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1. Langguth B, Salvi R, Elgoyhen AB: Emerging pharmacotherapy of tinnitus. Expert Opin Emerg Drugs; 2009 Dec;14(4):687-702
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Emerging pharmacotherapy of tinnitus.
  • No curative treatments are available.
  • The most widespread management therapies consist of auditory stimulation and cognitive behavioral treatment, aiming at improving habituation and coping strategies.
  • Available clinical trials vary in methodological rigor and have been performed for a considerable number of different drugs.
  • None of the investigated drugs have demonstrated providing replicable long-term reduction of tinnitus impact in the majority of patients in excess of placebo effects.
  • Accordingly, there are no FDA or European Medicines Agency approved drugs for the treatment of tinnitus.
  • Therefore, more effective pharmacotherapies for this huge and still growing market are desperately needed and even a drug that produces only a small but significant effect would have an enormous therapeutic impact.
  • This review describes current and emerging pharmacotherapies with current difficulties and limitations.
  • Finally, it describes recent advances in the tinnitus field which may help overcome obstacles faced in the pharmacological treatment of tinnitus.
  • [MeSH-major] Cognitive Therapy. Depression / etiology. Depressive Disorder / diet therapy. Quality of Life. Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders / etiology. Tinnitus / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Anxiety / etiology. Body Mass Index. Cannabinoid Receptor Antagonists. Cognition Disorders / etiology. Health Status. Humans. Irritable Mood. Lung Neoplasms / etiology. Radiography. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Risk Factors. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / etiology. Surveys and Questionnaires. Time Factors. United States. United States Food and Drug Administration

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Tinnitus.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Depression.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Insomnia.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Tinnitus.
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  • (PMID = 19712015.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-7623
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on emerging drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Emerg Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / R01 DC009091-03; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / R01DC009219; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / R01DC0090910; United States / Howard Hughes Medical Institute / / ; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / R01 DC009091; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / R01 DC009219-02; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / R01 DC009219
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cannabinoid Receptor Antagonists
  • [Number-of-references] 199
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS180697; NLM/ PMC2832848
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2. Kornblith AB, Herndon JE 2nd, Weiss RB, Zhang C, Zuckerman EL, Rosenberg S, Mertz M, Payne D, Jane Massie M, Holland JF, Wingate P, Norton L, Holland JC: Long-term adjustment of survivors of early-stage breast carcinoma, 20 years after adjuvant chemotherapy. Cancer; 2003 Aug 15;98(4):679-89
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  • [Title] Long-term adjustment of survivors of early-stage breast carcinoma, 20 years after adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: The long-term impact of breast carcinoma and its treatment was assessed in 153 breast carcinoma survivors previously treated on a Phase III randomized trial (Cancer and Leukemia Group B [CALGB 7581]) a median of 20 years after entry to CALGB 7581.
  • METHODS: Survivors were interviewed by telephone using the following standardized measures: Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), PostTraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist with the trauma defined as survivors' response to having had cancer (PCL-C), Conditioned Nausea, Vomiting and Distress, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 (quality of life), Life Experience Survey (stressful events), MOS Social Support Survey, comorbid conditions (Older Americans Resources and Services Questionnaire), and items developed to assess long-term breast carcinoma treatment side effects and their interference with functioning.
  • RESULTS: Only 5% of survivors had scores that were suggestive of clinical levels of distress (BSI), 15% reported 2 or more posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms (PCL-C) that were moderately to extremely bothersome, 1-6% reported conditioned nausea, emesis, and distress as a consequence of sights, smells, and tastes triggered by reminders of their treatment, 29% reported sexual problems attributed to having had cancer, 39% reported lymphedema, and 33%, reported numbness.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Twenty years after the initial treatment, the impact of breast carcinoma on survivors' adjustment was minimal.
  • However, the higher prevalence of PTSD symptoms in response to having had cancer is indicative of continuing psychologic sequelae long after treatment completion.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Psychological. Breast Neoplasms / psychology. Quality of Life. Survivors / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Emotions. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hodgkin Disease / psychology. Humans. Leukemia / psychology. Middle Aged. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Socioeconomic Factors. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / diagnosis. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / etiology. Stress, Psychological

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society.DOI 10.1002/cncr.11531
  • (PMID = 12910510.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA31946
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Miovic M, Block S: Psychiatric disorders in advanced cancer. Cancer; 2007 Oct 15;110(8):1665-76
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  • Oncologists play an important role in screening for these conditions, providing first-line treatment and referring patients for further evaluation and treatment when indicated.
  • METHODS: The literature on psycho-oncology was reviewed, focusing on the epidemiology, assessment, and treatment of psychiatric disorders (adjustment disorders, major depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress, personality disorders, substance abuse, and major mental disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) in patients with advanced cancer.
  • Both psychosocial and pharmacological treatments are effective for anxiety and depression, although existing studies have methodological limitations.
  • Oncologists play a key role in screening for psychiatric disorders, initiating first-line treatments for depression and anxiety, and communicating with patients and caregivers about prognosis and end-of-life issues.
  • [MeSH-major] Mental Disorders / etiology. Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Psychotropic Drugs / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 17847017.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Psychotropic Drugs
  • [Number-of-references] 112
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4. Forzoni S, Perez M, Martignetti A, Crispino S: Art therapy with cancer patients during chemotherapy sessions: an analysis of the patients' perception of helpfulness. Palliat Support Care; 2010 Mar;8(1):41-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Art therapy with cancer patients during chemotherapy sessions: an analysis of the patients' perception of helpfulness.
  • OBJECTIVE: Art therapy has been shown to be helpful to cancer patients at different stages in the course of their illness, especially during isolation for bone marrow transplantation, during radiotherapy treatment, and after treatment.
  • (1) to assess whether patients during chemotherapy sessions perceive art therapy as helpful and (2) to outline in which way art therapy is perceived as helpful.
  • METHOD: 157 cancer patients attending an Oncology Day Hospital (Siena, Italy) met the art therapist during their chemotherapy sessions.
  • The art therapist used the same art therapy technique with each patient during the first encounter ("free collage"); afterward the relationship would evolve in different ways according to the patients' needs.
  • A psychologist interviewed a randomized group of 54 patients after the chemotherapy treatment using a semistructured questionnaire.
  • RESULTS: Out of the 54 patients, 3 found art therapy "not helpful" ("childish," "just a chat," "not interesting").
  • The other 51 patients described their art therapy experience as "helpful."
  • (1) art therapy was perceived as generally helpful (e.g., "relaxing," "creative"; 37.3%), (2) art therapy was perceived as helpful because of the dyadic relationship (e.g., "talking about oneself and feeling listened to"; 33.3%), and (3) art therapy was perceived as helpful because of the triadic relationship, patient-image-art therapist (e.g., "expressing emotions and searching for meanings"; 29.4%).
  • SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: These data have clinical implications, as they show that art therapy may be useful to support patients during the stressful time of chemotherapy treatment.
  • Some illustrations of patients using the art therapy process to fulfill these three different needs are provided.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Art Therapy / methods. Helping Behavior. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / psychology. Professional-Patient Relations. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / therapy


5. Amir M, Ramati A: Post-traumatic symptoms, emotional distress and quality of life in long-term survivors of breast cancer: a preliminary research. J Anxiety Disord; 2002;16(2):195-206
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Post-traumatic symptoms, emotional distress and quality of life in long-term survivors of breast cancer: a preliminary research.
  • Thirty-nine long-term female survivors of breast cancer were compared with 39 matched women who had not been exposed to any chronic disease regarding post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), quality of life (QoL), emotional distress and coping styles.
  • Multiple regression analysis showed that receiving chemotherapy and disease stage, as well as the interaction between chemotherapy and disease stage, were significant predictors of hyperarousal.
  • The findings show that post-traumatic symptoms are a common sequel after recovery from cancer.
  • Furthermore, finding suggest a conceptual distinction between PTSD symptoms and QoL in the study of long-term effects of cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Psychological. Breast Neoplasms / psychology. Quality of Life. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / epidemiology. Survivors / psychology


6. Klimek M, Dammers R: Antiepileptic drug therapy in the perioperative course of neurosurgical patients. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol; 2010 Oct;23(5):564-7

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  • [Title] Antiepileptic drug therapy in the perioperative course of neurosurgical patients.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Antiepileptic agents are widely used in the perioperative course of neurosurgical patients - for prophylactic and therapeutic reasons.
  • If the drugs are used nevertheless, stopping after the first postoperative week must be strongly recommended.
  • After traumatic brain injury, early prophylactic use might prevent late post-traumatic seizures.
  • The new antiepileptic drug levetiracetam seems to have a better safety profile, which makes it more suitable for prophylactic use.
  • However, in all groups, evidence concerning the choice of drugs and duration of prophylaxis is lacking.
  • Therapeutic use of antiepileptic drugs is supported by evidence.
  • These drugs should be continued perioperatively.
  • However, they might induce severe adverse events during adjuvant treatments like radiotherapy or chemotherapy in patients with brain tumors.
  • SUMMARY: Despite lacking evidence, prophylactic antiepileptic drug use is common in the perioperative course of neurosurgical patients.
  • More research is needed to deal better with epileptogenesis and to define the right drug for the right patient at the right time.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticonvulsants / therapeutic use. Neurosurgical Procedures. Perioperative Care / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Brain Injuries / complications. Brain Injuries / surgery. Brain Neoplasms / complications. Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Humans. Intraoperative Complications / drug therapy. Intraoperative Complications / prevention & control. Seizures / drug therapy. Seizures / prevention & control. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / complications. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / therapy

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  • (PMID = 20689411.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-6500
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in anaesthesiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Anaesthesiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticonvulsants
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7. Levin AO, Carpenter KM, Fowler JM, Brothers BM, Andersen BL, Maxwell GL: Sexual morbidity associated with poorer psychological adjustment among gynecological cancer survivors. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2010 Apr;20(3):461-70
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  • Although often studied as a separate domain, sexuality represents an integral component of psychological adjustment and quality of life (QoL) that is adversely affected by cancer treatments.
  • The participants were gynecological (cervical, endometrial, ovarian, and vulvar) cancer survivors who were partnered (N = 186), whose cancer was diagnosed 2 to 10 years previously, and who were at least 6 months post any cancer therapy.
  • Most had been found to have early-stage disease (70%) and were treated with hysterectomy (77%), chemotherapy (43%), and/or radiotherapy (23%).
  • Outcomes included self-reported depressive symptoms, traumatic stress symptoms, cancer-specific stress, stress about body changes, and QoL.
  • Nurse-rated of performance status and disruptive signs/symptoms of treatment toxicity, as well as relevant sociodemographic and disease variables were collected as potential controls.
  • Notably, disease and treatment variables were not statistically significant correlates of psychological adjustment or QoL.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that prevention or treatment of sexual morbidity might foster improved psychological adjustment/QoL.

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  • (PMID = 20375814.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-1438
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K05 CA098133; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA092704; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025755; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K05CA098133; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA090223; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / L30 CA136257; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA92704
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS515899; NLM/ PMC3869624
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8. Wang T, Tian FZ, Cai ZH, Li X, Cheng T, Shi L, Cheng Q: Ultrasonic interventional analgesia in pancreatic carcinoma with chemical destruction of celiac ganglion. World J Gastroenterol; 2006 May 28;12(20):3288-91
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  • AIM: To detect the therapeutic effects of chemical destruction of celiac ganglion in patients with pancreatic carcinoma with intractable pain.
  • The changes of visual analogue scale (VAS), serum substance P (Sub P), beta-endopeptide (beta-EP) and T-lymphocyte subtypes level were compared between pre- and post-therapy.
  • No serious complications such as traumatic pancreatitis, pancreatic fistula, abdominal cavity hemorrhage or peritoneal infection occurred.
  • VAS, serum Sub P and beta-EP level significantly changed after treatment (8.0+/-2.3 vs 4.6+/-2.1, 254.1+/-96.7 vs 182.4+/-77.6, 3.2+/-0.8 vs 8.8+/-2.1, P<0.01, P<0.05, P<0.01) with complete relief rate 54.2%, partial relief rate 21.9%, ineffective rate 12.5% and recurrent rate 10.7%.
  • The T-lymphocyte subtypes level remarkably increased when compared with that of pre-therapy (46.7+/-3.7 vs 62.5+/-5.5, P<0.01).
  • [MeSH-major] Analgesia / methods. Carcinoma / complications. Ethanol / therapeutic use. Ganglia, Sympathetic / drug effects. Pain, Intractable / etiology. Pain, Intractable / therapy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / complications. Ultrasonography, Interventional
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antigens, CD3 / physiology. Antigens, CD4 / immunology. Antigens, CD8 / physiology. Female. Humans. Immunity / physiology. Male. Middle Aged. Opioid Peptides / blood. Pain Measurement. Substance P / blood. T-Lymphocyte Subsets. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16718854.001).
  • [ISSN] 1007-9327
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD3; 0 / Antigens, CD4; 0 / Antigens, CD8; 0 / Opioid Peptides; 33507-63-0 / Substance P; 3K9958V90M / Ethanol
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4087977
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9. Thomsen L, Bellemere P, Loubersac T, Gaisne E, Poirier P, Chaise F: Treatment by collagen conduit of painful post-traumatic neuromas of the sensitive digital nerve: a retrospective study of 10 cases. Chir Main; 2010 Sep;29(4):255-62

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment by collagen conduit of painful post-traumatic neuromas of the sensitive digital nerve: a retrospective study of 10 cases.
  • OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this retrospective study was to report the results of surgery in painful post-traumatic neuromas of the digital nerves treated by collagen conduits after excision of the neuromas, when two stumps were available.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that collagen conduit is an effective treatment for post-traumatic painful neuromas of digital nerves and common digital nerves.
  • [MeSH-major] Amputation Stumps. Collagen. Fingers / innervation. Neoplasms, Post-Traumatic / therapy. Nerve Regeneration. Neuroma / therapy. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pain Measurement. Postoperative Care / methods. Retrospective Studies. Sensation / drug effects. Severity of Illness Index. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS.
  • (PMID = 20727807.001).
  • [ISSN] 1769-6666
  • [Journal-full-title] Chirurgie de la main
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chir Main
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9007-34-5 / Collagen
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10. Michelet N, Spenatto N, Viraben R, Cuny JF, Mazet J, Trechot P, Barbaud A, Schmutz JL: [BCG infection of the glans penis after intravesical BCG therapy]. Ann Dermatol Venereol; 2008 Jun-Jul;135(6-7):479-83
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  • [Title] [BCG infection of the glans penis after intravesical BCG therapy].
  • [Transliterated title] BCGite du gland post-BCGthérapie intravésicale.
  • BACKGROUND: BCG therapy is an effective adjuvant treatment for superficial bladder tumors.
  • Therapy involves intravesical instillation of live attenuated Calmette-Guérin bacilli.
  • BCG infection of the glans is a rare local complication associated with this treatment, two cases of which are reported below.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Case 1: A 77-year-old man presented relapsing urothelial bladder carcinoma treated by endoscopic resection and BCG therapy.
  • One week after the seventh instillation, severe balanitis developed.
  • Slow cure of the lesions was achieved within 12months using double antitubercular antibiotic therapy.
  • Case 2: In a 61-year-old man receiving BCG therapy for relapsing bladder carcinoma in situ, the sixth instillation was considered traumatic since it was highly painful.
  • Antibiotic treatment comprising ofloxacin followed by rifampicin for two months proved ineffective.
  • Triple antitubercular antibiotic therapy was initiated.
  • DISCUSSION: The first reported case of BCG infection of the glans in patients undergoing intravesical BCG therapy was published in 1992.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / administration & dosage. Adjuvants, Immunologic / adverse effects. BCG Vaccine / administration & dosage. BCG Vaccine / adverse effects. Balanitis / etiology. Carcinoma in Situ / therapy. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / therapy. Tuberculosis / etiology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Intravesical. Aged. Antibiotics, Antitubercular / administration & dosage. Antibiotics, Antitubercular / therapeutic use. Biopsy. Drug Therapy, Combination. Granuloma, Giant Cell / etiology. Granuloma, Giant Cell / pathology. Humans. Male. Penis / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18598797.001).
  • [ISSN] 0151-9638
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales de dermatologie et de vénéréologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Dermatol Venereol
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Antibiotics, Antitubercular; 0 / BCG Vaccine
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11. Gressner O, Saurbruch T: Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma secondary to an open fracture of the tibia: a case report and review of literature. South Med J; 2008 Jan;101(1):99-101
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  • Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is a highly malignant tumor in children and adolescents.
  • A 47-year-old patient presented with ERMS of the muscle flap transplant 20 years after an open type III-comminuted fracture of the lower leg.
  • The patient refused adjuvant chemotherapy and one year after surgery remains disease-free and in good general condition.
  • [MeSH-major] Fractures, Comminuted / complications. Fractures, Open / complications. Muscle Neoplasms / etiology. Neoplasms, Post-Traumatic / etiology. Rhabdomyosarcoma, Embryonal / etiology. Tibial Fractures / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Amputation. Fracture Fixation, Internal. Humans. Leg. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 18176302.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-8243
  • [Journal-full-title] Southern medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] South. Med. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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12. Okamura M, Yamawaki S, Akechi T, Taniguchi K, Uchitomi Y: Psychiatric disorders following first breast cancer recurrence: prevalence, associated factors and relationship to quality of life. Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2005 Jun;35(6):302-9
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  • Psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD), dysthymic disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder and adjustment disorders (AD), were evaluated according to the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-III-R and IV.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / psychology. Mental Disorders / epidemiology. Quality of Life / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Psychological. Adjustment Disorders / epidemiology. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Anxiety Disorders / epidemiology. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Depressive Disorder, Major / epidemiology. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Dysthymic Disorder / epidemiology. Feasibility Studies. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / psychology. Panic Disorder / epidemiology. Prevalence. Regression Analysis. Social Support. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / epidemiology


13. Onishi H: [Intervention and psychological care for the family caregivers of cancer patients]. Seishin Shinkeigaku Zasshi; 2009;111(1):79-84
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • There are shared responsibilities for decision-making, providing concrete care-giving, meeting the financial and social costs, maintaining stability and adapting to change.
  • It has been shown that spouses demonstrate levels of emotional and functional disruption as great or greater than that of the patient and that these problems often worsen with time, independent of the patient's mood or health.
  • Although bereavement is not a disease, it is associated with excess risk of mortality and morbidity.
  • Bereaved individuals show various physical and psychological symptoms and some of the bereaved individuals develop psychiatric disorders such as bereavement reaction, major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • Among the psychiatric problems, clinicians should consider major depressive disorder because of its higher prevalence, and the need for pharmacotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Caregivers / psychology. Neoplasms / nursing

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  • (PMID = 19301592.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-2658
  • [Journal-full-title] Seishin shinkeigaku zasshi = Psychiatria et neurologia Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Seishin Shinkeigaku Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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14. Ronson A: [Adjustment disorders in oncology: a conceptual framework to be refined]. Encephale; 2005 Mar-Apr;31(2):118-26
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  • Many nosological classification systems were not specifically developed to meet the peculiarities associated with the emotional experience of cancer.
  • In this paper, we intend to offer an operational definition of adjustment and we argue that a vast majority of cancer patients currently receiving a diagnosis of adjustment disorder actually suffer from either subthreshold depression or from full or partial presentation of post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • The confirmation of these hypotheses by clinical observation, experimental psychology paradigms or functional brain imagery studies could have substantial implications for the treatment of psychological distress in patients with cancer.
  • Issues such as the relevance of pharmacological treatment of subthreshold depression--which has received little attention in the general literature--or the role of psychodynamic approaches in the management of cancer-related traumatic dimensions, should be addressed systematically.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjustment Disorders / etiology. Neoplasms / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cost of Illness. Depressive Disorder, Major / diagnosis. Depressive Disorder, Major / etiology. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Humans. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / diagnosis. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / etiology

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  • (PMID = 15959439.001).
  • [ISSN] 0013-7006
  • [Journal-full-title] L'Encéphale
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Encephale
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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15. Aydoğdu E, Yildirim S, Aköz T: Is surgery an effective and adequate treatment in advanced Marjolin's ulcer? Burns; 2005 Jun;31(4):421-31
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  • [Title] Is surgery an effective and adequate treatment in advanced Marjolin's ulcer?
  • We perform a combined approach and aggressive surgery for treatment of Marjolin's ulcer; excision with safe margin, lymphatic dissection, postoperative radiotherapy, chemotherapy and amputation if needed.
  • We think that the scar tissue acts as a barrier for the tumors, which will enlarge.
  • We believe that, if we release this barrier like scar tissue, the virulent the spread of the tumor will be permitted.
  • In this article, we consider whether or not surgical excision alone as recommended in the treatment of Marjolin's ulcers is adequate and effective.
  • An aggressive combined approach is essential for treatment in early stages with high success rate.
  • But there is no consensus for the treatment of advanced disease and results are generally unsuccessful.
  • [MeSH-major] Burns / complications. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Cicatrix / surgery. Neoplasms, Post-Traumatic / surgery. Skin Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Skin Ulcer / etiology. Skin Ulcer / radiotherapy. Skin Ulcer / surgery. Treatment Outcome. Wound Healing

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  • (PMID = 15896503.001).
  • [ISSN] 0305-4179
  • [Journal-full-title] Burns : journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Burns
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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16. Michelucci R: Optimizing therapy of seizures in neurosurgery. Neurology; 2006 Dec 26;67(12 Suppl 4):S14-8
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  • [Title] Optimizing therapy of seizures in neurosurgery.
  • The use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in the neurosurgical setting has a number of implications, including their possible role in the prevention of seizures after acute cerebral insults or brain tumors and the potential for toxicity and interactions when these agents are administered in association with radiotherapy or chemotherapy.
  • 1) AEDs should be prescribed on a short-term basis to prevent seizures occurring within the first week after a cerebral insult (trauma, neurosurgical procedure) but are ineffective to avoid true post-traumatic epilepsy or first seizures in patients with primary or secondary cerebral neoplasms.
  • The newly developed AEDs that are devoid of hepatic metabolism, such as levetiracetam and gabapentin, are now recommended because of good results in preliminary studies and because they do not show interactions with anticancer agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Epilepsy / drug therapy. Epilepsy / etiology. Neurosurgical Procedures / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Anticonvulsants / adverse effects. Anticonvulsants / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / complications. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Cerebellum / surgery. Craniocerebral Trauma / complications. Drug Interactions. Humans. Radiation Injuries

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  • (PMID = 17190915.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-632X
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticonvulsants; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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17. Dunigan JT, Carr BI, Steel JL: Posttraumatic growth, immunity and survival in patients with hepatoma. Dig Dis Sci; 2007 Sep;52(9):2452-9
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  • [Title] Posttraumatic growth, immunity and survival in patients with hepatoma.
  • This study was designed to assess the relationship between posttraumatic growth (PTG), immunity, and survival in patients with biopsy-proven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).
  • Forty-one patients with HCC were administered the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory.
  • The results of this study suggest that patients with greater PTG scores recover more rapidly from chemotherapy in regards to their white blood cell counts.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Hepatocellular. Immunity, Cellular / immunology. Liver Neoplasms. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy. Disease Progression. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Sex Distribution. Surveys and Questionnaires. Survival Rate. Time Factors. United States / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 17417728.001).
  • [ISSN] 0163-2116
  • [Journal-full-title] Digestive diseases and sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dig. Dis. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Burns DS, Azzouz F, Sledge R, Rutledge C, Hincher K, Monahan PO, Cripe LD: Music imagery for adults with acute leukemia in protective environments: a feasibility study. Support Care Cancer; 2008 May;16(5):507-13
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  • BACKGROUND: Patients receiving intensive chemotherapy can experience increased distressed related to both the cancer diagnosis and treatment isolation.
  • If not addressed, distress can lead to anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and possible benefits of a music imagery intervention for patients hospitalized in a protective environment for the treatment of acute leukemia or high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Adults receiving intensive myelosuppressive chemotherapy in a protective environment were randomized to standard care or standard care plus music imagery.
  • Both groups improved over time on all outcomes (all p < 0.001).
  • [MeSH-major] Anxiety / psychology. Imagery (Psychotherapy). Leukemia / psychology. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / psychology. Music Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Affect. Aged. Fatigue. Feasibility Studies. Female. Hematologic Neoplasms. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Relaxation Therapy. Severity of Illness Index. Surveys and Questionnaires. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Cites] J Music Ther. 2001 Spring;38(1):51-65 [11407965.001]
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  • (PMID = 17891547.001).
  • [ISSN] 0941-4355
  • [Journal-full-title] Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Support Care Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCCIH NIH HHS / AT / 5F32AT001144-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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19. Mehnert A, Berg P, Henrich G, Herschbach P: Fear of cancer progression and cancer-related intrusive cognitions in breast cancer survivors. Psychooncology; 2009 Dec;18(12):1273-80
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  • Participants completed self-report measures assessing fear of cancer progression (FoP-Q-SF), posttraumatic stress-disorder symptoms (PCL-C), coping strategies (DWI) and quality of life (QoL) (SF-8).
  • FoP was significantly associated with younger age, having children, disease progress, chemotherapy, perceived amount of impairments, physical and mental QoL, but not with time since initial diagnosis.
  • We found significant correlations between FoP and intrusive thoughts (r=0.63), avoidance (r=0.57), hyperarousal (r=0.54) and posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis (r=0.42).
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / psychology. Fear. Sick Role. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / psychology. Survivors / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Activities of Daily Living / psychology. Adaptation, Psychological. Adult. Aged. Defense Mechanisms. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / psychology. Neoplasm Staging. Personality Inventory. Problem Solving. Religion and Psychology


20. Raimondo G, Ridola V, Brugières L, Couanet D, Valteau-Couanet D, Grill J, Pein F, Hartmann O: [Pseudotumoral diseases: ten years of experience in a pediatric oncology department]. Arch Pediatr; 2002 Oct;9(10):1039-45
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  • PURPOSE: Among the 350 new patients per year treated in the pediatric oncology department of the Gustave-Roussy Institute, about 2% have no tumor.
  • This study analyzes these children presenting a pseudotumoral disease.
  • OUTCOME: Between 1990 and 2000, 64 patients were seen in the pediatric department for pseudotumoral disease.
  • The reasons of orientation were mainly a soft tissue mass (15 cases), an abdominal mass (14 cases), or a bone lesion (13 cases).
  • Diagnosis was most often infectious diseases (33 cases), or post-traumatic lesions (10 cases).
  • For two children, diagnosis was corrected after the beginning of chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Bone Neoplasms / diagnosis. Diagnostic Errors. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 12462834.001).
  • [ISSN] 0929-693X
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives de pédiatrie : organe officiel de la Sociéte française de pédiatrie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Pediatr
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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21. Mann SJ: Severe paroxysmal hypertension (pseudopheochromocytoma). Curr Hypertens Rep; 2008 Feb;10(1):12-8
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  • Yet 98% of people with paroxysmal hypertension do not have this tumor.
  • Based on this understanding, three forms of intervention, alone or in combination, appear successful: antihypertensive therapy with agents directed at the sympathetically mediated blood pressure elevation (eg, combined alpha- and beta-blockade or central alpha-agonists such as clonidine); psychopharmacologic interventions including anxiolytic and/or antidepressant agents; and psychological intervention, particularly reassurance and increased psychological awareness.
  • [MeSH-major] Emotions. Hypertension / drug therapy. Hypertension / psychology. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / complications. Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / diagnosis. Anti-Anxiety Agents / therapeutic use. Antidepressive Agents / therapeutic use. Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Panic Disorder / complications. Pheochromocytoma / complications. Pheochromocytoma / diagnosis. Psychotherapy. Sympathetic Nervous System / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 18367021.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-3111
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hypertension reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Hypertens. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Anxiety Agents; 0 / Antidepressive Agents; 0 / Antihypertensive Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 20
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22. Ronson A: Psychiatric disorders in oncology: recent therapeutic advances and new conceptual frameworks. Curr Opin Oncol; 2004 Jul;16(4):318-23
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  • [Title] Psychiatric disorders in oncology: recent therapeutic advances and new conceptual frameworks.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Major advances achieved in anticancer treatment have resulted in significant increases in cancer patients' survival periods.
  • At the same time, growing awareness of the psychologic impact of the diagnosis and treatment of cancer on quality of life has created the need for deeper insights into the adjustment process, its disorders, and effective strategies for the treatment of psychiatric morbidity.
  • The existence of traumatic stress-like syndromes has received increasing support.
  • Hypotheses about functional modifications at the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis level may have significant implications for the identification, treatment, and even prevention of psychopathology.
  • Finally, longitudinal studies assessing psychologic adjustment confirm the need for psychosocial and pharmacologic interventions.
  • The use of antidepressant medication has received substantial empiric and scientific support, but a risk of antidepressant-induced carcinogenesis has not been excluded, which should keep clinicians from overprescribing attitudes.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Psychological. Antidepressive Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Depression / drug therapy. Depression / psychology. Humans. Life Change Events. Psychology. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / drug therapy. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / psychology. Stress, Psychological / psychology

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  • (PMID = 15187885.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-8746
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antidepressive Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 44
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23. Ishiyama H, Satoh T, Kitano M, Kotani S, Uemae M, Baba S, Hayakawa K: Interactive-plan technique conquers the disadvantages of volume-reducing hormone therapy in 125I permanent implantation for localized prostate cancer. Int J Clin Oncol; 2009 Feb;14(1):53-5
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  • [Title] Interactive-plan technique conquers the disadvantages of volume-reducing hormone therapy in 125I permanent implantation for localized prostate cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of hormone therapy on post-implant dosimetry in patients in whom pre-plan and interactive-plan techniques were used for transperineal brachytherapy against prostatic cancer.
  • The prescribed dose to the periphery of the prostate was 145 Gy.
  • Hormone therapy was used in 71 patients (29.1%).
  • The D90 (dose to 90% of prostate volume) of post-implant computed tomography (CT) analysis was assessed in both groups.
  • In addition, the ratio of post-implant CT volume to preoperative ultrasonography (US) volume was assessed.
  • RESULTS: In the pre-plan group, D90 was significantly lower for patients who received hormone therapy than for those who did not (P = 0.035).
  • However, in the interactive-plan group, D90 did not differ between patients with and without hormone therapy (P = 0.467).
  • The CT-to-US prostate volume ratio was 1.022 for patients who received hormone therapy and 0.960 for patients who did not (P = 0.021).
  • CONCLUSION: Post-traumatic swelling following implantation is increased by cessation of hormone therapy and may reduce D90.
  • However, the present results suggest that the interactive-plan technique overcomes this disadvantage of hormone therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / administration & dosage. Brachytherapy. Iodine Radioisotopes / therapeutic use. Prostate / drug effects. Prostate / radiation effects. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Organ Size. Radiation Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Ultrasonography

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  • (PMID = 19225925.001).
  • [ISSN] 1341-9625
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Iodine Radioisotopes
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24. Tarantini B, Ciuoli C, Checchi S, Montanaro A, Bonato V, Theodoropoulou A, Pasqui L, Pacini F: Serum ghrelin levels in growth hormone-sufficient and growth hormone-deficient patients during growth hormone-releasing hormone plus arginine test. J Endocrinol Invest; 2009 Apr;32(4):335-7
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

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  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study group comprised 35 patients, including 20 with pituitary tumors, 12 with empty sella, 2 with short stature, and 1 with post-traumatic isolated GH deficiency.
  • Patients with central hypothyroidism, hypocorticism, and hypogonadism had been on replacement therapy for at least 3 months at the moment of the study.
  • [MeSH-major] Arginine / administration & dosage. Empty Sella Syndrome / drug therapy. Ghrelin / blood. Growth Disorders / drug therapy. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone / administration & dosage. Human Growth Hormone / blood. Pituitary Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. GLUCOSE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. (L)-ARGININE .
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  • (PMID = 19636202.001).
  • [ISSN] 1720-8386
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of endocrinological investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Endocrinol. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Ghrelin; 0 / Insulin; 12629-01-5 / Human Growth Hormone; 9034-39-3 / Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone; 94ZLA3W45F / Arginine; IY9XDZ35W2 / Glucose
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25. Thomas L, Dalle S: Dermoscopy provides useful information for the management of melanonychia striata. Dermatol Ther; 2007 Jan-Feb;20(1):3-10
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  • Gray homogeneous lines are observed in case of lentigo, lentiginoses, ethnic or drug-induced pigmentations, and in post-traumatic pigmentations.
  • Blood spots are characterized by their round-shaped proximal edge and their filamentous distal edge and are highly suggestive of subungual hemorrhages.
  • Dermoscopic examination of the free edge of the nail plate gives information on the lesion location; pigmentation of the dorsum of the nail plate is in favor of a proximal nail matrix lesion, whereas pigmentation the lower part of the nail edge is in favor of a lesion of the distal matrix.
  • [MeSH-minor] Dermoscopy. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Melanoma / diagnosis. Melanoma / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17403255.001).
  • [ISSN] 1396-0296
  • [Journal-full-title] Dermatologic therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dermatol Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Number-of-references] 14
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26. Roffey P, Thangathurai D: Posttraumatic stress disorder in cancer ICUs. J Intensive Care Med; 2010 Jul;25(4):244
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. KETAMINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Posttraumatic stress disorder in cancer ICUs.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Dissociative / therapeutic use. Fentanyl / therapeutic use. Ketamine / therapeutic use. Narcotics / therapeutic use. Neoplasms. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Intensive Care Units

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Opioid Abuse and Addiction.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FENTANYL .
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  • (PMID = 20695032.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-1489
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of intensive care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Intensive Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Letter
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Dissociative; 0 / Narcotics; 690G0D6V8H / Ketamine; UF599785JZ / Fentanyl
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