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Items 1 to 19 of about 19
1. Chang HJ, Lee MD, Yi HG, Lim JH, Lee MH, Shin JH, Choi SJ, Moon Y, Nahm CH, Kim CS: A case of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm initially mimicking cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Cancer Res Treat; 2010 Dec;42(4):239-43

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A case of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm initially mimicking cutaneous lupus erythematosus.
  • Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare disease.
  • The prognosis is poor in most cases with rapid progression despite administering chemotherapy.
  • A 67-year-old man complained of skin rashes on his back and this spread to the trunk, face, arms and thighs, and he was initially diagnosed with cutaneous lupus erythematosus according to the skin biopsy.
  • Repeated skin biopsy revealed a diffuse infiltration of lymphoid cells with medium sized nuclei, positive for CD4 and CD56, negative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), indicating a diagnosis of BPDCN.
  • Further workups confirmed stage IVA BPDCN involving the skin, multiple lymph nodes, the peripheral blood and the bone marrow.
  • He was treated with six cycles of combination chemotherapy consisting of ifosphamide, methotrexate, etoposide, prednisolone and L-asparaginase, and he achieved a partial response.

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  • (PMID = 21253327.001).
  • [ISSN] 2005-9256
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research and treatment : official journal of Korean Cancer Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res Treat
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3021744
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cutaneous lupus erythematosus / Drug therapy / Neoplasm / Plasmacytoid dendritic cells
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2. Winter SS, Sweatman J, Shuster JJ, Link MP, Amylon MD, Pullen J, Camitta BM, Larson RS: Bone marrow stroma-supported culture of T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells predicts treatment outcome in children: a Pediatric Oncology Group study. Leukemia; 2002 Jun;16(6):1121-6
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  • [Title] Bone marrow stroma-supported culture of T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells predicts treatment outcome in children: a Pediatric Oncology Group study.
  • Significant predictors of treatment outcome are poorly defined for patients with T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).
  • A high WBC at diagnosis, which has traditionally been a predictor of poor response in T-ALL, has considerably weakened prognostic significance in the face of modern, more intensive chemotherapy.
  • To test the hypothesis that bone marrow stroma-supported leukemic cell recovery might identify children at high risk for relapse, we measured the ex vivo recovery of T-ALL lymphoblasts from 29 newly diagnosed patients using a stromal cell co-culture assay.
  • This is the first report to show that higher lymphoblast recovery may predict a more favorable outcome for children with T-ALL.
  • A prospective study is needed to test whether stroma-supported leukemic cell recovery might serve as a basis for assigning risk-adjusted therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Cells / cytology. Coculture Techniques / methods. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Stromal Cells / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Case-Control Studies. Cell Line. Cell Lineage. Cell Survival. Child. Child, Preschool. Humans. Infant. Leukocyte Count. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 12040442.001).
  • [ISSN] 0887-6924
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leukemia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 29139; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 37379; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA15989; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA34233; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA30969; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA33603
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
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3. Haut MJ, Harryhill JF, Rosenstock J, Warhol MJ, Vitti R: Progressing prostate carcinoma. Oncologist; 2001;6(2):183-96
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  • In the Karnell Cancer Center Grand Rounds, we present a patient who underwent radical prostatectomy with bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy, but had positive margins and subsequently developed local recurrence and then systemic disease.
  • Therapeutic options at different stages of the disease are examined from the point of view of the urologist, radiation oncologist, and medical oncologist.
  • The surgical portion of the discussion focuses on the selection of initial therapy.
  • Both the selection of surgical candidates and choice of pre- or post-operative therapy in patients can be aided by prognostic tools looking at several variables, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score of the tumor, seminal vesicle invasion, extracapsular invasion, and lymph node involvement.
  • Low-risk patients can be treated with monotherapy, such as radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy, prostate brachytherapy, or cryosurgical ablation of the prostate.
  • Higher risk patients may require adjuvant and possibly neoadjuvant therapy in addition.
  • The radiation portion of the discussion focuses on the use of radiation therapy as salvage for relapsing disease.
  • Of particular importance is the point that treating high-risk patients whose PSA levels have started to rise but are less than 1 ng/ml results in a long-term PSA control rate as high as 75%, but that limiting the use of salvage radiation therapy to patients with high PSA levels or biopsy confirmation of local recurrence in the face of a negative bone scan results in biochemical long-term control of less than 40%.
  • In the medical oncology part of the discussion, the major focus is on the use of chemotherapy to treat patients whose disease has become resistant to hormonal therapy.
  • Combination therapy with estramustine plus taxanes, other microtubule inhibitors, or other agents such as topoisomerase II inhibitors, has been found to cause shrinkage of measurable soft tissue disease and diminution of serum PSA levels.
  • The development of effective hormonal and chemotherapeutic drugs for treatment of metastatic disease has led to new interest in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy of high-risk patients.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Prognosis. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Hyperplasia / pathology. Radiotherapy, Conformal. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11306730.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-7159
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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4. Quintás-Cardama A, Kantarjian H, Jones D, Shan J, Borthakur G, Thomas D, Kornblau S, O'Brien S, Cortes J: Delayed achievement of cytogenetic and molecular response is associated with increased risk of progression among patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in early chronic phase receiving high-dose or standard-dose imatinib therapy. Blood; 2009 Jun 18;113(25):6315-21
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  • [Title] Delayed achievement of cytogenetic and molecular response is associated with increased risk of progression among patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in early chronic phase receiving high-dose or standard-dose imatinib therapy.
  • Patients not in complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) continuously face the competing possibilities of eventually achieving a cytogenetic response versus progressing.
  • For patients not in CCyR, the probability of achieving CCyR (P = .002) or major molecular response (P = .004) significantly decreased, whereas the risk of progression increased (P = .16) at each time point.
  • Patients with a BCR-ABL1/ABL1 ratio greater than 1% to 10% after 3 months of imatinib had a 92% probability of achieving CCyR with continued therapy, similar to the 98% for those with 1% or less, but their risk of progression (11%) was almost 3-fold that of patients with a BCR-ABL1/ABL1 transcript ratio of 1% or less (4%) and similar to that of patients with transcript levels more than 10% (13%).
  • This risk is discernible as early as 3 months into imatinib therapy by molecular analysis and may provide the rationale to institute therapies that render higher rates of early response.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic-Phase / drug therapy. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Benzamides. Biomarkers, Tumor. Bone Marrow Cells / chemistry. Bone Marrow Cells / pathology. Clinical Trials as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl / analysis. Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl / genetics. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. RNA, Messenger / analysis. RNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Remission Induction. Risk. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19369233.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0020
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrimidines; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate; EC 2.7.10.2 / Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3953080
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5. Kim R, Osaki A, Toge T: Feasibility and therapeutic efficacy of weekly 1-h low-dose paclitaxel infusion for relapsed breast cancer. Oncol Rep; 2003 Jan-Feb;10(1):145-50
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  • [Title] Feasibility and therapeutic efficacy of weekly 1-h low-dose paclitaxel infusion for relapsed breast cancer.
  • The therapeutic efficacy of weekly paclitaxel infusion for relapsed breast cancer patients is not known.
  • We assessed safety, feasibility, and therapeutic efficacy in a pilot study of weekly 1-h low-dose paclitaxel infusion for relapsed breast cancer in an outpatient clinic.
  • Eighteen patients with relapsed breast cancer who had received prior chemotherapy regimens, including anthracyclines, mitomycin, and 5-fluorouracil beyond a second line of treatment were enrolled into the study.
  • The dose of paclitaxel was between 40 mg/m(2) and 80 mg/m(2) per week in a 1-h infusion, and a treatment cycle was 4 weeks until there was no evidence of progressive disease.
  • When a dose of 80 mg/m(2) was administered, the treatment cycle was weekly infusion three times with a 1-week interval per 4-week cycle.
  • The mean treatment period was 5.5 months and the maximal length of administration was 8 months.
  • Tumor response was observed in 3 of 7 cases of lung metastases (42.8%), 6 of 12 cases of soft tissue metastases (50.0%), and 1 of 3 cases of liver metastases (33.3%), whereas 8 cases with bone metastases did not respond.
  • The mean time to response was 1.8 months and the mean response duration was 4.3 months.
  • Toxicities associated with weekly 1-h low-dose paclitaxel infusion were tolerable, and most were less than grade 2, including alopecia (100%), neutropenia (88.8%), flushing (66.6%), face edema (61.1%), numbness (55.5%), and myalgia (38.8%).
  • Weekly 1-h low-dose paclitaxel might be a therapeutically effective, safe infusion and feasible as a salvage chemotherapy for relapsed breast cancer patients following failure of prior chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / metabolism. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Feasibility Studies. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / metabolism. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / metabolism. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged. Pilot Projects. Prognosis. Salvage Therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12469161.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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6. Leitenberger JJ, Berthelot CN, Polder KD, Pro B, McLaughlin P, Jones D, Duvic M: CD4+ CD56+ hematodermic/plasmacytoid dendritic cell tumor with response to pralatrexate. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2008 Mar;58(3):480-4
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  • The CD4(+) CD56(+) hematodermic/plasmacytoid dendritic cell tumor is a rare, highly aggressive, systemic neoplasm for which effective therapies have not yet been established.
  • These tumors express CD4, CD56, CD123, and T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (TCL)-1 and are clinically characterized by cutaneous involvement with spread to bone marrow and blood, and poor prognosis with current chemotherapy regimens.
  • Clinically, multiple cutaneous lesions were brown to violaceous firm nodules on the face, arms, and trunk.
  • The patient underwent two courses of cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy but relapsed quickly.
  • Our observation highlights pralatrexate as a promising therapeutic option for hematodermic/plasmacytoid dendritic cell lymphoma/leukemias.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminopterin / analogs & derivatives. Antigens, CD4 / analysis. Antigens, CD56 / analysis. Dendritic Cells / pathology. Lymphoma, T-Cell / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Folic Acid / therapeutic use. Humans. Killer Cells, Natural / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Positron-Emission Tomography. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / therapeutic use. Vitamin B 12 / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 18280345.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6787
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K24-CA86815
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 10-propargyl-10-deazaaminopterin; 0 / Antigens, CD4; 0 / Antigens, CD56; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 935E97BOY8 / Folic Acid; JYB41CTM2Q / Aminopterin; P6YC3EG204 / Vitamin B 12; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHOP protocol
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7. Schlemmer M, Reichardt P, Verweij J, Hartmann JT, Judson I, Thyss A, Hogendoorn PC, Marreaud S, Van Glabbeke M, Blay JY: Paclitaxel in patients with advanced angiosarcomas of soft tissue: a retrospective study of the EORTC soft tissue and bone sarcoma group. Eur J Cancer; 2008 Nov;44(16):2433-6
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  • [Title] Paclitaxel in patients with advanced angiosarcomas of soft tissue: a retrospective study of the EORTC soft tissue and bone sarcoma group.
  • RATIONALE: Angiosarcomas of soft tissue represent a heterogenous group of rare sarcomas with specific clinical behaviour and risk factors.
  • METHOD: Clinical data from patients with angiosarcomas of soft tissue treated with single agent paclitaxel were collected from the centres of the soft tissue and bone sarcoma group of EORTC, using a standardised data collection form.
  • Primary angiosarcomas were located in scalp and face in 8 patients (25%) and at other primary sites in 24 patients (75%).
  • Thirteen (40%) patients had been pretreated with doxorubicin-based first-line-chemotherapy and three of them (9%) had also received second-line chemotherapy with ifosfamide.
  • Eleven (34%) patients had been irradiated before as treatment for angiosarcoma.
  • In 8 (25%) patients, the angiosarcoma occurred at sites of prior radiation therapy for other malignancies.
  • The median time to progression was 7.6 months (range, 1-42) for the whole group.
  • For the face/scalp group it was 9.5 months, and for patients with angiosarcomas at other sites it was 7.0 months, respectively.
  • CONCLUSION: Paclitaxel was found to be an active agent in angiosarcoma of soft tissue in this retrospective analysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Hemangiosarcoma / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Facial Neoplasms / drug therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Retrospective Studies. Scalp. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Young Adult


8. Mahajan S, Juneja M, George T: Osteosarcoma as a second neoplasm after chemotherapeutic treatment of hereditary retinoblastoma: a case report. Quintessence Int; 2008 May;39(5):439-45
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  • [Title] Osteosarcoma as a second neoplasm after chemotherapeutic treatment of hereditary retinoblastoma: a case report.
  • Osteosarcoma is the most common second neoplasm in patients with retinoblastoma.
  • The risk of occurrence of second neoplasm after retinoblastoma increases after radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • A case is presented of an 11-year-old girl who had painless swelling on the left side of her face for 8 days.
  • Biopsy of the lesion revealed tumor cells forming trabeculae of osteoid and woven bone interspersed with myxoid and cartilaginous areas.
  • The tumor cells showed pleomorphism and hyperchromatism with increased and abnormal mitotic figures consistent with the diagnosis of osteosarcoma.
  • Further investigations revealed no history of retinoblastoma in the family. (This case was considered hereditary, however, because of the occurrence of the second neoplasm.
  • ) To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of mandibular osteosarcoma occurring after unilateral retinoblastoma treated with chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Mandibular Neoplasms / chemically induced. Neoplasms, Second Primary / chemically induced. Osteosarcoma / chemically induced. Retinoblastoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Child. Cyclophosphamide / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Vincristine / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 19088959.001).
  • [ISSN] 1936-7163
  • [Journal-full-title] Quintessence international (Berlin, Germany : 1985)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Quintessence Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
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9. Zwerger S, Günther L, Pekrun A, Krause HR, Rustemeyer J: A strategy to avoid facial mutilation in orbital embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Oral Maxillofac Surg; 2010 Dec;14(4):233-7
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  • [Title] A strategy to avoid facial mutilation in orbital embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.
  • We detail the case of an 8-year-old female with orbital RMS and discuss the therapeutic options.
  • Open biopsy led to the histological diagnosis.
  • Metastasis or infiltration of orbital bone was not observed.
  • Chemotherapy was carried out in accordance with the Cooperative Weichteilsarkom Studie (CWS) 2002 protocol.
  • Tumor regression was detected after the first course of chemotherapy; we decided to excise the residual tumor with preservation of the globe.
  • One year after treatment, RMS recurrence was not observed.
  • CONCLUSION: After interdisciplinary treatment, mutilation was avoided after exenteration of the orbit or radiation treatment to the growing facial skeleton.
  • [MeSH-major] Face / surgery. Orbital Neoplasms / surgery. Postoperative Complications / prevention & control. Rhabdomyosarcoma, Embryonal / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Muscle Neoplasms / surgery. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Oculomotor Muscles / pathology. Oculomotor Muscles / surgery. Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures / methods. Remission Induction

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  • (PMID = 20143115.001).
  • [ISSN] 1865-1569
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral and maxillofacial surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Maxillofac Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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10. Frikha H, Chaari N, Nasr C, Bouguila H, Chebbi A, Bhouri L, Hentati D, Kochbati L, Besbes M, Rifi H, Oubiche F, Ayed S, Maalej M: [Radiotherapy in the treatment of retinoblastoma: about 40 cases]. Cancer Radiother; 2009 Jan;13(1):30-6
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  • [Title] [Radiotherapy in the treatment of retinoblastoma: about 40 cases].
  • [Transliterated title] Place de la radiothérapie dans le traitement du rétinoblastome : à propos de 40 cas.
  • PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to analyze the results and the complications of radiotherapy in the treatment of retinoblastoma.
  • The average dose was 44 Gy (1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction, five fractions weekly).
  • This radiotherapy was associated with chemotherapy in 24 cases.
  • The major therapeutic complication was the growth defect of the bones face.
  • A femoral bone sarcoma was noted five years after the end of the irradiation and chemotherapy in one case.
  • CONCLUSION: If the radiotherapy offers the advantage of the functional conservation and the improvement of the local control, its indications are more and more restricted in favor of the other therapeutic methods (chemotherapy, thermochemotherapy) and this considering the iatrogene risk.
  • [MeSH-minor] Brachytherapy. Cataract / epidemiology. Cataract / etiology. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Consanguinity. Cranial Irradiation. Eye Enucleation. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Neoplasm Staging. Patient Selection. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Radiotherapy / methods. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Radiotherapy, Conformal. Restraint, Physical / methods. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Tunisia / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 18790660.001).
  • [ISSN] 1278-3218
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer radiothérapie : journal de la Société française de radiothérapie oncologique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Radiother
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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11. Kahwash SB, Qualman SJ: Cutaneous lymphoblastic lymphoma in children: report of six cases with precursor B-cell lineage. Pediatr Dev Pathol; 2002 Jan-Feb;5(1):45-53
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Three occurred in the scalp, one in the skin of the thigh, one in the skin of the face and breast, and one in the subcutaneous tissue of the orbit.
  • None of the cases had bone marrow involvement, while two had bone involvement (maxilla, distal tibia, and distal humerus in one case, and distal tibia and orbital bone in another case); only one case had lymphadenopathy (retroperitoneal).
  • The five patients who received multiagent chemotherapy are alive with follow-up intervals of 2 to 18 years.
  • Two patients had local recurrences and were given radiation therapy (one with repeating multiagent chemotherapy).
  • One patient (diagnosed in 1962) died of disseminated disease; she had been treated with radiation therapy and 6MP only.
  • Cutaneous B-LBL must be included in the differential diagnosis of small blue cell tumors, especially in children.
  • In contrast to its T-cell counterpart, B-LBL occurs more frequently in females, tends to present as skin or bone lesions, and is associated with a potential cure, even in cases that relapse.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Fatal Outcome. Female. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local

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  • (PMID = 11815868.001).
  • [ISSN] 1093-5266
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric and developmental pathology : the official journal of the Society for Pediatric Pathology and the Paediatric Pathology Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Dev. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins
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12. Hesseling P, Broadhead R, Mansvelt E, Louw M, Wessels G, Borgstein E, Schneider J, Molyneux E: The 2000 Burkitt lymphoma trial in Malawi. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2005 Mar;44(3):245-50
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: We previously reported 57% 12-month event free survival (EFS) in Malawian children with stage I to III Burkitt lymphoma (BL) with an intermediate dose chemotherapy protocol lasting 77 days.
  • A fine needle aspirate, bone marrow aspirate, cerebrospinal fluid cytology, haemoglobin (Hb), white cell count (WCC), malaria smear, ELISA for HIV, and abdominal ultrasound were performed routinely.
  • The first dose of chemotherapy (COP1) consisted of 300 mg cyclophosphamide (CPM), 1 mg vincristine, and 60 mg prednisone given on day 1 and followed by COP2 on day 8 (only for patients with larger tumour volumes, stage III or IV disease).
  • The face was involved in 74%, abdomen in 55%, bone marrow in 14%, kidneys in 24%, and 12% had paraplegia.
  • Fourteen children died during or shortly after completion of chemotherapy.
  • The morbidity and mortality of treatment was high.
  • [MeSH-major] Burkitt Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Child. Child, Preschool. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Malawi / epidemiology. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Staging. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 15547922.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5009
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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13. Kornek GV, Schuell B, Laengle F, Gruenberger T, Penz M, Karall K, Depisch D, Lang F, Scheithauer W: Mitomycin C in combination with capecitabine or biweekly high-dose gemcitabine in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer: a randomised phase II trial. Ann Oncol; 2004 Mar;15(3):478-83
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  • BACKGROUND: Patients with advanced biliary tract carcinoma face a particularly dismal prognosis, and no standard palliative chemotherapy has yet been defined.
  • In view of a potential drug synergy, the present randomised phase II trial was initiated.
  • The aim was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy and tolerance of mitomycin C (MMC) in combination with gemcitabine (GEM) or capecitabine (CAPE) in previously untreated patients with advanced biliary tract cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 51 patients were entered in this study and randomly allocated to treatment with MMC 8 mg/m2 on day 1 in combination with GEM 2000 mg/m2 on days 1 and 15 every 4 weeks, or MMC 8 mg/m2 on day 1 plus CAPE 2000 mg/m2/day on days 1-14, every 4 weeks.
  • In both arms, chemotherapy was administered for a total of 6 months unless progressive disease occurred earlier.
  • RESULTS: Pretreatment characteristics were well balanced between the two treatment arms.
  • Chemotherapy was fairly well tolerated in both arms, with a comparably low rate of only grade 1 and 2 non-haematological adverse reactions.
  • Also, only four (17%) patients in both treatment arms experienced grade 3 leukocytopenia, and three (13%) and four (17%) had grade 3 thrombocytopenia in the MMC + GEM and MMC + CAPE arm, respectively.

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  • (PMID = 14998852.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; 6804DJ8Z9U / Capecitabine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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14. Radich JP: Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphocytic leukemia. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am; 2001 Feb;15(1):21-36
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Further characterization of molecular subtypes of Ph+ ALL may in the future distinguish those few patients with a potentially good outcome from the majority who face inevitable relapse.
  • Also, novel targeted biologic therapy especially in combination with aggressive, early chemotherapy, may soon be able to temper the disease.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Animals. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor. Bone Marrow Transplantation. Cell Lineage. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / genetics. Child. Disease-Free Survival. Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl / analysis. Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl / genetics. Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl / physiology. Humans. Leukemia, Experimental / genetics. Mice. Mice, Transgenic. Neoplasm Transplantation. Neoplasm, Residual. Philadelphia Chromosome. Phosphorylation. Prognosis. Protein Processing, Post-Translational. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11258387.001).
  • [ISSN] 0889-8588
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology/oncology clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol. Oncol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 18029
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 2.7.10.2 / Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl
  • [Number-of-references] 77
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15. Omoti CE, Omoti AE: Richter syndrome: a review of clinical, ocular, neurological and other manifestations. Br J Haematol; 2008 Sep;142(5):709-16
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  • The large cell lymphoma clone occurs by transformation of the original CLL clone in the majority of patients, and as a separate and independent neoplasm in fewer cases.
  • Extranodal Richter syndrome has also been reported to occur in the central nervous system, eye, gastrointestinal system, nose, skin, face, bone and bronchus.
  • The therapeutic options include cytoreductive therapy consisting of chemotherapy and immunotherapy, followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation as postremission therapy.

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  • [CommentIn] Br J Haematol. 2009 Feb;144(4):613; author reply 614-5 [19016718.001]
  • (PMID = 18492119.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2141
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 62
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16. Kovács AF: Clinical analysis of implant losses in oral tumor and defect patients. Clin Oral Implants Res; 2000 Oct;11(5):494-504

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In the period between 1990 and 1996, 279 endosteal dental Bone-Lock implants were placed in 79 patients.
  • The circumstances of implant loss were noted down for descriptive analysis concerning age, sex, topography, implant dimensions, loading, time in place and type of superstructure.
  • Five causes for implant loss could be detected: lacking primary osseointegration, acute inflammation, bone loss, biomechanical overloading and tumor recurrence.
  • Free iliac bone grafts impaired osseointegration of implants.
  • A quarter of all patients (26.3%) had to face implant loss.
  • Clustering of implant loss in several patients was caused by free iliac bone grafting and by prosthetic faults.
  • Chemotherapy had no negative influence on implant survival.
  • It is concluded that implant treatment can be equally effective for tumor and defect patients as it is known for healthy subjects.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Alveolar Bone Loss / complications. Alveolar Bone Loss / etiology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / rehabilitation. Dental Implantation, Endosseous / adverse effects. Dental Implantation, Endosseous / statistics & numerical data. Dental Prosthesis Design. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / complications. Osseointegration. Periodontitis / complications. Periodontitis / etiology. Regression Analysis. Sex Factors. Stress, Mechanical. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 11168242.001).
  • [ISSN] 0905-7161
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical oral implants research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Oral Implants Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dental Implants
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17. Abrahamsson PA: Treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer--a new role for antiandrogen monotherapy? Eur Urol; 2001;39 Suppl 1:22-8
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  • [Title] Treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer--a new role for antiandrogen monotherapy?
  • Men with locally advanced prostate cancer face a high risk of disease progression and cancer-related death.
  • The traditional active treatment options for locally advanced disease, either following failure of treatment of primary curative intent or newly diagnosed, are radiotherapy and castration.
  • Radiotherapy alone has a high failure rate, although outcome can be improved by adjuvant hormonal therapy.
  • Castration is associated with loss of libido, sexual dysfunction, osteoporosis and hot flushes, which are significant drawbacks when patients may receive treatment for several years.
  • Preliminary data suggest that bicalutamide maintains bone mineral density.
  • [MeSH-major] Androgen Antagonists / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Anilides / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Nitriles. Quality of Life. Tosyl Compounds

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 11114597.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-2838
  • [Journal-full-title] European urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] SWITZERLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgen Antagonists; 0 / Anilides; 0 / Nitriles; 0 / Tosyl Compounds; A0Z3NAU9DP / bicalutamide
  • [Number-of-references] 46
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18. Carmeliet P: Angiogenesis in life, disease and medicine. Nature; 2005 Dec 15;438(7070):932-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Recently, the first anti-angiogenic agents have been approved for the treatment of cancer and blindness.
  • Angiogenesis research will probably change the face of medicine in the next decades, with more than 500 million people worldwide predicted to benefit from pro- or anti-angiogenesis treatments.
  • [MeSH-major] Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Neovascularization, Physiologic
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Vessels / cytology. Blood Vessels / drug effects. Blood Vessels / physiology. Bone Marrow Cells / drug effects. Bone Marrow Cells / physiology. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Humans. Neoplasms / blood supply. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16355210.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-4687
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nature
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 27
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19. Rodríguez-Vázquez M, García-Arpa M, González-García J: Juvenile mycosis fungoides treated with bexarotene and PUVA. Int J Dermatol; 2007 Jan;46(1):99-102
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  • The palms, soles, face, and mucosa were not affected.
  • In follow-up, the patient developed two red-colored, mobile, well-delimited cutaneous nodules of 2.5 cm in diameter in the right hemithorax and lumbar area.
  • The lumbar nodule regressed spontaneously before treatment.
  • The clinical diagnosis was mycosis fungoides.
  • A bone marrow study and a thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan were normal.
  • With the diagnosis of mycosis fungoides stage IVA (according to the TNM classification), treatment was initiated with psoralen plus ultraviolet light A (PUVA), three times a week, plus oral bexarotene at a dose of 300 mg/m2/day.
  • The parents were informed that this treatment was not approved for this age group and informed consent was obtained.
  • After 32 sessions of PUVA and 6 months of treatment with oral bexarotene, the skin patches regressed, except for the plaque on the left buttock and the nodule on the right hemithorax (Fig. 4).
  • Nevertheless, 5 months after discontinuation of oral treatment, the patient developed multiple, scaling, nonconfluent macules on the trunk and arms affecting almost 30% of the body surface area, which disappeared with the application of methylprednisolone aceponate.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Mycosis Fungoides / drug therapy. PUVA Therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tetrahydronaphthalenes / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Biopsy. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 17214731.001).
  • [ISSN] 0011-9059
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Tetrahydronaphthalenes; A61RXM4375 / bexarotene
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