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1. Ogunyemi O, Rojas A, Hematpour K, Rogers D, Head C, Bennett C: Metastasis of genitourinary tumors to the head and neck region. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2010 Feb;267(2):273-9
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  • [Title] Metastasis of genitourinary tumors to the head and neck region.
  • The objective of the present study is to characterize genitourinary tumors (GU) metastatic to the head and neck and to determine long-term prognoses.
  • Using a retrospective chart review of 734 patients treated between January 1995 and May 2005 with an ICD-9 code pertaining to a metastatic head and neck cancer, we found 37 patients with primary GU tumors.
  • We concluded that prolonged survival is possible in prostate cancer patients treated aggressively with radiation and chemotherapy, indicating that early detection and aggressive screening are important in these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / secondary. Head and Neck Neoplasms / secondary. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. California / epidemiology. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors. Urogenital Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19536555.001).
  • [ISSN] 1434-4726
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2798081
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2. Green DA, Antholine WE, Wong SJ, Richardson DR, Chitambar CR: Inhibition of malignant cell growth by 311, a novel iron chelator of the pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone class: effect on the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase. Clin Cancer Res; 2001 Nov;7(11):3574-9
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  • The key roles of iron and iron proteins in cell proliferation make them potential targets for cancer therapy.
  • We found that 311 inhibited the growth of CCRF-CEM cells in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion with an IC(50) that was approximately 20-fold lower than that of DFO.
  • 311 also inhibited the growth of breast, bladder, and head and neck cancer cell lines.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Cell Division / drug effects. Iron Chelating Agents / pharmacology. Isoniazid / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Deferoxamine / pharmacology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Humans. Hydroxyurea / pharmacology. Mutation. Protein Subunits. Ribonucleotide Reductases / drug effects. Ribonucleotide Reductases / metabolism. Time Factors. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / genetics

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  • (PMID = 11705879.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Iron Chelating Agents; 0 / Protein Subunits; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; EC 1.17.4.- / Ribonucleotide Reductases; J06Y7MXW4D / Deferoxamine; V83O1VOZ8L / Isoniazid; X6Q56QN5QC / Hydroxyurea
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3. Bott SR, Kirby RS: Avoidance and management of positive surgical margins before, during and after radical prostatectomy. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis; 2002;5(4):252-63
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  • Earlier detection of prostate cancer, appropriate patient selection and improved operative techniques can reduce the incidence of positive margins, though the risk can not be eliminated as pre-operative staging techniques are not sufficiently sensitive.
  • Nerve sparing and bladder neck sparing do not adversely affect margin status in appropriately selected men.
  • Once positive margins have been diagnosed the optimal management and the timing of treatment remains controversial.
  • [MeSH-minor] Androgens. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Laparoscopy. Male. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Proteins / blood. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasm, Residual. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / radiotherapy. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / surgery. Patient Selection. Postoperative Complications / prevention & control. Preoperative Care. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Salvage Therapy

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  • (PMID = 12627209.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-7852
  • [Journal-full-title] Prostate cancer and prostatic diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgens; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
  • [Number-of-references] 118
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4. Martelli H, Haie-Meder C, Branchereau S, Franchi-Abella S, Ghigna MR, Dumas I, Bouvet N, Oberlin O: Conservative surgery plus brachytherapy treatment for boys with prostate and/or bladder neck rhabdomyosarcoma: a single team experience. J Pediatr Surg; 2009 Jan;44(1):190-6
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  • [Title] Conservative surgery plus brachytherapy treatment for boys with prostate and/or bladder neck rhabdomyosarcoma: a single team experience.
  • PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to report the results of a conservative surgery + brachytherapy treatment for boys with prostate and/or bladder-neck rhabdomyosarcoma avoiding total cystectomy or prostatectomy and external radiotherapy.
  • PATIENTS: From 1991 to 2007, 26 boys were operated for a residual mass after chemotherapy (1 for local relapse).
  • All patients underwent a conservative surgical procedure, with bladder-neck and urethra preservation.
  • Brachytherapy was systematically performed after tumor resection, as a perioperative procedure, consisting of 2 loops encompassing the prostate and the bladder-neck area.
  • A dose of 60 Gy was delivered with low dose rate.
  • Bladder function was evaluated clinically and with urodynamic study for boys with abnormal continence.
  • The remaining 9 patients underwent a partial cystectomy with no procedure at the level of the prostate.
  • Only 1 patient with bladder dysfunction after treatment underwent a total cystectomy.
  • Four patients are too young to be evaluated for bladder function (<4 years of age).
  • Among 11 boys older than 6 years, 9 (82%) are normally continent (3 after temporary dribbling), 2 have diurnal dribbling treated by bladder education.
  • CONCLUSION: Even if very long-term sequelae of brachytherapy cannot be evaluated, this conservative combined treatment may allow normal continence in nearly all patients, even after temporary diurnal incontinence and should be discussed as an alternative to external radiotherapy or radical surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachytherapy / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / surgery. Rhabdomyosarcoma / radiotherapy. Rhabdomyosarcoma / surgery. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Infant. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm, Residual / radiotherapy. Neoplasm, Residual / surgery. Radiotherapy Dosage. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19159742.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Cresswell J, Roberts JT, Neal DE: Urethral recurrence after radical radiotherapy for bladder cancer. J Urol; 2001 Apr;165(4):1135-7
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  • [Title] Urethral recurrence after radical radiotherapy for bladder cancer.
  • PURPOSE: Following cystectomy for bladder cancer, orthotopic reconstruction may result in a decreased risk of urethral recurrence compared to cutaneous diversion.
  • Patients treated with chemotherapy were excluded from study.
  • Urethral recurrence developed in 7 (3.2%) cases and was detected within 18 months (median 10 months, range 3 months to 5 years) of followup in 5.
  • In 2 of these 7 cases recurrence developed in the prostatic urethra, and when these 2 cases were excluded from analysis the recurrence rate decreased to 2.3%.
  • Multifocal disease, bladder neck involvement, prostatic disease and cis were possible risk factors for urethral recurrence.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The risk of urethral recurrence after radical radiotherapy for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder is comparable with that reported after orthotopic reconstruction.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / radiotherapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Urethral Neoplasms / prevention & control. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cystectomy. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Urinary Diversion

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  • (PMID = 11257654.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Mhawech-Fauceglia P, Allal A, Odunsi K, Andrews C, Herrmann FR, Huard B: Role of the tumour necrosis family ligand APRIL in solid tumour development: Retrospective studies in bladder, ovarian and head and neck carcinomas. Eur J Cancer; 2008 Oct;44(15):2097-100

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  • [Title] Role of the tumour necrosis family ligand APRIL in solid tumour development: Retrospective studies in bladder, ovarian and head and neck carcinomas.
  • Here, we studied the role of APRIL in patients with urothelial bladder, epithelial surface ovarian, and head and neck squamous carcinomas.
  • By using immunohistochemistry, we revealed an upregulation of APRIL expression in lesions from a significant subset of patients compared to corresponding healthy tissues.
  • This indicates that APRIL is not potent enough to promote the development of solid tumour cells under the pressure of chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Proteins / physiology. Neoplasms / metabolism. Tumor Necrosis Factor Ligand Superfamily Member 13 / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Female. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / metabolism. Humans. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / metabolism. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Up-Regulation. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18718755.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0852
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / TNFSF13 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor Ligand Superfamily Member 13
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7. Djeu JY, Wei S: Clusterin and chemoresistance. Adv Cancer Res; 2009;105:77-92
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  • Resistance to anticancer agents is one of the primary impediments to effective cancer therapy.
  • Chemoresistance occurs not only to clinically established therapeutic agents but also to novel targeted therapeutics.
  • Both intrinsic and acquired mechanisms have been implicated in drug resistance but it remains controversial which mechanisms are responsible that lead to failure of therapy in cancer patients.
  • Moreover, it is abnormally upregulated in numerous advanced stage and metastatic cancers spanning prostate, renal, bladder, breast, head and neck, colon, cervical, pancreatic, lung carcinomas, melanoma, and lymphoma.
  • Thus, sCLU has a key role in preventing apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents and has the potential to be targeted for cancer therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Clusterin / physiology. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Resistance, Multiple. Humans. Oxidative Stress

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  • (PMID = 19879424.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-230X
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA098080
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CLU protein, human; 0 / Clusterin
  • [Number-of-references] 78
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS539156; NLM/ PMC3889866
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8. Beresford MJ, Burcombe R, Ah-See ML, Stott D, Makris A: Pre-treatment haemoglobin levels and the prediction of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer. Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol); 2006 Aug;18(6):453-8
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  • [Title] Pre-treatment haemoglobin levels and the prediction of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.
  • AIMS: A low pre-treatment haemoglobin level has been shown to negatively influence outcome in the treatment of tumours of the cervix, bladder and head and neck by radiotherapy.
  • The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of baseline haemoglobin levels on the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and thirty-nine women receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for operable breast tumours (T2-4, N0-1, M0) were accessed from our prospective database.
  • Most women were treated with 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy (122/139 patients).
  • Baseline haemoglobin levels were compared for clinical responders (partial or complete) and non-responders (stable or progressive disease) using Student's t test and logistic regression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence for an influence of pre-treatment haemoglobin levels on the clinical response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hemoglobins / analysis. Neoadjuvant Therapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Databases, Factual. Disease Progression. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Menopause. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasm, Residual / surgery. Platelet Count. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Regression Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16909968.001).
  • [ISSN] 0936-6555
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain))
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hemoglobins; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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9. Metwalli AR, Kamat AM: Controversial issues and optimal management of stage T1G3 bladder cancer. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther; 2006 Aug;6(8):1283-94
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  • [Title] Controversial issues and optimal management of stage T1G3 bladder cancer.
  • The management of T1G3 bladder cancer is controversial.
  • Diagnostic methods, such as bladder mapping or second-look transurethral resection are recommended to assess risk.
  • Bacillus Calmette-Guérin intravesical therapy with a maintenance regimen is recommended for solitary T1G3 tumors.
  • The timing of radical cystectomy for these patients is controversial, but early recurrence during intravesical therapy is an indication for radical cystectomy.
  • Multifocal disease, concomitant carcinoma in situ and disease in the prostatic urethra and bladder neck also suggest aggressive disease and cystectomy should be considered in these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] BCG Vaccine / therapeutic use. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Intravesical. Algorithms. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Reproducibility of Results

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  • (PMID = 16925494.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8328
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of anticancer therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / BCG Vaccine
  • [Number-of-references] 117
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10. Perry CF, Stevens M, Rabie I, Yarker ME, Cochrane J, Perry E, Traficante R, Coman W: Chemoprevention of head and neck cancer with retinoids: a negative result. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2005 Mar;131(3):198-203

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Chemoprevention of head and neck cancer with retinoids: a negative result.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether isotretinoin (or 13-cis-retinoic acid) decreases the risk of second primary cancers in patients previously treated for cure of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
  • SETTING: Two head and neck multidisciplinary cancer clinics in university teaching hospitals taking cases from 4 to 5 million people in Queensland, Australia, combined to enter appropriate patients into this trial.
  • PATIENTS: One hundred fifty-one patients with their first head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with high expectation for cure and living close by.
  • They were randomized into 3 arms to receive 3 years of treatment.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The diagnosis of a second primary malignancy of the head and neck, lung, or bladder was regarded as the end point signifying failure of therapy.
  • Issues of drug adverse effect profile and impact on survival were measured.
  • RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the occurrence of second primary disease (P = .90), the recurrence of primary disease (P = .70), or disease-free time (P = .80) between the treatment and nontreatment arms.
  • CONCLUSION: With evidence that retinoid treatment adversely affects survival of lung cancer and with this drug not significantly decreasing the incidence of second primary tumors of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, the use of this drug in head and neck cancer patients for second cancer prophylaxis is not indicated.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Neoplasms, Second Primary / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / prevention & control. Retinoids / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Chemoprevention / methods. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Double-Blind Method. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Head and Neck Neoplasms / mortality. Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. New South Wales. Poisson Distribution. Probability. Proportional Hazards Models. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Treatment Failure

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  • (PMID = 15781758.001).
  • [ISSN] 0886-4470
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of otolaryngology--head & neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Retinoids
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11. Mekhail TM, Markman M: Paclitaxel in cancer therapy. Expert Opin Pharmacother; 2002 Jun;3(6):755-66
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  • [Title] Paclitaxel in cancer therapy.
  • Mechanisms of acquired resistance to paclitaxel include alterations of tubulin structure and the amplification of membrane phosphoglycoproteins that function as drug-efflux pumps.
  • Paclitaxel has activity against a broad band of tumour types, including breast, ovarian, lung, head and neck cancers.
  • Paclitaxel also has activity in other malignancies that are refractory to conventional chemotherapy, including previously-treated lymphoma and small cell lung cancers and oesophageal, gastric endometrial, bladder and germ cell tumours.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Paclitaxel / pharmacology. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 12036415.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-6566
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
  • [Number-of-references] 106
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12. Piulats JM, Jiménez L, García del Muro X, Villanueva A, Viñals F, Germà-Lluch JR: Molecular mechanisms behind the resistance of cisplatin in germ cell tumours. Clin Transl Oncol; 2009 Dec;11(12):780-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .

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  • Cisplatin has been one of the principal chemotherapy agents for the last 30 years and is still used widely in the treatment of testicular, ovarian, lung, head and neck, bladder and several other tumours.
  • Resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is a major obstacle for successful treatment.
  • Treatment effect on germ cell tumours (GCTs) is more successful than in adults suffering from almost any other solid tumour, but resistance still appears in 20% of patients with metastatic disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / genetics. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Disease Models, Animal. Humans. Models, Biological. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Signal Transduction / genetics

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  • (PMID = 20045784.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-3055
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  • [Number-of-references] 62
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13. Ok JH, Meyers FJ, Evans CP: Medical and surgical palliative care of patients with urological malignancies. J Urol; 2005 Oct;174(4 Pt 1):1177-82
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  • There are many effective medical and surgical palliative treatments, although few comprehensive guidelines have been published.
  • We reviewed the various palliative treatments available for the 3 most common urological malignancies, namely prostate cancer, bladder cancer and renal cancer.
  • RESULTS: Several effective treatments are available for the palliative care of patients with prostate, bladder or renal cancer.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Palliative care includes disease directed treatment as well as functional, psychosocial and spiritual support.
  • Disease directed therapy and palliative care should be provided simultaneously throughout illness.
  • Supportive care begins at initial diagnosis and it should be flexible to meet the changing needs of patients with cancer and their families.
  • [MeSH-major] Palliative Care. Urologic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Algorithms. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Hospices. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Pelvic Pain / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / complications. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy. Spinal Cord Compression / etiology. Spinal Cord Compression / surgery. Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction / etiology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 16145365.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 48
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14. Iwamoto FM, Omuro AM, Raizer JJ, Nolan CP, Hormigo A, Lassman AB, Gavrilovic IT, Abrey LE: A phase II trial of vinorelbine and intensive temozolomide for patients with recurrent or progressive brain metastases. J Neurooncol; 2008 Mar;87(1):85-90
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINBLASTINE .

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  • The primary tumor sites were lung (n = 20), breast (n = 11), colorectal (n = 2), kidney (n = 2), bladder (n = 1), endometrium (n = 1), head and neck (n = 1).
  • Prior therapies included chemotherapy (97%), whole-brain radiation therapy (79%), brain metastasis resection (53%) and stereotatic radiosurgery (47%).
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 17987262.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; Q6C979R91Y / vinorelbine; YF1K15M17Y / temozolomide
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15. Bien E, Stachowicz-Stencel T, Balcerska A, Godzinski J, Kazanowska B, Perek-Polnik M, Madziara W, Rybczynska A, Kurylak A, Zalewska-Szewczyk B, Peregud-Pogorzelski J: Angiosarcoma in children - still uncontrollable oncological problem. The report of the Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours Study. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl); 2009 Jul;18(4):411-20
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  • The report of the Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours StudyAngiosarcoma is a rare, highly malignant vascular neoplasm with little data available on its clinical course and management in children.
  • Ten children with angiosarcoma (M/F: 6/4; aged 2, 3-16 years) registered in Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours and Soft Tissue Sarcomas Studies between 1992 and 2006.
  • Primary tumour exceeded 5 cm in seven patients and affected mainly deep tissues (heart-2, head/neck, bladder, brain, liver and upper limb - one patient each).
  • All patients received supplementing chemotherapy with no response in four.
  • Relapsed patients received chemotherapy +/- radiotherapy and surgery (three).
  • The response to chemotherapy is poor and the large number of metastatic recurrences suggests a need for systemic therapy modifications.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemangiosarcoma / pathology. Hemangiosarcoma / therapy. Sarcoma / pathology. Sarcoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease Progression. Humans. Male. Poland / epidemiology. Prognosis. Radiotherapy. Recurrence. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 19490008.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2354
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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16. Cecchetto G, Guglielmi M, Inserra A, Zanetti I, Dall'Igna P, Gigante C, Carli M, Italian Cooperative Group on Soft-tissue Sarcomas: Primary re-excision: the Italian experience in patients with localized soft-tissue sarcomas. Pediatr Surg Int; 2001 Sep;17(7):532-4

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Primary re-excision: the Italian experience in patients with localized soft-tissue sarcomas.
  • Primary re-excision (PRE) is a wide, non-mutilating procedure carried out in patients with soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) when microscopic residuals are left after initial excision or when there are insufficient data on its completeness.
  • The primary sites were the extremities in 20, paratesticular 15, trunk 9, head-neck-non-parameningeal (HNnPM) 6, bladder 1, other sites in 2; the tumor (T) status was T1a in 30, T1b in 10, T2a in 9, and T2b in 4; the median interval between primary surgery and PRE was 36 days.
  • Of the 53 patients, 45 had complete histologic excision of the tumor (residuals were found in 21/45 specimens) and subsequently received chemotherapy (CT) alone: 39/45 are in their first complete remission (CR) with a median follow-up of 53 months; 6/45 (3 RMS, 3 NRSTS) relapsed, 4 locally (2 extremities, 2 trunk), and 1 of these died of progressive disease, and 2 with metastatic spread died of their disease.
  • In 8/53 cases (HNnPM 4. extremities 2, bladder 1, trunk 1) PRE did not achieve complete removal of the residuals (3 T1a, 2 Tlb, 2 T2a, 1 T2b); these patients were treated with CT and/or radiotherapy (RT); 1 also underwent further surgery.
  • The histologic types and the presence of residuals at PRE did not predict the failures; PRE was effective especially in extremity, trunk, and paratesticular sites, whereas its role was uncertain in large sarcomas over 5 cm in size.
  • [MeSH-major] Rhabdomyosarcoma / surgery. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Head and Neck Neoplasms / surgery. Humans. Infant. Italy. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Testicular Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 11666052.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric surgery international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Surg. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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17. Baker KS, Anderson JR, Link MP, Grier HE, Qualman SJ, Maurer HM, Breneman JC, Wiener ES, Crist WM: Benefit of intensified therapy for patients with local or regional embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma: results from the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study IV. J Clin Oncol; 2000 Jun;18(12):2427-34
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINCRISTINE .

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  • [Title] Benefit of intensified therapy for patients with local or regional embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma: results from the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study IV.
  • Subset analysis revealed two groups that benefited most from IRS-IV therapy.
  • FFS at 3 years for patients with resectable node-positive or unresectable (group III) embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma arising at certain favorable sites (head and neck [not orbit/eyelid or parameningeal] and genitourinary [not bladder or prostate]) improved from 72% on IRS-III to 92% on IRS-IV (P =.01).
  • CONCLUSION: IRS-IV therapy benefited certain subgroups of patients with intermediate-risk embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Rhabdomyosarcoma, Embryonal / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dactinomycin / administration & dosage. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 10856103.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-24507; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-30138; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-30969; etc
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1CC1JFE158 / Dactinomycin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide; VAC protocol
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18. Li AF, Hsu HS, Hsu CY, Li AC, Li WY, Liang WY, Chen JY: A 20-year retrospective study of small-cell carcinomas in Taiwan. J Surg Oncol; 2010 Oct 1;102(5):497-502
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  • This study aimed to examine the distribution, treatment, and survival of SCCs.
  • RESULTS: The lung (89.2%) was the most common location, followed by the esophagus (1.8%), urinary bladder (1.6%), uterine cervix (1.5%), colorectum (1.4%), skin (1.0%), stomach (0.9%), head and neck (0.7%), prostate (0.3%), and small intestine (0.1%).
  • Limited disease (LD) SCLC patients underwent surgery and chemotherapy had significantly higher survival rates than those who received chemotherapy alone, those who underwent combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and those who were administered supportive treatment.
  • The need for combined surgery and chemotherapy in LD-SCLC patients deserves further evaluation.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / mortality. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / therapy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Taiwan. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] J. Surg. Oncol. 2010;102:497-502. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 20872953.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-9098
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Cecchetto G, Carretto E, Bisogno G, Dall'Igna P, Ferrari A, Scarzello G, Donfrancesco A, Alaggio R, Indolfi P, Carli M: Complete second look operation and radiotherapy in locally advanced non-alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in children: A report from the AIEOP soft tissue sarcoma committee. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2008 Nov;51(5):593-7
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  • [Title] Complete second look operation and radiotherapy in locally advanced non-alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in children: A report from the AIEOP soft tissue sarcoma committee.
  • PROCEDURE: We analyzed data from 39 patients (age: 0.5-194 months, median 52) who were enrolled between 1988 and 2005 in 2 consecutive Italian Studies, RMS 88 and RMS 96.
  • All achieved a complete resection of the residual tumor after neoadjuvant chemotherapy; 27 did not receive any other local treatment: pelvic 8, extremities 6, head-neck-non-parameningeal 5, orbit 1, genito-urinary-bladder-prostate 3, trunk 2, abdomen 1, vagina 1; 12 were given RT (32-45 Gy), 5 before and 7 after the operation: genito-urinary-bladder-prostate 3, pelvic 3, abdominal 1, extremities 1, head-neck-parameningeal 1, head-neck-non-parameningeal 1, vagina 1, orbit 1.
  • All received postoperative chemotherapy.
  • Without RT: 16/27 maintained the first complete remission, however 1/16 died due to a second tumor; 8 suffered from local relapse (4 pelvic, 1 orbit, 1 vagina, 1 head-neck-non-parameningeal, 1 abdomen) and 3 of them died, 3 showed a metastatic recurrence (2 extremities, 1 pelvic) and 1 died.
  • The two relapses after RT occurred in huge bladder-prostate RMS.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Child. Child, Preschool. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Infant. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Sarcoma

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 18668515.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5017
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Delord JP, Raymond E, Chaouche M, Ruffie P, Ducreux M, Faivre S, Boige V, Le Chevalier T, Rixe O, Baudin E, Pautier P, Rodier JM, Chouaki N, Escudier B, Kayitalire L, Armand JP: A dose-finding study of gemcitabine and vinorelbine in advanced previously treated malignancies. Ann Oncol; 2000 Jan;11(1):73-9
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  • PURPOSE: Gemcitabine and vinorelbine are active drugs with broad spectrum of activity and manageable toxicity in clinical trials.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Drugs were given as 30-min infusions on day 1 and 8 (vinorelbine before gemcitabine) every 3 weeks.
  • Thirty-six patients (male:female ratio 25:11; mean age 54, PS > 60) were treated including 1 retroperitoneal sarcoma, 7 head and neck, 10 lung, 4 thyroid, 6 pancreatic, 1 bladder, 2 ovary, 2 gastric, 1 rectum, 1 unknown primary, and 1 renal cell carcinoma.
  • One toxic death due to hematologic toxicity was reported in a heavily pretreated patient who underwent prior chemotherapy and pelvic radiotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 10690391.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; Q6C979R91Y / vinorelbine
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21. Martin M: Clinical experience with pemetrexed in breast cancer. Semin Oncol; 2006 Feb;33(1 Suppl 2):S15-8
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  • Alimta (pemetrexed) is a novel multitargeted antifolate that inhibits several enzymes in the de novo pathways of pyrimidine and purine biosynthesis, including thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase, and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase.
  • Pemetrexed possesses antitumor activity in several solid tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer, malignant pleural mesothelioma, pancreas, colorectal, gastric, bladder, breast, and head and neck cancers.
  • The main toxicities of the drug are myelosuppression, skin rash, and mucositis.
  • The drug has shown an activity of around 30% in advanced breast cancer patients with minimal or no prior chemotherapy.
  • A randomized phase II study comparing pemetrexed 600 and 900 mg/m(2) with vitamin supplementation as first-line treatment for metastatic breast cancer is ongoing.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Glutamates / therapeutic use. Guanine / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Exanthema / chemically induced. Folic Acid / administration & dosage. Humans. Mucositis / chemically induced. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Pemetrexed. Treatment Outcome. Vitamin B 12 / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 16472713.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Glutamates; 04Q9AIZ7NO / Pemetrexed; 5Z93L87A1R / Guanine; 935E97BOY8 / Folic Acid; P6YC3EG204 / Vitamin B 12
  • [Number-of-references] 24
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22. Wu M, Rivkin A, Pham T: Panitumumab: human monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptors for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Clin Ther; 2008 Jan;30(1):14-30
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  • [Title] Panitumumab: human monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptors for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Panitumumab, formerly known as ABX-EGF, was the first recombinant human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) refractory to fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and/or irinotecan-containing chemotherapeutic regimens.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, clinical efficacy, and safety profile of panitumumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.
  • In a Phase III trial of panitumumab plus best supportive care (BSC) versus BSC alone in patients with refractory mCRC, panitumumab was found to have efficacy in time-related end points, such as progression-free survival.
  • At the present time, the use of panitumumab as first-line treatment for mCRC with standard chemotherapy and bevacizumab is not indicated due to increased toxicity with no advantage in efficacy.
  • The efficacy of panitumumab is being evaluated in other solid tumors, such as lung, breast, ovarian, bladder, and head and neck cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism


23. Tu WH, Jensen K, Freiha F, Liao JC: A case of prostatic adenocarcinoma recurrence presenting as ductal carcinoma of the prostate. Nat Clin Pract Urol; 2008 Jan;5(1):55-8
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  • BACKGROUND: A 61-year-old man with a history of recurrent prostate cancer presented with obstructive urinary symptoms.
  • He had been diagnosed with locally invasive adenocarcinoma of the prostate 10 years previously and treated with neoadjuvant hormonal and external beam radiation therapies.
  • Because of the patient's rising PSA level, he had been started on goserelin 6 years after this diagnosis and bicalutamide 6 months before the current presentation.
  • The patient presented to the urology clinic with worsening lower urinary tract symptoms consisting of nocturia, urgency, and weak stream.
  • Laboratory tests showed no evidence of urinary tract infection, but confirmed a rising PSA level despite low serum testosterone levels.
  • Cystoscopic examination revealed hypervascular, large lateral prostatic lobes obstructing the bladder neck.
  • The bladder was normal.
  • DIAGNOSIS: The patient underwent transurethral resection of the prostate.
  • The patient was started on docetaxel-based chemotherapy for hormone refractory recurrence of prostate cancer as ductal carcinoma of the prostate.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Ductal / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 18185514.001).
  • [ISSN] 1743-4289
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature clinical practice. Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Clin Pract Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Capdevila J, Salazar R: Molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Target Oncol; 2009 Dec;4(4):287-96
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  • [Title] Molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.
  • The traditional cytotoxic agents are of limited efficacy in the treatment of these tumors.
  • A better understanding of the molecular pathways that characterize tumor growth has provided novel targets in cancer treatment.
  • In this article we aim to review the recent development of the main molecules that target these proteins and have showed promising activity in the treatment of GEPNETs.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Neovascularization, Pathologic / prevention & control. Neuroendocrine Tumors / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Biomarkers, Tumor. Cell Line, Tumor. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Delivery Systems. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Drug Synergism. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / metabolism. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt / administration & dosage. Signal Transduction. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19898923.001).
  • [ISSN] 1776-260X
  • [Journal-full-title] Targeted oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Target Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 2.7.11.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
  • [Number-of-references] 63
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25. Chiewvit P, Danchaivijitr N, Sirivitmaitrie K, Chiewvit S, Thephamongkhol K: Does magnetic resonance imaging give value-added than bone scintigraphy in the detection of vertebral metastasis? J Med Assoc Thai; 2009 Jun;92(6):818-29
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  • [Title] Does magnetic resonance imaging give value-added than bone scintigraphy in the detection of vertebral metastasis?
  • The MR imaging findings were studied: location (cervical or thoracic or lumbar or sacrum spine), number of lesions (solitary or multiple lesions), pattern of enhancement (homogeneous or inhomogeneous), involvement of spinal canal, compression of spinal cord, extradural extension, other incidental findings such as pulmonary metastasis, pleural effusion, lymphadenopathy The final diagnosis was confirmed clinically and followed-up for further management (radiation or surgery) or followed-up by MR imaging (1 month-16 months) and bone scintigraphy (5 months-12 months).
  • Primary neoplasms include breast cancer (n=11), colorectal cancer (n=7), lung cancer (n=6), prostate cancer (n=5), nasopharyngeal cancer (n=5), head and neck cancer (n=3), thyroid cancer (n=2), liver cancer (n=2), esophagus cancer (n=1), bladder cancer (n=1), retroperitoneum cancer (n=1), medulloblastoma (n=1), cervical cancer (n=1), ovarian cancer (n=1), malignant melanoma (n=1).
  • Furthermore, MR imaging is important for the further treatment planning such as radiation therapy or systemic chemotherapy.
  • Although MR imaging is useful in the detection of early metastasis that are localized completely in the bone marrow cavity routinely bone scintigraphy remains that most cost-effective method for examination of the entire skeleton.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Child. Diphosphonates. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis / radionuclide imaging. Organotechnetium Compounds. Radionuclide Imaging. Retrospective Studies. Spinal Cord Compression. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19530588.001).
  • [ISSN] 0125-2208
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Assoc Thai
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Thailand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Organotechnetium Compounds; 0 / technetium 99m methylene bisphosphonate
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26. Soto Parra H, Cavina R, Latteri F, Sala A, Dambrosio M, Antonelli G, Morenghi E, Alloisio M, Ravasi G, Santoro A: Three-week versus four-week schedule of cisplatin and gemcitabine: results of a randomized phase II study. Ann Oncol; 2002 Jul;13(7):1080-6
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

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  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ninety-six patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and an additional 11 patients with an advanced epithelial neoplasm [bladder (n = 5), head and neck (n = 3), cervix (n = 1), esophageal (n = 1) or unknown primary carcinoma (n = 1)] were randomized to receive cisplatin 70 mg/m(2) intravenously on day 2 plus either gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28-day cycle or gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle.
  • A total of 398 cycles of therapy were delivered.

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  • (PMID = 12176787.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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27. Goel A, Aggarwal BB: Curcumin, the golden spice from Indian saffron, is a chemosensitizer and radiosensitizer for tumors and chemoprotector and radioprotector for normal organs. Nutr Cancer; 2010;62(7):919-30
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

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  • Chemosensitization has been observed in cancers of the breast, colon, pancreas, gastric, liver, blood, lung, prostate, bladder, cervix, ovary, head and neck, and brain and in multiple myeloma, leukemia, and lymphoma.
  • Although it acts as a chemosensitizer and radiosensitizer for tumors in some cases, curcumin has also been shown to protect normal organs such as liver, kidney, oral mucosa, and heart from chemotherapy and radiotherapy-induced toxicity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Humans

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  • (PMID = 20924967.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-7914
  • [Journal-full-title] Nutrition and cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nutr Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Radiation-Protective Agents; 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; IT942ZTH98 / Curcumin
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28. Várady E, Deák B, Molnár ZS, Rosta A, Schneider T, Esik O, Eckhardt S: Second malignancies after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. Leuk Lymphoma; 2001 Nov-Dec;42(6):1275-81
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  • [Title] Second malignancies after treatment for Hodgkin's disease.
  • The occurrence of treatment-related second malignancy following Hodgkin's disease (HD) has now been recognized as a major problem.
  • Second neoplasm developed in 32 cases (4.8%).
  • Among patients with second hematological malignancies, the mean age at diagnosis of HD was 44 years and the mean interval until the development of second malignancy was 6.1 years.
  • Five patients received chemo- and radiotherapy and in two cases chemotherapy was used.
  • Twenty-five patients have had solid tumors, affecting lung (5), breast (3), colon (3), stomach (2), urinary bladder (2), head-and-neck (1), thyroid gland (1), esophagus (1), liver (1), pancreas (1), furthermore, three sarcomas and two malignant melanomas were observed.
  • Their mean age at the diagnosis of HD was 46 years and the mean period of latency was 8.3 years.
  • Chemotherapy was applied to nine patients, 16 patients received both chemo- and radiotherapy.
  • Since alkylating agents increase the risk of leukemia and irradiation contributes mainly to other malignancies, future treatment protocols should attempt to reduce the most serious consequence of therapy without compromising the survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 11911408.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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29. Mohammadianpanah M, Vasei M, Mosalaei A, Omidvari S, Ahmadloo N: Malignant spinal cord compression in cancer patients may be mimicked by a primary spinal cord tumour. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl); 2006 Dec;15(5):497-500
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • A 50-year-old man developed intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord 1.5 years following chemoradiation for Waldeyer's ring lymphoma.
  • He presented with a 2-month history of neck pain, progressive upper- and lower-extremity numbness and weakness, and bowel and bladder dysfunction.
  • [MeSH-major] Ependymoma / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Second Primary / diagnosis. Spinal Cord Compression / etiology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Cervical Vertebrae. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / radiotherapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Quadriplegia / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17177910.001).
  • [ISSN] 0961-5423
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 10
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30. Palou Redorta J, Schatteman P, Huguet Pérez J, Segarra Tomás J, Rosales Bordes A, Algaba F, Villavicencio Mavrich H: Intravesical instillations with bacillus calmette-guérin for the treatment of carcinoma in situ involving prostatic ducts. Eur Urol; 2006 May;49(5):834-8; discussion 838
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intravesical instillations with bacillus calmette-guérin for the treatment of carcinoma in situ involving prostatic ducts.
  • OBJECTIVES: Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has proven its efficacy in the treatment of carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the prostatic urethra.
  • Ten patients (91%) had a simultaneous superficial bladder carcinoma.
  • Eight patients (73%) had tumoral involvement of the bladder neck region.
  • After a median follow-up of 27 mo (n=10 patients), the response in the prostatic urethra was 82%, and the response in the bladder due to superficial tumor recurrence was 64%.
  • Another patient developed distant metastatic disease and died a few months after diagnosis.
  • Currently, 90% of patients are alive without evidence of disease and 72.7% have benefitted from this bladder preservation strategy.
  • CONCLUSION: Intravesical BCG is a feasible treatment option for patients with CIS involving prostatic ducts.
  • In this retrospective study, bladder preservation was successful in 8 of 11 patients (70%) and there was only one oncologic death.
  • Obviously, these patients need a careful follow-up with cystoscopy and cytology to detect either recurrence or progression and in those with persistent disease after the initial BCG induction therapy, prompt cystectomy is indicated.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / administration & dosage. BCG Vaccine / administration & dosage. Carcinoma in Situ / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urethral Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Intravesical. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy. Cystectomy. Cystoscopy. Diagnosis, Differential. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Instillation, Drug. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Transurethral Resection of Prostate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16426729.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-2838
  • [Journal-full-title] European urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / BCG Vaccine
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31. Berge V, Thompson T, Blackman D: Additional surgical intervention after radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, androgen-deprivation therapy, or watchful waiting. Eur Urol; 2007 Oct;52(4):1036-43
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Additional surgical intervention after radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, androgen-deprivation therapy, or watchful waiting.
  • OBJECTIVES: The amount of additional surgical procedures that cancer patients undergo following their initial treatment is one means of measuring the impact that cancer and cancer treatment has on their quality of life.
  • In this study we looked for treatment-related differences in the need for additional surgical intervention among men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer within 66 mo of their initial treatment.
  • We searched the claims database for procedure codes indicating artificial urinary sphincter procedures, cystoscopy, urethral dilation, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and bladder-neck incision, bladder irrigation/cystotomy, or nephrostomy.
  • RESULTS: Of the 12,711 patients in our study, 3940 (31.0%) were initially treated by radical prostatectomy (RP), 3950 (31.1%) by radiation therapy (RT), 1209 (9.5%) by androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), and 3612 (28.4%) by watchful waiting (WW).
  • The percentage of patients who underwent cystoscopy 6-66 mo after their initial treatment ranged narrowly from 22% to 24% among members of the four treatment groups.
  • In the RP group, 5.2% had artificial urinary sphincter procedures; 6.8% of the RT group, 8.2% of the ADT group, and 10.1% of the WW group had TURP/bladder-neck procedures compared with 3.7% of the RP group; and 12.5-16.2% of members in the four groups had urethral dilation procedures.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Over one third of prostate cancer patients needed surgical intervention within 66 mo of their initial treatment despite the type of initial treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Androgen Antagonists / therapeutic use. Prostatectomy / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cohort Studies. Combined Modality Therapy. Comorbidity. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Male. National Cancer Institute (U.S.). Neoplasm Staging. United States

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  • [CommentIn] Eur Urol. 2007 Oct;52(4):1043 [17933028.001]
  • (PMID = 17178188.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-2838
  • [Journal-full-title] European urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgen Antagonists
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32. Bajorin DF: Plenary debate of randomized phase III trial of neoadjuvant MVAC plus cystectomy versus cystectomy alone in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2001 Sep 15;19(18 Suppl):17S-20S
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Plenary debate of randomized phase III trial of neoadjuvant MVAC plus cystectomy versus cystectomy alone in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cystectomy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Humans. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Reproducibility of Results. Treatment Outcome. Vinblastine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 11560966.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; M-VAC protocol
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