.
  • Though considerable advances have been made in our understanding of NK-cell biology, malignant transformation including the role of Epstein-Barr virus, and prognosis, the rare nature of ENKL and its heterogeneity limit the ability to standardize therapy.
  • Radiotherapy is fundamental to treatment of early-stage disease with a role for chemoradiotherapy among high-risk patients.
  • The clinical course of advanced disease is highly aggressive with frequent chemotherapy resistance and a poor prognosis.
  • Therapeutic approaches to advanced-stage or relapsed and refractory disease, including the appropriate sequence of chemotherapy, combined modality therapy, and stem cell transplantation is not well-established.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Extranodal NK-T-Cell / pathology. Lymphoma, Extranodal NK-T-Cell / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Radiotherapy. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 19883307.001).
  • [ISSN] 1029-2403
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / T32 HL007952
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 84
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17. Suárez C, Rodrigo JP, Ferlito A, Devaney KO, Rinaldo A: Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Oral Oncol; 2004 Sep;40(8):773-9
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  • Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare neuroendocrine neoplasm of the skin.
  • A significant proportion of MCC have been reported to occur in intimate association with malignant epithelial neoplasms.
  • Complete surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment of the primary tumor.
  • The role of adjuvant radiation therapy is controversial.
  • The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in diminishing the risk of subsequent systemic recurrence in patients with positive nodes remains undefined.
  • Overall response rates to combination chemotherapy for surgically unresectable distant metastatic disease are generally high, although responses are transient.
  • Finally, factors generally associated with survival are the stage of disease at presentation, distant recurrence usually being the most adverse predictor of survival.
  • [MeSH-minor] Chromosome Aberrations. Female. Humans. Immune Tolerance. Male. Prognosis. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy / methods. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15288830.001).
  • [ISSN] 1368-8375
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 61
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18. Grávalos C, García-Escobar I, García-Alfonso P, Cassinello J, Malón D, Carrato A: Adjuvant chemotherapy for stages II, III and IV of colon cancer. Clin Transl Oncol; 2009 Aug;11(8):526-33
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  • [Title] Adjuvant chemotherapy for stages II, III and IV of colon cancer.
  • Colorectal cancer is the third most frequent malignant neoplasm in Western countries.
  • After complete resection, 5-year overall survival varies according to the initial stage.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) is indicated in patients with colon cancer at high-risk stage II, stage III and after complete resection of metastases.
  • 5-Fluorouracil (5FU), alone or modulated with levamisol or leucovorin (LV), oral fluoropyrimidines, raltitrexed, irinotecan and oxaliplatin have been studied as adjuvant therapy for colon cancer.
  • This article reviews the state of the art and the future perspectives of adjuvant therapy in colon cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Bevacizumab. Cetuximab. Humans. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 19661027.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-3055
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab; PQX0D8J21J / Cetuximab
  • [Number-of-references] 48
  •  go-up   go-down


19. Prasad ML, Busam KJ, Patel SG, Hoshaw-Woodard S, Shah JP, Huvos AG: Clinicopathologic differences in malignant melanoma arising in oral squamous and sinonasal respiratory mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2003 Aug;127(8):997-1002
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  • [Title] Clinicopathologic differences in malignant melanoma arising in oral squamous and sinonasal respiratory mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract.
  • We compare melanomas arising in 2 histologically different mucosa, the stratified oral squamous mucosa and pseudostratified sinonasal respiratory mucosa, to investigate the clinicopathologic influence of native mucosal histology on the tumor.
  • METHODS: Clinicopathologic features of 36 melanomas arising in the squamous mucosa of the oral cavity were compared with 59 melanomas arising in the sinonasal respiratory mucosa.
  • RESULTS: The median age of patients was 61 and 63 years for oral and sinonasal melanomas, respectively, with the squamous and respiratory mucosa covering the maxilla being most frequently involved (68.7% and 66%, respectively).
  • The oral melanomas were more likely to be detected in the early in situ or microinvasive stage (4 cases vs none, P =.008) and were more frequently amelanotic (14 vs 12, P =.049) than sinonasal melanomas.
  • The sinonasal melanomas were frequently thicker (median thickness, 9 vs 2.6 mm), polypoid (29 vs none), ulcerated (57 vs 20), and necrotic (57 vs 14) than oral melanoma (P <.001).
  • Pseudopapillary architecture was more frequent in sinonasal melanomas (16 tumors vs none, P <.001), and desmoplastic melanomas were more frequent in the oral mucosa (6 vs 1, P =.005).
  • Sinonasal melanoma showed vascular and deep tissue invasion more frequently than oral melanoma; however, no significant difference in disease-specific survival was noted (median survival, 2.8 years vs 3.0 years; 5-year survival, 37% vs 35%, respectively).
  • CONCLUSION: Sinonasal melanomas demonstrated aggressive morphologic features significantly more frequently than oral melanomas; however, prognosis remained similar in both groups.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Nasal Mucosa / drug effects. Nasal Mucosa / pathology. Nasal Mucosa / surgery. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / drug therapy. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / mortality. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / pathology. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / surgery


20. Cripps C, Winquist E, Devries MC, Stys-Norman D, Gilbert R, Head and Neck Cancer Disease Site Group: Epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapy in stages III and IV head and neck cancer. Curr Oncol; 2010 Jun;17(3):37-48
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  • [Title] Epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapy in stages III and IV head and neck cancer.
  • QUESTION: What are the benefits associated with the use of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapies in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC)?
  • Anti-EGFR therapies of interest included cetuximab, gefitinib, lapatinib, zalutumumab, erlotinib, and panitumumab.
  • PERSPECTIVES: Head-and-neck cancer includes malignant tumours arising from a variety of sites in the upper aerodigestive tract.
  • The most common histologic type is squamous cell carcinoma, and most common sites are the oral cavity, the oropharynx, the hypopharynx, and the larynx.
  • Worldwide, HNSCC is the sixth most common neoplasm, and despite advances in therapy, long-term survival in HNSCC patients is poor.
  • Primary surgery followed by chemoradiation, or primary chemoradiation, are the standard treatment options for patients with locally advanced (stages III-IVB) HNSCC; however, meta-analytic data indicate that the benefit of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy disappears in patients over the age of 70 years.
  • Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody approved for use in combination with radiation in the treatment of patients with untreated locally advanced HNSCC and as monotherapy for patients with recurrent or metastatic (stage IVC) HNSCC who have progressed on platinum-based therapy.
  • Given the interest in anti-EGFR agents in advanced HNSCC, the Head and Neck Cancer Disease Site Group (DSG) of Cancer Care Ontario's Program in Evidence-Based Care (PEBC) chose to systematically review the literature pertaining to this topic so as to develop evidence-based recommendations for treatment.
  • OUTCOMES: Outcomes of interest included overall and progression-free survival, quality of life, tumour response rate and duration, and the toxicity associated with the use of anti-EGFR therapies.
  • The randomized controlled trials (RCTS) involved three distinct patient populations: those with locally advanced HNSCC being treated for cure, those with incurable advanced recurrent or metastatic HNSCC being treated with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, and those with incurable advanced recurrent or metastatic HNSCC who had disease progression despite, or who were unsuitable for, first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.
  • PRACTICE GUIDELINE: These recommendations apply to adult patients with locally advanced (nonmetastatic stages iii-ivb) or recurrent or metastatic (stage IVC) HNSCC.
  • Platinum-based chemoradiation remains the current standard of care for treatment of locally advanced HNSCC.
  • In patients with locally advanced HNSCC who are medically unsuitable for concurrent platinum based chemotherapy or who are over the age of 70 years (because concurrent chemotherapy does not appear to improve overall survival in this patient population), the addition of cetuximab to radical radiotherapy should be considered to improve overall survival, progression-free survival, and time to local recurrence.Cetuximab in combination with platinum-based combination chemotherapy is superior to chemotherapy alone in patients with recurrent or metastatic HNSCC, and is recommended to improve overall survival, progression-free survival, and response rate.The role of anti-EGFR therapies in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC is currently under study in large randomized trials, and patients with HNSCC should continue to be offered clinical trials of novel agents aimed at improving outcomes.
  • However, five ongoing trials are investigating the effect of the addition of EGFR inhibitors concurrently with, before, or after chemoradiotherapy; those trials should provide direction about the best integration of cetuximab into standard treatment.
  • In patients with recurrent or metastatic HNSCC who experience progressive disease despite, or who are unsuitable for, first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, gefitinib at doses of 250 mg or 500 mg daily, compared with weekly methotrexate, did not increase median overall survival [hazard ratio (hr): 1.22; 96% confidence interval (ci): 0.95 to 1.57; p = 0.12 (for 250 mg daily vs. weekly methotrexate); hr: 1.12; 95% ci: 0.87 to 1.43; p = 0.39 (for 500 mg daily vs. weekly methotrexate)] or objective response rate (2.7% for 250 mg and 7.6% for 500 mg daily vs. 3.9% for weekly methotrexate, p > 0.05).

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  • (PMID = 20567625.001).
  • [ISSN] 1718-7729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current oncology (Toronto, Ont.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2880902
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Head-and-neck cancer / egfr inhibitors / epidermal growth factor receptor / overall survival / progression-free survival / tumour response rate
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21. Khademi B, Moradi A, Hoseini S, Mohammadianpanah M: Malignant neoplasms of the sinonasal tract: report of 71 patients and literature review and analysis. Oral Maxillofac Surg; 2009 Dec;13(4):191-9
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  • [Title] Malignant neoplasms of the sinonasal tract: report of 71 patients and literature review and analysis.
  • BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to report the characteristics, prognostic factors, and treatment outcomes of 71 cases of malignant neoplasms of the sinonasal tract and literature review and analysis of major report series.
  • METHODS: Seventy-one consecutive patients diagnosed with primary malignant neoplasm of the sinonasal tract that were treated and followed up at a university hospital between May 2000 and March 2008 were selected for the present study.
  • Thirty-four patients were treated with surgery followed by a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 15 with surgery alone, 14 with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, six with radiotherapy alone, and two with surgery followed by radiotherapy.
  • In all, we found 42 major series including 8,164 patients with malignant neoplasms of the sinonasal tract.
  • There were one case of stage I, 20 of stage II, 27 of stage III, and 23 of stage IV.
  • Local recurrence was the most frequent treatment failure.
  • On univariate analysis, cervical lymph nodes involvement, primary tumor size, histologic type, response to therapy, and stage of disease were independent prognostic factors for overall survival.
  • Epithelial tumors consisted of 69% of all malignant neoplasms of sinonasal tract and stages III and IV disease constituted 74.7% of all stages.
  • Local recurrence was the dominant treatment failure in nearly all series.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this review and by analyzing the large data collection of recent major reported series, we found that malignant neoplasms of the sinonasal tract tend to present at locally advanced stage, with a high frequency of local failure and a moderate to poor outcome.
  • More effective local treatment for improving the local control and overall survival is needed.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Cobalt Radioisotopes / therapeutic use. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Radiography. Young Adult

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Nasal Cancer.
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  • (PMID = 19795137.001).
  • [ISSN] 1865-1569
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral and maxillofacial surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Maxillofac Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cobalt Radioisotopes; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Number-of-references] 62
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22. Chalastras T, Elefteriadou A, Giotakis J, Soulandikas K, Korres S, Ferekidis E, Kandiloros D: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. A clinicopathological and immunohistochemical study. Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital; 2007 Feb;27(1):6-9
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  • Overall 12 patients with non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma, at our Institute, were studied over an eight-year period from 1997 to 2005.
  • Patients' data collected were age, sex, presenting signs and symptoms, histology, treatment, complications, and outcome.
  • Also available were computerised tomography findings, and paraffin-embedded tissue bocks.
  • Using immunocytochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissue sections, the predominance of large B-cell subtype was detected.
  • Treatment administered: only radiotherapy (stage IEA) or in combination with chemotherapy (IIE-IVE).
  • Early diagnosis, based mainly on tissue biopsy and computerised tomography, is essential in the management of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Nasal Cavity. Neoplasm Staging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 17601204.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-100X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta otorhinolaryngologica Italica : organo ufficiale della Società italiana di otorinolaringologia e chirurgia cervico-facciale
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2640014
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23. Okuma Y, Shimokawa T, Takagi Y, Hosomi Y, Iguchi M, Okamura T, Shibuya M: S-1 is an active anticancer agent for advanced thymic carcinoma. Lung Cancer; 2010 Dec;70(3):357-63
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  • BACKGROUND: Thymic carcinoma is a rare intrathoracic malignant tumor, and the prognosis for patients with advanced stage of the disease is poor.
  • However, no definitive chemotherapeutic regimen has been established for advanced thymic carcinoma in front-line settings.
  • The efficacy and benefit of second-line or salvage chemotherapy are also unknown, as few cases or case series have been reported.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 monotherapy with S-1, a novel oral fluoropyrimidine agent, as salvage therapy in four consecutive patients with previously treated advanced thymic carcinoma from January, 2008 to May, 2010.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that oral S-1 monotherapy is useful as second-line or later chemotherapy in previously treated patients with advanced thymic carcinoma and is a potential alternative choice for patients who cannot tolerate platinum-containing treatments.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Oxonic Acid / administration & dosage. Tegafur / administration & dosage. Thymus Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Combinations. Feasibility Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Salvage Therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20951466.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-8332
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid
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24. Kovács AF, Eberlein K, Smolarz A, Weidauer S, Rohde S: [Organ-preserving treatment in inoperable patients with primary oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma: chances and limitations]. Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir; 2006 May;10(3):168-77
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  • [Title] [Organ-preserving treatment in inoperable patients with primary oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma: chances and limitations].
  • [Transliterated title] Organerhaltende Therapie bei inoperablen Patienten mit primären Mundhöhlen- und Oropharynxkarzinomen: Möglichkeiten und Grenzen.
  • INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the chances of nonoperative therapy in those patients from an unselected population suffering from primary previously untreated squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and the oropharynx who did not seem to be operable.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Following interdisciplinary counseling and extensive individual discussion, 72 (21%) of 340 consecutive patients (1997-2004) did not or did not reasonably seem to be operable; three other patients with stage II disease refused surgery.
  • Of the inoperable patients, 95%suffered from far-advanced stage IV disease, 8% had distant metastases, 14% had synchronous malignancies, 9% were aged over 85 years combined with advanced malignant disease, and nearly 50% were limited in their activity or were even bedridden.
  • Depending on fitness and tumor extent, three therapy regimens were used: intra-arterial (i.a.) high-dose chemotherapy with systemic antagonization for palliation, induction with this i.a. high-dose chemotherapy followed by additional radiotherapy, and induction with the i.a. high-dose chemotherapy followed by additional radiochemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Thirty-two patients were treated with i.a. chemotherapy alone for palliation with few acute side effects.
  • Of the patients, 22% had to cut short additional radiotherapy and 47% had to discontinue concomitant chemotherapy.
  • Viewed with caution, sex (male), performance state (ECOG) <3, and positive response to i.a. chemotherapy could be regarded as predictors for therapeutic success.
  • The combination of i.a. chemotherapy and radiochemotherapy seemed to be most successful.
  • Conversely, the therapies offered could not achieve a substantial improvement of survival in 80% of patients classified as inoperable; the most successful therapy combination could be offered to merely 23% of patients as classified inoperable due to reduced general condition.
  • The i.a. high-dose chemotherapy has to be regarded as a well tolerated and effective palliation.
  • This descriptive analysis must be followed by specific studies to establish clinical treatment recommendations.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Palliative Care / methods. Taxoids / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retreatment. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 16604330.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-9417
  • [Journal-full-title] Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie : MKG
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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25. Kunz J, Bannwart F: [Placental site trophoblastic tumor: case report and review of literature]. Praxis (Bern 1994); 2008 Apr 2;97(7):387-94
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  • Amenorrhoea then ensued due to oral contraception.
  • This is a rare tumour with malignant potential, whose prognosis depends on the stage of the primary tumour, the period of time between the last pregnancy and onset of disease, the patient's age, and the rate of mitosis, and whose progress cannot be assessed using the WHO Prognostic Index Score for Gestational Trophoblastic Disease.
  • In therapeutic terms, hysterectomy is recommended.
  • Chemosensitivity is low and, due to the infrequency of the tumours, the most suitable chemotherapy scheme is unknown.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Cervix Uteri / pathology. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy. Inhibins / analysis. Neoplasm Staging. Pancreatin / analysis. Pregnancy. Reoperation. Uterine Rupture / surgery. Uterus / pathology






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