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1. Nacher JC, Schwartz JM: A global view of drug-therapy interactions. BMC Pharmacol; 2008;8:5
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  • [Title] A global view of drug-therapy interactions.
  • Even though new high-throughput technologies have rapidly been generating large amounts of genomic data, drug design has not followed the same development, and it is still complicated and expensive to develop new single-target drugs.
  • Nevertheless, recent approaches suggest that multi-target drug design combined with a network-dependent approach and large-scale systems-oriented strategies create a promising framework to combat complex multi-genetic disorders like cancer or diabetes.
  • RESULTS: We here investigate the human network corresponding to the interactions between all US approved drugs and human therapies, defined by known relationships between drugs and their therapeutic applications.
  • Our results show that the average paths in this drug-therapy network are shorter than three steps, indicating that distant therapies are separated by a surprisingly low number of chemical compounds.
  • We also identify a sub-network composed by drugs with high centrality measures in the drug-therapy network, which represent the structural backbone of this system and act as hubs routing information between distant parts of the network.
  • CONCLUSION: These findings provide for the first time a global map of the large-scale organization of all known drugs and associated therapies, bringing new insights on possible strategies for future drug development.
  • Special attention should be given to drugs which combine the two properties of (a) having a high centrality value in the drug-therapy network and (b) acting on multiple molecular targets in the human system.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Design. Drug Interactions / physiology. Models, Chemical. Pharmaceutical Preparations / chemical synthesis. Pharmaceutical Preparations / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18318892.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2210
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Pharmaceutical Preparations
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2294115
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2. Nakamura T, Sasaki T, Fujimori M, Yazawa K, Kano Y, Amano J, Taniguchi S: Cloned cytosine deaminase gene expression of Bifidobacterium longum and application to enzyme/pro-drug therapy of hypoxic solid tumors. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem; 2002 Nov;66(11):2362-6
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  • [Title] Cloned cytosine deaminase gene expression of Bifidobacterium longum and application to enzyme/pro-drug therapy of hypoxic solid tumors.
  • Recently, it was reported that B. longum accumulated in hypoxic solid tumors.
  • The gene of interest was expressed in transfected B. longum by the shuttle vector pBLES100 in solid tumors.
  • In addition, transfected B. longum produced cytosine deaminase that converted 5-fluorocytosine into 5-fluorouracil. B. longum could be useful for enzyme/pro-drug therapy of hypoxic solid tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacokinetics. Bifidobacterium / enzymology. Bifidobacterium / genetics. Flucytosine / pharmacokinetics. Fluorouracil / pharmacokinetics. Genetic Therapy / methods. Nucleoside Deaminases / genetics. Nucleoside Deaminases / metabolism. Prodrugs / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Anoxia / physiopathology. Blotting, Western. Cloning, Molecular. Cytosine Deaminase. Gene Expression. Genetic Vectors / genetics. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Transfection. Transformation, Bacterial

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  • (PMID = 12506973.001).
  • [ISSN] 0916-8451
  • [Journal-full-title] Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Prodrugs; D83282DT06 / Flucytosine; EC 3.5.4.- / Nucleoside Deaminases; EC 3.5.4.1 / Cytosine Deaminase; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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3. Cho M: [Indication of drug therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B]. Korean J Hepatol; 2005 Mar;11(1):1-8
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  • [Title] [Indication of drug therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B].
  • [MeSH-major] Hepatitis B, Chronic / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15788876.001).
  • [ISSN] 1738-222X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Korean journal of hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Korean J Hepatol
  • [Language] kor
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Number-of-references] 68
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4. Zairis MN, Tsiaousis GZ, Patsourakos NG, Georgilas AT, Kontos CF, Adamopoulou EN, Vogiatzidis K, Argyrakis SK, Fakiolas CN, Foussas SG: The impact of treatment with omeprazole on the effectiveness of clopidogrel drug therapy during the first year after successful coronary stenting. Can J Cardiol; 2010 Feb;26(2):e54-7
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  • [Title] The impact of treatment with omeprazole on the effectiveness of clopidogrel drug therapy during the first year after successful coronary stenting.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of omeprazole administration on the effectiveness of clopidogrel drug therapy during the first year following successful coronary stenting (CS).
  • METHODS: A total of 588 consecutive patients who underwent successful CS for stable or unstable coronary artery disease were studied.
  • RESULTS: Baseline characteristics, and dual clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid drug therapy were well balanced between the study groups.
  • By one year, the primary end point was reached by 58 (9.9%) patients, including 20 (3.4%) who died due to cardiac reasons and 38 (6.5%) who were rehospitalized because of a nonfatal myocardial infarction.
  • CONCLUSIONS: According to the results of the present study, treatment with omeprazole had no impact on the clinical efficacy of clopidogrel drug therapy during the first year after successful CS.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Cause of Death. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Greece / epidemiology. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Patient Readmission / statistics & numerical data. Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Prospective Studies. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20151060.001).
  • [ISSN] 1916-7075
  • [Journal-full-title] The Canadian journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can J Cardiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors; A74586SNO7 / clopidogrel; KG60484QX9 / Omeprazole; OM90ZUW7M1 / Ticlopidine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2851393
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5. Komarova NL, Barnes E, Klenerman P, Wodarz D: Boosting immunity by antiviral drug therapy: a simple relationship among timing, efficacy, and success. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 2003 Feb 18;100(4):1855-60
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  • [Title] Boosting immunity by antiviral drug therapy: a simple relationship among timing, efficacy, and success.
  • Drug therapies against persistent human infections such as hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, and HIV fail to consistently eradicate the infection from the host.
  • Hence, recent emphasis has shifted to the study of antiviral therapy aimed at boosting specific immune responses.
  • It was argued that structured therapy interruptions were required to achieve this, because such regimes have shown promising results in early HIV infection.
  • Using mathematical models, we show that, contrary to this notion, a single phase of drug therapy can result in the establishment of sustained immunity.
  • We present a simple relationship between timing of therapy and efficacy of the drugs required for success.
  • In the presence of strong viral suppression, we show that therapy should be stopped relatively early, and that a longer duration of treatment leads to failure.
  • On the other hand, in the presence of weaker viral suppression, stopping treatment too early is detrimental, and therapy has to be continued beyond a time threshold.
  • We discuss our modeling results primarily in the context of HCV therapy during chronic infection.
  • Although the therapy regimes explored here also have implications for HIV, virus-mediated destruction of specific immune cells renders success unlikely during the chronic phase of the infection.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Immune System / drug effects. Models, Theoretical
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Administration Schedule. Hepatitis C / drug therapy. Hepatitis C / immunology. Humans

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  • (PMID = 12574516.001).
  • [ISSN] 0027-8424
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC149923
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6. Komatsu T, Nakamura S, Suzuki O, Yomogida K, Horiuchi D, Okumura K: [Relationship between efficacy of antiarrhythmic drug therapy and structural remodeling in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation]. J Cardiol; 2005 Dec;46(6):229-36
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  • [Title] [Relationship between efficacy of antiarrhythmic drug therapy and structural remodeling in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation].
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether the response to antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation affects the development of structural remodeling in the left atrium and ventricle.
  • METHODS: This study included 230 patients (158 men and 72 women, mean age 67 +/- 11 years) in whom antiarrhythmic drug therapy was attempted for > or = 12 months to maintain sinus rhythm (mean follow-up period 45 +/- 27 months).
  • The patients were divided into three groups according to the response to antiarrhythmic drug therapy: group A consisted of 78 patients without recurrence of atrial fibrillation, group B consisted of 87 patients with recurrence of atrial fibrillation and electrical and/or pharmacological cardioversion to restore sinus rhythm, and group C consisted of 65 patients with permanent conversion despite antiarrhythmic drug therapy.
  • RESULTS: In group A, left atrial dimension (LAD), left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVDd), and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) did not change after antiarrhythmic drug therapy.
  • In group B, LAD increased significantly after antiarrhythmic drug therapy (from 32.6 +/- 6.4 to 36.0 +/- 6.5 mm, p < 0.01), Whereas either LVDd or LVEF did not change after antiarrhythmic drug therapy.
  • In group C, LAD increased significantly after antiarrhythmic drug therapy (from 37.3 +/- 7.0 to 40.5 +/- 7.9 mm, p < 0.01) and LVEF was significantly reduced after antiarrhythmic drug therapy (from 69.4 +/- 6.2% to 66.5 +/- 8.9%, p < 0.05).
  • LVDd did not change after antiarrhythmic drug therapy.
  • The plasma concentration of human atrial natriuretic peptide during sinus rhythm at the initiation of antiarrhythmic drug therapy in group A (30.5 +/- 26.7 pg/ml) was significantly lower than those in group B (48.0 +/- 49.7 pg/ml) and group C (49.7 +/- 39.5 pg/ml).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The development of structural remodeling in human myocardium can be prevented with antiarrhythmic drug therapy if sinus rhythm is maintained without recurrence of atrial fibrillation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / administration & dosage. Atrial Fibrillation / drug therapy. Atrial Fibrillation / physiopathology. Ventricular Remodeling / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 16389742.001).
  • [ISSN] 0914-5087
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cardiol
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents; 85637-73-6 / Atrial Natriuretic Factor
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7. Regev A, Schiff ER: Drug therapy for hepatitis B. Adv Intern Med; 2001;46:107-35
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  • [Title] Drug therapy for hepatitis B.
  • Until recently, IFN has been the only available therapy for chronic HBV infection; however, many new and exciting therapeutic strategies have emerged during the last decade.
  • Recent advances in our understanding of the replicative mechanism of HBV and the development of potent nucleoside analogues have opened a new era in the treatment of HBV.
  • Lamivudine has been introduced as an alternative to IFN, showing at least similar efficacy, but with a wider spectrum of indications and without the adverse effects.
  • Therapeutic vaccination and molecular or gene therapy are being investigated as potential approaches, and aggressive combination therapy is emerging as a promising strategy.
  • Based on the experience with HIV, the future of drug therapy against HBV likely includes combination therapy with 1 or more nucleoside/nucleotide analogues and an immune-modulating agent, such as IFN or a therapeutic vaccine.
  • This combination may act synergistically against HBV and delay or prevent the development of drug-resistant mutants.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenine / analogs & derivatives. Antiviral Agents / administration & dosage. Hepatitis B, Chronic / drug therapy. Organophosphonates. Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Interferons / administration & dosage. Lamivudine / administration & dosage. Liver Transplantation. Male. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 11147250.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-2822
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Intern Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Organophosphonates; 0 / Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors; 2T8Q726O95 / Lamivudine; 6GQP90I798 / adefovir; 9008-11-1 / Interferons; JAC85A2161 / Adenine
  • [Number-of-references] 125
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8. Matl I, Lácha J, Lodererová A, Símová M, Teplan V, Lánská V, Vítko S: Withdrawal of steroids from triple-drug therapy in kidney transplant patients. Nephrol Dial Transplant; 2000 Jul;15(7):1041-5
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  • [Title] Withdrawal of steroids from triple-drug therapy in kidney transplant patients.
  • BACKGROUND: In renal transplant patients with stable graft function, triple-drug immunosuppression may not be necessary, while withdrawal of steroids may eliminate side effects.
  • METHODS: A total of 88 patients with stable graft function and serum creatinine <160 micromol/l, treated with cyclosporin A, azathioprine and prednisone were randomized into group A (n=46) with a gradual prednisone reduction to zero in the course of 6 months, and group B (n=42) on triple-drug therapy without change.
  • At the time of randomization, fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) was carried out in all of the patients.
  • A finding of some degree of immunological activity in FNAB was made in four patients in each group, but none of these patients developed rejection.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Gradual withdrawal of steroids is not associated with a higher risk for rejection and has a beneficial effect on serum total cholesterol levels.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biopsy, Needle. Cholesterol / blood. Creatinine / blood. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Graft Rejection / etiology. Humans. Kidney / pathology. Leukocyte Count. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 10862645.001).
  • [ISSN] 0931-0509
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; 97C5T2UQ7J / Cholesterol; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine; MRK240IY2L / Azathioprine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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9. Stefanutti C, Vivenzio A, Di Giacomo S, Mareri M, Ceccarelli F, Valesini G: Cyclophosphamide and immunoadsorption apheresis treatment of lupus nephritis nonresponsive to drug therapy alone. BioDrugs; 2005;19(2):129-33
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  • [Title] Cyclophosphamide and immunoadsorption apheresis treatment of lupus nephritis nonresponsive to drug therapy alone.
  • In this report we present a 28-year-old male patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that was treated with immunoadsorption apheresis (IA) and cyclophosphamide for lupus nephritis (proliferative glomerulonephritis, class IV-B) after proving nonresponsive to drug therapy alone.
  • Before starting the therapeutic cycle with IA, the patient was administered prednisone 25 mg/d, hydroxychloroquine 200mg twice/d, ACE inhibitors 5 mg/d, aspirin 100 mg/d, furosemide 50 mg/d, and intravenous (IV) albumin (20%) 50 mL.
  • Deteriorating clinical conditions necessitated a renal biopsy, and thereafter an increase in medication.
  • Thus, 3 weeks after the more aggressive pharmacologic treatment with cyclophosphamide, which had been prescribed to improve renal function, and given the young age of the patient, the decision was made to administer IA (Selesorb).
  • The treatment was administrated twice a week for the first 15 days, once a week for a further 5 weeks, and biweekly in the last month with a bolus of cyclophosphamide (average 250-100 mg) after each session.
  • Although it is not proven, the concomitant use of cyclophosphamide could presumably improve the final clinical outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Component Removal. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Immunosorbent Techniques. Lupus Nephritis / drug therapy. Lupus Nephritis / therapy. Treatment Failure
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Dextran Sulfate / therapeutic use. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Injections, Intravenous. Italy / epidemiology. Male. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 15807630.001).
  • [ISSN] 1173-8804
  • [Journal-full-title] BioDrugs : clinical immunotherapeutics, biopharmaceuticals and gene therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BioDrugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9042-14-2 / Dextran Sulfate
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10. Evans-Gilbert T, Pierre R, Steel-Duncan JC, Rodriguez B, Whorms S, Hambleton IR, Figueroa JP, Christie CD: Antiretroviral drug therapy in HIV-infected Jamaican children. West Indian Med J; 2004 Oct;53(5):322-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Antiretroviral drug therapy in HIV-infected Jamaican children.
  • BACKGROUND: The study describes a cohort of HIV-infected Jamaican children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and reports the outcome.
  • METHOD: An observational prospective study was conducted on HIV-infected Jamaican children receiving anti retroviral drug therapy (ART).
  • The distribution by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) clinical class was C (severely symptomatic), 22 (59.5%); B (moderately symptomatic), 8 (21.6%); A (mildly symptomatic), 6 (16.2%) and N (asymptomatic), one (2.7%).
  • Antiretroviral therapy resulted in a mean weight gain of 2.8 kg+/-4.9 kg (95% CI 1.0, 4.5; p < 0.003) and a mean gain in height of 1.7 cm+/-2.6 cm (95% CI 0.6, 2.8; p < 0.003).
  • Five children required second line therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: The introduction of antiretroviral therapy has resulted in improved outcomes and is being initiated in older children cared for mainly at home.
  • Limitations in accessing affordable second line agents underscore the need for compliance with first line therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Retroviral Agents / therapeutic use. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active / utilization. Child Health Services. HIV Infections / drug therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15675498.001).
  • [ISSN] 0043-3144
  • [Journal-full-title] The West Indian medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] West Indian Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Jamaica
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Retroviral Agents
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11. Hernández M, Salmen S, Berrueta L, Navas M, Sánchez B, Muñoz J, Delgado R, Romano E, Rangel A: [Control of inhaled triggering factors decreases prolonged drug therapy requirements in patients with asthma]. Invest Clin; 2000 Mar;41(1):3-18
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Control of inhaled triggering factors decreases prolonged drug therapy requirements in patients with asthma].
  • [Transliterated title] El control de los desencadenantes inhalables disminuye el requerimiento prolongado de farmacoterapia en pacientes asmáticos.
  • Along with inheritance in atopic patients, the presence of inhaled triggering allergens are considered the predominant predisposing factors in the development of the disease.
  • We have conducted a longitudinal clinical therapeutic study, which included 45 pediatrics patients with asthma, in order to evaluate whether the removal of any potential inhaled triggering factor, could decrease the requirement of drug based anti-inflammatory therapy.
  • A single treatment with theophylline (group A), beclomethasone (group B) or salbutamol (group C), was prescribed during the first 2 weeks, along with specific instructions to avoid inhaled allergens.
  • Regardless of the drug used, patients showed impressive and prolonged clinical improvement during 6 months, reduction of total IgE serum levels in the three groups (p < 0.02; 0.005 and 0.02 respectively) and favorable modification of force expiratory volume at the first second, forced vital capacity and flow expiratory peak.
  • During the observation period a constant monitoring of mites allergens concentrations was performed, showing a decrease of these antigens, associated with clinical improvement, and only in those patients who remained symptomatic (group A 31%, group B 29% and group C 9%), failures performing the measures designed to reduce their exposure to environmental allergens, was demonstrated.
  • These results suggest that reduction of inhaled triggering factors may decrease the requirement of anti-inflammatory drug therapy to control the symptoms in patients with asthma.
  • [MeSH-major] Allergens. Anti-Asthmatic Agents / administration & dosage. Asthma / drug therapy. Inhalation Exposure
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Albuterol / administration & dosage. Anti-Inflammatory Agents / administration & dosage. Beclomethasone / administration & dosage. Bronchodilator Agents / administration & dosage. Child. Child, Preschool. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Dust. Female. Humans. Immunoglobulin E / blood. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Respiratory Function Tests. Theophylline / administration & dosage. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 10758695.001).
  • [ISSN] 0535-5133
  • [Journal-full-title] Investigación clínica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Invest Clin
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Controlled Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] VENEZUELA
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Allergens; 0 / Anti-Asthmatic Agents; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Bronchodilator Agents; 0 / Dust; 37341-29-0 / Immunoglobulin E; C137DTR5RG / Theophylline; KGZ1SLC28Z / Beclomethasone; QF8SVZ843E / Albuterol
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12. McNally P: Considerations for drug therapy in hypertension. Int J Clin Pract; 2001 Jan-Feb;55(1):32-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Considerations for drug therapy in hypertension.
  • Both the Joint National Committee and the British Hypertension Society recommend b-blockers and diuretics as first-line therapy in the treatment of uncomplicated hypertension.
  • As a result, many clinicians will also prescribe these drugs in the treatment of patients with hypertension and coexistent disease (unless they are specifically contraindicated), even though they may not always be the most beneficial choice.
  • This review aims to examine factors that should be taken into consideration when choosing appropriate antihypertensive therapy.
  • Particular attention is given to treatment options in two special patient groups, the elderly and patients with co-morbid diabetes, as these groups have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular complications.
  • In response to the increasing evidence base from large-scale trials, the article concludes that cardiovascular risk factors, coexisting disease, concomitant medication and age should all be taken into account when choosing antihypertensive therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Hypertension / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Aged. Clinical Trials as Topic. Decision Making. Diabetes Complications. Humans. Insulin Resistance / physiology. Lipids / blood. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 11219316.001).
  • [ISSN] 1368-5031
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Pract.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; 0 / Lipids
  • [Number-of-references] 70
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13. Cella D, Evans W, Wallace J, Kallich J, Blayney D, Vadhan-Raj S: The relationships between FACT-Fatigue (FACT-F) scores and physical function (PF) in patients (pts) with chemotherapy-induced anemia treated with darbepoetin alfa (DA). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8062

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The relationships between FACT-Fatigue (FACT-F) scores and physical function (PF) in patients (pts) with chemotherapy-induced anemia treated with darbepoetin alfa (DA).
  • : 8062 Background: Anemia-related fatigue in pts undergoing chemotherapy has been shown to decrease health-related quality of life and possibly impair PF.
  • The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the relationships between treatment with darbepoetin alfa (DA; Aranesp®), FACT-F, and self-reported PF.
  • Pts completed the FACT-F and 5 PF questions (climbing several flights of stairs, climbing 1 flight of stairs, walking > 1 mile, walking several blocks, walking 1 block) at baseline (BL), week 9, and week 17.
  • Across all 3 time periods, the majority (66-88%) of the patients whose FACT-F scores were worse than 25 reported being very limited in their ability to climb stairs.
  • Both fatigue and PF improved over time in the observed cohort and the relationship between fatigue and PF was stable.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue and PF improved over the 17 weeks of DA therapy and a consistent relationship between FACT-F and PF was maintained.

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  • (PMID = 28015880.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Vicente A, García-Martínez E, Gonzalez-Billalabeitia E, Zafra M, Castilla-Llorente C, García-García T, Macías J, García-Garre E, Vicente V, Ayala de la Peña F: Prognostic value of decrease on blood lymphocytes in breast cancer patients undergoing primary chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11537

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic value of decrease on blood lymphocytes in breast cancer patients undergoing primary chemotherapy.
  • : e11537 Background: There is evidence about chemotherapy creating a better tumor control by inmune system.
  • Neoadjuvant treatment is an excellent situation to study tumor behaviour.
  • The aim of this study is to determine whether decreases on blood lymphocytes (BL) absolute number have a prognostic significance on women with breast cancer receiving primary chemotherapy (PC).
  • We collected data on BL before the first cycle of PC (basal BL), just before second doxorubicin- cyclophosphamide (AC) cycle (BLa), and three weeks from the end of PC (BLb).
  • The median decrease (MD) in blood lymphocytes has been calculated: MDa = BLa - basal BL; MDb = BLb - basal BL.
  • RESULTS: Of 105 patients with breast cancer 16,2% were clinical stage IIA, 19% IIB, 30,5% IIIA, 14,3% IIIB, 15,2% IIIC.
  • The complete pathologic response (pCR) rate was 14,9% in primary tumor, and 37,9% in axillary nodes.
  • Disease-free survival: (DFS) 21,8 mo (range 5 - 80.3).
  • A decrease on BL just before second AC cycle (> MDa=300 10<sup>6</sup>/L) is correlated with worse DFS, in univariant and multivariant analysis (HR =4.022; 95% CI:1.105-14.63; p 0.035 at first; HR=5.36; 95% CI:1.1-25.82; p 0.037 at former).
  • Patients with BL decrease three weeks after finishing PC (>MDb=700 10<sup>6</sup>/L) have worse DFS in univariant as multivariant analysis (HR=5.9 95% CI:1.2-27.5; p0.022 at first; HR=9.7 95% CI:1.11- 85.07; p 0.04 at former).
  • CONCLUSIONS: A decrease on blood lymphocyte number in women with breast cancer undergoing primary chemotherapy is correlated with worse DFS.

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  • (PMID = 27964682.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Cabanillas ME, Mattiuzzi G, Thomas D, Vu K, Ossa G, Garcia-Manero G, Cortes J, Giles F, O'Brien S, Kantarjian H: Invasive fungal infections (IFI) in patients (pts) receiving hyper-CVAD. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6727

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Pts at high risk for IFI are those with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and pts undergoing bone marrow transplant.
  • Fluconazole 200mg daily is standard anti-fungal prophylaxis for pts undergoing hyper-CVAD for acute lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL), lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL), or Burkitts leukemia/lymphoma (BL).
  • Review was conducted until relapse, death, transplant, or end of chemotherapy.
  • No maintenance was given for BL.
  • Median age was 41 (r: 15-92), 74% ALL, 20% BL and 6% LL.
  • Overall mortality due to IFI was 24% (5/21), 3 of them occurring in pts who were HIV+/BL and 2 in ALL pts.
  • 3/7 pts with HIV+/BL developed and died due to IFI.
  • CONCLUSION: The incidence of IFI in pts with ALL, BL, LL is similar to AML/MDS pts, however, the mortality is lower.
  • Patients with BL/HIV, have a high risk of death due to IFI.

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  • (PMID = 28014663.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Schwartzberg L, Yee L, Senecal F, Charu V, Tomita D, Rossi G: Darbepoetin alfa (DA) 200 mcg every 2 weeks (Q2W) vs epoetin alfa (Epo) 40,000 U weekly (QW) in anemic patients (pts) receiving chemotherapy (ctx). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8063

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Darbepoetin alfa (DA) 200 mcg every 2 weeks (Q2W) vs epoetin alfa (Epo) 40,000 U weekly (QW) in anemic patients (pts) receiving chemotherapy (ctx).
  • : 8063 Background: Both ASH/ASCO and NCCN evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of ctx-induced anemia (CIA) recommend achievement and maintenance of hemoglobin (Hb) near 12 g/dL to assure optimal quality of life and transfusion independence.
  • Therefore, determining the ability to achieve and maintain Hb near 12 g/dL may be a useful approach to evaluate clinical effectiveness of erythropoietic therapies.
  • RESULTS: This analysis included data through wk 17 (after 16 wks) for the first 210 pts (DA [n=105] and Epo [n=105]) with at least 1 dose of study drug.
  • Baseline (BL) characteristics were similar, with mean (SD) BL Hb of 10.4 (0.8) g/dL for DA and 10.5 (0.8) g/dL for Epo.
  • Mean (95% CL) change in Hb from BL (excluding effects of transfusion) through wk 17 was 1.4 (1.1, 1.7) g/dL for DA and 1.5 (1.2, 1.8) g/dL for Epo.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that DA 200 mcg Q2W and Epo 40,000 U QW have comparable efficacy in achieving and maintaining Hb of 11 to 13 g/dL and in reducing transfusions in both pts with BL Hb < 10 and ≥ 10 g/dL.

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  • (PMID = 28015876.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Tarantolo S, Bouda DW: Early results from a novel treatment strategy for chemotherapy-related anemia: Epoetin alfa 60,000 U SC QW induction followed by 60,000 U SC Q2W. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8204

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Early results from a novel treatment strategy for chemotherapy-related anemia: Epoetin alfa 60,000 U SC QW induction followed by 60,000 U SC Q2W.
  • : 8204 Background: Epoetin alfa (EPO) 40,000 U subcutaneously (SC) once weekly (QW) significantly reduces transfusions, increases hemoglobin (Hb), and improves overall quality of life in anemic cancer patients (pts) receiving chemotherapy (CT).
  • METHODS: This ongoing, open-label, pilot study (N = 50) is investigating the efficacy and safety of a 4-week (wk) induction treatment (Phase A, EPO 60,000 U SC QW) followed by 12-wk maintenance (Phase B, EPO 60,000 U SC every 2 wks [Q2W]) in pts with anemia (Hb ≤11 g/dL) undergoing CT for nonmyeloid malignancies.
  • Primary end point is proportion of pts achieving HR (≥1 g/dL Hb increase from baseline [BL]) in Phase A.
  • If Hb >13 g/dL or if increase is >1.3 g/dL in 2 wks, EPO is held until Hb ≤12 g/dL, then resumed at 40,000 U SC in Phase A or B.
  • RESULTS: Twenty-four pts receiving ≥1 dose of study drug are included in this analysis (mean age 66 y [range 39-80]; 33% men; 83% ECOG PS 0-1, BL Hb 10.1 ± 0.8 g/dL).
  • At the time of this analysis, 12/24 (50%) pts achieved HR independent of transfusion; mean time to HR was 11 ± 5 days (median 8 days).
  • There were 2 deaths unrelated to EPO (sepsis and disease progression).
  • NCCN guidelines (Cancer- and Treatment-related anemia) define Hb response as a 1-g/dL increase after 4 wks; these preliminary data show an earlier 1-g/dL increase in Hb.

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  • (PMID = 28016818.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Bechstein WO, Lang H, Köhne C, Parisi F, Raab HR, Frilling A, Konopke R, Weitz J, Stroszczynski C, Folprecht G: Resectability and agreement between surgeons: Review of CT and MR scan of the CELIM study: (Multicenter randomized trial of cetuximab/FOLFOX versus cetuximab/FOLFIRI in unresectable liver metastases. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4091

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 4091 Background: Liver resection of patients with colorectal cancer liver metastasis (mets) may provide curative therapy.
  • The decision for resection is based on CT- or MRI scans and includes technical aspects (esp. remaining liver tissue) and prognostic factors (i.e. number of metastases).
  • METHODS: During two workshops, CT- or MRI scans at baseline (BL) and after 4 months treatment (follow-up, F-U) of CELIM-patients (pts) were presented to surgeons (surg.) who were blinded to each other, the time of investigation (BL or F-U) and clinical data.
  • (1) resection, (2) exploration, (3) borderline resectable (prior chemotherapy preferred) or (4) non-resectable If scans were allocated to category (3) or (4), the reason (technical or poor prognosis) was stated.
  • For evaluation of resectability over time, pts were regarded as resectable according to presented imaging, if ≥ 50% of surg. voted for (1) or (2).
  • Inter-observer variability was evaluated by a reduced model, too: operation (1+2), borderline, primary chemo therapy preferred (3) and non-resectable, chemotherapy (4).
  • Both, BL and F-U scans, were available for 75 pts (68% of study pts).
  • During the review, 24 pts changed from 'non-resectable' at BL to 'resectable' at F-U, 5 pts from 'resectable' to 'non-resectable', 29 pts remained 'non-resectable', and 17 pts 'resectable' (19 pts more resectable at F-U; chi-square: p=.021).
  • R0 resection was actually performed in 16/29 pts classified as 'resectable' (55%) and 13/54 pts not classified as 'resectable' (24%) according to presented BL- images.
  • Regarding the clinical approach, different surgeons had a high degree of agreement.

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  • (PMID = 27961671.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Waltzman RJ, Fesen M, Justice GR, Croot C, Williams D: Epoetin alfa 40,000 U QW vs darbepoetin alfa 200 mcg Q2W in anemic cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: Preliminary results of a comparative trial. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8153

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Epoetin alfa 40,000 U QW vs darbepoetin alfa 200 mcg Q2W in anemic cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: Preliminary results of a comparative trial.
  • : 8153 Background: Epoetin alfa (EPO) and darbepoetin alfa (DARB) both decrease transfusion requirements and increase hemoglobin (Hb) in anemic cancer patients (pts) receiving chemotherapy (CT).
  • Eligible pts ≥18 y with solid tumors, baseline (BL) Hb ≤11 g/dL, and scheduled to receive CT for ≥12 wks.
  • End points include proportion of pts achieving ≥1-g/dL Hb increase after 4 wks, Hb change over time for pts with Hb data at 4, 8, and 12 wks, and transfusion rates for all pts.
  • RESULTS: 123 pts (EPO, 59; DARB, 64) receiving ≥1 dose of study drug are included in this analysis.
  • BL demographics (mean age 63 y, 59% women, 82% ECOG PS 0-1, 65% nonplatinum CT) were similar in each arm.
  • Most common tumor types were breast and lung.
  • Mean BL Hb was 10.1 g/dL for EPO (n = 56) and 9.9 g/dL for DARB (n = 61).
  • 11 (19%) EPO and 14 (22%) DARB pts discontinued treatment, none as a result of drug-related AEs.
  • 1 death unrelated to study drug occurred in each arm.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest a greater Hb increase at each time point with EPO 40,000 U QW vs DARB 200 mcg Q2W.

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  • (PMID = 28015356.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Baltz B, Gregory SA, Ehmann WC, Williams D: Initial dosing of epoetin alfa 60,000 U QW followed by Q2W maintenance for anemic patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8212

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Initial dosing of epoetin alfa 60,000 U QW followed by Q2W maintenance for anemic patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy.
  • : 8212 Background: The efficacy of epoetin alfa (EPO) at a starting dose of 40,000 U SC once weekly (QW) has been established in previous clinical studies.
  • Higher starting doses followed by less frequent maintenance dosing may shorten time to Hb response, and increase response rates.
  • Primary end point was proportion of pts with Hb ≥12 g/dL or Hb increase ≥2 g/dL from baseline (BL) in IP.
  • RESULTS: Fifty-five patients are evaluable for analysis (mean BL Hb, 10.0 ± 0.8 g/dL).
  • Proportion of pts with Hb ≥12 g/dL or Hb increase ≥2 g/dL from BL in IP was 64%.
  • Twenty-eight pts have been withdrawn (16 in IP; 12 in MP) due to Hb <11 g/dL in MP (n = 7), disease progression (n = 4), death (n = 3), loss to follow-up (n = 1), failure to reach Hb ≥12 g/dL in IP (n = 1), and other/missing (n = 12).

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  • (PMID = 28016883.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Cleeland C, Crawford J, Lubeck D, Tomita D, SURPASS Study Group: Using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) to assess symptom burden and interference: Interim results of an open-label study of darbepoetin Alfa 200 mcg every 2 weeks (Q2W) for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8065

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) to assess symptom burden and interference: Interim results of an open-label study of darbepoetin Alfa 200 mcg every 2 weeks (Q2W) for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA).
  • : 8065 Background: Cancer patients (pts) receiving chemotherapy experience symptoms related to both their disease and its treatment, including CIA.
  • Eligibility criteria included concurrent multicycle chemotherapy for nonmyeloid malignancies and Hb ≤11 g/dL.
  • This interim analysis includes data through week 17 for 1053 pts who completed 16 weeks of study treatment.
  • RESULTS: The mean (SD) baseline (BL) Hb was 10.1 (0.8) g/dL.
  • The Kaplan-Meier percentage (95% CL) of pts with a hematopoietic response was 72% (70, 74) after 16 weeks.
  • Exploratory analyses of the MDASI items have been performed and indicate the impact of treatment on the severity of symptoms.
  • CONCLUSION: DA treatment is associated with significant improvement in a breadth of symptoms for pts with moderate to severe burden as measured by the MDASI.

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  • (PMID = 28015878.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Charu V, Belani CP, Gill AN, Bhatt M, Ben-Jacob A, Tomita D, Katz D: A controlled, randomized, open-label study to evaluate the effect of every-2-week darbepoetin alfa for anemia of cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8084

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 8084 Background: Patients (pts) with cancer who are not receiving chemotherapy (ctx) or radiotherapy (rtx) often develop anemia.
  • A previous randomized, controlled trial evaluating the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin therapy vs placebo on transfusion (tfn) incidence in this pt population failed to show a significant reduction in tfn requirements in treated pts, relative to control (Abels, 1991).
  • Results are provided for all pts and stratified by baseline (BL) Hb category.
  • BL Hb was 10.2 (SD: 0.9) in the DA arm and 10.3 (0.9) in the control arm.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results show that AOC pts treated with darbepoetin alfa Q2W (vs no treatment) had marked improvements in Hb corresponding to clinically meaningful improvements in fatigue and a substantial reduction in tfn requirements.
  • Importantly, the stratified analysis suggests that pts with AOC experience important clinical benefits, regardless of BL Hb category; however, earlier intervention (Hb >10 to <11g/dL) may optimize anemia management for this pt population.

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  • (PMID = 28016005.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Fischbach NA, Spigel D, Brahmer J, Garst J, Robles R, Chung C, Wang L, Sing A, Lynch T, ARIES Investigators: Preliminary safety and effectiveness of bevacizumab (BV) based treatment in subpopulations of patients (pts) with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from the ARIES study: A bevacizumab (BV) treatment observational cohort study (OCS). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8040

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preliminary safety and effectiveness of bevacizumab (BV) based treatment in subpopulations of patients (pts) with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from the ARIES study: A bevacizumab (BV) treatment observational cohort study (OCS).
  • To further define clinical outcomes associated with BV treatment among a broader population of NSCLC pts in a real-world setting, the ARIES OCS was initiated.
  • Pt populations in OCSs are often more reflective of pts encountered in practice, permitting examination of treatment benefit and toxicity in subgroups that might be too small for study in traditional randomized controlled trials (RCTs).
  • The NSCLC cohort in ARIES will assess clinical outcomes in the overall cohort as well as subpopulations such as the elderly, pts with poor PS or pts on concurrent anticoagulants (AC).
  • METHODS: Pts with advanced NSCLC whose 1<sup>st</sup>-line therapy includes BV may enroll.
  • There are no protocol-specified treatments or assessments.
  • Data is collected at baseline (BL) then quarterly, including targeted adverse events (AEs) and BV-related serious AEs.
  • Clinical outcomes will be descriptively summarized by baseline characteristics.
  • Key BL characteristics: 20% ≥75 yrs; 67% adenocarcinoma; 10% ECOG ≥2; 8% brain metastasis; 5% therapeutic AC.
  • The most common 1<sup>st</sup>-line chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin/paclitaxel (64%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The safety of BV in subpopulations of pts in ARIES (elderly pts, pts with ECOG PS ≥2, with brain mets at BL, or on therapeutic AC) is generally consistent with safety results from RCTs.

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  • (PMID = 27962849.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Qu P, Haessler J, Barlogie B, Shaughnessy J: Bone marrow microenvironment (ME) associated genes identified prior to all altered 48 hours after bortexomib test-dose application and prognosis of multiple myeloma (MM) treated with total therapy 3 (TT3). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8520

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Bone marrow microenvironment (ME) associated genes identified prior to all altered 48 hours after bortexomib test-dose application and prognosis of multiple myeloma (MM) treated with total therapy 3 (TT3).
  • : 8520 Background: Total Therapy 3 (TT3) incorporated bortezomib (BOR) to co-target ME that plays an important role in MM progression and drug resistance.
  • Consenting patients received a BOR test dose of 1mg/m2 to determine whether ME alterations induced 48hr post-BOR could clarify the drug's in-vivo mechanism of action in the context of achieving MM control.
  • METHODS: Bone marrow biopsies were obtained at baseline (BL) prior to and 48hr after BOR (PB) in 70 of 303 patients receiving TT3a (training set) and in 45 of 177 patients enrolled in TT3b (test set).
  • Among 608 ME genes distinguishing BL and PB training samples, 58 were identified as being significantly linked to short event-free survival (EFS).
  • Additionally, 20 ME genes were selected whose BL expression predicted OS, arriving at a BL score (BL-ME-S).
  • The BL-ME-S distinguished OS and EFS in the training set of 70 patients, with 3-yr OS and EFS estimates of 92% and 91% among the 50 patients with low and 54% and 45% in the 20 patients with high BL-ME-S (both P<0.0001).
  • These data were validated in 113 patients with only BL-ME data: 3-yr OS and EFS were 90% and 85% among the 89 patients with low as opposed to 70% and 55% among the 14 patients with high BL-ME-S (p=0.001, p=0.002).
  • TT3 survival was independently significantly affected by PB-ME-S (OS: HR=12.74, p=0.002; EFS: HR=14.32, p<0.001) and BL-ME-S (EFS: HR=3.10, p=0.045), whereas the univariately significant role of BL-PC-S for both endpoints could not be confirmed on multivariate analysis.
  • Key genes shared by both PB-ME-S and BL-ME-S models are involved in endothelial and mesenchymal stem-cell signaling, the details of which will be reported at the meeting.

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  • (PMID = 27960896.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Tarabay G, Braly P, Baker JJ, Williams D, Waltzman RJ: Treatment of anemia with epoetin alfa 80,000 U QW in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8205

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of anemia with epoetin alfa 80,000 U QW in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.
  • : 8205 Background: The efficacy of epoetin alfa 40,000 U subcutaneously (SC) once weekly (QW) for the treatment of chemotherapy (CT)-induced anemia in cancer patients (pts) has been demonstrated in clinical studies.
  • Primary end points are HR rates (minor: Hb increase ≥1-<2 g/dL from baseline [BL]; major: Hb increase ≥2 g/dL from BL), based on number of pts evaluable for a given week and independent of transfusion within 28 days.
  • RESULTS: 16 of a target of 60 pts (50% women; mean age 63 years; 88% ECOG PS 0-1; BL Hb 9.8 ± 0.7 g/d) have ≥1 post-BL assessment and are included in this analysis.
  • [Figure: see text] Mean times to 1 g/dL and 2 g/dL Hb increases were 3.9 ± 3.5 wks (n = 11) and 4.8 ± 2.9 wks (n = 8), respectively.
  • Dose was reduced to 60,000 U SC QW in 8 pts and subsequently to 40,000 U SC QW in 3 pts due to Hb increase >1.3-g/dL in 2-wk period (n = 9), Hb >13 g/dL (n = 1), and physician decision (n = 1).
  • Mean time to first dose reduction was 4.0 ± 2.0 wks (n = 8).
  • AEs of any grade were reported in 5 pts, none related to study drug.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary data suggest that higher initiation doses of epoetin alfa may result in a shorter time to ≥ 2g/dL Hb increase than historically seen with 40,000 U QW.

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  • (PMID = 28016824.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Tsujimura H, Mimura N, Ise M, Sakai C, Shimada H, Nagata M, Kumagai K: Incidence of therapy-related leukemia following chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15663

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence of therapy-related leukemia following chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer.
  • : e15663 Background: The combination of chemotherapy and concurrent radiotherapy (CRT) has recognized as a curative alternative for several stage of esophageal cancer.
  • On the other hands, a sufficiently long survival time has increased treatment-related late toxicities.
  • METHODS: From July 2000 to March 2008, 348 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma underwent CRT.
  • All patients received chemotherapy consisting with nedaplatin (80 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, div day1) and fluorouracil (700 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, ci day 1-5) and concurrent long T field irradiation (2 Gy daily, up to 30 Gy).
  • Two cycles of CRT as the definitive or palliative setting were administered in 248 patients.
  • RESULTS: Four patients, who achieved CR after CRT, developed leukemia.
  • Case1, 60-yo-male, developed overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from myelodysplastic syndrome 48 months after CRT.
  • Case2, 64-yo-male, developed AML M0 with t(9;22)(q34;q11) 44 months after CRT.
  • Case3, 72-yo-male, developed Burkitt leukemia with t(8;14)(q24;q32) 19 months after CRT.
  • Case4, 65-yo-male, developed myeloid crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia with complicated abnormalities including t(9;22)(q34;q11) 48 months after CRT.
  • Case 1 and 3 had localized disease and received single course of neoadjuvant CRT.
  • Case 2 and 4 had advance disease and received 2 courses of CRT.
  • All patients eventually died of leukemia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Since platinum and fluorouracil have shown relatively low chance of secondary neoplasm, our data demonstrates that the concurrent radiotherapy which involves massive bone marrow tissue may increase the risk of leukomogenesis.
  • To this end, atypical cytogenetic abnormalities seen in the present cases give a new insight into the biology of therapy-related leukemia.
  • Notably, this is the first report presenting the incidence of secondary leukemia by nedaplatin.

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  • (PMID = 27962759.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Vadhan-Raj S, Mirtsching B, Gregory SA, Hong J, Fessen M, Yao B, Rossi G, Blayney D: Baseline (BL) covariates of response to darbepoetin alfa (DA) every 2 weeks (Q2W) in patients (pts) with chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8061

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Baseline (BL) covariates of response to darbepoetin alfa (DA) every 2 weeks (Q2W) in patients (pts) with chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA).
  • : 8061 Background: Classification and regression tree (CART) and multiple regression (MR) methods can be used to model BL characteristics of pts treated with DA (Aranesp®) relative to their performance on hematologic and clinical endpoints.
  • MR models allow for assessment of a covariate after adjusting for the effects of other important covariates.
  • Overall, using intent-to-treat methods, the mean (95% CL) change in Hb (n = 1462) was 1.7 (1.6, 1.8) g/dL with over 70% of pts achieving a hematopoietic response (Hb ≥ 12 g/dL or ≥ 2 g/dL rise from BL).
  • The more anemic pts were at BL, the more likely a higher Hb change would occur; the more fatigued pts were at BL, the more likely a 3-point change in FACT-Fatigue would occur.
  • Breast and lymphoid cancer pts responded well relative to lung cancer pts, although this may be related to factors such as gender, chemotherapy, and disease stage.
  • Ferritin and serum erythropoietin levels (after adjusting for tumor type and BL Hb or FACT-Fatigue) were also significant but less impactful covariates.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Response to erythropoietic therapy in pts with CIA is significantly impacted by BL Hb category and tumor type.

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  • (PMID = 28015881.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Moschidis A, Papageorgiou A, Tsavdaridis D, Atmatzidis K, Tsalis K, Chrysogelou E, Oustabasidis P, Geromichalos G, Charlaftis N: Gemcitabine in combination with Oxaliplatin in Pancreatic (PAN-02) tumor bearing mice. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):4153

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gemcitabine in combination with Oxaliplatin in Pancreatic (PAN-02) tumor bearing mice.
  • : 4153 Background: Combination chemotherapy is routinely used for many cancer patients to enhance the antitumor efficacy of single agents and reduce overall toxicity.
  • Single agents Gemcitabine (Gem) and Oxaliplatin (Ox) have clinical antitumor activity and act at the DNA level by different mechanism of action.
  • The aim of this study was to optimize scheduling of both drugs in PAN-02 tumor, since in previous in vivo studies with several other tumor types no effective combination schedule of both compounds was found.
  • Tumor was grown in female C<sub>57</sub> BL.
  • The tumor was implanted subcutaneously in the axillary region with puncture in the inguinal region.
  • Drug administration was begun 24 hours later either as a single dose or on days 1, 9.
  • This study shows that the schedule dependency between both compounds plays an important role in antitumor response which is of major interest for the treatment of tumors in the clinic.

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  • (PMID = 28013782.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Reiter A, Meinhardt A, Burkhardt B, Zimmermann M, Borkhardt A, Kontny U, Mann G, Schrappe M: Phase II window study on rituximab in newly diagnosed pediatric mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10000

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II window study on rituximab in newly diagnosed pediatric mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
  • : 10000 Background: Pediatric mature B-cell NHL differ from aggressive B-NHL of adults in terms of biology and treatment outcome.
  • In contrast to adults, rituximab (Rx) is not established in the treatment of pediatric B-NHL has not be determined yet.
  • Even the activity of Rx in pediatric B-NHL is not determined.
  • We conducted a phase II window study to examine the activity of Rx in newly diagnosed pediatric B-NHL.
  • METHODS: Eligibility: age < 19 y, CD20 + B-NHL, ≥ 1 measurable lesion/s, informed consent.
  • Exclusion: Lansky performance scale 5, pre-treatment, impaired renal-, heart-, liver-function, hepatitis B, pre-existing disease, pregnancy.
  • TREATMENT: Rx 375 mg/m<sup>2</sup> IV at day 1; concomitant therapy: Rasburicase, steroids only for anaphylaxis, intrathecal (IT) triple drug at days 1, 3 for CNS+ pts only.
  • Begin of chemotherapy at day 5.
  • NTC °3/4 toxicities: general condition 16%, fatigue 13%, anaphylaxis (chill/fever/bronchospasm) 6 (1/2/4)%, infection 3%, S-GOT/GPT 10%, acute tumor lysis (ATL) 7%, capillary leakage (0), toxic death (0).
  • Forty-nine pts were not evaluable for response: Withdrawal (anaphylaxis 8, ATL 2, suspected progression, not verified 4, other 2), IT therapy in CNS- pts (8), corticosteroids (3), technical inadequacy of response evaluation (21), no index lesion (1).
  • RR by histology: BL/B-ALL 29/68, DLBCL 6/14, juvenile follicular lymphoma 1/2, PMBCL 1/1, B-NHL nfs 0/2.
  • Fifty pts were non-RPs.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although the RR was lower than requested Rx as single agent is active in pediatric B-NHL.

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  • (PMID = 27962545.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Firer MA, Laptev R, Kasatkin I, Trombka D: Specific destruction of hybridoma cells by antigen-toxin conjugates demonstrate an efficient strategy for targeted drug therapy in leukemias of the B cell lineage. Leuk Lymphoma; 2003 Apr;44(4):681-9
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Specific destruction of hybridoma cells by antigen-toxin conjugates demonstrate an efficient strategy for targeted drug therapy in leukemias of the B cell lineage.
  • Many types of leukemia including multiple myeloma remain essentially incurable despite recent developments in immuno- and chemotherapy.
  • The effectiveness of these therapies might be greatly enhanced by targeting cell surface proteins unique to the malignant clone, which for leukemias of the B cell lineage means clonotypic surface immunoglobulin (sIg).
  • As this immunoglobulin (Ig) is necessarily epitope specific, we are developing ligand-toxin conjugates (LTCs) as a strategy for delivering toxins and other drugs to clonotypic tumor cells.
  • LTC comprising the DNP hapten conjugated to ricin A toxin (DNP-RTA) were shown to specifically and effectively kill anti-DNP secreting murine hybridoma (U7.6) cells but not other hybridoma cells (1B12), a murine erythroleukemia cell line (Friend's Leukemia or) normal mouse spleen cells.
  • In addition to direct toxicity, LTC treatment negatively affected the growth characteristics of the few surviving cells as reflected in decreased growth index and an increase in growth inhibition over 72 h post treatment.
  • Interestingly, U7.6 cells that survived one or two LD90 dose(s) of LTC showed no alteration in their dose response to a subsequent attack of LTC indicating that this treatment strategy may not induce drug resistance.
  • These data suggest that LTC therapy may be a new and effective strategy for specific destruction of tumor cells such as myeloma plasma cells and could be extended to other tumors where clonotypic receptors can be identified.
  • [MeSH-major] B-Lymphocytes / cytology. Hybridomas / metabolism. Leukemia / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antigens / metabolism. Cell Division. Cell Line. Cell Lineage. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Epitopes. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Immunoglobulins / metabolism. Ligands. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Inbred C3H. Microscopy, Fluorescence. Species Specificity. Spleen / cytology. Time Factors. Toxins, Biological / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 12769346.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens; 0 / Epitopes; 0 / Immunoglobulins; 0 / Ligands; 0 / Toxins, Biological
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31. Turco P, De Simone A, La Rocca V, Iuliano A, Capuano V, Astarita C, Di Napoli T, Messina V, Baldi S, Stabile G: Antiarrhythmic drug therapy after radiofrequency catheter ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol; 2007 Jan;30 Suppl 1:S112-5
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Antiarrhythmic drug therapy after radiofrequency catheter ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation.
  • OBJECTIVES: The use of antiarrhythmic drugs after ablation is a controversial issue when evaluating the efficacy of atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation.
  • This study compares in a prospective and randomized fashion the impact of an antiarrhythmic drug in preventing AF recurrence after AF ablation.
  • METHODS: From February 2004 to May 2005, 107 consecutive patients (mean age 57 +/- 10 years, 69 men), with paroxysmal (60%) or persistent (40%) drug refractory AF, were randomly assigned to ablation alone (Group A, 53 patients) or combined with the best antiarrhythmic therapy, preferably amiodarone (Group B, 54 patients).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Continuing antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients who undergo catheter ablation for AF did not lower the rate of AF recurrences.
  • Antiarrhythmic drugs increased the proportion of patients with asymptomatic AF episodes.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / therapeutic use. Atrial Fibrillation / drug therapy. Atrial Fibrillation / surgery. Catheter Ablation
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Amiodarone / therapeutic use. Electrocardiography. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Secondary Prevention. Treatment Outcome

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  • [ErratumIn] Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 2007 Nov;30(11):1424
  • (PMID = 17302684.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-8389
  • [Journal-full-title] Pacing and clinical electrophysiology : PACE
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pacing Clin Electrophysiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents; N3RQ532IUT / Amiodarone
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32. Färkkilä M: [Drug therapy of hepatitis B and C]. Duodecim; 2003;119(6):519-29
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. RIBAVIRIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Drug therapy of hepatitis B and C].
  • [MeSH-major] Hepatitis B / drug therapy. Hepatitis C / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Therapy, Combination. Hepatitis B Vaccines / therapeutic use. Humans. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Lamivudine / therapeutic use. Liver Cirrhosis / etiology. Liver Cirrhosis / prevention & control. Liver Neoplasms / etiology. Liver Neoplasms / prevention & control. Polyethylene Glycols / therapeutic use. Recombinant Proteins. Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Ribavirin / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 12708339.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-7183
  • [Journal-full-title] Duodecim; lääketieteellinen aikakauskirja
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Duodecim
  • [Language] fin
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Finland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Hepatitis B Vaccines; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors; 0 / peginterferon alfa-2a; 2T8Q726O95 / Lamivudine; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; 49717AWG6K / Ribavirin; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a
  • [Number-of-references] 41
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33. Llamas-Prudhon C, Mandy B, Woronoff-Lemsi MC, Belon JP: [Best practice drug therapy. B. Use of antibiotics 8/urinary infections]. Soins; 2003 Apr;(674):53-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Best practice drug therapy. B. Use of antibiotics 8/urinary infections].
  • [Transliterated title] Bon usage du médicament. B. Utilisation des antibiotiques 8/les infections urinaires.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Bacterial Infections / drug therapy. Patient Selection. Urinary Tract Infections / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 12725000.001).
  • [ISSN] 0038-0814
  • [Journal-full-title] Soins; la revue de référence infirmière
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Soins
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
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34. Nguyen T, Locarnini S: Hepatitis: Monitoring drug therapy for hepatitis B--a global challenge? Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2009 Oct;6(10):565-7
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - International Health.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hepatitis: Monitoring drug therapy for hepatitis B--a global challenge?
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Global Health. Hepatitis B, Chronic / diagnosis. Hepatitis B, Chronic / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers / blood. DNA, Viral / blood. Hepatitis B virus / genetics. Humans. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19789570.001).
  • [ISSN] 1759-5053
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature reviews. Gastroenterology & hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / DNA, Viral
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35. Howard PA, Cheng JW, Crouch MA, Colucci VJ, Kalus JS, Spinler SA, Munger M: Drug therapy recommendations from the 2005 ACC/AHA guidelines for treatment of chronic heart failure. Ann Pharmacother; 2006 Sep;40(9):1607-17
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Drug therapy recommendations from the 2005 ACC/AHA guidelines for treatment of chronic heart failure.
  • OBJECTIVE: To review and discuss key aspects of the drug therapy recommendations in the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) 2005 Guideline Update for the Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Heart Failure (HF) in the Adult.
  • English-language clinical trials, observational studies, and pertinent review articles evaluating the pharmacotherapy of chronic HF were identified, based on MEDLINE searches through January 2006.
  • STUDY SELECTION: Articles presenting information that impacts the evidence base for recommendations regarding the use of various drug therapies in patients with chronic HF were evaluated.
  • DATA SYNTHESIS: The ACC/AHA 2005 Guideline Update for HF provides revised, evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of chronic HF.
  • Recommendations are provided for 2 stages of patients (A and B) who do not yet have clinical HF but are clearly at risk and 2 stages (C and D) that include patients with symptomatic HF.
  • Based on recent trials, updated recommendations address the roles of combination therapy and the selective addition of hydralazine and isosorbide dinitrate.
  • Along with specific drug recommendations, information on the practical use of various drugs is provided.
  • Recent clinical trial findings have further clarified the evolving role of neurohormonal-blocking drugs in the prevention and treatment of HF.
  • [MeSH-major] American Heart Association. Cardiology / standards. Health Planning Guidelines. Heart Failure / drug therapy. Societies, Medical
  • [MeSH-minor] Chronic Disease. Humans. Practice Guidelines as Topic / standards. United States

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  • (PMID = 16896019.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-6270
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 68
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36. Cellona RV, Balagon MF, dela Cruz EC, Burgos JA, Abalos RM, Walsh GP, Topolski R, Gelber RH, Walsh DS: Long-term efficacy of 2 year WHO multiple drug therapy (MDT) in multibacillary (MB) leprosy patients. Int J Lepr Other Mycobact Dis; 2003 Dec;71(4):308-19
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term efficacy of 2 year WHO multiple drug therapy (MDT) in multibacillary (MB) leprosy patients.
  • Relapse rate estimates after 2 year WHO multiple drug therapy (MDT) in multi-bacillary (MB) leprosy vary.
  • The majority of patients (N = 316) were treated and followed at the physician-staffed Cebu Skin Clinic (CSC), whereas others (N = 184) received therapy from government clinics and were followed by CSC technicians in the field.
  • Through 2002, follow-up was 5368 person-years, with a mean of 10.8 years per patient.
  • The absolute relapse rate was 3% (15/498; 0.28/100 person-years), with a cumulative risk estimate of 3.9% at 15 yrs.
  • The rate for patients followed at CSC for >or=12 yrs and a pre-treatment BI >or=2.7+ was 13% (13/98).
  • All relapses were BL or LL, with pre-treatment BI's of >or=2.7+.
  • Relapses occurred long after completion of therapy, between 3 and 11 yrs from the midpoint of the examination without relapse to detection, or between 6 to 13 yrs to the actual year of detection, 7 occurring at >or=10 yrs.
  • [Follow-up rigor and time], medical expertise, and pre-treatment bacterial load influence relapse rates after 2 yr MDT.
  • [MeSH-major] Leprostatic Agents / therapeutic use. Leprosy / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Animals. Child. Cohort Studies. Drug Resistance, Bacterial. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Male. Mice. Microbial Sensitivity Tests. Middle Aged. Mycobacterium leprae / drug effects. Philippines. Recurrence. Time Factors. World Health Organization

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  • (PMID = 14763888.001).
  • [ISSN] 0148-916X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of leprosy and other mycobacterial diseases : official organ of the International Leprosy Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Lepr. Other Mycobact. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Leprostatic Agents
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37. Stefanutti C, Vivenzio A, Di Giacomo S, Labbadia G, Mazza F, D'Alessandri G, Ferraro PM, Masala C: Immunoadsorption apheresis and immunosuppressive drug therapy in the treatment of complicated HCV-related cryoglobulinemia. J Clin Apher; 2009;24(6):241-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Immunoadsorption apheresis and immunosuppressive drug therapy in the treatment of complicated HCV-related cryoglobulinemia.
  • The immunosuppressive drug therapy (IDT) is not always effective to avoid the development of complications in hepatitis C virus-related cryoglobulinemia (HCV-Cr).
  • Removal of cryoglobulins by therapeutic plasmapheresis is currently accepted.
  • In this randomized, parallel group study, 17 male and female patients aged 43-79 years, with complicated HCV-Cr, were submitted for 12 weeks (initial immunosuppressive therapy) to IDT (alpha-interferon, pegylated-interferon alpha-2a, cyclophosphamide, methylprednisolone, prednisone, cyclosporine, ribavirin, and melphalan).
  • A Clinical Score (CS) was adapted from a pre-existing scoring model to evaluate signs and symptoms inherent to the underlying immunologic disorder.
  • The CS was calculated at baseline (CS0), after the initial immunosuppressive therapy (CS1 = 12 weeks) when patients were treated only with IDT, and at the end of the study (24 weeks) in the group A (CSA; IA plus IDT) and B (CSB; IDT only).
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Component Removal / methods. Cryoglobulinemia / therapy. Hepatitis C / complications. Immunosorbent Techniques. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 19927363.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-1101
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical apheresis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Apher
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
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38. Orosz SE: Antifungal drug therapy in avian species. Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract; 2003 May;6(2):337-50, vi
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Antifungal drug therapy in avian species.
  • This article reviews current literature regarding antifungal drugs available for veterinary and human use and those that are in clinical trials.
  • Drugs include the polyenes, amphotericin B and nystatin; flucytosine; and the first generation triazoles.
  • Antifungal agents generally not used in avian medicine or which are being analyzed in clinical trials in people include lipid formulations of amphotericin B and nystatin, voriconazole, echinocandins, and the allylamines.
  • Information about the pharmacology of the triazoles in people is contrasted with known information for these drugs in birds.
  • [MeSH-major] Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Bird Diseases / drug therapy. Mycoses / veterinary

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  • (PMID = 12827726.001).
  • [ISSN] 1094-9194
  • [Journal-full-title] The veterinary clinics of North America. Exotic animal practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 52
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39. Bhatnagar D: Should pediatric patients with hyperlipidemia receive drug therapy? Paediatr Drugs; 2002;4(4):223-30
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  • [Title] Should pediatric patients with hyperlipidemia receive drug therapy?
  • Hyperlipidemia is now established as a major risk factor for causation of coronary heart disease (CHD) in adults; however, there is much debate on the level of coronary risk at which lipid-lowering drugs should be used.
  • These issues of possible harm or lack of benefit from long-term use of lipid-lowering therapy, and cost effectiveness, are also pertinent in the pediatric setting.
  • Evidence from several countries indicates that children have an increasing prevalence of obesity, hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus.
  • These considerations should not cloud the need for case finding and treatment of children with genetic disorders.
  • Low fat diets have been shown to be well tolerated and effective in children; however, there are no major long-term studies demonstrating harm or benefit in those on lipid-lowering drugs.
  • Lipid-lowering drugs should be generally restricted to children with genetic disorders of lipid metabolism.
  • Children with diabetes mellitus, hypertension or nonlipid-related inherited disorders leading to premature CHD in adults should be treated with diet, and with lipid-lowering drugs when they reach adulthood.
  • A number of drugs and nutriceuticals are available for use in children, but only a few drugs are licensed for use in children.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticholesteremic Agents / therapeutic use. Hyperlipidemias / drug therapy. Hypolipidemic Agents / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Cholestyramine Resin / therapeutic use. Coronary Disease / prevention & control. Fatty Acids, Omega-3 / therapeutic use. Humans. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Niacin / analogs & derivatives. Niacin / therapeutic use. Psyllium / therapeutic use. Risk Assessment

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  • (PMID = 11960511.001).
  • [ISSN] 1174-5878
  • [Journal-full-title] Paediatric drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Paediatr Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticholesteremic Agents; 0 / Fatty Acids, Omega-3; 0 / Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors; 0 / Hypolipidemic Agents; 11041-12-6 / Cholestyramine Resin; 2679MF687A / Niacin; 8063-16-9 / Psyllium
  • [Number-of-references] 66
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40. Chandramoulesswaran V, Dhanaraj M, Rangaraj R, Vengatesan A: Patients' preferences towards antiepileptic drug therapy following first attack of seizure. Neurol India; 2006 Dec;54(4):387-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Patients' preferences towards antiepileptic drug therapy following first attack of seizure.
  • BACKGROUND: Antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy following first unprovoked seizure is controversial.
  • AIM: To study the patients' preferences towards AED therapy following first unprovoked generalized tonic clonic seizure (GTCS).
  • Counseling was done for all the patients and the relatives regarding seizure recurrence, duration and adverse effects of AED therapy if preferred.
  • Patients were encouraged to make their own decision in preferring or deferring AED with reasons.
  • RESULTS: Of the 73 enrolled (54 males and 19 females) 39 (53%) preferred to go on AED therapy.
  • The reasons for preferring AED therapy were;.
  • The reasons for deferring were: (a) fear of adverse effects of long-term AED therapy, 19 (56%) and (b) preferring to wait for the second attack, 15 (44%).
  • All the patients were happy about being involved in the decision-making.
  • CONCLUSION: Following first attack of unprovoked GTCS the decision regarding AED therapy may be taken by the patients and their family members after adequate counseling and such decisions have more relevance from their perspective.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticonvulsants / therapeutic use. Epilepsy, Generalized / drug therapy. Epilepsy, Tonic-Clonic / drug therapy. Patient Satisfaction
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • [CommentIn] Neurol India. 2006 Dec;54(4):350-1 [17114836.001]
  • (PMID = 17114848.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-3886
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurology India
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurol India
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticonvulsants
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41. Krishnamoorthy G, Karande S, Ahire N, Mathew L, Kulkarni M: Bone metabolism alteration on antiepileptic drug therapy. Indian J Pediatr; 2009 Apr;76(4):377-83
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VALPROIC ACID .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Bone metabolism alteration on antiepileptic drug therapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether serum total alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone-specific ALP (bone ALP), calcium, phosphorus, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHvit D) concentrations are altered early in the course of treatment with carbamazepine or valproic acid monotherapy in ambulatory children with adequate sun exposure; and to determine the effectiveness of simultaneous supplementation with calcium and 25-OHvit D at recommended dietary allowance doses on these biochemical parameters.
  • METHODS: For each drug, children were divided into two groups (Group A: without supplementation; and Group B: with supplementation) and serum biochemical parameters estimated at 0, 30, 60, and 90 days of starting treatment.
  • Also for each drug, serum biochemical parameters were compared between Groups A and B at 0, 30, 60, and 90 days of starting treatment using student's unpaired t test.
  • RESULTS: For both drugs, in Group A, serum total ALP levels were significantly increased above the normal range (P<0.0001) by 90 days of starting treatment; however, serum bone ALP level was significantly increased (P=0.002) only in children on valproic acid.
  • For both drugs when serum biochemical parameters were compared between Groups A and B, supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in serum total ALP (P<0.0001) and bone ALP levels (P<0.001), and a significant increase in serum calcium (P<0.0001) and 25-OHvit D levels (P<0.0001) by 90 days of starting treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Alkaline Phosphatase / blood. Alkaline Phosphatase / drug effects. Anticonvulsants / adverse effects. Bone and Bones / drug effects. Bone and Bones / metabolism. Carbamazepine / adverse effects. Epilepsy / drug therapy. Valproic Acid / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 19205634.001).
  • [ISSN] 0973-7693
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Pediatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticonvulsants; 33CM23913M / Carbamazepine; 614OI1Z5WI / Valproic Acid; EC 3.1.3.1 / Alkaline Phosphatase
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42. Reimann IR, Schilbach S, Cercasov M, Hoffmann A: Pattern of outpatient drug therapy in diabetics admitted to hospital--preliminary results. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther; 2001 Nov;39(11):499-502
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Diabetes.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pattern of outpatient drug therapy in diabetics admitted to hospital--preliminary results.
  • The prevalence of outpatient treatment with various drug groups is significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetic control patients.
  • In addition to the specific diabetes-related prescriptions, diabetics were more frequently treated with drugs acting on the alimentary tract or used in metabolic disorders (ATC code A), drugs used in disorders of the blood and blood-forming organs (ATC B), cardiovascular system (ATC C), musculo-skeletal system (ATC M) and nervous system (ATC N)-- resulting in markedly higher outpatient costs in this patient group.
  • Objective of this investigation was to analyze the pre-hospital prescription pattern of diabetics and non-diabetic controls at the time of admission to hospital.
  • METHOD: A sample survey of a total of 189 general medical and 68 surgical admissions involving diabetics and 676 and 143 non-diabetic control patients corresponding in age, sex and main diagnosis--were analyzed with regard to selected medical and demographic characteristics and pharmacotherapy.
  • RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The prevalence of non-diabetic drug treatment in diabetics was highest for ATC C (87.8% and 69.1%), ATC A (40.7% and 27.9%; without A10) and ATC B (39.2% and 29.4%) in internal and surgical admissions, respectively.
  • CONCLUSION: Data indicate that the need for treatment with cardiovascular drugs and drugs used to treat disorders of the blood and blood-forming organs may be associated with a higher risk of hospitalization in general medical wards.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetes Mellitus / drug therapy. Hospitalization. Outpatients
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diagnosis, Differential. Drug Prescriptions. Drug Utilization. Humans. Polypharmacy. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 11727971.001).
  • [ISSN] 0946-1965
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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43. Strupp M, Arbusow V, Brandt T: Exercise and drug therapy alter recovery from labyrinth lesion in humans. Ann N Y Acad Sci; 2001 Oct;942:79-94
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHYLPREDNISOLONE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Exercise and drug therapy alter recovery from labyrinth lesion in humans.
  • Acute unilateral vestibular failure is characterized by rotatory vertigo, horizontal-rotatory nystagmus, and postural imbalance, all of which last from days to weeks.
  • Acute unilateral failure is most often caused by vestibular neuritis, which is most likely due to the reactivation of a latent HSV-1 infection.
  • Therefore, therapeutic strategies to improve the outcome of VN are theoretically based on two principles: (a) vestibular exercises and drugs to improve CVC and (b) drug treatment of the assumed viral inflammation.
  • Moreover, slower exercises are likely to be more effective than faster exercises because slower ones seem to depend more on the vestibular system. (2) Despite extensive data from animal experiments indicating that drugs have a favorable effect on CVC, this has not been clinically proven and thus cannot be recommended yet. (3) Preliminary results of an interim analysis from an ongoing randomized, prospective study showed that methylprednisolone (plus an antiviral agent?
  • [MeSH-major] Acyclovir / therapeutic use. Ear, Inner / pathology. Exercise. Methylprednisolone / therapeutic use. Vertigo / drug therapy. Vertigo / physiopathology. Vestibular Neuronitis / drug therapy. Vestibular Neuronitis / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 11710505.001).
  • [ISSN] 0077-8923
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] X4HES1O11F / Acyclovir; X4W7ZR7023 / Methylprednisolone
  • [Number-of-references] 67
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44. Wallace DJ: Advances in drug therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus. BMC Med; 2010 Nov 29;8:77
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

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  • [Title] Advances in drug therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder that afflicts 500,000 people in the United States.
  • There has not been a new SLE drug approved in the United States since 1958.
  • However, a guidance document issued by the Food and Drug Administration in 2005 provided a roadmap for investigators which spawned numerous ongoing clinical trials.
  • This minireview highlights the latest therapies under investigation in SLE and gives an overview of the pathways that are specifically being targeted.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Immunologic Factors / adverse effects. Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Clinical Trials as Topic. Humans. Treatment Outcome. United States

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  • [Cites] Lupus. 2001;10(7):480-3 [11480845.001]
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  • (PMID = 21114845.001).
  • [ISSN] 1741-7015
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 73B0K5S26A / belimumab
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3009611
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45. Tan TY, Lu CH, Chuang HY, Lin TK, Liou CW, Chang WN, Chuang YC: Long-term antiepileptic drug therapy contributes to the acceleration of atherosclerosis. Epilepsia; 2009 Jun;50(6):1579-86
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term antiepileptic drug therapy contributes to the acceleration of atherosclerosis.
  • PURPOSE: Long-term antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy has been associated with an increase in risk of atherosclerosis.
  • At issue is whether this risk is related to the duration of AED therapy.
  • METHODS: One hundred ninety-five patients under long-term AED therapy and 195 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects received measurement of intima media thickness (IMT) at the far wall of the common carotid artery (CCA) by B-mode ultrasonography to assess the extent of atherosclerosis.
  • Multiple linear regression analysis further revealed that duration of AED therapy, age, gender, and TBARS level (index for oxidative stress) were independently associated with CCA IMT.
  • In addition, the log-transformed CCA IMT increased linearly with duration of AED therapy after adjustments for age, gender, and TBARS level.
  • DISCUSSION: The duration of AED therapy is significantly associated with the acceleration of atherosclerosis in patients with epilepsy, alongside independent contributions of age, gender, and oxidative stress to the atherosclerotic process.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticonvulsants / adverse effects. Epilepsy / drug therapy. Intracranial Arteriosclerosis / chemically induced

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  • (PMID = 19292757.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1167
  • [Journal-full-title] Epilepsia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Epilepsia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticonvulsants
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46. Wong M, Tavazzi L: Effect of drug therapy for heart failure on quality of life. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich); 2004 May;6(5):256-61
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Heart Failure.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of drug therapy for heart failure on quality of life.
  • Symptomatic heart failure interferes with a patient's quality of life (QOL) by limiting his or her ability to perform physical tasks and daily activities and by lowering his or her sense of psychological well-being.
  • Therefore, in addition to decreasing mortality and morbidity, improving QOL should be an important goal when selecting pharmacotherapy.
  • QOL questionnaires, both generic and disease specific, are used widely, but in randomized controlled trials of heart failure treatments, QOL has not been a routine study end point.
  • Beta blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, medications widely used in the management of heart failure and hypertension--one of the most common causes of heart failure--have been associated with negative, neutral, and modestly positive QOL effects.
  • Angiotensin receptor blockers, combined with other therapy, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (usually with a diuretic) and/or b blockers in heart failure, have produced improvements in QOL.
  • With current heart failure regimens prolonging life, improving QOL becomes an even more essential end point in assessing the effectiveness of new medications, whether used alone or in combination with standard therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Heart Failure / drug therapy. Quality of Life
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Humans. Surveys and Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 15133408.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-6175
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antihypertensive Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 31
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47. Griffiths RI, Bar-Din M, MacLean CH, Sullivan EM, Herbert RJ, Yelin EH: Medical resource use and costs among rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy. Arthritis Care Res; 2000 Aug;13(4):213-26
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. SULFASALAZINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Medical resource use and costs among rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: To identify costs among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients receiving alternative disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapies.
  • METHODS: Using managed care organization data, we identified members who (a) were prescribed any DMARD therapy for two consecutive months between July 1993 and February 1998, (b) were aged > or = 18 years, (c) had > or = 6 months of DMARD-free enrollment prior to the first DMARD, and (d) had a diagnosis of RA.
  • Mean duration of enrollment following initiation of DMARD therapy (observation period) was 19.5 months; 28.8% of patients switched DMARD regimens.
  • Monthly RA-coded costs varied by DMARD: hydroxychloroquine $227 (n = 252), methotrexate $340 (n = 185); sulfasalazine $233 (n = 49), and other mono/combination therapy $425 (n = 85) (P = 0.001).
  • [MeSH-major] Antirheumatic Agents / therapeutic use. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / economics. Health Resources / economics. Health Resources / utilization
  • [MeSH-minor] Direct Service Costs / statistics & numerical data. Drug Costs. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Health Care Costs / statistics & numerical data. Health Services Research. Humans. Hydroxychloroquine / therapeutic use. Male. Managed Care Programs / economics. Managed Care Programs / utilization. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Midwestern United States. New England. Sulfasalazine / therapeutic use. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14635276.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-7524
  • [Journal-full-title] Arthritis care and research : the official journal of the Arthritis Health Professions Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arthritis Care Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antirheumatic Agents; 3XC8GUZ6CB / Sulfasalazine; 4QWG6N8QKH / Hydroxychloroquine; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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48. Rostom A, Moayyedi P, Hunt R, Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Consensus Group: Canadian consensus guidelines on long-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and the need for gastroprotection: benefits versus risks. Aliment Pharmacol Ther; 2009 Mar 1;29(5):481-96
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Canadian consensus guidelines on long-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and the need for gastroprotection: benefits versus risks.
  • BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used, but are not without risks.
  • AIM: To provide evidence-based management recommendations to help clinicians determine optimal long-term NSAID therapy and the need for gastroprotective strategies based on an assessment of both gastrointestinal (GI) and cardiovascular (CV) risks.
  • RESULTS: An algorithmic approach was developed to help manage patients who require long-term NSAID therapy.
  • When both GI and CV risks are high and NSAID therapy is absolutely necessary, risk should be prioritized.
  • CONCLUSION: More large, long-term trials that examine clinical outcomes of complicated and symptomatic upper and lower GI ulcers are needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / adverse effects. Aspirin / adverse effects. Cardiovascular Diseases / chemically induced. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors / adverse effects. Gastrointestinal Diseases / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Algorithms. Canada. Consensus. Humans. Middle Aged. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Risk Factors. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 19053986.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2036
  • [Journal-full-title] Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; R16CO5Y76E / Aspirin
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49. Grover ND: Echinocandins: A ray of hope in antifungal drug therapy. Indian J Pharmacol; 2010 Feb;42(1):9-11
SciCrunch. DrugBank: Data: Chemical .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Echinocandins: A ray of hope in antifungal drug therapy.
  • Amphotericin B and azole antifungals have been the mainstay of antifungal therapy so far.
  • Echinocandins are a new class of antifungal drugs that act by inhibition of beta (1, 3)-D- glucan synthase, a key enzyme necessary for integrity of the fungal cell wall.Caspofungin was the first drug in this class to be approved.
  • It is indicated for esophageal candidiasis, candidemia, invasive candidiasis, empirical therapy in febrile neutropenia and invasive aspergillosis.
  • Micafungin is presently approved for esophageal candidiasis, for prophylaxis of candida infections in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) and in disseminated candidiasis and candidemia.
  • Even though a better pharmacoeconomical choice than amphotericin B, the higher cost of these drugs in comparison to azole antifungals is likely to limit their use to azole resistant cases of candidial infections and as salvage therapy in invasive aspergillosis rather than as first line drugs.

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  • (PMID = 20606829.001).
  • [ISSN] 1998-3751
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Pharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2885632
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Anidulafungin / candidemia / caspofungin / echinocandins / esophageal candidiasis / invasive aspergillosis / invasive candidiasis / micafungin
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50. Tada H, Mizuta I, Takano T, Tatsumi KI, Izumi Y, Hidaka Y, Amino N: Blocking-type anti-TSH receptor antibodies and relation to responsiveness to antithyroid drug therapy and remission in Graves' disease. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf); 2003 Apr;58(4):403-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. THYROGLOBULIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Blocking-type anti-TSH receptor antibodies and relation to responsiveness to antithyroid drug therapy and remission in Graves' disease.
  • OBJECTIVE: Antithyroid drugs are effective in some patients with Graves' disease but not in others.
  • We examined the relationship between the nature of anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies and responsiveness to drugs in Graves' disease.
  • PATIENTS: Twenty-eight untreated patients with Graves' disease were treated with thiamazole and followed for up to 13 years.
  • These patients with blocking antibodies (Group A) responded well initially to antithyroid drugs and showed earlier normalization of the serum T4 level (3.0 +/- 1.2 weeks) than patients without blocking antibodies (Group B, 10.7 +/- 8.5, P < 0.001).
  • Measurement of blocking antibodies may be useful for selection of treatment options in Graves' disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Antithyroid Agents / therapeutic use. Graves Disease / immunology. Immunoglobulins, Thyroid-Stimulating / blood. Methimazole / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 12641621.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-0664
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical endocrinology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Endocrinol. (Oxf)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antithyroid Agents; 0 / Immunoglobulins, Thyroid-Stimulating; 0 / thyroid stimulation-blocking antibody; 554Z48XN5E / Methimazole; 9010-34-8 / Thyroglobulin; Q51BO43MG4 / Thyroxine
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51. Zaka-Ur-Rehman Z, Jamshaid M, Chaudhry A: Clinical evaluation and monitoring of adverse effects for fixed multidose combination against single drug therapy in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Pak J Pharm Sci; 2008 Apr;21(2):185-94
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. PYRAZINAMIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical evaluation and monitoring of adverse effects for fixed multidose combination against single drug therapy in pulmonary tuberculosis patients.
  • To evaluate the clinical and therapeutic value of 4 and 3 drug fixed dose combinations verses single drug formulations to treat pulmonary tuberculosis patients.
  • Group A and B were given FDCs and group C was given single drug formulations.
  • All patients received 4 drugs in the intensive phase and 3 drugs in the continuation phase.
  • There was no significant difference in the efficacy among the three treatment regimens.
  • [MeSH-major] Antitubercular Agents / therapeutic use. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Monitoring / methods. Drug Therapy, Combination. Educational Status. Employment / statistics & numerical data. Ethambutol / adverse effects. Ethambutol / therapeutic use. Humans. Isoniazid / adverse effects. Isoniazid / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Pakistan. Pyrazinamide / adverse effects. Pyrazinamide / therapeutic use. Rifampin / adverse effects. Rifampin / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 18390450.001).
  • [ISSN] 1011-601X
  • [Journal-full-title] Pakistan journal of pharmaceutical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pak J Pharm Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Pakistan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antitubercular Agents; 2KNI5N06TI / Pyrazinamide; 8G167061QZ / Ethambutol; V83O1VOZ8L / Isoniazid; VJT6J7R4TR / Rifampin
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52. Athamna A, Athamna M, Nura A, Shlyakov E, Bast DJ, Farrell D, Rubinstein E: Is in vitro antibiotic combination more effective than single-drug therapy against anthrax? Antimicrob Agents Chemother; 2005 Apr;49(4):1323-5
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Is in vitro antibiotic combination more effective than single-drug therapy against anthrax?
  • The in vitro activities of antibiotic combinations against two strains of B. anthracis, strain Sterne and the Russian anthrax vaccine strain STi, were tested by the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) method, derived from the MICs of the agents in combination, and by measuring the rate of bacterial killing over time by several antibiotic combinations.
  • The results of the bacterial time-kill study demonstrated indifferent effects for all combinations.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology. Bacillus anthracis / drug effects. Bacillus anthracis / growth & development. Drug Synergism
  • [MeSH-minor] Clindamycin / pharmacology. Drug Antagonism. Microbial Sensitivity Tests / methods. Rifampin / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 15793105.001).
  • [ISSN] 0066-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 3U02EL437C / Clindamycin; VJT6J7R4TR / Rifampin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1068588
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53. Kim JH, Mascola JR, Ratto-Kim S, VanCott TC, Loomis-Price L, Cox JH, Michael NL, Jagodzinski L, Hawkes C, Mayers D, Gilliam BL, Birx DC, Robb ML: Selective increases in HIV-specific neutralizing antibody and partial reconstitution of cellular immune responses during prolonged, successful drug therapy of HIV infection. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses; 2001 Jul 20;17(11):1021-34
HIV InSite. treatment guidelines - Clinical Implications of Immune Reconstitution in AIDS .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Selective increases in HIV-specific neutralizing antibody and partial reconstitution of cellular immune responses during prolonged, successful drug therapy of HIV infection.
  • Because the immune response to HIV depends on viral gene expression, we examined the HIV-specific immune responses in persons whose viral load after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was <400 on at least 3 occasions over a 12-month interval.
  • Compared with CD4-matched, non-HAART controls, there were significant increases in NAb against the subtype B primary isolate US1 (p < 0.0009); no increases were seen against more easily neutralized primary isolate BZ167.
  • New responses developed to HIV Gag p24.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-HIV Agents / therapeutic use. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. HIV Antibodies / biosynthesis. HIV Infections / immunology. Immunity, Cellular

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  • (PMID = 11485619.001).
  • [ISSN] 0889-2229
  • [Journal-full-title] AIDS research and human retroviruses
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI00950; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-59718
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-HIV Agents; 0 / HIV Antibodies; 0 / HIV Core Protein p24; 0 / RNA, Viral
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54. Kawasaki Y, Takano K, Suyama K, Isome M, Suzuki H, Sakuma H, Fujiki T, Suzuki H, Hosoya M: Efficacy of tonsillectomy pulse therapy versus multiple-drug therapy for IgA nephropathy. Pediatr Nephrol; 2006 Nov;21(11):1701-6
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  • [Title] Efficacy of tonsillectomy pulse therapy versus multiple-drug therapy for IgA nephropathy.
  • We evaluated the efficacy of tonsillectomy plus pulse prednisolone, warfarin, and dipyridamole including methylprednisolone pulse (tonsillectomy plus pulse therapy), versus prednisolone, warfarin, and dipyridamole including mizoribine (PWDM) for the treatment diffuse IgA nephropathy (IgAN) in children.
  • The patients were randomly assigned to be treated by tonsillectomy plus pulse therapy for 2 years (Group A, n=16) or PWDM for 2 years (Group B, n=16).
  • The clinical features and pathological findings in both groups were analyzed prospectively.
  • The mean urinary protein excretion after 6 months of treatment in both groups had decreased significantly compared with pre-therapy.
  • The activity index (AI) in both groups was lower at the time of the second biopsy than at the time of the first biopsy.
  • None of the patients in Group A, but six patients in Group B experienced an acute exacerbation of IgAN as a result of tonsillitis (P<0.05).
  • In conclusion, although there was no untreated control group in this study, the results suggested that tonsillectomy plus pulse therapy is as effective as PWDM in ameliorating proteinuria and histological severity in IgAN patients and in preventing acute exacerbation of IgAN by tonsillitis.
  • [MeSH-major] Glomerulonephritis, IGA / drug therapy. Glomerulonephritis, IGA / surgery. Kidney / pathology. Proteinuria / therapy. Tonsillectomy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Biopsy. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Pulse Therapy, Drug

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  • (PMID = 16932894.001).
  • [ISSN] 0931-041X
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, Germany)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Nephrol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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55. Sandrim VC, Yugar-Toledo JC, Desta Z, Flockhart DA, Moreno H Jr, Tanus-Santos JE: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase haplotypes are related to blood pressure elevation, but not to resistance to antihypertensive drug therapy. J Hypertens; 2006 Dec;24(12):2393-7
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  • [Title] Endothelial nitric oxide synthase haplotypes are related to blood pressure elevation, but not to resistance to antihypertensive drug therapy.
  • OBJECTIVES: Most hypertensive patients require two or more drugs to control arterial blood pressure effectively.
  • Although endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) haplotypes have been associated with hypertension, it is unknown whether eNOS genotypes/haplotypes are associated with resistance to antihypertensive therapy.
  • Genotypes were determined for 111 normotensive controls (NT), 116 hypertensive individuals who were well controlled (HT), and 100 hypertensive individuals who were resistant to conventional antihypertensive therapy (RHT).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Whereas our findings suggest a protective effect for the 'C Glu b' haplotype against hypertension and that the 'C Asp b' haplotype increases the susceptibility to hypertension, our results suggest that eNOS haplotypes are not associated with resistance to antihypertensive therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Resistance / genetics. Haplotypes. Hypertension / genetics. Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III / genetics

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  • (PMID = 17082721.001).
  • [ISSN] 0263-6352
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Hypertens.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 1.14.13.39 / Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III
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56. Rogers A, Addington-Hall JM, McCoy AS, Edmonds PM, Abery AJ, Coats AJ, Gibbs JS: A qualitative study of chronic heart failure patients' understanding of their symptoms and drug therapy. Eur J Heart Fail; 2002 Jun;4(3):283-7
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  • [Title] A qualitative study of chronic heart failure patients' understanding of their symptoms and drug therapy.
  • OBJECTIVES: To explore patients' understanding of their symptoms and the treatment of their heart failure.
  • Analysis of the data identified four key areas: patients had little understanding of the purpose of their medications, were concerned about both the quantity and combination of drugs they were prescribed, had difficulties in differentiating between the side effects of drugs and symptoms of heart failure, and had little knowledge to help them interpret and/or treat changing symptoms.
  • CONCLUSION: Providing patients with relevant information about their medications may help to reduce anxiety about the drugs they are taking.
  • Acknowledging the symptoms associated with heart failure and the likely side effects of treatments might improve patients' ability to interpret, treat or relieve symptoms.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiotonic Agents / adverse effects. Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice. Heart Failure / complications. Heart Failure / drug therapy. Patient Education as Topic

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  • (PMID = 12034153.001).
  • [ISSN] 1388-9842
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of heart failure
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Heart Fail.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cardiotonic Agents
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57. Gyárfás T, Knuuttila J, Lindholm P, Rantamäki T, Castrén E: Regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) by anti-parkinsonian drug therapy in vivo. Cell Mol Neurobiol; 2010 Apr;30(3):361-8
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  • [Title] Regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) by anti-parkinsonian drug therapy in vivo.
  • Available treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) is mainly symptomatic instead of halting or reversing degenerative processes affecting the disease.
  • Research on the molecular pathogenesis of PD has suggested reduced trophic support as a possible cause or mediator of neurodegeneration.
  • In animal models of the disease, neurotrophic factors prevent neurodegeneration and induce behavioral recovery.
  • Some anti-Parkinsonian drugs show neuroprotective activity, but it is not known whether the drug-induced neuroprotection is mediated by neurotrophic factors.
  • In this study, we have investigated the influence of two neuroprotective anti-Parkinsonian drugs, the monoamine oxidase B inhibitor selegiline and the adenosine A(2A) antagonist SCH 58261, on the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) in the mouse brain.
  • Protein levels of BDNF and CDNF were quantified by western blot after 2 weeks of treatment with either of the drugs or placebo.
  • Selegiline treatment significantly increased BDNF levels in the anterior cingulate cortex (1.55 +/- 0.22, P < 0.05, Student's t-test).
  • In the striatum, selegiline increased BDNF content by 32%, but this change did not reach statistical significance (1.32 +/- 0.15, P < 0.13, Student's t-test).
  • Our data suggest that neurotrophic factors, particularly BDNF may play a role in the neuroprotective effects of selegiline, but do not support the hypothesis that anti-Parkinsonian drugs would work by increasing the levels of CDNF in brain.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiparkinson Agents / pharmacology. Brain / drug effects. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor / drug effects. Nerve Growth Factors / drug effects. Neuroprotective Agents / pharmacology. Parkinson Disease / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenosine A2 Receptor Antagonists. Animals. Blotting, Western. Corpus Striatum / drug effects. Corpus Striatum / metabolism. Cytoprotection / drug effects. Cytoprotection / physiology. Gyrus Cinguli / drug effects. Gyrus Cinguli / metabolism. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Pyrimidines / pharmacology. Receptor, Adenosine A2A / metabolism. Selegiline / pharmacology. Triazoles / pharmacology. Up-Regulation / drug effects. Up-Regulation / physiology

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  • (PMID = 19777340.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-6830
  • [Journal-full-title] Cellular and molecular neurobiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell. Mol. Neurobiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)pyrazolo(4,3-e)-1,2,4-triazolo(1,5-c)pyrimidine; 0 / Adenosine A2 Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Antiparkinson Agents; 0 / Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor; 0 / Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors; 0 / Nerve Growth Factors; 0 / Neuroprotective Agents; 0 / Pyrimidines; 0 / Receptor, Adenosine A2A; 0 / Triazoles; 0 / cdnf protein, mouse; 2K1V7GP655 / Selegiline
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58. Copeland KF, Chen Z, Fiebig M, Ni L, Savoy S, Smaill FM, Rosenthal KL, Kim JE: Identification of mutations in proviral long terminal repeats of HIV type 1-infected subjects naive to drug therapy. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses; 2004 Sep;20(9):1019-21
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  • [Title] Identification of mutations in proviral long terminal repeats of HIV type 1-infected subjects naive to drug therapy.
  • Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA sequences in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) were examined among 28 drug-naive individuals.
  • Importantly, a novel 16-bp deletion was found in the distal NFAT-1 site.
  • [MeSH-major] HIV Infections / drug therapy. HIV Long Terminal Repeat / genetics. HIV-1 / genetics. Mutation. Proviruses / genetics

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  • (PMID = 15585090.001).
  • [ISSN] 0889-2229
  • [Journal-full-title] AIDS research and human retroviruses
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] GENBANK/ AY353928/ AY353929/ AY353930/ AY353931/ AY353932/ AY353933/ AY353934/ AY353935/ AY353936/ AY353937/ AY353938/ AY353939/ AY353940/ AY353941/ AY353942/ AY353943/ AY353944/ AY353945/ AY353946/ AY353947/ AY353948/ AY353949/ AY353950/ AY353951/ AY353952/ AY353953/ AY353954/ AY353955
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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59. Sanchez-Fructuoso AI, Prats D, Naranjo P, Fernández-Pérez C, González MJ, Mariano A, González J, Figueredo MA, Martin JM, Paniagua V, Fereres J, Gómez de la Concha E, Barrientos A: Influenza virus immunization effectivity in kidney transplant patients subjected to two different triple-drug therapy immunosuppression protocols: mycophenolate versus azathioprine. Transplantation; 2000 Feb 15;69(3):436-9
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  • [Title] Influenza virus immunization effectivity in kidney transplant patients subjected to two different triple-drug therapy immunosuppression protocols: mycophenolate versus azathioprine.
  • BACKGROUND: Due to possible complications and treatment limitations, the prevention of influenza in renal transplant (RT) patients is highly indicated.
  • METHODS: Forty-nine patients with a 1-year functioning RT subjected to two different immunosuppressive regimens and 37 healthy relatives (HR) were administered the anti-influenza vaccine as recommended for 1996 to 1997.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Immunosuppression / adverse effects. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 10706057.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1337
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplantation
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Influenza Vaccines
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60. Zhang RY: [Clinical observation on treatment of cerebral infarction by combined therapy of acupuncture with extremities tissue separating manipulation]. Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi; 2005 Jun;25(6):496-8
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  • [Title] [Clinical observation on treatment of cerebral infarction by combined therapy of acupuncture with extremities tissue separating manipulation].
  • OBJECTIVE: To observe the curative effect of combined treatment of extremities tissue separating manipulation (ETSM) and acupuncture on cerebral infarction (CI).
  • Group A was treated with drug-therapy only, Group B was treated with drug-therapy plus acupuncture and Group C was treated with drug-therapy plus ETSM and acupuncture.
  • RESULTS: The cured-markedly effective rate, total effective rate and nerve function deficit score after treatment was 28.6% , 71.4% and 17.57 +/- 1.51 scores in Group A, 48.4%, 80.6% and 13.97 +/- 1.38 scores in Group B, and 81.3%, 93.7% and 11.00 +/- 1.51 scores in Group C, respectively.
  • Significant difference was shown in comparison of Group A with Group B, also in comparison of Group C with Group A and B (All P <0.05).
  • CONCLUSION: ETSM combined acupuncture has a good therapeutic effect on CI.

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  • (PMID = 16025960.001).
  • [ISSN] 1003-5370
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo Zhong xi yi jie he za zhi Zhongguo Zhongxiyi jiehe zazhi = Chinese journal of integrated traditional and Western medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi
  • [Language] CHI
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal
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61. Arribas JR, Pulido F, Delgado R, Lorenzo A, Miralles P, Arranz A, González-García JJ, Cepeda C, Hervás R, Paño JR, Gaya F, Carcas A, Montes ML, Costa JR, Peña JM: Lopinavir/ritonavir as single-drug therapy for maintenance of HIV-1 viral suppression: 48-week results of a randomized, controlled, open-label, proof-of-concept pilot clinical trial (OK Study). J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr; 2005 Nov 1;40(3):280-7
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  • [Title] Lopinavir/ritonavir as single-drug therapy for maintenance of HIV-1 viral suppression: 48-week results of a randomized, controlled, open-label, proof-of-concept pilot clinical trial (OK Study).
  • DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, open-label, multicenter, pilot clinical trial.
  • At baseline there were no significant differences between groups in median CD4 cells/muL (baseline or nadir), pre-HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) HIV log10 viremia, or time with HIV RNA <50 copies/mL prior to enrollment.
  • After 48 weeks of follow-up, percentage of patients remaining at <50 HIV RNA copies/mL (intention to treat, M = F) was 81% for the monotherapy group (95% CI: 64% to 98%) vs. 95% for the triple-therapy group (95% CI: 86% to 100%); P = 0.34.
  • [MeSH-major] HIV Infections / drug therapy. HIV-1. Pyrimidinones / therapeutic use. Ritonavir / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 16249701.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-4135
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Pyrimidinones; 0 / RNA, Viral; 2494G1JF75 / Lopinavir; O3J8G9O825 / Ritonavir
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62. Brenner B, Hoffman R, Balashov D, Shutluko E, Culić SD, Nizamoutdinova E: Control of bleeding caused by thrombocytopenia associated with hematologic malignancy: an audit of the clinical use of recombinant activated factor VII. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost; 2005 Oct;11(4):401-10
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  • [Title] Control of bleeding caused by thrombocytopenia associated with hematologic malignancy: an audit of the clinical use of recombinant activated factor VII.
  • Patients with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, B-cell or T-cell lymphoma, or aplastic anemia received rFVIIa at total doses of between 18 and 1040 mug/kg body weight.
  • This warrants further investigation in rigorously controlled clinical trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Factor VIIa / therapeutic use. Hemorrhage / drug therapy. Hemorrhage / etiology. Leukemia / complications. Lymphoma / complications. Thrombocytopenia / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Anticoagulants / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Internet. Male. Medical Audit. Middle Aged. Prothrombin / metabolism. Thromboplastin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16244765.001).
  • [ISSN] 1076-0296
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical and applied thrombosis/hemostasis : official journal of the International Academy of Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Appl. Thromb. Hemost.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticoagulants; 9001-26-7 / Prothrombin; 9035-58-9 / Thromboplastin; EC 3.4.21.21 / Factor VIIa
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63. Roomi MW, Bhanap BA, Roomi NW, Rath M, Niedzwiecki A: Antineoplastic effects of nutrient mixture on raji and jurkat t cells: the two highly aggressive non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. Exp Oncol; 2009 Sep;31(3):149-55
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. L-Lysine .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Antineoplastic effects of nutrient mixture on raji and jurkat t cells: the two highly aggressive non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines.
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphomas incidence has increased more than 70% in last 25 years.
  • Aggressiveness, higher relapse rate, and treatment complications pose significant barriers.
  • Decreased food intake and side effects of treatments make cancer patients vulnerable to deficiency of essential nutrients such as vitamin C, lysine, and proline leading to the formation of weak extra cellular matrix susceptible to easy breakdown by matrix metalloproteinase enzymes.
  • AIM: In this study, we investigated the effects of a specific nutrient mixture, containing ascorbic acid, lysine, proline, green tea extract among others, in most aggressive forms of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma - Burkitt's lymphoma, and T-cell lymphoma - using Raji and Jurkat cells respectively.
  • METHODS: Nutrient mixture (NM) doses of 0, 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000 microg/ml, were used to study effects on cell proliferation, expression of matrix metalloproteinase, Matrigel invasion and apoptosis.
  • The nutrient mixture was non-toxic to Jurkat cells, however exhibited anti-proliferative properties at higher concentrations.
  • CONCLUSION: Considering the lack of treatment options and continually increasing incidence, NM could be further explored for its therapeutic potential in Burkitt's lymphoma and T-cell lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Burkitt Lymphoma / drug therapy. Lymphoma, T-Cell / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis / drug effects. Ascorbic Acid / pharmacology. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Collagen / metabolism. Drug Combinations. Humans. Laminin / metabolism. Lysine / pharmacology. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 / metabolism. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Proline / pharmacology. Proteoglycans / metabolism. Tea / chemistry. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 19783966.001).
  • [ISSN] 1812-9269
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ukraine
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Laminin; 0 / Proteoglycans; 0 / Tea; 119978-18-6 / matrigel; 9007-34-5 / Collagen; 9DLQ4CIU6V / Proline; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9; K3Z4F929H6 / Lysine; PQ6CK8PD0R / Ascorbic Acid
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64. Pianetti Filho G, Pedroso ER, Giannetti AV, Darwich R: [Cerebral Aspergillus abscess in immunocompetent patient]. Arq Neuropsiquiatr; 2005 Dec;63(4):1094-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUCONAZOLE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Five months later, she developed multiple Aspergillus cerebral abscess.
  • Two craniotomies and amphotericin B became necessary during treatment.
  • Treatment of brain aspergillosis abscess implied the combination of both surgical and drug therapy with amphotericin B.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Abscess / microbiology. Immunocompetence. Neuroaspergillosis / diagnosis. Postoperative Complications / microbiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Amphotericin B / therapeutic use. Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Aspergillus / isolation & purification. Female. Fluconazole / therapeutic use. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Intracranial Aneurysm / surgery. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16400435.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-282X
  • [Journal-full-title] Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arq Neuropsiquiatr
  • [Language] por
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 7XU7A7DROE / Amphotericin B; 8VZV102JFY / Fluconazole
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65. Kim YR, Park Q, Yu BH: Changes in lymphocyte subsets after short-term pharmacotherapy in patients with panic disorder. Psychiatry Res; 2004 Sep 30;128(2):183-90
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Changes in lymphocyte subsets after short-term pharmacotherapy in patients with panic disorder.
  • Panic disorder is associated with a high frequency of comorbid immunological diseases, such as allergies and asthma, although the psychoneuroimmunology of panic disorder is relatively unexplored.
  • The objective of this study was to determine whether panic patients have different immunological findings compared with normal healthy subjects and whether changes in immune function are associated with short-term pharmacotherapy.
  • We also examined whether immunological variables were associated with clinical severity and serum catecholamine levels.
  • Patients with panic disorder (n=26) and healthy control subjects (n=26) were recruited for this study.
  • After drug therapy, however, percentages of circulating CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes were significantly increased, while the percentage of CD19+ B lymphocytes was significantly decreased in the patients.
  • The difference in the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes before and after treatment was negatively correlated with pretreatment Global Clinical Impression scores.
  • In conclusion, panic patients showed increased CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte proportions and a decreased B lymphocyte proportion after 3 months of drug therapy.
  • This finding suggests that pharmacological treatment may affect immune function in panic patients.
  • [MeSH-major] B-Lymphocyte Subsets / drug effects. Panic Disorder / drug therapy. Paroxetine / therapeutic use. Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors / therapeutic use. T-Lymphocyte Subsets / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Drug Administration Schedule. Epinephrine / blood. Female. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Lymphocyte Count. Male. Norepinephrine / blood. Personality Inventory. Reference Values

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  • (PMID = 15488961.001).
  • [ISSN] 0165-1781
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychiatry research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychiatry Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors; 41VRH5220H / Paroxetine; X4W3ENH1CV / Norepinephrine; YKH834O4BH / Epinephrine
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66. Kurashige N, Ohkawa K, Hiramatsu N, Oze T, Yakushijin T, Mochizuki K, Hosui A, Miyagi T, Ishida H, Tatsumi T, Kanto T, Takehara T, Hayashi N: Two types of drug-resistant hepatitis B viral strains emerging alternately and their susceptibility to combination therapy with entecavir and adefovir. Antivir Ther; 2009;14(6):873-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. GUANINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Two types of drug-resistant hepatitis B viral strains emerging alternately and their susceptibility to combination therapy with entecavir and adefovir.
  • The most serious problem of nucleoside/nucleotide analogue therapy for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the emergence of drug-resistant mutant virus.
  • Here, we describe a patient with chronic hepatitis B infection with a complex drug-resistant mutant virus during sequential therapy with lamivudine (3TC), entecavir (ETV) and adefovir dipivoxil (ADV).
  • The patient was a 52-year-old male with positive hepatitis B e antigen and high HBV DNA (>7.6 log(10) copies/ml).
  • At that time, rtA181T was undetectable and the virus with rtM204V and rtL180M became predominant.
  • Efficacy of subsequent combination therapy with ADV and 3TC was limited because of reappearance of the virus with rtA181T, which might confer cross-resistance to 3TC and ADV.
  • Final combination therapy with ETV and ADV reduced HBV DNA to 3.7 log(10) copies/ml for 5 months, which was the most effective therapy for this patient.
  • Combination therapy with ETV and ADV might have been effective because these drugs share therapeutic roles, that is, ETV affects the rtA181T-related virus and ADV affects the rtM204V-related virus.
  • This is the first report suggesting clinical significance of combination therapy with ETV and ADV for controlling replication of the complex drug-resistant mutant HBV.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenine / analogs & derivatives. Guanine / analogs & derivatives. Hepatitis B / drug therapy. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Organophosphonates / administration & dosage. Organophosphonates / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antiviral Agents / administration & dosage. Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 19812452.001).
  • [ISSN] 1359-6535
  • [Journal-full-title] Antiviral therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antivir. Ther. (Lond.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Organophosphonates; 5968Y6H45M / entecavir; 5Z93L87A1R / Guanine; 6GQP90I798 / adefovir; JAC85A2161 / Adenine
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67. Yim HJ, Hussain M, Liu Y, Wong SN, Fung SK, Lok AS: Evolution of multi-drug resistant hepatitis B virus during sequential therapy. Hepatology; 2006 Sep;44(3):703-12
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evolution of multi-drug resistant hepatitis B virus during sequential therapy.
  • Multi-drug resistant hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been reported in hepatitis B patients who received sequential antiviral therapy.
  • In vitro studies showed that HBV constructs with mutations resistant to lamivudine and adefovir have marked reduction in sensitivity to combination of lamivudine and adefovir, whereas constructs with mutations resistant to either drug remain sensitive to the other drug.
  • Sera from six patients who had been found to have multi-drug resistant HBV mutations to lamivudine+adefovir, lamivudine+hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG), or lamivudine+entecavir on direct sequencing were cloned after nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
  • Analysis of 215 clones from 11 samples with multi-drug resistant mutations on direct sequencing showed that 183 (85%) clones had mutations to both therapies on the same genome; 31 clones had lamivudine-resistant mutants only.
  • Clonal analysis of serial samples from three patients showed progressive evolution from all clones with lamivudine-resistant HBV mutations only to mixtures of clones that have multi-drug resistant mutations and clones that have lamivudine-resistant HBV mutations only, and ultimately all clones having multi-drug resistant HBV mutations.
  • In conclusion, mutations conferring resistance to multiple antiviral agents co-locate on the same viral genome, suggesting that combination therapy directed against mutants resistant to each treatment may not be adequate in suppressing multi-drug resistant HBV.
  • De novo combination therapy may prevent the emergence of multi-drug resistant mutants.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. DNA, Viral / genetics. Drug Resistance, Multiple, Viral / genetics. Hepatitis B / drug therapy. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Hepatitis B virus / physiology. Mutation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. In Vitro Techniques. Male. Middle Aged. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Prognosis. Virus Replication / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 16941700.001).
  • [ISSN] 0270-9139
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01-DK57577
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral
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68. Chang ML, Chien RN, Yeh CT, Liaw YF: Virus and transaminase levels determine the emergence of drug resistance during long-term lamivudine therapy in chronic hepatitis B. J Hepatol; 2005 Jul;43(1):72-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LAMIVUDINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Virus and transaminase levels determine the emergence of drug resistance during long-term lamivudine therapy in chronic hepatitis B.
  • The aim was to evaluate the impact of viral factors, host factors, host-viral interaction and drug factor on the emergence of rtM204 I/V.
  • METHODS: 56 non-cirrhotic and 58 cirrhotic patients received lamivudine therapy for a median of 34 (12-60) months.
  • Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that baseline hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) status [odds ratio (OR), 7.728; 95% confidental interval (CI), 2.886-12.957; P=0.0026], HBV-DNA level (OR, 3.756; 95% CI, 1.058-5.089; P=0.0202), alanine transaminase (ALT) level (OR, 6.285; 95% CI, 1.057-11.990; P=0.00246) and treatment duration (OR, 19.88; 95% CI, 8.652-31.762; P<0.0004) were independent determinants for the emergence of rtM204 I/V.
  • CONCLUSIONS: HBeAg status, HBV-DNA, ALT levels and treatment duration are the major determinants for the YMDD mutation during lamivudine therapy, and should be considered in designing the therapeutic strategy.
  • [MeSH-major] Alanine Transaminase / blood. Drug Resistance, Viral. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Hepatitis B, Chronic / drug therapy. Lamivudine / administration & dosage. Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Viral Load
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Amino Acid Motifs / genetics. DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase / genetics. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Hepatitis B e Antigens / blood. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mutation

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  • (PMID = 15896869.001).
  • [ISSN] 0168-8278
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Hepatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hepatitis B e Antigens; 0 / Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors; 2T8Q726O95 / Lamivudine; EC 2.6.1.2 / Alanine Transaminase; EC 2.7.7.7 / DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
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69. Matl I, Lácha J, Lodererová A, Símová M, Teplan V, Lánská V, Vítko S: [Withdrawal of prednisone from a triple combination of immunosuppressive agents after kidney transplantation]. Cas Lek Cesk; 2000 Mar 1;139(4):115-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Triple-drug immunosuppression may not be necessary in a majority of stabilized patients over 1 year after kidney transplantation.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: 88 patients 1 year after the first renal transplantation with stable graft function and serum creatinine < 160 mumol/l treated with cyclosporine-A, azathioprine and prednisone were randomized into group A (n = 46) with a prednisone withdrawal and group B (n = 42) on triple-drug therapy without change.
  • At the time of randomization, fine-needle biopsy was carried out in all of the patients.
  • In the group B, patients on triple-drug therapy were followed for the corresponding period of time.
  • [MeSH-minor] Azathioprine / administration & dosage. Cyclosporine / administration & dosage. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Graft Rejection / diagnosis. Graft Rejection / prevention & control. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 10838741.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-7335
  • [Journal-full-title] Casopís lékar̆ů c̆eských
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cas. Lek. Cesk.
  • [Language] cze
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] CZECH REPUBLIC
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glucocorticoids; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; MRK240IY2L / Azathioprine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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70. Zoulim F: Antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis B: can we clear the virus and prevent drug resistance? Antivir Chem Chemother; 2004 Nov;15(6):299-305

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis B: can we clear the virus and prevent drug resistance?
  • Antiviral therapy of chronic HBV infection remains a clinical challenge.
  • The latter is the source of renewed viral replication in case of immune depression or after antiviral drug withdrawal.
  • The mechanisms of clearance of infected cells involve CD8+ cell-mediated cytolytic and non-cytolytic pathways.
  • Antiviral therapy, using nucleoside analogues that inhibit the viral polymerase, induces a slow depletion of intrahepatic cccDNA.
  • The persistence of low-grade viral replication under antiviral therapy may then lead to the selection of drug-resistant mutants.
  • New assays have been developed to study the functional consequences of these polymerase mutations in terms of replication capacity and drug susceptibility.
  • Together with the development of new HBV polymerase inhibitors and novel immunostimulatory approaches, this should lead to the design and evaluation of rational treatment combinations for a better control of viral replication and prevention of drug resistance.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Drug Resistance, Viral / drug effects. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Hepatitis B, Chronic / drug therapy. Virus Replication / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / cytology. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / metabolism. DNA, Circular / genetics. DNA, Circular / metabolism. Drug Therapy, Combination. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Killer Cells, Natural / metabolism. Mutation

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  • (PMID = 15646643.001).
  • [ISSN] 0956-3202
  • [Journal-full-title] Antiviral chemistry & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antivir. Chem. Chemother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / DNA, Circular; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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71. Ma L, Sun J, Xing H, Si X, Yuan L, Guo Y, Cheng H, Shao Y: Genotype and phenotype patterns of drug-resistant HIV-1 subtype B' (Thai B) isolated from patients failing antiretroviral therapy in China. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr; 2007 Jan 1;44(1):14-9
HIV InSite. treatment guidelines - Resistance Testing .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Genotype and phenotype patterns of drug-resistant HIV-1 subtype B' (Thai B) isolated from patients failing antiretroviral therapy in China.
  • Many AIDS patients in China who received free-of-charge antiretroviral therapeutics, including nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), showed significant life improvement.
  • Increasing numbers of patients, however, are experiencing antiretroviral therapy failure due to the emergence of drug-resistant viruses.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the genotypic and phenotypic drug resistance patterns of HIV-1 subtype B' variants, which are prevalent in China, in order to rationally design more efficient anti-HIV-1 regimens for future treatment of AIDS patients.
  • 13 out of 16 patients (81%) who were treated with two NRTIs (ddI, and d4T or AZT) and one NNRTI (NVP) exhibited high resistance to NVP, 8 of them with a >1,000 IC50 fold increase.
  • Because NVP and AZT can induce high resistances in these patients, these two drugs should be replaced with others more effective NNRTIs and NRTIs.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-HIV Agents / pharmacology. Drug Resistance, Viral / genetics. HIV Infections / virology. HIV-1 / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. China. Genotype. Phenotype

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  • (PMID = 17019361.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-4135
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-HIV Agents
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72. Fournier C, Zoulim F: Antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis B: prevention of drug resistance. Clin Liver Dis; 2007 Nov;11(4):869-92, ix
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Hepatitis.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis B: prevention of drug resistance.
  • The emergence of viral resistance during treatment is becoming an important clinical issue for hepatitis B virus (HBV) antiviral therapy.
  • Considerable progress has been achieved in the efficacy of treatment, with the development of new drugs that allow a sustained suppression of HBV replication, or at least maintain the viral load below a clinically relevant threshold.
  • Although most drugs currently registered for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B are effective in suppressing viral load, long-term therapy is required to avoid viral reactivation and progression of liver disease.
  • Because of the variability of the HBV genome, such long-term treatments are associated with the emergence of resistant viral strains, which may compromise the initial clinical benefit of the treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Hepatitis B virus / physiology. Hepatitis B, Chronic / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Resistance, Viral. Humans. RNA, Viral / blood. Virus Replication

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  • (PMID = 17981233.001).
  • [ISSN] 1089-3261
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinics in liver disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Liver Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / RNA, Viral
  • [Number-of-references] 92
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73. Rhee SY, Fessel WJ, Zolopa AR, Hurley L, Liu T, Taylor J, Nguyen DP, Slome S, Klein D, Horberg M, Flamm J, Follansbee S, Schapiro JM, Shafer RW: HIV-1 Protease and reverse-transcriptase mutations: correlations with antiretroviral therapy in subtype B isolates and implications for drug-resistance surveillance. J Infect Dis; 2005 Aug 1;192(3):456-65
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] HIV-1 Protease and reverse-transcriptase mutations: correlations with antiretroviral therapy in subtype B isolates and implications for drug-resistance surveillance.
  • Background. It is important, for drug-resistance surveillance, to identify human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains that have undergone antiretroviral drug selection.Methods.
  • We compared the prevalence of protease and reverse-transcriptase (RT) mutations in HIV-1 sequences from persons with and without previous treatment with protease inhibitors (PIs), nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs), and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs).
  • Treatment-associated mutations in protease isolates from 5867 persons and RT isolates from 6247 persons were categorized by whether they were polymorphic (prevalence, >0.5%) in untreated individuals and whether they were established drug-resistance mutations.
  • Some 36 established and 24 additional nonpolymorphic protease mutations at 34 positions were related to PI treatment, 21 established and 22 additional nonpolymorphic RT mutations at 24 positions with NRTI treatment, and 15 established and 11 additional nonpolymorphic RT mutations at 15 positions with NNRTI treatment.
  • Established drug-resistance mutations encompass only a subset of treatment-associated mutations; some of these are polymorphic in untreated persons.
  • In contrast, nonpolymorphic treatment-associated mutations may be more sensitive and specific markers of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance.

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  • (PMID = 15995959.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-1899
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of infectious diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Infect. Dis.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI046148-08; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI068581-03; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI068581; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI046148; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI046148-08; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI068581-03; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI46148-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-HIV Agents; 0 / HIV Protease Inhibitors; 0 / Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors; EC 3.4.23.- / HIV Protease
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS65108; NLM/ PMC2597526
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74. Gubbins PO, Penzak SR, Polston S, McConnell SA, Anaissie E: Characterizing and predicting amphotericin B-associated nephrotoxicity in bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant recipients. Pharmacotherapy; 2002 Aug;22(8):961-71
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. AMPHOTERICIN B .

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  • [Title] Characterizing and predicting amphotericin B-associated nephrotoxicity in bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant recipients.
  • PATIENTS: A homogeneous population of 69 recipients of a bone marrow (BMT) or peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) with multiple myeloma and who received at least two doses of amphotericin B deoxycholate from January 1, 1992-January 1, 1995.
  • INTERVENTION: Data on demographics, prior and concomitant nephrotoxic drug therapy, daily laboratory values, and amphotericin B dosing were collected serially from medical and pharmacy records.
  • MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Forward stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed on the data from the first day of therapy to characterize and determine variables related to amphotericin B-associated nephrotoxicity.
  • Nephrotoxicity occurred in 30 patients (43%) and developed rapidly Patients who developed nephrotoxicity were similar to those who did not in many aspects associated with their treatment.
  • However, baseline estimated creatinine clearance, cyclosporine therapy, nephrotoxic drug therapy within 30 days of starting amphotericin B, and the number of concomitant nephrotoxic drugs were significant predictors of amphotericin B-associated nephrotoxicity.
  • CONCLUSION: Recipients of a BMT or PBSCT who have multiple myeloma and are receiving cyclosporine or multiple nephrotoxic drugs at the start of amphotericin B therapy should be considered at high risk for developing amphotericin B-associated nephrotoxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Amphotericin B / adverse effects. Antifungal Agents / adverse effects. Bone Marrow Transplantation. Kidney Diseases / chemically induced. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Creatinine / blood. Female. Hospitals, University. Humans. Length of Stay. Male. Middle Aged. Multiple Myeloma / complications. Multiple Myeloma / therapy. Mycoses / complications. Mycoses / prevention & control. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 12173799.001).
  • [ISSN] 0277-0008
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharmacotherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 7XU7A7DROE / Amphotericin B; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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75. Adler-Moore JP, Proffitt RT: Amphotericin B lipid preparations: what are the differences? Clin Microbiol Infect; 2008 May;14 Suppl 4:25-36
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  • To reduce the in-vivo toxicity of the broad-spectrum antifungal drug amphotericin B, various lipid formulations of amphotericin B, ranging from lipid complexes to small unilamellar liposomes, have been developed and subsequently commercialized.
  • These structurally diverse formulations differ in their serum pharmacokinetics as well as their tissue localisation, tissue retention and toxicity.
  • These differences can affect the choice of formulation for a given infection, the time of initiation of treatment, and the dosing regimen.
  • Although preclinical studies have shown similarities in the in-vitro and in-vivo antifungal activity of the formulations with comparable dosing, their acute and chronic toxicity profiles are not the same, and this has a significant impact on their therapeutic indices, especially in high-risk, immunosuppressed patients.
  • With the recent introduction of new antifungal drugs to treat the increasing numbers of infected patients, the amphotericin B lipid formulations are now being studied to evaluate their potential in combination drug regimens.
  • With proven efficacy demonstrated during the past decade, it is expected that amphotericin B lipid formulations will remain an important part of antifungal drug therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Amphotericin B / administration & dosage. Antifungal Agents / administration & dosage. Mycoses / drug therapy. Phosphatidylcholines / administration & dosage. Phosphatidylglycerols / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Drug Combinations. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans

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  • (PMID = 18430127.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-0691
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical microbiology and infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Microbiol. Infect.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Phosphatidylcholines; 0 / Phosphatidylglycerols; 0 / liposomal amphotericin B; 7XU7A7DROE / Amphotericin B
  • [Number-of-references] 95
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76. Akouamba BS, Viel J, Charest H, Merindol N, Samson J, Lapointe N, Brenner BG, Lalonde R, Harrigan PR, Boucher M, Soudeyns H: HIV-1 genetic diversity in antenatal cohort, Canada. Emerg Infect Dis; 2005 Aug;11(8):1230-4
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  • Forty-three of 44 women infected with non-clade B viruses were newcomers from sub-Saharan Africa, and subtype identity was consistent with those circulating in their countries of origin.
  • These results highlight the epidemiologic importance of non-B HIV-1 in antenatal populations in a large North American urban center, underscore the influence of population movements on clade intermixing, and identify a group of patients who could be targeted for surveillance and drug therapy followup.

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  • (PMID = 16102312.001).
  • [ISSN] 1080-6040
  • [Journal-full-title] Emerging infectious diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Emerging Infect. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Gene Products, pol; 0 / HIV pol protein p65; 0 / RNA, Viral; 0 / pol Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3320510
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77. Frascà GM, Soverini ML, Falaschini A, Tampieri E, Vangelista A, Stefoni S: Plasma exchange treatment improves prognosis of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis: a case-control study in 26 patients from a single center. Ther Apher Dial; 2003 Dec;7(6):540-6
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Plasma exchange treatment improves prognosis of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis: a case-control study in 26 patients from a single center.
  • Twenty-six patients with Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) were divided into two groups according to the acute phase treatment: drug therapy consisting of steroids and oral cyclophosphamide plus a plasma exchange (PE) course (group A, 13 patients) or drug therapy alone (group B, 13 patients).
  • Group A patients had a more severe clinical picture and higher serum creatinine than group B (12.7 +/- 6.9 vs. 8.5 +/- 5.3 mg%); nine patients from group A (69%) and five from group B (38%) required dialysis.
  • At follow up (mean 35 months) all patients treated with PE were alive: four of them were in end-stage renal disease.
  • Among group B patients, three (23%) died in the acute phase; 6 (46%) needed renal replacement therapy at follow up.
  • Of the dialysis-dependent patients, five out of nine from group A were free of dialysis, while in group B two out of five patients had died, two had entered a regular dialysis treatment and one had received a cadaver graft.
  • These data suggest that PE may significantly improve the prognosis of patients with ANCA-associated crescentic GN even if they are not dialysis-dependent at the time of diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic / immunology. Glomerulonephritis, Membranoproliferative / therapy. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis / therapy. Plasma Exchange / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Case-Control Studies. Chi-Square Distribution. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Kidney Function Tests. Male. Middle Aged. Probability. Risk Assessment. Severity of Illness Index. Sex Factors. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15018241.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-9979
  • [Journal-full-title] Therapeutic apheresis and dialysis : official peer-reviewed journal of the International Society for Apheresis, the Japanese Society for Apheresis, the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ther Apher Dial
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic
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78. Corrales JJ, López A, Ciudad J, Orfao A: The distribution of the major peripheral blood T, B and NK cell subsets does not predict the clinical outcome of Graves' disease patients after methimazole therapy. J Biol Regul Homeost Agents; 2000 Jul-Sep;14(3):193-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHIMAZOLE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The distribution of the major peripheral blood T, B and NK cell subsets does not predict the clinical outcome of Graves' disease patients after methimazole therapy.
  • Biological markers capable of predicting the clinical outcome of antithyroid drug therapy could be clinically useful in selecting the modality of treatment for Graves' disease, but at present they are unavailable.
  • In the present study we prospectively explore the value of 22 different peripheral blood T, B and NK lymphocyte subsets to predict remission and relapse in a group of 42 Graves' disease patients.
  • Eighteen patients were studied at diagnosis, before treatment, and 24 during antithyroid drug therapy.
  • All cases were followed-up for at least one year after finishing an 18 month cycle of methimazole therapy.
  • The combination of flow cytometry and 3- color immunofluorescence did not reveal significant differences in the distribution of the major peripheral blood T, B and NK cell subsets between the relapsed patients and those in remission, both in the groups studied at diagnosis and in those analyzed during the cycle of antithyroid drug therapy.
  • In our search for a prognostic marker for relapse prediction we found that some lymphoid subpopulations such as total B cells, total NK and NK CD8+ cells showed high sensitivity (88-100%).
  • [MeSH-major] Antithyroid Agents / therapeutic use. Graves Disease / blood. Graves Disease / drug therapy. Lymphocyte Subsets / drug effects. Methimazole / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. B-Lymphocytes / drug effects. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Killer Cells, Natural / drug effects. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Prospective Studies. T-Lymphocytes / drug effects. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11037052.001).
  • [ISSN] 0393-974X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of biological regulators and homeostatic agents
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biol. Regul. Homeost. Agents
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ITALY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antithyroid Agents; 554Z48XN5E / Methimazole
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79. Höfle G, Holzmüller H, Gouya G, Hergan K, Hubmann M, Langer P, Drexel H: Lower serum beta-CrossLaps in male cardiac transplant recipients treated without prednisolone. Transpl Int; 2003 Jul;16(7):523-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOSPORIN A .

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  • Post-transplantation bone disease is a frequent problem after successful cardiac transplantation.
  • Nine patients (group A) had received immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporin A and mycophenolate mofetil (steroid-free treatment), and 12 patients (group B) remained on triple-drug therapy, which included glucocorticosteroids.
  • beta-CrossLaps were significantly lower in sera of cardiac transplant recipients on double immunosuppressive (i.e., glucocorticosteroid-free) regimen than in sera of patients on triple-drug therapy (428.3+/-109.4 vs 661.7+/-337.0 pg/ml, P<0.05).
  • Lower serum beta-CrossLaps levels in patients undergoing glucocorticosteroid-free treatment may indicate a lower risk of bone deterioration in the long term.
  • [MeSH-major] Collagen / blood. Heart Transplantation / adverse effects. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Mycophenolic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Peptide Fragments / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone Density / drug effects. Bone Diseases, Metabolic / etiology. Cross-Sectional Studies. Cyclosporine / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Osteoporosis / etiology. Prednisolone / therapeutic use. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 12677365.001).
  • [ISSN] 0934-0874
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplant international : official journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transpl. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / glutamyl-lysyl-alanyl-histidyl-aspartyl-glycyl-glycyl-arginine; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; 9007-34-5 / Collagen; 9242ECW6R0 / mycophenolate mofetil; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; HU9DX48N0T / Mycophenolic Acid
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80. Yang MP, Hou YQ, Feng JH: Clinical analysis of 51 cases of aortic dissection. Di Yi Jun Yi Da Xue Xue Bao; 2003 Jul;23(7):748-9
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  • [Title] Clinical analysis of 51 cases of aortic dissection.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of different treatments on the prognosis of aortic dissection.
  • METHOD: Different treatment modalities including drug therapy, surgical resection and stent implantation were performed in 37, 9, and 5 cases of aortic dissection (AD) respectively, and the clinical outcome of the patients was observed during the follow-up study.
  • RESULTS: The survival rate in drug therapy group was 70.3% (26) while death occurred in 11 cases (29.7%).
  • CONCLUSION: Surgical resection is superior to drug therapy in the treatment of type A AD cases, while stent implantation should be the first choice for type B AD cases for causing less complications and injuries and resulting in high cure rate.
  • [MeSH-major] Aneurysm, Dissecting / therapy. Aortic Aneurysm / therapy

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  • (PMID = 12865241.001).
  • [ISSN] 1000-2588
  • [Journal-full-title] Di 1 jun yi da xue xue bao = Academic journal of the first medical college of PLA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Di Yi Jun Yi Da Xue Xue Bao
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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81. Perez Diaz CE: [Use of antifungal combination therapy]. Drugs Today (Barc); 2010 Apr;46 Suppl C:47-50
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  • [Title] [Use of antifungal combination therapy].
  • [Transliterated title] Uso de la terapia antifungica combinada.
  • The growing use of antifungal agents in patients with febrile neutropenia points at combination therapy as a strategy to face the increasing incidence of fungal infections in this population.
  • Likewise, the low efficacy of single-drug therapies calls for research on this approach.
  • Combination therapies should focus on extending their activity to a wider range of microorganisms, considering the mechanisms of action of major known antifungal agents, and also on enhancing the individual effect of each drug alone.
  • In vitro and in vivo findings suggest that combination therapy may be better than single-drug therapy with amphotericin B for the treatment of emergent pathogens in immunosuppressed patients.
  • In order to implement combination treatments, knowledge of the sensitivity profile of most prevalent species is required.
  • [MeSH-major] Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Fever / complications. Mycoses / prevention & control. Neutropenia / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Amphotericin B / therapeutic use. Drug Combinations. Drug Interactions. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans

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  • (PMID = 20490382.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-3993
  • [Journal-full-title] Drugs of today (Barcelona, Spain : 1998)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drugs Today
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 0 / Drug Combinations; 7XU7A7DROE / Amphotericin B
  • [Number-of-references] 12
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82. Suzuki H, Saitoh H, Suzuki T, Takaku H: Baculovirus-mediated bispecific short-hairpin small-interfering RNAs have remarkable ability to cope with both influenza viruses A and B. Oligonucleotides; 2009 Dec;19(4):307-16

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Baculovirus-mediated bispecific short-hairpin small-interfering RNAs have remarkable ability to cope with both influenza viruses A and B.
  • Influenza viruses A and B cause widespread infections of the human respiratory tract; however, existing vaccines and drug therapy are of limited value for their treatment.
  • Here, we show that bispecific short-hairpin small-interfering RNA constructs containing an 8-nucleotide intervening spacer, targeted against influenza virus A or influenza virus B, can inhibit the production of both types of virus in infected cell lines.
  • Furthermore, the Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus can infect a range of mammalian cells, facilitating its use as a baculovirus vector for gene delivery into cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Influenza A virus / genetics. Influenza B virus / genetics. Nucleopolyhedrovirus / genetics. RNA, Small Interfering / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Base Sequence. Cell Line. Dogs. Genes, Viral. Genetic Engineering. Genetic Therapy / methods. Genetic Vectors. Humans. Molecular Sequence Data. Nucleic Acid Conformation. Plasmids / genetics. RNA, Viral / genetics. RNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Viral Core Proteins / genetics. Virus Replication / genetics

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  • (PMID = 19899951.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-8526
  • [Journal-full-title] Oligonucleotides
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oligonucleotides
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / NP protein, Influenza A virus; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 0 / RNA, Viral; 0 / RNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Viral Core Proteins
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83. Suzuki H, Saitoh H, Suzuki T, Takaku H: Inhibition of influenza virus by baculovirus-mediated shRNA. Nucleic Acids Symp Ser (Oxf); 2009;(53):287-8

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Influenza viruses A and B cause widespread infections of the human respiratory tract; however, existing vaccines and drug therapy are of limited value for their treatment.
  • Here we show that bispecific short hairpin small-interfering RNA constructs containing an eight-nucleotide intervening spacer, targeted against influenza virus A or influenza virus B, can inhibit the production of both types of virus in infected cell lines.
  • This multiple vector showed remarkable ability to cope with both influenza virus A or B.
  • Furthermore, the Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus can infect a range of mammalian cells, facilitating its use as a baculovirus vector for gene delivery into cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Baculoviridae / genetics. Influenza A virus / genetics. Influenza B virus / genetics. RNA, Small Interfering
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line. Dogs. Down-Regulation. Genetic Vectors. RNA-Binding Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. RNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Viral Core Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. Viral Core Proteins / genetics

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  • (PMID = 19749373.001).
  • [ISSN] 1746-8272
  • [Journal-full-title] Nucleic acids symposium series (2004)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nucleic Acids Symp Ser (Oxf)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / NP protein, Influenza A virus; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 0 / RNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Viral Core Proteins
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84. Fulda TR, Lyles A, Pugh MC, Christensen DB: Current status of prospective drug utilization review. J Manag Care Pharm; 2004 Sep-Oct;10(5):433-41

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Current status of prospective drug utilization review.
  • BACKGROUND: The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 offered the promise that prospective drug utilization review (pDUR) systems would improve the quality of drug prescribing and patient drug use.
  • To the contrary, there is growing evidence that suboptimal use of drugs (in terms of preventable drug-related morbidity) is at least as costly as the prescription drugs themselves.
  • Problems with the current pDUR "system" can be grouped into those involving technical aspects (e.g., duplicate messaging from in-store and online systems, or message text limitations) and into those involving human aspects, specifically how pharmacists and other health care providers interpret and respond to potential drug therapy problem alerts generated by the electronic systems.
  • CONCLUSION: DUR is a quality assurance system that holds promise as a tool that, if implemented effectively, could enhance appropriate drug use.
  • To address technical aspects, we strongly recommend (a) a national effort to validate DUR screen criteria relying upon evidence-based studies and (b) adoption of a minimal set of.critical. pDUR screen criteria by pharmacy service providers and third-party intermediaries, including pharmacy benefit managers.
  • To address the human component of pDUR systems, we advocate (a) adoption of performance standards for pharmacists and (b) explicit remuneration for time spent identifying and responding to drug therapy problems.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Therapy / economics. Drug Utilization Review. Pharmacies

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  • (PMID = 15369426.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-4087
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of managed care pharmacy : JMCP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Manag Care Pharm
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 44
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85. Delgado J, Febrer L, Nieves D, Piñol C, Brosa M: [Cost-reduction analysis for oral versus intravenous fludarabine (Beneflur) in Spain]. Farm Hosp; 2009 Sep-Oct;33(5):240-6

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Transliterated title] Análisis de minimización de costes de fludarabina (Beneflur) oral vs. vía intravenosa en España.
  • INTRODUCTION: Various international studies have shown that fludarabine is effective, safe, and efficient for treating B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL).
  • METHODS: The presence of clinical evidence about the treatment equivalence of the two options being compared (oral fludarabine vs. intravenous fludarabine) led us to carry out a cost-minimization analysis.
  • A pharmacoeconomic model was constructed to compile data from the literature and experts' opinions in order to determine the use of health resources associated with the treatment; unit costs were obtained from Spanish databases.
  • RESULTS: Although fludarabine in its oral form has a higher purchase price than generic intravenous fludarabine does, increased administration costs for the latter, which is used in hospitals, mean that oral fludarabine use produces total savings of euro1,908 and euro1,292 for single-drug therapy and combined therapy with cyclophosphamide, respectively.
  • Including indirect costs increased the savings associated with the oral form of the drug.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In B-CLL patients, treatment with oral fludarabine has a lower cost than treatment with intravenous fludarabine, in both single-drug therapy and combined therapy.
  • Various sensitivity analyses confirmed these results and showed that oral fludarabine should be the treatment of choice for B-CLL in Spain, unless contrain.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / economics. Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell / drug therapy. Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell / economics. Vidarabine Phosphate / analogs & derivatives

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  • (PMID = 19775574.001).
  • [ISSN] 1130-6343
  • [Journal-full-title] Farmacia hospitalaria : órgano oficial de expresión científica de la Sociedad Española de Farmacia Hospitalaria
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Farm Hosp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 106XV160TZ / Vidarabine Phosphate; 1X9VK9O1SC / fludarabine phosphate
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86. Chiriac S, Cozma CD, Jerca O, Pandele GI: [The effects of the physical training on the hypertensive patients with glycoregulation disorder]. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi; 2003 Jan-Mar;107(1):108-12
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CHOLESTEROL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [The effects of the physical training on the hypertensive patients with glycoregulation disorder].
  • [Transliterated title] Efectele antrenamentului fizic la hipertensivii cu tulburări de glicoreglare.
  • The purpose of our clinical study was the evaluation of moderate physical training on hypertensive patients with the impaired glycoregulation, for a determinate period of time.
  • METHODS: The study included 80 patients with moderate hypertension, divided in two groups: group B formed of 40 patients that followed an associated treatment (physical exercises 3-5 times/week, 45-60 min. for one training and antihypertensive drug therapy) and group C formed of 40 patients that followed only drug therapy for controlling blood pressure.
  • The glycoregulation disorder was appreciated by determining a jeune glycemia to all the patients, the oral glucose tolerance test at the patients who were until 60 years old and for which there wasn't any evidence of glucose intolerance a jeune.
  • RESULTS: The patients with impaired glycoregulation had significant increased values of cholesterol (p = 0.03) and triglycerides (p < 0.001), decreased HDL-C (p = 0.004), compared to the patients without glycoregulation disorder.
  • The patients with impaired glycoregulation had the value of ventricular mass 254.46 +/- 38 g, compared to 239.52 +/- 41 g for the patients without glycoregulation disorder.
  • In group B, we found 14 patients with impaired glycoregulation (35%) and 11 patients in group C (27.5%) with the same metabolic disorder.
  • After 6 month, only 9 patients with glycoregulation disorder (22.5) were left in group B and also 10 patients (25%) with the same disorder in group C.
  • CONCLUSION: Moderate physical exercise associated with antihypertensive therapy induced, besides the decrease of blood pressure values, a good control of lipids and glucose markers of metabolism.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetes Mellitus / therapy. Exercise. Hypertension / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Cholesterol / blood. Cholesterol, HDL / blood. Female. Glucose Tolerance Test. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Obesity / blood. Obesity / therapy. Treatment Outcome. Triglycerides / blood. Verapamil / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 14755979.001).
  • [ISSN] 0048-7848
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista medico-chirurgicală̆ a Societă̆ţ̜ii de Medici ş̧i Naturaliş̧ti din Iaş̧i
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi
  • [Language] rum
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Romania
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; 0 / Cholesterol, HDL; 0 / Triglycerides; 97C5T2UQ7J / Cholesterol; CJ0O37KU29 / Verapamil
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87. de Lima Garcias G, Schüler-Faccini L: Community diagnosis of maternal exposure to risk factors for congenital defects. Community Genet; 2003;6(2):96-103
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Community diagnosis of maternal exposure to risk factors for congenital defects.
  • OBJECTIVES: This paper describes a community diagnosis of maternal exposure to risk factors for congenital defects in the population of Pelotas, RS, Brazil (400000 inhabitants).
  • The authors investigated biological and demographic factors (maternal age, alcohol ingestion and smoking), social and economic factors (family income and type of work), and welfare factors (prenatal care, illnesses during pregnancy, drug therapy, and vaccinations).
  • drug therapy (more common) and (b).

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 14560070.001).
  • [ISSN] 1422-2795
  • [Journal-full-title] Community genetics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Community Genet
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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88. Carrouée-Durantel S, Durantel D, Werle-Lapostolle B, Pichoud C, Naesens L, Neyts J, Trépo C, Zoulim F: Suboptimal response to adefovir dipivoxil therapy for chronic hepatitis B in nucleoside-naive patients is not due to pre-existing drug-resistant mutants. Antivir Ther; 2008;13(3):381-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Suboptimal response to adefovir dipivoxil therapy for chronic hepatitis B in nucleoside-naive patients is not due to pre-existing drug-resistant mutants.
  • BACKGROUND: Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) has demonstrated activity against wild-type and lamivudine-resistant hepatitis B virus (HBV).
  • After 1 year of therapy, a median 3.5-4.0 log10 decrease in viral load is observed.
  • The influence of baseline characteristics and drug compliance on response was investigated.
  • The replication capacity and drug susceptibility of HBV genomes of selected clinical isolates that were considered representative of the treatment response quartiles were analysed using a phenotypic assay.
  • Phenotypic analysis of viral strains in vitro in Huh7 and HepG2 cells showed that HBV genomes remained susceptible to ADV, regardless of treatment response observed in patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Suboptimal response to ADV might result from a host pharmacological effect or from patient compliance issues rather than from a reduced susceptibility of HBV to ADV.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenine / analogs & derivatives. Drug Resistance, Viral / genetics. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Hepatitis B, Chronic / drug therapy. Mutation. Organophosphonates / therapeutic use. Patient Compliance. Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Cell Line, Tumor. DNA, Viral / blood. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Europe. Female. Genotype. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Phenotype. Time Factors. Treatment Failure. United States. Viral Load. Virus Replication

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  • (PMID = 18572751.001).
  • [ISSN] 1359-6535
  • [Journal-full-title] Antiviral therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antivir. Ther. (Lond.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Viral; 0 / Organophosphonates; 0 / Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors; JAC85A2161 / Adenine; U6Q8Z01514 / adefovir dipivoxil
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89. Vasseur BG, Kawanishi H, Shah N, Anderson ML: Type B lactic acidosis: a rare complication of antiretroviral therapy after cardiac surgery. Ann Thorac Surg; 2002 Oct;74(4):1251-2
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. STAVUDINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Type B lactic acidosis: a rare complication of antiretroviral therapy after cardiac surgery.
  • This report describes a 47-year-old woman with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis, treated with combination antiretroviral drug therapy, who developed an acute, severe type B lactic acidosis 24 hours after homograft root replacement for endocarditis.
  • She fully recovered after HIV medication was discontinued, along with administration of riboflavin and supportive measures including hemodialysis.
  • The timing of this complication and previous reports suggest that open heart surgery may be a risk factor for nonischemic (type B) lactic acidosis in patients taking nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors.
  • [MeSH-major] Acidosis, Lactic / chemically induced. Anti-HIV Agents / adverse effects. Aortic Valve / surgery. HIV Infections / drug therapy. HIV Protease Inhibitors / adverse effects. Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors / adverse effects


90. Jefferies R, Ryan UM, Jardine J, Robertson ID, Irwin PJ: Babesia gibsoni: detection during experimental infections and after combined atovaquone and azithromycin therapy. Exp Parasitol; 2007 Oct;117(2):115-23
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. AZITHROMYCIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Babesia gibsoni: detection during experimental infections and after combined atovaquone and azithromycin therapy.
  • Babesia gibsoni is a protozoan parasite of dogs worldwide yet both an effective treatment and a reliable method for detecting subclinical cases of this emerging infection remain elusive.
  • Experimental B. gibsoni infections were established in vivo to investigate the efficacy of combined atovaquone and azithromycin drug therapy and to determine the detection limits of a nested-PCR, IFAT and microscopy during various stages of infection.
  • While atovaquone and azithromycin produced a reduction in parasitaemia, it did not eliminate the parasite and drug resistance appeared to develop in one dog.
  • Polymerase chain reaction was found to be most useful in detecting infection in the pre-acute and acute stages, while IFAT was most reliable during chronic infections.
  • Microscopy is suggested to be only effective for detecting acute stage infections.
  • This study also describes the detection of B. gibsoni in tissue samples during chronic infections for the first time, suggesting possible sequestration of this parasite.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Infective Agents / therapeutic use. Atovaquone / therapeutic use. Azithromycin / therapeutic use. Babesia / isolation & purification. Babesiosis / veterinary. Dog Diseases / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Animals. Antibodies, Protozoan / blood. Chronic Disease. DNA, Protozoan / analysis. Dogs. Drug Resistance. Female. Fluorescent Antibody Technique / veterinary. Parasitemia / diagnosis. Parasitemia / parasitology. Parasitemia / veterinary. Polymerase Chain Reaction / veterinary

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  • (PMID = 17543304.001).
  • [ISSN] 0014-4894
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental parasitology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Parasitol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Infective Agents; 0 / Antibodies, Protozoan; 0 / DNA, Protozoan; 83905-01-5 / Azithromycin; Y883P1Z2LT / Atovaquone
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91. Stuyver L, Van Geyt C, De Gendt S, Van Reybroeck G, Zoulim F, Leroux-Roels G, Rossau R: Line probe assay for monitoring drug resistance in hepatitis B virus-infected patients during antiviral therapy. J Clin Microbiol; 2000 Feb;38(2):702-7
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Line probe assay for monitoring drug resistance in hepatitis B virus-infected patients during antiviral therapy.
  • Since the introduction of antiviral compounds such as lamivudine and famciclovir in the treatment schedules of patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, the accumulation of a variety of mutations in the HBV polymerase gene has been observed.
  • The selection of these mutations is generally considered the cause of viral nonresponsiveness and treatment failure.
  • Therefore, the detection of these mutations is of clinical importance.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase / genetics. Hepatitis B / virology. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Hepatitis B virus / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Base Sequence. DNA, Viral / genetics. Drug Resistance, Microbial / genetics. Humans. Molecular Sequence Data. Mutation. Oligonucleotide Probes. Plasmids / genetics. Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods. Sequence Analysis, DNA

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  • (PMID = 10655370.001).
  • [ISSN] 0095-1137
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral; 0 / Oligonucleotide Probes; EC 2.7.7.7 / DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC86181
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92. Qin LY, Xing WB, Ye WJ: [Effect of combined therapy with Chinese drug and narrow broad ultraviolet B on Bcl-2, caspase-3 and survivin in skin lesion with psoriasis vulgaris]. Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi; 2010 Jul;30(7):706-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Effect of combined therapy with Chinese drug and narrow broad ultraviolet B on Bcl-2, caspase-3 and survivin in skin lesion with psoriasis vulgaris].
  • OBJECTIVE: To reveal the possible role of combined therapy with Chinese drug and narrow broad ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) on keratinocytes apoptosis in skin lesion of psoriasis vulgaris (PV).
  • METHODS: Skin samples were taken from 20 healthy subjects and 30 PV patients before and after they received the combined therapy for 8 weeks.
  • After treatment, in skin of PV, Bcl-2 expression increased to 13.63 +/- 2.14, Caspase-3 and survivin decreased to 11.70 +/- 2.44 and 12.46 +/- 1.80, respectively (all P < 0.01), showing a normalizing trend.
  • Moreover, patients' psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) score decreased from 14.24 +/- 3.42 before treatment to 3.52 +/- 1.07 after treatment (P < 0.01).
  • CONCLUSION: The curing effect of the combined therapy with Chinese drug and NB-UVB in treating PV is possibly realized by way of regulating Bcl-2, Caspase-3 and survivin expressions to adjust keratinocyte apoptosis.

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  • (PMID = 20929126.001).
  • [ISSN] 1003-5370
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo Zhong xi yi jie he za zhi Zhongguo Zhongxiyi jiehe zazhi = Chinese journal of integrated traditional and Western medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi
  • [Language] CHI
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / BIRC5 protein, human; 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal; 0 / Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; EC 3.4.22.- / CASP3 protein, human; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3
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93. Puchhammer-Stöckl E, Mandl CW, Kletzmayr J, Holzmann H, Hofmann A, Aberle SW, Heinz FX, Watschinger B, Hofmann H: Monitoring the virus load can predict the emergence of drug-resistant hepatitis B virus strains in renal transplantation patients during lamivudine therapy. J Infect Dis; 2000 Jun;181(6):2063-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LAMIVUDINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Monitoring the virus load can predict the emergence of drug-resistant hepatitis B virus strains in renal transplantation patients during lamivudine therapy.
  • The development of resistant hepatitis B virus (HBV) strains during lamivudine treatment has been described repeatedly.
  • To investigate whether the development of such resistant HBV strains can be predicted in an early phase of therapy, the HBV loads of 11 renal transplantation patients were screened at 3-month intervals by a quantitative HBV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay.
  • Five patients developed resistance to lamivudine in the 12-15-month follow-up period.
  • In all of them, a virus load of 1x103 HBV DNA copies still was detectable after 3 months of therapy.
  • This was statistically significantly different from those patients who did not develop lamivudine resistance within the observation period, all of whom had no HBV DNA detectable after 3 months of treatment (P=.0022).
  • Thus, virus load testing by use of a sensitive PCR assay allows the early prediction of the emergence of lamivudine-resistant HBV strains.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. DNA, Viral / blood. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Lamivudine / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Drug Resistance. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 10837194.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-1899
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of infectious diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Infect. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral; 2T8Q726O95 / Lamivudine
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94. Kim HS, Han KH, Ahn SH, Kim EO, Chang HY, Moon MS, Chung HJ, Yoo W, Kim SO, Hong SP: Evaluation of methods for monitoring drug resistance in chronic hepatitis B patients during lamivudine therapy based on mass spectrometry and reverse hybridization. Antivir Ther; 2005;10(3):441-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LAMIVUDINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of methods for monitoring drug resistance in chronic hepatitis B patients during lamivudine therapy based on mass spectrometry and reverse hybridization.
  • A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based genotyping assay, termed restriction fragment mass polymorphism (RFMP) has been recently developed for detecting hepatitis B virus (HBV) mutants.
  • We compared the efficacy and usefulness of the RFMP assay with a commercial assay using a reverse hybridization line probe technology, namely INNO-LiPA HBV DR (referred to henceforth as the LiPA assay), for the detection of lamivudine-resistant HBV mutants.
  • A total of 60 patient samples were analysed for the presence of mutations at rtL1 80M and rtM204I/V of HBV polymerase by the LiPA and RFMP assays.
  • The ability to detect mutations at rtM204I/V was compared with defined mixtures of wild-type and mutant HBV cloned in plasmids at relative concentrations ranging from 1-25%.
  • Defined mixtures were consistently successfully identified at a 1% relative concentration of mutant versus wild-type viruses by the RFMP assay and 4% by the LiPA assay.
  • The RFMP assay proved to be an accurate and reliable tool for detection of lamivudine-resistant mutations and was more sensitive than the LiPA assay in detecting mixtures of mutant and wild-type viruses.
  • The improved sensitivity of the RPMP assay can help monitor drug resistance as it develops, enabling early intervention and prevention.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Drug Resistance, Viral. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Hepatitis B, Chronic / drug therapy. Lamivudine / therapeutic use. Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] DNA, Viral. Drug Monitoring. Genetic Variation. Humans. Mutation. Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length

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  • (PMID = 15918335.001).
  • [ISSN] 1359-6535
  • [Journal-full-title] Antiviral therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antivir. Ther. (Lond.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral; 2T8Q726O95 / Lamivudine
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95. Lok AS, Zoulim F, Locarnini S, Mangia A, Niro G, Decraemer H, Maertens G, Hulstaert F, De Vreese K, Sablon E: Monitoring drug resistance in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients during lamivudine therapy: evaluation of performance of INNO-LiPA HBV DR assay. J Clin Microbiol; 2002 Oct;40(10):3729-34
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LAMIVUDINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Monitoring drug resistance in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients during lamivudine therapy: evaluation of performance of INNO-LiPA HBV DR assay.
  • Sensitive and early detection of emerging hepatitis B virus (HBV) drug resistance may not only help monitor the viral dynamics associated with lamivudine treatment but could also improve therapeutic decision making.
  • A total of 159 serum samples from 33 chronic HBV patients receiving lamivudine treatment were analyzed at four centers for the presence of lamivudine-resistant mutations at codons 528 [180] (proposed revised nomenclature according to Stuyver et al.
  • The most common reason for discrepant or indeterminate results (0.4% and 1.5%, respectively) in a small percentage of the population tested could be attributed to polymorphisms not yet covered by LiPA probes.
  • In 15 patients, LiPA detected mixed wild-type and mutant virus populations before viral breakthrough.
  • These results demonstrate that INNO-LiPA HBV DR is a highly sensitive and easily applicable assay for the detection and monitoring of lamivudine-resistant mutations in chronic hepatitis B patients and that the assay is more sensitive than sequencing in detecting mixed mutant and wild-type sequences.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Drug Monitoring / methods. Drug Resistance, Viral / physiology. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Hepatitis B, Chronic / virology. Lamivudine / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 12354872.001).
  • [ISSN] 0095-1137
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral; 2T8Q726O95 / Lamivudine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC130856
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96. Wongprasit P, Manosuthi W, Kiertiburanakul S, Sungkanuparph S: Hepatitis B virus drug resistance in HIV-1-infected patients taking lamivudine-containing antiretroviral therapy. AIDS Patient Care STDS; 2010 Apr;24(4):205-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LAMIVUDINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hepatitis B virus drug resistance in HIV-1-infected patients taking lamivudine-containing antiretroviral therapy.
  • A cross-sectional study was conducted in HIV-1-infected patients receiving lamivudine-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) to determine the prevalence and risk factors of hepatitis B virus drug resistance (HBV-DR).
  • There were 84 patients with a mean age (standard deviation [SD]) of 42.2 (10.2) years and 77% were males.
  • Median (range) CD4 cell count was 352 (49-790) cells/mm(3).
  • Of all, 19 (23%) had HBV-DR with a median (range) HBV DNA of 2.56 x 10(7) (2.54 x 10(3)-11 x 10(7)) IU/mL.
  • In addition to lamivudine resistance, cross-resistance to other anti-HBV drugs is also frequently observed.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-HIV Agents / pharmacology. Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. HIV Infections / complications. Hepatitis B / complications. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Lamivudine / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. CD4 Lymphocyte Count. Cross-Sectional Studies. DNA, Viral / analysis. Drug Resistance, Viral / genetics. Female. Genotype. HIV-1 / genetics. Hepatitis B Surface Antigens / blood. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prevalence. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome


97. Enomoto M, Tamori A, Kohmoto MT, Morikawa H, Habu D, Sakaguchi H, Takeda T, Seki S, Kawada N, Shiomi S, Nishiguchi S: Mutational patterns of hepatitis B virus genome and clinical outcomes after emergence of drug-resistant variants during lamivudine therapy: analyses of the polymerase gene and full-length sequences. J Med Virol; 2007 Nov;79(11):1664-70
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LAMIVUDINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mutational patterns of hepatitis B virus genome and clinical outcomes after emergence of drug-resistant variants during lamivudine therapy: analyses of the polymerase gene and full-length sequences.
  • It remains unclear whether mutational patterns of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome are associated with the development of severe hepatitis after the emergence of tyrosine-methionine-aspartate-aspartate (YMDD) variants during lamivudine treatment.
  • Thirty patients with chronic hepatitis B who had YMDD variants during lamivudine therapy and were followed up subsequently while receiving lamivudine alone for at least 6 months were examined retrospectively.
  • Between months 5 and 33 of therapy, mutations from methionine to isoleucine at rt204 (rtM204I) were detected in 18 patients, and mutations from methionine to valine at rt204 (rtM204V) were detected in 12.
  • No specific mutation was identified on full-length sequence analysis in three patients with a hepatitis flare.
  • In conclusion, mutational patterns of HBV DNA at the time of emergence of YMDD variants were apparently unrelated to the clinical outcomes in Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis B during lamivudine therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Resistance, Viral / genetics. Hepatitis B virus / genetics. Hepatitis B, Chronic / drug therapy. Lamivudine / therapeutic use. Mutation. RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase / genetics. Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Amino Acid Motifs. Amino Acid Sequence. Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Female. Genome, Viral. Humans. Japan. Male. Middle Aged. Sequence Analysis, DNA. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 17854034.001).
  • [ISSN] 0146-6615
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medical virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Med. Virol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors; 2T8Q726O95 / Lamivudine; EC 2.7.7.49 / RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
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98. Zöllner B, Schäfer P, Feucht HH, Schröter M, Petersen J, Laufs R: Correlation of hepatitis B virus load with loss of e antigen and emerging drug-resistant variants during lamivudine therapy. J Med Virol; 2001 Dec;65(4):659-63
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LAMIVUDINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Correlation of hepatitis B virus load with loss of e antigen and emerging drug-resistant variants during lamivudine therapy.
  • It remains unclear whether sequential assessment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) load during lamivudine therapy can predict the loss of hepatitis B e antigen or emergence of drug-resistant variants.
  • Therefore, a longitudinal study was carried out in 28 consecutive patients with chronic hepatitis B who started lamivudine therapy for a median of 12 months (range, 6-31).
  • From month 6 onward, HBV viral load below the detection limit of the PCR was predictive of the loss of envelope antigen (P = 0.043).
  • Continuously detectable HBV DNA during the first 12 months of treatment indicated emergence of drug-resistant variants (P = 0.034).
  • These data suggest that the goal of lamivudine therapy should be complete suppression of serum HBV DNA.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Hepatitis B e Antigens / blood. Hepatitis B virus / drug effects. Hepatitis B, Chronic / virology. Lamivudine / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cohort Studies. DNA, Viral / analysis. Drug Resistance, Viral. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mutation. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Viral Load

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 11745928.001).
  • [ISSN] 0146-6615
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medical virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Med. Virol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral; 0 / Hepatitis B e Antigens; 2T8Q726O95 / Lamivudine
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99. Cooper C, Jakob F, Chinn C, Martin-Mola E, Fardellone P, Adami S, Thalassinos NC, Melo-Gomes J, Torgerson D, Gibson A, Marin F: Fracture incidence and changes in quality of life in women with an inadequate clinical outcome from osteoporosis therapy: the Observational Study of Severe Osteoporosis (OSSO). Osteoporos Int; 2008 Apr;19(4):493-501
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Fracture incidence and changes in quality of life in women with an inadequate clinical outcome from osteoporosis therapy: the Observational Study of Severe Osteoporosis (OSSO).
  • In this observational study of women with an inadequate clinical outcome to osteoporosis therapy, those with a fracture at baseline were more likely to sustain an incident fracture and have a worse health-related quality of life than those without prior fracture.
  • INTRODUCTION: The Observational Study of Severe Osteoporosis (OSSO) was designed to assess the fracture incidence and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in women with an inadequate clinical outcome to osteoporosis therapy.
  • METHODS: Post-menopausal women (N=1,885) with established osteoporosis and an inadequate clinical response to osteoporosis drug therapy defined as: a) a fragility fracture despite therapy for one year (index fracture, N=988), or b) discontinued drug therapy due to adverse effects and/or non-compliance (N=897), were assessed during one year for HRQoL using the EQ-5D and the QUALEFFO questionnaires.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Women with an inadequate response to osteoporosis therapy had a high rate of incident fracture which had an adverse impact on HRQoL.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Density Conservation Agents / adverse effects. Fractures, Bone / prevention & control. Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal / therapy. Quality of Life / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Bone Density / physiology. Female. Humans. Incidence. Middle Aged. Patient Compliance / statistics & numerical data. Surveys and Questionnaires. Treatment Failure. Women's Health

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  • (PMID = 17968611.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-941X
  • [Journal-full-title] Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Osteoporos Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0400491; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / MC/ UP/ A620/ 1014
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bone Density Conservation Agents
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100. Chin W, Lau W, Cheng C, Olivo M: Evaluation of Hypocrellin B in a human bladder tumor model in experimental photodynamic therapy: biodistribution, light dose and drug-light interval effects. Int J Oncol; 2004 Sep;25(3):623-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. PERYLENE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of Hypocrellin B in a human bladder tumor model in experimental photodynamic therapy: biodistribution, light dose and drug-light interval effects.
  • Hypocrellin B (HB), a monomeric perylenequinone pigment, is a promising second-generation photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy.
  • We have evaluated the efficacy of HB mediated PDT by experimenting with various drug-light intervals, based on the biodistribution analysis in human bladder tumor (MGH cell line) models.
  • Tumor growth rates were assessed at 10-day post treatment followed by morphometric analysis.
  • The level of HB peaked at 6 h postinjection in tumor, peritumoral skin and normal muscle followed by a decline over the next 42 h.
  • Concurrently, the ratio of drug in tumor versus skin was relatively low at all times in comparison to tumor to muscle ratio.
  • The level of PDT response revealed a strong dependence on the drug-light intervals (DLI) and light dose.
  • For both high and low fluence/fluence rate, comparable tumor response was observed at 1 h DLI; treated tumors exhibited significant tumor regression compared to 6 and 24 h DLI.
  • The absence of tumor response was observed at 24 h DLI even at high light dose (100 J/cm(2); 100 mW/cm(2)).
  • Tumor response detected at low light dose (12 J/cm(2); 12 mW/cm(2)) at short DLI suggests that the tumor vasculature is a more sensitive target compared to the cellular compartment of the tumor, correlating significantly with the bioavailability of the drug in serum.
  • Therefore, HB mediated PDT effect is characteristics of a predominantly vascular mediated effect.
  • This study confirms that for short drug-light intervals, PDT seems to target tumor vasculature, which contributes to tumor destruction.
  • [MeSH-major] Perylene / analogs & derivatives. Perylene / pharmacokinetics. Perylene / therapeutic use. Photochemotherapy. Photosensitizing Agents / pharmacokinetics. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Quinones / pharmacokinetics. Quinones / therapeutic use. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Disease Models, Animal. Humans. Mice. Neoplasm Transplantation. Tissue Distribution. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 15289863.001).
  • [ISSN] 1019-6439
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 0 / Quinones; 123940-54-5 / hypocrellin B; 5QD5427UN7 / Perylene
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