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1. Bacci G, Ferrari C, Longhi A, Ferrari S, Forni C, Bacchini P, Palmerini E, Briccoli A, Pignotti E, Balladelli A, Picci P: Second malignant neoplasm in patients with osteosarcoma of the extremities treated with adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2006 Dec;28(12):774-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Second malignant neoplasm in patients with osteosarcoma of the extremities treated with adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • We evaluated the rate of second malignancies in 1205 patients with osteosarcoma of the extremity treated at our Institution with different protocols of adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Twenty-six patients (2.15%) developed a second malignant neoplasm at a median of 7.6 years (1 to 25 y) after primary osteosarcoma treatment.
  • Of these, 2 developed a third cancer which were not considered in the series.
  • Second neoplasms were leukemia (10), breast (7), lung (2), kidney (2), central nervous system cancer (2), soft tissue (1), parotid (1), and colon (1).
  • The rate of second neoplasms was significantly higher in female patients, and the latent period shorter in hematologic tumors compared with solid tumors.
  • Ten of these 26 patients are disease free at a median of 7.7 years (range 1 to 15 y) after the last treatment.
  • The rate of second malignancies observed in the osteosarcoma group was significantly higher than that observed in the control group of 1160 patients with benign tumors treated in the same period at our Institute (2.2% vs. 0.8%, P<0.009).
  • Our study showed that the risk of second neoplasm within 15 years increased and then leveled off and that although secondary solid tumors could be explained as unrelated cases, leukemias seem to be over represented.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology. Osteosarcoma
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Incidence. Infant. Male. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / epidemiology. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Sex Factors. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 17164644.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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2. El-Gaidi MA, Eissa EM: Infantile intracranial neoplasms: characteristics and surgical outcomes of a contemporary series of 21 cases in an Egyptian referral center. Pediatr Neurosurg; 2010;46(4):272-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Infantile intracranial neoplasms: characteristics and surgical outcomes of a contemporary series of 21 cases in an Egyptian referral center.
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the demographic, clinical, radiological, pathological and surgical features and outcomes of infantile intracranial neoplasms, the second most common neoplasm in infants.
  • RESULTS: Out of 451 patients with primary intracranial neoplasms (age 0-14 years), 21 infants (<1 year) underwent surgery, representing 4.7% of total cases.
  • The most common tumor was choroid plexus papilloma (23.8%), followed by teratoma (19%) then astrocytoma and ependymoma (14.3% each).
  • Three patients received chemotherapy, but none received radiotherapy.
  • The statistically significant predictors of prognosis were the extent of resection and tumor grade.
  • CONCLUSION: Although the prognosis for infantile intracranial neoplasms is worse than for older children, an overall promising outcome with low operative morbidity and mortality was achieved using gross total excision and appropriate adjuvant chemotherapy as part of a multidisciplinary approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / mortality. Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / mortality. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Astrocytoma / drug therapy. Astrocytoma / mortality. Astrocytoma / surgery. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Egypt / epidemiology. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Ependymoma / mortality. Ependymoma / surgery. Female. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Male. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / mortality. Medulloblastoma / surgery. Morbidity. Neurilemmoma / drug therapy. Neurilemmoma / mortality. Neurilemmoma / surgery. Prognosis. Quality of Life. Referral and Consultation / statistics & numerical data. Retrospective Studies. Teratoma / drug therapy. Teratoma / mortality. Teratoma / surgery

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 21160236.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0305
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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3. Lee SH, Yoo KH, Sung KW, Kim JY, Cho EJ, Koo HH, Chung SE, Kang SW, Oh SY, Ham DI, Kim YD: Tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue in children with bilateral advanced retinoblastoma. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2008 Sep;42(6):385-91
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  • [Title] Tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue in children with bilateral advanced retinoblastoma.
  • Although external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been an effective treatment modality in patients with bilateral advanced retinoblastoma, it significantly increases the risk of second malignancies and facial deformities.
  • This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue (HDCT/ASCR) for treatment, instead of EBRT, in children with bilateral advanced retinoblastoma.
  • Fourteen patients with bilateral retinoblastoma received chemotherapy, and local therapy was provided whenever possible.
  • When at least one functional eye could not be saved by chemoreduction and local therapy, tandem HDCT/ASCR was provided to avoid EBRT.
  • No second malignancy has developed to date.
  • HDCT/ASCR might be an effective treatment for bilateral advanced retinoblastoma, especially in cases in which at least one functional eye could not be preserved with chemoreduction and local therapy alone, and where EBRT was unavoidable.
  • Long-term follow-up and further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of HDCT/ASCR as an alternative treatment to EBRT.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Retinoblastoma / therapy

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  • (PMID = 18574441.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5365
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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4. Haimi M, Arush MW, Bar-Sela G, Gez E, Bernstein Z, Postovsky S, Barak AB, Kuten A: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the pediatric age group: the northern Israel (Rambam) medical center experience, 1989-2004. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2005 Oct;27(10):510-6
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  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is rare in children, accounting for less than 1% of all malignancies.
  • Radiation therapy has been the mainstay of treatment of many years, but to improve survival, the use of chemotherapy has been advocated.
  • Of the 13 patients, one patient had stage I, 6 had stage III, 5 had stage IV-A, and 1 had stage IV-B disease.
  • Ten patients (77%) had undifferentiated carcinoma (WHO type III) and three patients (23%) had nonkeratinizing carcinoma (WHO type II).
  • Most of the children received two or three courses of neoadjuvant multiagent chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and 5-FU, followed by radiotherapy with doses in excess of 60 Gy.
  • Ten of the 13 patients (77%) are alive without disease 6 years after diagnosis (range 1-15 years).
  • One patient developed local and distant metastases 1 year after diagnosis and is currently receiving combined radiochemotherapy.
  • Nine patients (69%) developed moderate to severe long-term complications.
  • Pediatric NPC is curable by combined radiation and chemotherapy, with doses of radiation in excess of 60 Gy.
  • Long-term follow-up is important for early detection of second malignancies as well as for radiation-induced endocrinologic deficiencies and other normal tissue complications.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Neoadjuvant Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age Distribution. Carcinoma / epidemiology. Carcinoma / therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / epidemiology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Infant. Israel / epidemiology. Male. Prognosis. Radiotherapy Dosage. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Vinblastine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 16217252.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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5. Escherich G, Horstmann MA, Zimmermann M, Janka-Schaub GE, COALL study group: Cooperative study group for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (COALL): long-term results of trials 82,85,89,92 and 97. Leukemia; 2010 Feb;24(2):298-308
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  • A refinement of risk assessment has been achieved by in vitro drug sensitivity testing in COALL 92 and 97.
  • In patients with very sensitive leukaemic cells, therapy could be reduced without loss of efficacy.
  • In COALL 97, a further improvement in risk stratification was gained by the molecular assessment of minimal residual disease (MRD) under treatment, which proved to have a superior prognostic effect when compared with in vitro drug sensitivity testing.
  • Importantly, the gradual reduction in central nervous system (CNS) irradiation led to a decreased incidence of brain tumours as a second malignancy.
  • In general, the prevention of treatment-related late effects will be one of the major issues in future studies.
  • It remains to be shown whether prolonged infusions of anthracyclines, which have been implemented into the COALL studies after equal efficacy compared with short-time infusions was confirmed, will be associated with fewer cardiac late effects.
  • Another way to prevent late effects may be a more refined risk assessment allowing for a reduction in cumulative treatment burden.
  • A great challenge in the future will be to improve the overall treatment results, which very likely can only be achieved by the identification of molecularly defined subgroups to which novel, rational therapeutic strategies can be applied.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cranial Irradiation. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Neoplasm, Residual / therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Infant. Leukocyte Count. Male. Prognosis. Remission Induction. Risk Factors. Survival Rate. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20016530.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5551
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leukemia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Investigator] Pongratz; Otte J; Jorch N; Spaar HJ; Lieber T; Siegert; Göbel U; Janssen G; Beck JF; Weigel S; Streitberger; Nürnberger W; von Klinggräff C; Westerbeck K; Thomas P; Völpel S; Weissbach G; Bierbach U; Gutjahr P; Althaus I; Roos R; Klose P; Graubner U; Schmidt I; Haas; Drescher; Müller H; Kolb R; Wolff J; Peters O; Weber J; Dohrn
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6. Lavoie JC, Connors JM, Phillips GL, Reece DE, Barnett MJ, Forrest DL, Gascoyne RD, Hogge DE, Nantel SH, Shepherd JD, Smith CA, Song KW, Sutherland HJ, Toze CL, Voss NJ, Nevill TJ: High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for primary refractory or relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma: long-term outcome in the first 100 patients treated in Vancouver. Blood; 2005 Aug 15;106(4):1473-8
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  • [Title] High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for primary refractory or relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma: long-term outcome in the first 100 patients treated in Vancouver.
  • Beginning in 1985, patients in British Columbia with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) that was not controlled by conventional chemotherapy routinely underwent high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HD-ASCT).
  • Data were obtained retrospectively on the first 100 patients that underwent HD-ASCT for HL in Vancouver, focusing on relapse, treatment-related complications, and the occurrence of late events.
  • OAS was significantly better in patients in first relapse (67%) than in patients with primary refractory-induction failure (39%) and advanced disease (29%) (P = .002).
  • Treatment-related mortality, including death from second malignancy, was 17% at 15 years.
  • Cumulative risk of a second malignancy was 9% at 15 years.
  • Karnofsky performance status was at least 90% in 47 patients although hypogonadism (20 patients), hypothyroidism (12 patients), unusual infections (10 patients), anxiety or depression (7 patients), and cardiac disease (5 patients) were not uncommon in survivors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Hodgkin Disease / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Canada. Cause of Death. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms, Second Primary / chemically induced. Neoplasms, Second Primary / mortality. Probability. Retrospective Studies. Salvage Therapy. Survival Rate. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome


7. Laccourreye O, Veivers D, Bassot V, Ménard M, Brasnu D, Laccourreye H: Analysis of local recurrence in patients with selected T1-3N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the true vocal cord managed with a platinum-based chemotherapy-alone regimen for cure. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol; 2002 Apr;111(4):315-21; discussion 321-2
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  • [Title] Analysis of local recurrence in patients with selected T1-3N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the true vocal cord managed with a platinum-based chemotherapy-alone regimen for cure.
  • Based on an inception cohort of 35 patients with T1-3N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the true vocal cord who had a complete clinical response after a platinum-based induction chemotherapy regimen and a minimum of 3 years of follow-up, the current retrospective study documented the long-term results and consequences of local recurrence following the use of a platinum-based chemotherapy-alone regimen for cure.
  • During the years 1985 to 1996, 231 patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the true vocal cord classified as T1-3N0M0 were managed at our department with a platinum-based induction chemotherapy regimen.
  • Thirty-five of the 77 patients with complete clinical response were managed at our institution with a platinum-based chemotherapy-alone regimen.
  • The statistical analysis of data on survival, local control, nodal control, distant metastasis, and metachronous second primary tumor incidence was based on the Kaplan-Meier product limit method.
  • Overall, the causes of death were intercurrent disease in 6 patients and metachronous second primary tumor in 4 patients.
  • Salvage treatment in patients with local recurrence yielded a 100% local control rate and laryngeal preservation rate.
  • The 5- and 10-year actuarial estimates for patients with metachronous second primary tumor were 9.7% and 28.1%, respectively.
  • Although local recurrence was noted in almost a third of patients with complete clinical response who were managed with a platinum-based chemotherapy-alone regimen, it did not appear to be detrimental, as none of the patients who had local recurrence ultimately died from their disease or lost their larynx.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carboplatin / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Vocal Cords
  • [MeSH-minor] Actuarial Analysis. Adult. Aged. Chi-Square Distribution. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2002 Sep;111(9):860 [12296346.001]
  • (PMID = 11991582.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4894
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Otol. Rhinol. Laryngol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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8. Mehdi I, Shah AH, Moona MS, Verma K, Abussa A, Elramih R, El-Hashmi H: Synchronous and metachronous malignant tumours expect the unexpected. J Pak Med Assoc; 2010 Nov;60(11):905-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Synchronous and metachronous malignant tumours expect the unexpected.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate occurrence of synchronous and metachronous malignant tumours, to find tumour types, age group, and relationship to treatment received.
  • METHODS: Previously diagnosed 1st primary tumour cases experiencing a synchronous or metachronous tumour, seen at AOI from February 2003 to August 2009 (78 months) were included.
  • The cases were analyzed for morphology/histology of 1st primary tumour, age and gender of patient, treatment received for first tumour, time interval between the 1st and 2nd primary tumour, morphology/histology of second tumour, and the treatment conferred for 2nd tumour.
  • RESULTS: The 2nd synchronous and metachronous tumours were 46/4025 (1.14%), in 18 males and 28 females (M:F 1:1.6).
  • The follow up time was 24-150 months.
  • The time to 2nd primary tumour was 2-132 months.
  • The 1st primary tumours were breast, ovary, GIT and urinary bladder.
  • The patients received surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy alone or as multi-modality treatment for the 1st tumours.
  • CONCLUSION: It is imperative that patients with a primary malignant tumour should be thoroughly, closely, and regularly followed.
  • The 2nd primary tumour is usually more aggressive, treatment resistant, and metastasizes early requiring a more aggressive treatment strategy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Distribution. Aged. Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Sex Distribution. Time Factors. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 21375191.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-9982
  • [Journal-full-title] JPMA. The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pak Med Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Pakistan
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9. Sugimoto K, Nakahara I, Nishikawa M: Bilateral metachronous germinoma of the basal ganglia occurring long after total removal of a mature pineal teratoma: case report. Neurosurgery; 2002 Mar;50(3):613-6; discussion 616-7
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  • [Title] Bilateral metachronous germinoma of the basal ganglia occurring long after total removal of a mature pineal teratoma: case report.
  • OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: We report the extremely rare occurrence of a second germ cell tumor at a different site and with different histological types long after total removal of a mature pineal teratoma.
  • Neuroradiological studies revealed a tumor in the pineal region.
  • The tumor was totally removed.
  • Histologically, the tumor proved to be a mature teratoma.
  • The patient received no adjuvant therapy and was followed in the outpatient clinic.
  • Neuroradiological studies showed a tumor in the bilateral basal ganglia.
  • INTERVENTION: The second tumor, which was located in the right basal ganglion, was partially removed for biopsy.
  • Histologically, the tumor proved to be a germinoma.
  • The patient received three cycles of combination chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and etoposide with radiotherapy.
  • After the second course of chemotherapy, magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed no evidence of the tumor.
  • CONCLUSION: The second tumor was considered to be a de novo metachronous neoplasm rather than a recurrence of the original mature teratoma.
  • We think that if primordial germ cell groups exist along the midline of the brain, more than two primordial germ cell groups could give rise to metachronous neoplasms at different sites and with different histological types.
  • [MeSH-major] Basal Ganglia Diseases / surgery. Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Germinoma / surgery. Neoplasms, Second Primary. Pineal Gland / surgery. Teratoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male

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  • (PMID = 11841731.001).
  • [ISSN] 0148-396X
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
  • [Number-of-references] 11
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10. Ikeda Y, Saku M, Kawanaka H, Nonaka M, Yoshida K: Features of second primary cancer in patients with gastric cancer. Oncology; 2003;65(2):113-7
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  • [Title] Features of second primary cancer in patients with gastric cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: In order to improve the prognosis of gastric cancer patients, the timely identification of second primary cancers is considered to be a crucial clinical problem.
  • METHODS: We analyzed the clinicopathological data of 2250 patients with gastric cancer with regard to both synchronous and metachronous second primary cancers.
  • RESULTS: Of 2250 patients, 95 (4.2%) had a second primary cancer.
  • Regarding the time of detection for such second cancers, 65% of colorectal cancers were detected synchronously, while more than 80% of lung cancers were detected metachronously.
  • The prognosis of gastric cancer patients with a second primary cancer was more negatively influenced by a second primary cancer than by a primary gastric cancer.
  • CONCLUSION: Since gastric cancer patients may develop synchronous and metachronous second cancers in other organs, effective preoperative and postoperative diagnostic modalities both for second primary cancers, as well as for the recurrence of gastric cancer, need to be developed.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Gastrectomy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / pathology. Prognosis. Time Factors

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 12931016.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-2414
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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11. Müller J, Kovács G, Jakab Z, Rényi I, Galántai I, Békési A, Kiss C, Nagy K, Kajtár P, Bartyik K, Masát P, Magyarosy E: [Treatment results with ALL-BFM-95 protocol in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Hungary]. Orv Hetil; 2005 Jan 9;146(2):75-80
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  • [Title] [Treatment results with ALL-BFM-95 protocol in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Hungary].
  • AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the experience with this protocol, the treatment results according to the risk groups and to compare the Hungarian data with the international results.
  • METHODS: Patients were stratified into 3 risk groups, based on initial white blood cell count, age, immunology, cytogenetics and response to treatment: standard, medium and high risk group.
  • Duration of the chemotherapy was 2 years, except of the boys in the standard risk group, their maintenance therapy was 1 year longer.
  • In one patient second malignancy occurred.
  • CONCLUSION: The treatment outcome of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia improved remarkably over the last decades.
  • [MeSH-major] 6-Mercaptopurine / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Asparaginase / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Cytarabine / therapeutic use. Daunorubicin / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Prednisolone / therapeutic use. Vincristine / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Remission Induction. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15724956.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6002
  • [Journal-full-title] Orvosi hetilap
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orv Hetil
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; E7WED276I5 / 6-Mercaptopurine; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase; ZS7284E0ZP / Daunorubicin; ALL-BFM-95 protocol
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12. Avilés A, Neri N, Nambo MJ, Huerta-Guzman J, Cleto S: Surgery and chemotherapy versus chemotherapy as treatment of high-grade MALT gastric lymphoma. Med Oncol; 2006;23(2):295-300
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  • [Title] Surgery and chemotherapy versus chemotherapy as treatment of high-grade MALT gastric lymphoma.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of high-grade MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) gastric lymphoma remains uncertain.
  • To assess efficacy and toxicity of the most common therapies--surgery followed by chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone--we began a controlled clinical trial in patients in early stage (I and II 1).
  • METHODS: One hundred and two patients were randomized to be treated with surgery followed by six cycles of CEOP-Bleo (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and bleomycin at standard doses) (52 cases) or with chemotherapy alone (49 cases).
  • Actuarial curves at 5 yr showed that event-free survival were 70% (95% CI: 59-74%) in patients treated with surgery and chemotherapy, that were not statistically significant to 67% (95% CI: 51-69%) in the patients who received chemotherapy (p = 0.5).
  • Also, overall survival that was not statistically significant: 78% (95% CI: 70-88%) in the combined treatment and 76% (95% CI: 70-87%) in chemotherapy (p = 0.8).
  • No acute leukemia or second neoplasm has been observed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The use of surgery and chemotherapy did not improve outcome in patients with early-stage high-grade gastric MALT lymphoma.
  • It is apparent that chemotherapy alone is sufficient treatment in this select group of patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Remission Induction. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 16720930.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-0560
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical oncology (Northwood, London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CEOP-B protocol
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13. Elias D, Naudeix E, Ducreux M, Lusinchi A, Goharin A, Ouelette JF, Lasser P: Results of lymphadenectomy for obvious lateroaortic lymph node metastases from colorectal primaries. Hepatogastroenterology; 2001 Jan-Feb;48(37):123-7
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  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: To analyze the results of surgery for macroscopically or radiologically obvious (i.e., easily detectable by computed tomography scan or by palpation) synchronous or metachronous lateroaortic lymph node metastases from colorectal primaries.
  • Ten lateroaortic lymph node metastases were synchronous with the primary, and 21 were metachronous.
  • Decision for lymphadenectomy was taken after a multidisciplinary meeting and a period of observation.
  • All the patients received at least two systemic lines of chemotherapy before or after the lateroaortic lymphadenectomy.
  • Twenty-six (83.8%) patients developed recurrent lesions or had progressive residual disease.
  • Three-year global and disease-free survival rates were, respectively, 39% and 9.6%.
  • No significant difference was noted in survival between lateroaortic lymph node metastases that were synchronous or metachronous with the primary.
  • However, when it is isolated, in selected cases (objective response to systemic chemotherapy, good general status), resection can be beneficial whatever its synchronous or metachronous appearance.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Lymph Node Excision
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Thorax

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  • (PMID = 11268946.001).
  • [ISSN] 0172-6390
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepato-gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatogastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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14. Hakvoort-Cammel FG, Buitendijk S, van den Heuvel-Eibrink M, Hählen K: Treatment of pediatric Hodgkin disease avoiding radiotherapy: excellent outcome with the Rotterdam-HD-84-protocol. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2004 Jul;43(1):8-16
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  • [Title] Treatment of pediatric Hodgkin disease avoiding radiotherapy: excellent outcome with the Rotterdam-HD-84-protocol.
  • BACKGROUND: To reduce radiotherapy (XRT) induced toxicity of treatment of children with Hodgkin disease (HD) while maintaining a high cure rate, we introduced a risk-adapted protocol consisting of chemotherapy (CT) alone in 1984.
  • PROCEDURE: The outcome of 46 children treated for HD from 1984 until 2000 according to the Rotterdam-HD-84-protocol was determined.
  • Children with stage I-IIA disease (n = 23), were treated with six courses of epirubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (EBVD).
  • Children with stage IIB-IV disease (n = 23), were treated with three to five alternating cycles of EBVD and mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (MOPP).
  • RESULTS: At a median follow-up time of 8.6 years (range 2.6-18.3 years), the 10-year overall survival (OS) is 95% and the event-free survival (EFS) 91%.
  • Up until now only one patient developed hypothyroidism; no symptomatic cardiac or pulmonary dysfunction, no second malignancy has been diagnosed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Risk-adapted treatment consisting of CT alone is highly efficacious for children with HD and toxicity is low.
  • CT should be the first choice for HD in children and XRT should preferably be used for those with refractory or histologically proven residual disease or relapse.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bleomycin / therapeutic use. Dacarbazine / therapeutic use. Epirubicin / therapeutic use. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy. Mechlorethamine / therapeutic use. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Procarbazine / therapeutic use. Vinblastine / therapeutic use. Vincristine / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Netherlands / epidemiology. Statistics, Nonparametric. Survival Rate

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 15170884.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5009
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 35S93Y190K / Procarbazine; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 50D9XSG0VR / Mechlorethamine; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; EBVD protocol; MOPP protocol
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15. Bacci G, Ferrari S, Longhi A, Donati D, Barbieri E, Forni C, Bertoni F, Manfrini M, Giacomini S, Bacchini P: Role of surgery in local treatment of Ewing's sarcoma of the extremities in patients undergoing adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Oncol Rep; 2004 Jan;11(1):111-20
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  • [Title] Role of surgery in local treatment of Ewing's sarcoma of the extremities in patients undergoing adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Although more and more patients with Ewing's sarcoma of bone (ESB) are being treated by surgery, the relative role of surgery and radiotherapy in the local treatment of this tumor has yet to be determined.
  • Because the outcome of ESB may differ according to the anatomical site of the tumor, results reported in the literature, which generally refer to series with tumors located in all sites, may be selection biased.
  • Chemotherapy was administered according to four sequentially activated protocols.
  • Two patients underwent only chemotherapy.
  • One hundred and fifty-two patients remained continuously free of disease, 108 relapsed, 2 died of chemotherapy toxicity and 6 developed a second malignancy.
  • Furthermore, in group 3 there were 6 secondary malignancies.
  • Our results indicate that surgery should always be considered in the local treatment of ES of the extremities.
  • Postoperative radiation therapy must be added in case of inadequate surgical margins.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoadjuvant Therapy / methods. Sarcoma, Ewing / surgery. Sarcoma, Ewing / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Extremities. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14654912.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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16. Greco L, Papa U: [Mucinous cystoadenocarcinoma of the appendix. A case report]. Ann Ital Chir; 2006 Jul-Aug;77(4):355-8
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  • After two weeks patient underwent right hemicolectomy, he is alive without disease at 36 months follow up.
  • Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the appendix is an uncommon disease that is rarely suspected before surgery.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The Authors stress the importance of an appropriate surgical treatment.
  • Right hemicolectomy appears to be the appropriate treatment with aggressive debulking when mucinous cystoadenocarcinoma is associated with pseudomyxoma peritonei.
  • The role of chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with appendiceal cancers remains controversial.
  • No controlled data on the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy are available.
  • All patients with any form of appendiceal tumor appear to have an increased incidence of synchronous and metachronous neoplasms, especially in the gastrointestinal tract, and should be investigated and followed up appropriately.
  • [MeSH-major] Appendiceal Neoplasms. Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous

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  • (PMID = 17139968.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-469X
  • [Journal-full-title] Annali italiani di chirurgia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Ital Chir
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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17. Taylor AJ, Little MP, Winter DL, Sugden E, Ellison DW, Stiller CA, Stovall M, Frobisher C, Lancashire ER, Reulen RC, Hawkins MM: Population-based risks of CNS tumors in survivors of childhood cancer: the British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Dec 20;28(36):5287-93
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  • PURPOSE: CNS tumors are the most common second primary neoplasm (SPN) observed after childhood cancer in Britain, but the relationship of risk to doses of previous radiotherapy and chemotherapy is uncertain.
  • RESULTS: There were 137 meningiomas, 73 gliomas, and 37 other CNS neoplasms included in the analysis.
  • The risk of meningioma increased strongly, linearly, and independently with each of dose of radiation to meningeal tissue and dose of intrathecal methotrexate.
  • Those whose meningeal tissue received 0.01 to 9.99, 10.00 to 19.99, 20.00 to 29.99, 30.00 to 39.99 and≥40 Gy had risks that were two-fold, eight-fold, 52-fold, 568-fold, and 479-fold, respectively, the risks experienced by those whose meningeal tissue was unexposed.
  • The risk of glioma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors increased linearly with dose of radiation, and those who had CNS tissue exposed to at least 40 Gy experienced a risk four-fold that experienced by those who had CNS tissue unexposed.
  • CONCLUSION: The largest-ever study, to our knowledge, of CNS tumors in survivors of childhood cancer indicates that the risk of meningioma increases rapidly with increased dose of radiation to meningeal tissue and with increased dose of intrathecal methotrexate.

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  • (PMID = 21079138.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / ZIA CP010131-18; United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / / ; United Kingdom / Department of Health / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS533866; NLM/ PMC4809645
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18. Hicks J, Flaitz C: Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of salivary glands in children and adolescents: assessment of proliferation markers. Oral Oncol; 2000 Sep;36(5):454-60
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  • Malignant neoplasms represent one-third of all pediatric salivary gland tumors.
  • Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) composes 51% of malignant tumors and 16% of all salivary gland neoplasms in pediatrics.
  • Proliferation was assessed by determining the percentage of tumor cells immunoreactive for PCNA and Ki-67.
  • Tumor site was 16 parotid, eight submandibular, one base of tongue and one maxillary lip.
  • Median tumor size was 2.5 cm (range 1.5-5 cm).
  • Metastatic disease and capsular invasion occurred in five cases, while perineural invasion was noted in three cases.
  • Mean percentage of tumor cells immunoreactive for proliferation markers is as follows: PCNA: LG 9%, IG 17%, HG 32%; and Ki-67: LG 7%, IG 12%, HG 26%.
  • Treatment was surgical in 21 cases, and surgery with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in five cases.
  • Two patients with high grade MECs died of disease (21, 44 months).
  • Twenty-four patients had no evidence of disease at a median follow-up of 104 months (range 30-298 months).
  • MECs were second malignancies in two children with prior radiotherapy and chemotherapy for leukemia and histiocytosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Mucoepidermoid / chemistry. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Cell Division. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Ki-67 Antigen / chemistry. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen / analysis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis


19. Dietl B, Marienhagen J, Schaefer C, Pohl F, Murthum T, Kölbl O: [Survival with distant metastatic disease in head and neck cancer. A retrospective analysis]. HNO; 2007 Oct;55(10):785-6, 788-91
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  • [Title] [Survival with distant metastatic disease in head and neck cancer. A retrospective analysis].
  • [Transliterated title] Uberleben mit hämatogen metastasierten HNO-Tumoren: Eine retrospektive monozentrische Analyse.
  • QUESTIONS: The objective of this retrospective analysis was to investigate parameters with a potential impact on survival in a collective of 114 patients with distant metastatic disease after head and neck cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: The primary endpoint was the survival with distant metastatic disease, the secondary endpoint was overall survival.
  • Primary therapy, local recurrence, second neoplasms, palliative chemotherapy (CHT) and radiotherapy (RT), as well as Karnofsky performance status (KPS) at the time of diagnosis of the metastases were analyzed as potential impact parameters using the log-rank test with subsequent Cox regression analysis.
  • RESULTS: Palliative CHT (P=0.0020) and KPS (P=0.0011) had a significant positive impact on the median survival probability with metastases (8.2 months) using the log-rank test, KPS at the time of diagnosis of metastases remained as an independent prognostic parameter in the Cox regression (P=0.0013).
  • Primary therapy, local tumor control and KPS had a significant positive influence on the median overall survival probability (18.5 months) univariately (P=0.0139, P=0.0106, P= 0.0096) and multivariately (P=0.0123, and P=0.0063, P=0.0197, respectively).
  • CONCLUSIONS: KPS at the time of diagnosis of metastases is an independent prognostic parameter for both endpoints.
  • Lacking evidence for life prolongation, palliative therapies should therefore first and foremost focus on the stabilization of the KPS.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / mortality. Head and Neck Neoplasms / secondary. Palliative Care / statistics & numerical data. Risk Assessment / methods

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  • (PMID = 17333044.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-0458
  • [Journal-full-title] HNO
  • [ISO-abbreviation] HNO
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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20. Vázquez E, Lucaya J, Castellote A, Piqueras J, Sainz P, Olivé T, Sánchez-Toledo J, Ortega JJ: Neuroimaging in pediatric leukemia and lymphoma: differential diagnosis. Radiographics; 2002 Nov-Dec;22(6):1411-28
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  • Recent advances in therapy for pediatric hematologic neoplasms have greatly improved the prognosis but have resulted in an increased incidence of associated complications and toxic effects.
  • The main neuroimaging features in pediatric patients with leukemia or lymphoma treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy were retrospectively reviewed.
  • To simplify the approach and facilitate differential diagnosis, the neuroimaging features have been classified into three main categories: central nervous system manifestations of primary disease, side effects of therapeutic procedures (radiation therapy, chemotherapy, bone marrow transplantation), and complications due to immunosuppression, particularly infections.
  • Manifestations of primary disease include cerebrovascular complications (hemorrhage, cerebral infarction) and central nervous system involvement (infiltration of the meninges, parenchyma, bone marrow, orbit, and spine).
  • Effects of radiation therapy include white matter disease, mineralizing microangiopathy, parenchymal brain volume loss, radiation-induced cryptic vascular malformations, and second neoplasms.
  • Effects of chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation include hemorrhage, dural venous thrombosis, white matter disease, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome, and anterior lumbosacral radiculopathy.
  • Both the underlying malignancy and antineoplastic therapy can cause immunosuppression.
  • Familiarity with the imaging findings is essential for proper diagnosis of neurologic symptoms in pediatric patients with oncohematologic disease.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Infant. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • [Copyright] Copyright RSNA, 2002
  • (PMID = 12432112.001).
  • [ISSN] 0271-5333
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiographics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 43
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21. Einhorn N, Tropé C, Ridderheim M, Boman K, Sorbe B, Cavallin-Ståhl E: A systematic overview of radiation therapy effects in ovarian cancer. Acta Oncol; 2003;42(5-6):562-6
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  • [Title] A systematic overview of radiation therapy effects in ovarian cancer.
  • A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU).
  • This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for ovarian cancer is based on data from six randomized trials.
  • No studies have been reported where adjuvant radiotherapy has been compared with no adjuvant therapy in early-stage, high-risk patients.
  • Adjuvant radiotherapy, either whole abdominal irradiation or intraperitoneal p32, has been compared with adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage, high-risk patients.
  • There is some evidence to suggest that adjuvant radiotherapy after radical surgery leads to an increase in disease-free survival rate for patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer.
  • There is little documentation on long-term side effects (second malignancy) after adjuvant radiotherapy and no conclusions can be drawn.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachytherapy / methods. Ovarian Neoplasms / mortality. Ovarian Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Salvage Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Ovariectomy / methods. Prognosis. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Sweden. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14596514.001).
  • [ISSN] 0284-186X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Norway
  • [Number-of-references] 12
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22. Sausville JE, Hernandez DJ, Argani P, Gearhart JP: Pediatric renal cell carcinoma. J Pediatr Urol; 2009 Aug;5(4):308-14
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  • Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) comprises about 5% of pediatric renal neoplasms.
  • It has been recognized as a second malignancy in multiple reports.
  • It is generally symptomatic at diagnosis, and most children with RCC present with more locally advanced disease than do adults.
  • Contemporary investigation of pediatric RCC has demonstrated that a large percentage of these tumors bear cytogenetic translocations involving the MiT family of transcription factors.
  • Surgical therapy for these children resembles operative intervention for adult RCC, though debate continues about the precise role of lymph node dissection.
  • There are no adequately powered studies to support conclusions about adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy for children with RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell. Kidney Neoplasms. Neoplasms, Second Primary

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  • (PMID = 19443274.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4898
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pediatr Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 45
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23. Murray RA, Thom G, Gardner RV, Craver RD: Infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a 20-year children's hospital experience. Fetal Pediatr Pathol; 2008;27(4-5):197-205
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  • White blood cell counts ranged from 42,000-1.6 million/microL, 6 of 8 had hepatosplenomegaly, and 6 of 9 (66.6%) had central nervous system disease.
  • All received chemotherapy.
  • There were no late recurrences or second malignancies.
  • Despite extensive disease and age < 6 months at diagnosis (a poor prognostic feature), for ALL patients our 67% survival is at least as good as reported, although it is less favorable than childhood ALL.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Hospitals, University. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / mortality. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy. Transplantation Conditioning
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11. Humans. Infant. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18800262.001).
  • [ISSN] 1551-3823
  • [Journal-full-title] Fetal and pediatric pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fetal Pediatr Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Seidemann K, Henze G, Beck JD, Sauerbrey A, Kühl J, Mann G, Reiter A: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in pediatric patients with chromosomal breakage syndromes (AT and NBS): experience from the BFM trials. Ann Oncol; 2000;11 Suppl 1:141-5
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  • With improved management of infections, malignant disease is more frequently diagnosed and has become one of the commonest causes of death in pediatric AT and NBS.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: In three consecutive multicenter therapy trials for pediatric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (NHL-BFM), 1569 patients with newly diagnosed NHL have been registered between 1986 and 1997.
  • All patients received polychemotherapy according to tumor-entity and stage, none received radiation.
  • One patient died of toxic complications, two patients relapsed and died, one patient suffered from second malignancy.
  • Curative treatment is possible and should be attempted.
  • Intensity of therapy should be adjusted to individual risk factors and tolerance.

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  • (PMID = 10707797.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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25. Lima EM, Leal MF, Burbano RR, Khayat AS, Assumpção PP, Bello MJ, Rey JA, Smith MA, Casartelli C: Methylation status of ANAPC1, CDKN2A and TP53 promoter genes in individuals with gastric cancer. Braz J Med Biol Res; 2008 Jun;41(6):539-43
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  • Gastric cancer is the forth most frequent malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide.
  • Many tumor genes are inactivated by DNA methylation in gastric cancer.
  • We evaluated the DNA methylation status of ANAPC1, CDKN2A and TP53 by methylation-specific PCR in 20 diffuse- and 26 intestinal-type gastric cancer samples and 20 normal gastric mucosa in individuals from Northern Brazil.
  • Patients had never been submitted to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, nor did they have any other diagnosed cancer.
  • CDKN2A methylation was not detected in any normal gastric mucosa; however, the CDKN2A promoter was methylated in 30.4% of gastric cancer samples, with 35% methylation in diffuse-type and 26.9% in intestinal-type cancers.
  • CDKN2A methylation was associated with the carcinogenesis process for ~30% diffuse-type and intestinal-type compared to non-neoplastic samples.
  • CDKN2A can be implicated in the carcinogenesis process of only a subset of gastric neoplasias.

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  • (PMID = 18622497.001).
  • [ISSN] 1414-431X
  • [Journal-full-title] Brazilian journal of medical and biological research = Revista brasileira de pesquisas medicas e biologicas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ANAPC1 protein, human; 0 / Apc1 Subunit, Anaphase-Promoting Complex-Cyclosome; EC 6.3.2.19 / Anaphase-Promoting Complex-Cyclosome; EC 6.3.2.19 / Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes
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26. d'Annibale M, Piovanello P, Cerasoli V, Campioni N: Liver metastases from breast cancer: the role of surgical treatment. Hepatogastroenterology; 2005 Nov-Dec;52(66):1858-62
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  • [Title] Liver metastases from breast cancer: the role of surgical treatment.
  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: To evaluate short- and long-term outcomes in the surgical treatment of liver metastases from breast cancer METHODOLOGY: Between 1984 and 1999 we observed 26 patients with secondary liver localization (25 metachronous) from breast cancer.
  • The median disease-free interval was 70 months (4-136).
  • Median age at the time of liver surgery was 56 years (36-76).
  • In 9 cases the patients underwent adjuvant chemotherapy (5 of them following postoperative radiotherapy) and in 14 cases Tamoxifen was used.
  • Nine patients died; six patients are still living, 4 of them "disease-free", 2 having advanced metastatic disease, in treatment.
  • The overall 5-year-survival was 25% in patients whose liver metastases developed within 3 years after breast surgery compared with 40% in those ones with metastatic disease diagnosed more than 3 years after.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Hepatectomy / mortality. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Liver Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy, Needle. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Palliative Care. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome


27. Nurzyńska-Flak J, Mitura-Lesiuk M, Skomra S, Skomra D, Kowalczyk JR: [Second neoplasm in a 13-year-old boy complicated by Crohn's disease. Case report]. Med Wieku Rozwoj; 2004 Jul-Sep;8(3 Pt 2):839-45
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  • [Title] [Second neoplasm in a 13-year-old boy complicated by Crohn's disease. Case report].
  • Genetic abnormalities and immune system disorders resulting from them are the causes of neoplastic diseases as well as inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn's disease.
  • However, the rearrangement of genes may not only be the cause of neoplasms but also the result of oncolytic treatment used.
  • One of the late treatment-related complications of neoplastic diseases is the development of a second neoplasm and possible disorders belonging to the group of inflammatory bowel diseases, for example Crohn's disease.
  • The paper presents the case of a 13-year-old boy (K.G.) treated for a second neoplasm, complicated by Crohn's disease.
  • Eight years after the first line treatment the boy was diagnosed with the second neoplastic process -- pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL-L2 pre-B common +).
  • On day 71 of the therapy, during aplasia of blood marrow following chemotherapy, inflammation of the caecum was diagnosed and metronidazole was introduced.
  • Once blood counts improved, the complaints decreased and with continued chemotherapy of Protocol M (mercaptopurine, methotrexate), completely subsided.
  • The histopathological evaluation of the sections demonstrated a typical picture of Crohn's disease.
  • Crohn's disease of the ileum was diagnosed, the treatment with dexamethazone (according to Protocol II) was instituted which led to complete regression of the iliac lesions.
  • Steroid therapy (prednisone) continued until the treatment supporting the remission according to Protocol ALLIC 2002 (mercaptopurine, methotrexate orally) was initiated.
  • CONCLUSION: The differential diagnosis of complications accompanying neoplasms should consider the inflammatory bowel diseases; their atypical course may be masked by the treatment of the underlying disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Burkitt Lymphoma / diagnosis. Crohn Disease / complications. Neoplasms, Second Primary / diagnosis. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Anti-Inflammatory Agents / therapeutic use. Dexamethasone / therapeutic use. Humans. Male. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15858256.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Medycyna wieku rozwojowego
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Wieku Rozwoj
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone
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28. Ogilvy-Stuart AL, Gleeson H: Cancer risk following growth hormone use in childhood: implications for current practice. Drug Saf; 2004;27(6):369-82
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  • The therapeutic use of growth hormone (GH) has caused concern, as it is anabolic and mitogenic, and its effector hormone, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I is anti-apoptotic.
  • As both hormones can cause proliferation of normal and malignant cells, the possibility that GH therapy may induce cancer, increase the risk of tumour recurrence in those previously treated for a malignancy, or increase the risk of cancer in those with a predisposition, has resulted in concerns over its use.
  • Malignant tumours have been induced in animals exposed to supraphysiological doses of GH, whereas hypophysectomy appears to protect animals from carcinogen-induced neoplasms.
  • A number of studies have been undertaken to determine the risk of the development of cancer in children treated with GH, either de novo, or the recurrence of cancer in those previously treated for a malignancy.
  • Even in children with a primary diagnosis of cancer, subsequent GH use does not appear to increase the risk of tumour recurrence.
  • In addition, follow-up of oncology patients has suggested an increase in second neoplasms in those who also received GH therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Growth Hormone / adverse effects. Neoplasms / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Brain Neoplasms / chemically induced. Brain Neoplasms / epidemiology. Cell Division / drug effects. Child. Disease Models, Animal. Growth Disorders / therapy. Human Growth Hormone / adverse effects. Human Growth Hormone / therapeutic use. Humans. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 / metabolism. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I / metabolism. Leukemia / epidemiology. Leukemia / etiology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / chemically induced. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 15144231.001).
  • [ISSN] 0114-5916
  • [Journal-full-title] Drug safety
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drug Saf
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3; 12629-01-5 / Human Growth Hormone; 67763-96-6 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor I; 9002-72-6 / Growth Hormone
  • [Number-of-references] 98
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29. Schneider DT, Calaminus G, Wessalowski R, Pathmanathan R, Harms D, Göbel U: Therapy of advanced ovarian juvenile granulosa cell tumors. Klin Padiatr; 2002 Jul-Aug;214(4):173-8
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  • [Title] Therapy of advanced ovarian juvenile granulosa cell tumors.
  • In local disease (FIGO stage I), the beneficial role of tumor-ovarectomy is well established.
  • In contrast, life expectancy in patients with advanced JGCT (FIGO stage >/= II) is short even after complete tumor resection.
  • The current literature provides only limited and inconclusive data regarding the value of adjuvant chemotherapy in such patients with advanced disease.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Therefore, we analyzed the patients with FIGO stage >/= II JGCT who were prospectively documented as follow-up patients of the German MAKEI trials for non-testicular germ cell tumors and received the recommended cisplatin-based chemotherapy in an adjuvant setting.
  • Two patients received laparoscopic tumor resection, which was incomplete in both.
  • All patients received 4 or 6 cycles of adjuvant cisplatin-based three-agent chemotherapy in analogy to the current therapeutic concept applied in malignant germ cell tumors.
  • One patient with a large tumor and multiple peritoneal metastases additionally received 40 Gy abdominal irradiation.
  • RESULTS: All patients achieved complete clinical remission after initial surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • One patient developed a metachronous tumor of the contralateral ovary after 126 months follow-up and is still alive but currently in therapy of another recurrence.
  • Another patient suffered a tumor recurrence after 12 months but achieved a second complete remission with cisplatin chemotherapy after a follow-up of currently 4 months.
  • One patient achieved complete clinical remission but suffered a diffuse peritoneal tumor recurrence with massive ascites and finally died as a result of tumor progression.
  • In summary, at the time of this report 6 of 7 patients are alive after a median of 47 (15 - 138) months.
  • CONCLUSION: This analysis clearly demonstrates that advanced JGCT can be successfully treated with surgery followed by adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy.
  • Therefore, this study reveals encouraging therapeutic perspectives in these otherwise fatal tumors that merit further investigation in a prospective cooperative trial.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Granulosa Cell Tumor / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Germany. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Prospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 12165898.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8630
  • [Journal-full-title] Klinische Pädiatrie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Klin Padiatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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30. Ng TY, Wong LC: Diagnosis and management of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol; 2003 Dec;17(6):893-903
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  • [Title] Diagnosis and management of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia.
  • The FIGO Committee Report on the FIGO 2000 staging for gestational trophoblastic disease included criteria for the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN).
  • The use of single agent chemotherapy for low-risk disease versus multi-agent chemotherapy for high-risk disease is discussed.
  • Controversies regarding when to stop chemotherapy are explored with a view to minimizing the short and long-term toxicity, in particular the small risk of developing a second malignancy.
  • Recommendations for the follow up of patients after chemotherapy with particular reference to contraceptive advice and future pregnancies are discussed in the light of current evidence.
  • [MeSH-major] Gestational Trophoblastic Disease / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chorionic Gonadotropin / blood. Contraception. Female. Fertility. Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Pregnancy. Reagent Kits, Diagnostic. Risk Factors. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14614888.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-6934
  • [Journal-full-title] Best practice & research. Clinical obstetrics & gynaecology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Chorionic Gonadotropin; 0 / Reagent Kits, Diagnostic
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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31. Cozzi DA, Schiavetti A, Morini F, Castello MA, Cozzi F: Nephron-sparing surgery for unilateral primary renal tumor in children. J Pediatr Surg; 2001 Feb;36(2):362-5
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  • [Title] Nephron-sparing surgery for unilateral primary renal tumor in children.
  • PURPOSE: Definition of the role of nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) in the treatment of children with primary unilateral renal tumor (URT).
  • Preoperative 2-drug chemotherapy was given to all patients more than 6 months of age.
  • Between 1992 and 1995, 3-drug chemotherapy was used after NSS.
  • Thereafter, following NSS, 2-drug chemotherapy was given if no microscopic residual disease was found on final histologic examination.
  • Enucleation of 6 tumors (1 metachronous) was performed in 5 patients.
  • Seven children had standard histology nephroblastoma, 1 highly differentiated epithelial type nephroblastoma, 1 oncocytoma, and 1 cystic nephroma.
  • All children are alive and disease free with good functioning of the affected kidney after NSS, at a mean follow-up of 40.7 months (range, 2 to 100 months).
  • CONCLUSION: NSS should be considered in selected children with URT, especially in patients with increased risk for metachronous tumor or renal disease, and in patients with benign or low-grade malignant URT.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Nephrectomy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Eligibility Determination. Female. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Life Expectancy. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Postoperative Complications. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 11172435.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3468
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Kayıran SM, Özbek N: Acute Monoblastic Leukemia as a Second Malignancy After Doxorubicin and Cisplatin Treatment for Osteosarcoma. Turk J Haematol; 2003 Mar 5;20(1):39-42
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  • [Title] Acute Monoblastic Leukemia as a Second Malignancy After Doxorubicin and Cisplatin Treatment for Osteosarcoma.
  • Secondary or therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) occurs as a complication of various chemotherapy regimens.
  • In pediatric age group, leukemia as a second malignancy after osteosarcoma treatment with doxorubicin and cisplatin is relatively rare.
  • We interpreted this as a rare case of t- AML with normal cytogenetic analysis, and believe the disease was induced by the addition of platinum compounds to a regimen including topoisomerase II inhibitors.

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  • (PMID = 27265334.001).
  • [ISSN] 1300-7777
  • [Journal-full-title] Turkish journal of haematology : official journal of Turkish Society of Haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Turk J Haematol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
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33. Fernando IN: The role of radiotherapy in patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma of the breast. Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol); 2000;12(3):158-65
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  • The majority of recurrences will occur in the first 5 years and 50% of patients will have metastatic disease at the time of recurrence.
  • Improvements in breast cancer mortality may however be counterbalanced by increases in cardiac events and deaths caused by second malignancies.
  • Adjuvant radiation combined with systemic chemotherapy has a significant effect on local recurrence and probably on survival in node-positive patients after mastectomy.
  • Controversy still exists about what fields should be irradiated and in particular whether the supraclavicular fossa and internal mammary node chain should be included in adjuvant therapy.
  • Treatment at relapse on the chest wall may require a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, depending on previous therapy.
  • Re-irradiation after radical adjuvant radiotherapy can be considered only for selected patients when an adequate discussion with them has taken place with regard to the relative benefits versus toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma / radiotherapy. Carcinoma / surgery. Mastectomy
  • [MeSH-minor] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Tamoxifen / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 10942332.001).
  • [ISSN] 0936-6555
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain))
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen
  • [Number-of-references] 55
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34. Buch RS, Geisbüsch R, Kunkel M: [Acral ischemia as a rare paraneoplastic syndrome in the terminal phase of mouth floor carcinoma]. Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir; 2002 Sep;6(5):331-5
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  • BACKGROUND: The term "paraneoplastic syndrome" describes a clinically apparent disease associated with a malignant neoplasm, which is not a direct consequence of invasive tumor growth.
  • Symptoms evolved under palliative chemotherapy with gemcitabine for inoperable metachronous squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil following a history of two simultaneous carcinomas of the alveolar crest.
  • Digital ischemia was combined with severe pain, similar to Raynaud's syndrome, which required therapeutic intervention.
  • The treatment objective is to improve perfusion and simultaneously reduce pain.
  • [MeSH-major] Alveolar Process. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Fingers / blood supply. Ischemia / etiology. Maxillary Neoplasms / diagnosis. Mouth Floor. Mouth Neoplasms / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / diagnosis. Palliative Care. Paraneoplastic Syndromes / etiology. Tonsillar Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Male. Necrosis. Raynaud Disease / therapy. Sympathectomy. Vasodilator Agents / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 12448236.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-9417
  • [Journal-full-title] Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie : MKG
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vasodilator Agents
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35. Hall GW, Katzilakis N, Pinkerton CR, Nicolin G, Ashley S, McCarthy K, Daw S, Hewitt M, Wallace WH, Shankar A: Outcome of children with nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma - a Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group report. Br J Haematol; 2007 Sep;138(6):761-8
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  • In both trials, only patients with stage IA disease had the option of being treated with either involved field radiation alone or combination chemotherapy consisting of chlorambucil, vinblastine, procarbazine and prednisolone (ChlVPP).
  • Patients with all other stages were treated with ChlVPP chemotherapy.
  • Thirty-five patients (83%) presented with early stage disease (Stages I & II).
  • Six children relapsed after primary therapy.
  • There have been no second malignancies or transformations to B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Chlorambucil / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Great Britain. Humans. Ireland. Male. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Procarbazine / therapeutic use. Prospective Studies. Recurrence. Remission Induction. Survival Rate. Vinblastine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 17760808.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 18D0SL7309 / Chlorambucil; 35S93Y190K / Procarbazine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHIVPP protocol
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36. Miser JS, Goldsby RE, Chen Z, Krailo MD, Tarbell NJ, Link MP, Fryer CJ, Pritchard DJ, Gebhardt MC, Dickman PS, Perlman EJ, Meyers PA, Donaldson SS, Moore SG, Rausen AR, Vietti TJ, Grier HE: Treatment of metastatic Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone: evaluation of increasing the dose intensity of chemotherapy--a report from the Children's Oncology Group. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2007 Dec;49(7):894-900
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  • [Title] Treatment of metastatic Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone: evaluation of increasing the dose intensity of chemotherapy--a report from the Children's Oncology Group.
  • BACKGROUND: The outcome for patients with Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFTs) of bone with metastases at diagnosis remains poor despite new approaches to treatment.
  • We evaluated whether a dose-intensity chemotherapy regimen improved survival for patients with ESFTs of bone with metastases at diagnosis.
  • METHODS: We entered 60 patients with metastatic ESFTs of bone onto a single arm trial of a new intensive therapy.
  • Treatment consisted of 51-weeks of chemotherapy and local control of the primary with radiation, surgery, or both.
  • The chemotherapeutic protocol included two alternating blocks: one with vincristine (2 mg/m(2)), doxorubicin (90 mg/m(2)), and cyclophosphamide (2,200 mg/m(2)); and the second with ifosfamide (2,800 mg/m(2)/day x 5 days) and etoposide (100 mg/m(2)/day x 5 days).
  • Six patients (6-year cumulative incidence: 9%) developed second malignant neoplasms and died.
  • The 6-year overall event-free survival (EFS) was 28% (standard error (SE) 6%) and survival (S) was 29% (SE 6%).
  • CONCLUSION: An intensified treatment regimen using higher doses of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and doxorubicin increased toxicity and risk of second malignancy without improving EFS and S.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / chemically induced. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / therapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Critical Care. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Injections, Subcutaneous. Male. Risk Factors. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
  • (PMID = 17584910.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5009
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA 13539; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA 30969; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA 98543
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Venkateswaran V, Klotz LH, Fleshner NE: Selenium modulation of cell proliferation and cell cycle biomarkers in human prostate carcinoma cell lines. Cancer Res; 2002 May 1;62(9):2540-5
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  • Prostate cancer (PCA) is the most common histological malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among North American men.
  • Treatment with selenium caused G1 arrest and an 80% reduction in the S phase of LNCaP with no effect on PC3.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Cell Cycle Proteins / metabolism. Cyclins / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Selenium / pharmacology. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Cycle / drug effects. Cell Division / drug effects. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27. G1 Phase / drug effects. Growth Inhibitors / pharmacology. Humans. Male. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / genetics. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / metabolism. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / pathology. Receptors, Androgen / biosynthesis. Receptors, Androgen / genetics. Receptors, Androgen / physiology. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 11980647.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CDKN1A protein, human; 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21; 0 / Cyclins; 0 / Growth Inhibitors; 0 / Receptors, Androgen; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 147604-94-2 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27; H6241UJ22B / Selenium
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38. Peltier J, Vinchon M, Baroncini M, Kerdraon O, Dhellemmes P: Bifocal mixed germ-cell tumor with growing teratoma syndrome and metachronous mature metastases: case report. J Neurooncol; 2008 Oct;90(1):111-5
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  • [Title] Bifocal mixed germ-cell tumor with growing teratoma syndrome and metachronous mature metastases: case report.
  • The authors report the case of a 16-year-old male who presented with a bifocal diencephalic tumor arising both in the neurohypophysis and the pineal region with hydrocephalus.
  • MRI revealed an increase of the neoplasm during chemotherapy with recurrent obstructive hydrocephalus.
  • Subsequently, this patient developed metachronous cystic metastases in the cerebello-pontine angles, which were resected and identified as mature teratoma, then we observed a lesion of the brachium conjunctivum which stayed stable after 29 consecutive months.
  • Obviously surgical removal is the treatment of reference for teratomas.
  • Primary intracranial germ-cell tumors (CGT) arise in the midline of the brain and are located in the diencephalon.
  • The peak incidence occurs during the second decade of life.
  • Germ cell tumor (CGT) includes germinomas and non-germinomatous tumors, mature and immature teratomas account for 19.6 % [1].
  • Curiously, teratomas are able to grow during the first weeks of chemotherapy while serum markers remain normal.
  • This situation was originally described and designed as "the growing teratoma syndroma" (GTS) in primary testis tumors by Logothetis in 1982 [2].
  • Here we report the rare occurrence of a GTS in a teenager who presented metachronous cystic metastases located in posterior fossa which were histologically mature.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Teratoma / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neurosurgical Procedures. Pineal Gland / pathology. Pineal Gland / physiopathology

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  • [CommentIn] J Neurooncol. 2009 Sep;94(3):449-50 [19347253.001]
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  • (PMID = 18574668.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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39. Finazzi G, Ruggeri M, Rodeghiero F, Barbui T: Second malignancies in patients with essential thrombocythaemia treated with busulphan and hydroxyurea: long-term follow-up of a randomized clinical trial. Br J Haematol; 2000 Sep;110(3):577-83
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  • [Title] Second malignancies in patients with essential thrombocythaemia treated with busulphan and hydroxyurea: long-term follow-up of a randomized clinical trial.
  • However, the relatively short follow-up (median 27 months) did not enable the evaluation of the risk of developing secondary malignancies.
  • In this study, we report the long-term outcome of the 114 patients included in the trial: 56 patients randomized to receive HU and 58 patients to receive no cytoreductive therapy.
  • Analysis was by intention to treat and, when indicated, by treatment.
  • Seven patients (13%) in the HU group developed secondary acute leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndromes or solid tumours, compared with only one of the control group patients (1.7%) (P = 0.032).
  • The occurrence of secondary malignancies was also analysed by treatment: none of the 20 patients who had never been treated with chemotherapy developed neoplasia vs. three of the 77 patients given HU only (3.9% n.s.) and five of the 15 patients given busulphan plus HU (33% P < 0. 0001).
  • (b) the sequential use of busulphan and HU significantly increased the risk of second malignancies; and (c) overall survival was not affected by HU therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Busulfan / therapeutic use. Hydroxyurea / therapeutic use. Neoplasms, Second Primary / chemically induced. Thrombocythemia, Essential / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Leukemia / chemically induced. Male. Middle Aged. Myelodysplastic Syndromes / chemically induced. Thrombosis / prevention & control

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  • [CommentIn] Br J Haematol. 2002 Mar;116(4):923-4 [11886403.001]
  • (PMID = 10997967.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] G1LN9045DK / Busulfan; X6Q56QN5QC / Hydroxyurea
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40. Marchevsky AM: Problems in pathologic staging of lung cancer. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2006 Mar;130(3):292-302
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • CONTEXT: Tumor stage is the most important prognostic and predictive factor for patients with lung cancer, the most lethal neoplasm in the United States.
  • It is used by thoracic surgeons, radiation therapists, and oncologists to determine whether patients with these neoplasms will be treated surgically with curative intent or with palliative radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: To review the variety of practical problems that can arise during the assessment of the pathologic stage and other prognostic/predictive factors included in the College of American Pathologist checklist for evaluation of resected lung neoplasms.
  • DATA SOURCES: Potential practical difficulties that can arise during the pathologic staging of lung cancer patients include the distinction between pT1, pT2, and pT3 lesions based on their location and the presence of visceral pleura and/or parietal pleura invasion; the differential diagnosis between multiple synchronous or metachronous primary lung neoplasms (pT1m) and intrapulmonary metastasis of non-small cell carcinoma of the lung (pT4 or pM1 according to their location); and the role of the recent American Joint Committee on Cancer terminology for the classification of lymph nodes (isolated tumor cells, micrometastases, and metastases).
  • A brief discussion of the assessment of the effects of neoadjuvant therapy on resected lung neoplasms is also included.
  • [MeSH-major] Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Staging / standards. Pathology, Surgical / standards. Practice Guidelines as Topic / standards. Problem Solving. Societies, Medical / standards

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  • (PMID = 16519556.001).
  • [ISSN] 1543-2165
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Longhi A, Pasini E, Bertoni F, Pignotti E, Ferrari C, Bacci G: Twenty-year follow-up of osteosarcoma of the extremity treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. J Chemother; 2004 Dec;16(6):582-8
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  • [Title] Twenty-year follow-up of osteosarcoma of the extremity treated with adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • We have updated the results of an adjuvant chemotherapy study of 106 patients with osteosarcoma of the extremities published 17 years ago, treated by surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with vincristine (VCR), methotrexate (MTX) and doxorubicin (ADM), between 1980-1983, and followed-up for at least 20 years (20-23 years).
  • In comparison with the results reported 17 years ago with a median follow-up of 38 months (range: 27-66), this updated study showed 24 more deaths, 9 more relapses and 3 second malignancies.
  • We conclude that osteosarcoma patients treated with chemotherapy are at risk of late adverse events.
  • Protracted medical follow-up and long-term updated results are useful to identify, at an early stage, late relapses and late treatment-related complications.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Disease-Free Survival. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Morbidity. Risk Factors. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 15700851.001).
  • [ISSN] 1120-009X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of chemotherapy (Florence, Italy)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Chemother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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42. Billmire D, Vinocur C, Rescorla F, Colombani P, Cushing B, Hawkins E, London WB, Giller R, Lauer S: Malignant mediastinal germ cell tumors: an intergroup study. J Pediatr Surg; 2001 Jan;36(1):18-24
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  • PURPOSE: This review was conducted to determine clinical characteristics and response to therapy in this rare pediatric neoplasm.
  • METHODS: An intergroup Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) 9049/Children's Cancer Study Group (CCG) 8882 randomized trial was conducted to evaluate response rate and survival with chemotherapy using etoposide, bleomycin, and high or standard dose cisplatin for high-risk malignant germ cell tumors at extragonadal sites.
  • For this review, a secondary analysis of clinical and operative findings in patients with primary site in the mediastinum was carried out.
  • Yolk sac tumor was the only malignant element in girls.
  • Boys had yolk sac tumor in 7, germinoma in 3, choriocarcinoma in 2, and mixed malignant elements in 15.
  • Four patients had biopsy and chemotherapy without tumor resection, and only 1 survived.
  • Fourteen patients had resection at diagnosis followed by chemotherapy with 12 survivors.
  • Eighteen patients had biopsy followed by chemotherapy and postchemotherapy tumor resection with 13 survivors.
  • Tumor size in response to chemotherapy for these 18 patients was stable or increased in 6, and decreased in 12 (mean decrease of 57% in greatest dimension).
  • Ten patients died: 5 of tumor (all boys > or =15 yr), 2 of sepsis, and 3 of second malignancy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Malignant MGCT is a complex tumor of varied histology with frequent coexistence of benign elements.
  • Lesions often have incomplete regression with chemotherapy alone.
  • Tumor resection may be undertaken at diagnosis or after attempted shrinkage with chemotherapy.
  • Aggressive attempt at complete tumor resection should be offered to all patients even if bulky tumor persists after induction chemotherapy with expectation of a significant salvage rate.
  • Boys > or =15 years may be a high-risk subgroup for mortality from tumor progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Mediastinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Biopsy. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Child. Child, Preschool. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Infant, Newborn. Male. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11150432.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3468
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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43. Aziz TA, Aziz MA, Fouad HH, Rashed LA, Salama H, Abd-Alla S, Wehab MA, Ahmed T: Interferon-alpha gene therapy prevents aflatoxin and carbon tetrachloride promoted hepatic carcinogenesis in rats. Int J Mol Med; 2005 Jan;15(1):21-6
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  • [Title] Interferon-alpha gene therapy prevents aflatoxin and carbon tetrachloride promoted hepatic carcinogenesis in rats.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first time an experimental in vivo gene therapy trial was conducted in Egypt.
  • Two genes were examined in liver tissue by RT-PCR: the first was glutathione-S-transferase placental (GST-P) isoenzyme, as an early marker to detect hepatic malignancy; the second was IFN-alpha gene expression to detect the efficiency of gene uptake and its persistence after transduction.
  • Forty male rats, divided equally into 4 groups, were included in the study: the first group was the control; the second group received CCl4 0.2 ml subcutaneously twice weekly for 12 weeks and AFB1 0.25 mg/kg body wt intraperitoneally twice weekly for 6 weeks; the third group received IFN-alpha (10(8) pfu) intravenously in the tail vein prior to the start of CCl4 and AFB1 injections; and the fourth group received IFN-alpha (10(8) pfu) by intrahepatic injection under ultrasonography guide after termination of the CCl4 and AFB1 injection schedule.
  • Pathological examination of liver tissue proved that IFN-alpha minimized both fibrotic and cirrhotic processes.
  • In conclusion, IFN-alpha exerts significant protective effects, but more so when the gene is administered before fibrogenic and carcinogenic induction in hepatic tissues.
  • IFN-alpha gene therapy may be justified in clinical trials for high-risk candidates with hepatic carcinogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Aflatoxins / pharmacology. Carbon Tetrachloride / pharmacology. Genetic Therapy. Interferon-alpha / genetics. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Liver Neoplasms, Experimental / genetics. Liver Neoplasms, Experimental / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / chemically induced. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / pathology. Disease Models, Animal. Glutathione Transferase / metabolism. Isoenzymes / metabolism. Liver / drug effects. Liver / metabolism. Liver / pathology. Male. Placenta / enzymology. Rats. Transduction, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 15583823.001).
  • [ISSN] 1107-3756
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of molecular medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Mol. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aflatoxins; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Isoenzymes; CL2T97X0V0 / Carbon Tetrachloride; EC 2.5.1.18 / Glutathione Transferase
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44. Navarro D, Luzardo OP, Fernández L, Chesa N, Díaz-Chico BN: Transition to androgen-independence in prostate cancer. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol; 2002 Jul;81(3):191-201
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  • Prostate carcinoma is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of death as a result of cancer in men in the western countries.
  • Withdrawal of androgens or the peripheral blockage of androgen action remain the critical therapeutic options for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.
  • Understanding the mechanisms of transition to androgen independence and tumor progression in prostate cancer is critical to finding new ways to treat aged patients that are ineligible for conventional chemotherapy.
  • Many of these involve the androgen receptor (AR) and its signalling pathways, but they might also include genetic changes that affect several genes, which results in the activation of oncogenes or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes.
  • [MeSH-major] Androgens / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 12163131.001).
  • [ISSN] 0960-0760
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of steroid biochemistry and molecular biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Steroid Biochem. Mol. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgens; 0 / Receptors, Androgen
  • [Number-of-references] 61
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45. Morton LM, Curtis RE, Linet MS, Bluhm EC, Tucker MA, Caporaso N, Ries LA, Fraumeni JF Jr: Second malignancy risks after non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia: differences by lymphoma subtype. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Nov 20;28(33):4935-44
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  • [Title] Second malignancy risks after non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia: differences by lymphoma subtype.
  • PURPOSE: Previous studies have shown increased risks of second malignancies after non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL); however, no earlier investigation has quantified differences in risk of new malignancy by lymphoma subtype.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We evaluated second cancer and leukemia risks among 43,145 1-year survivors of CLL/small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), or follicular lymphoma (FL) from 11 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based registries during 1992 to 2006.
  • Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia risks were significantly elevated after FL and DLBCL, particularly among patients receiving initial chemotherapy, but not after CLL/SLL (SIR: CLL/SLL = 1.13, FL = 5.96, DLBCL = 4.96; P(Diff) < .001).
  • Patients with HIV/AIDS-related lymphoma (n = 932) were predominantly diagnosed with DLBCL and had significantly and substantially elevated risks for second anal cancer (SIR = 120.50) and Kaposi's sarcoma (SIR = 138.90).
  • CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that differing immunologic alterations, treatments (eg, alkylating agent chemotherapy), genetic susceptibilities, and other risk factors (eg, viral infections, tobacco use) among lymphoma subtypes contribute to the patterns of second malignancy risk.
  • Elucidating these patterns may provide etiologic clues to lymphoma as well as to the second malignancies.

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  • (PMID = 20940199.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3020697
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46. Bacci G, Ferrari S, Bertoni F, Ruggieri P, Picci P, Longhi A, Casadei R, Fabbri N, Forni C, Versari M, Campanacci M: Long-term outcome for patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of the extremity treated at the istituto ortopedico rizzoli according to the istituto ortopedico rizzoli/osteosarcoma-2 protocol: an updated report. J Clin Oncol; 2000 Dec 15;18(24):4016-27
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  • PURPOSE: To provide an estimate of long-term prognosis for patients with osteosarcoma of the extremity treated in a single institution with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and observed for at least 10 years.
  • Postoperatively, good responders (90% or more tumor necrosis) received the same three drugs used before surgery, whereas poor responders (less than 90% tumor necrosis) received ifosfamide and etoposide in addition to those three drugs.
  • At a follow-up ranging from 10 to 13 years (median, 11.5 years), 101 patients (61%) remained continuously free of disease, 61 relapsed, and two died of ADM-induced cardiotoxicity.
  • ADM-induced cardiotoxicity (six patients), male infertility (10 of the 12 assessable patients), and second malignancies (seven patients) were the major complications of chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSION: With an aggressive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, it is possible to cure more than 60% of patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of the extremity and amputation may be avoided in more than 80% of them.
  • Because local or systemic relapses, myocardiopathies, and second malignancies are possible even 5 years or more after the beginning of treatment, a long-term follow-up is recommended for these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Osteosarcoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Extremities. Female. Fertility / drug effects. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neoplasms, Second Primary / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / surgery. Patient Compliance. Postoperative Complications / etiology. Postoperative Complications / surgery. Radiography. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures. Reoperation. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11118462.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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47. Jehn U, Bartl R, Dietzfelbinger H, Haferlach T, Heinemann V: An update: 12-year follow-up of patients with hairy cell leukemia following treatment with 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine. Leukemia; 2004 Sep;18(9):1476-81
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  • [Title] An update: 12-year follow-up of patients with hairy cell leukemia following treatment with 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine.
  • In addition, the probability of obtaining another response with this drug in pts who relapsed after 2-CdA treatment will be addressed.
  • A total of 44 consecutive pts (34 males, 10 females) with a median age of 57 years (range 33-77) at the time of initiation of 2-CdA treatment were analyzed.
  • The median time to the start of 2-CdA treatment of the 11 pretreated pts was 47 months (mo) (10-160).
  • Out of 44, 43 (98%) achieved complete response (CR) (13 pts with residual disease-RD), one pt reached a good partial response with a single cycle of 2-CdA.
  • Bone marrow biopsies were performed at the time of recovery of hematopoiesis, thereafter at 2-3 mo intervals, thereafter at 6 mo, and finally annually in 35 pts.
  • Disease-free survival from the start of 2-CdA treatment is 36% at 12 years (median 8.4 years), 17/44 pts relapsed.
  • Nine of these pts were treated with 2-CdA again, eight achieved a second CR (median 2.5 yrs), one pt did not respond.
  • Eight of our cohort had a second malignancy before receiving 2-CdA.
  • Six pts died in CR due to the second malignancy.
  • The overall survival at 12 years after the start of 2-CdA treatment is 79%.
  • 2-CdA is a safe and effective treatment of HCL inducing complete remissions in the majority of pts with only a single cycle of 2-CdA, and a paucity of toxicities.
  • Pts who relapsed following treatment with 2-CdA responded to subsequent retreatment with 2-CdA.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cladribine / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Hairy Cell / drug therapy. Neoplasm, Residual / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cohort Studies. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Interferon-alpha / administration & dosage. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neoplasms, Second Primary / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / surgery. Palliative Care. Pentostatin / administration & dosage. Pentostatin / therapeutic use. Splenectomy. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15229616.001).
  • [ISSN] 0887-6924
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leukemia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 395575MZO7 / Pentostatin; 47M74X9YT5 / Cladribine
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48. McGovern SL, Williams MD, Weber RS, Sabichi A, Chambers MS, Martin JW, Chao KS: Three synchronous HPV-associated squamous cell carcinomas of Waldeyer's ring: case report and comparison with Slaughter's model of field cancerization. Head Neck; 2010 Aug;32(8):1118-24
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  • BACKGROUND: Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx have an 8% to 20% risk of a synchronous or metachronous second malignancy.
  • METHODS: We report the case of a 46-year-old man with 3 simultaneous primary malignancies of Waldeyer's ring: HPV-positive SCC of both tonsils and the nasopharynx, with bilateral neck metastases.
  • RESULTS: The patient received induction chemotherapy followed by definitive radiotherapy and remains free of disease at 18 months.
  • CONCLUSION: Comparison with the Slaughter model of field cancerization suggests that HPV-positive SCC of the head and neck may have a distinct mechanism for the development of multifocal disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / virology. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / virology. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / virology. Papillomavirus Infections / pathology

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  • [Copyright] 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2009.
  • (PMID = 19572386.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0347
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & neck
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Senkus E, Konefka T, Nowaczyk M, Jassem J: Second lower genital tract squamous cell carcinoma following cervical cancer. A clinical study of 46 patients. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand; 2000 Sep;79(9):765-70
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  • [Title] Second lower genital tract squamous cell carcinoma following cervical cancer. A clinical study of 46 patients.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients after treatment for cervical cancer have increased risk of developing second squamous cell malignancy of the lower genital tract.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective study of 46 patients with second lower genital tract epidermoid cancers following previous treatment for invasive cervical carcinoma.
  • RESULTS: Patient age at diagnosis of cervical cancer was 27 to 68 years (median 44 years) and at diagnosis of the second malignancy - 43 to 72 years (median 63 years).
  • Time span between metachronous malignancies ranged from 66 to 406 months (median 206 months).
  • In 32 cases (70%) second lesion was located in the vagina and in 14 (30%) - in the vulva.
  • Out of 35 previously irradiated patients, in 24 (69%) second tumor was located within the high dose volume and in 11 (31%) - outside it.
  • Treatment of second cancer consisted of surgery in 12 patients (26%), radiotherapy in 23 (50%), combined surgery and radiotherapy--in five (11%), chemotherapy in four (9%) and surgery plus chemotherapy - in one case.
  • Median survival was 52 months and five-year survival from the diagnosis of second malignancy - 47.5%.
  • CONCLUSION: Treatment outcome in patients with second lower genital tract carcinoma is unsatisfactory due to poor feasibility of another definite treatment after previous radical surgery and/or radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology. Vaginal Neoplasms / mortality. Vulvar Neoplasms / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Palliative Care. Poland / epidemiology. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome


50. Rice SC, Vacek P, Homans AH, Messier T, Rivers J, Kendall H, Finette BA: Genotoxicity of therapeutic intervention in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia. Cancer Res; 2004 Jul 1;64(13):4464-71
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  • [Title] Genotoxicity of therapeutic intervention in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • The survival rates of children treated for cancer have dramatically increased after the development of standardized multiple-modality treatment protocols.
  • To study the genotoxic effects of antineoplastic treatment in children, we performed a comparative analysis of the changes in the frequency of somatic mutations (Mfs) at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT)-reporter gene in children treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).
  • We measured HPRT Mfs from 130 peripheral blood samples from 45 children with ALL (13, low risk; 22, standard risk; and 10, high risk) from the time of diagnosis, as well as during and after the completion of therapy.
  • We observed a significant increase in mean HPRT Mfs during each phase of therapy (diagnosis, 1.4 x 10(-6); consolidation, 52.1 x 10(-6); maintenance, 93.2 x 10(-6); and off-therapy, 271.7 x 10(-6)) that were independent of the risk group treatment protocol used.
  • This 200-fold increase in mean somatic Mf remained elevated years after the completion of therapy.
  • We did not observe a significant difference in the genotoxicity of each risk group treatment modality despite differences in the compositional and clinical toxicity associated with these treatment protocols.
  • These findings suggest that combination chemotherapy used to treat children with ALL is quite genotoxic, resulting in an increased somatic mutational load that may result in an elevated risk for the development of multi-factorial diseases, in particular second malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Mutation. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / genetics

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  • (PMID = 15231655.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / 1 P20RR16462; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1K01CA77737; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1R01CA09094013; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / 1R29HD35309; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30CA22435
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; EC 2.4.2.8 / Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase
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51. Gambassi G, Semeraro R, Suma V, Sebastio A, Incalzi RA: Aggressive behavior of classical Kaposi's sarcoma and coexistence with angiosarcoma. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci; 2005 Apr;60(4):520-3
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  • Histology allowed a diagnosis of the classical form of Kaposi's sarcoma; the serology test result for HIV was negative, whereas the associated human herpes virus type 8 was detected by polymerase chain reaction on the skin sample.
  • Chemotherapy with vinblastine appeared to stabilize the cutaneous disease, but the patient developed a massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to dissemination to the stomach.
  • Twelve months after the onset of the disease, vegetative and easily bleeding lesions progressively occluded the mouth of the patient: histological features were consistent with a low-grade angiosarcoma distinct from that of Kaposi's sarcoma.
  • This case illustrates that, even in its classical form, Kaposi's sarcoma may be a malignant, rapidly progressing tumor.
  • LEARNING POINTS: a) The extent and rate of spread of initial skin lesions should be considered to be early signs of aggressive dissemination, even in the absence of other variables (i.e., histological pattern, human herpes virus type 8 positive mononuclear cells) associated with progression of the disease.
  • c) When classical Kaposi's sarcoma displays aggressive behavior a second, primary malignant tumor arising from the vascular tissue should be investigated.
  • TAKE-HOME MESSAGE: Even in its classical form, Kaposi's sarcoma may be a malignant, rapidly progressing tumor with visceral involvement; also, a second malignancy may occur in nearly one patient of four.
  • [MeSH-major] Foot Diseases / pathology. Hemangiosarcoma / pathology. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / pathology. Palatal Neoplasms / pathology. Sarcoma, Kaposi / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Fatal Outcome. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness

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  • (PMID = 15933395.001).
  • [ISSN] 1079-5006
  • [Journal-full-title] The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Brenner B, Shah MA, Gonen M, Klimstra DS, Shia J, Kelsen DP: Small-cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract: a retrospective study of 64 cases. Br J Cancer; 2004 May 4;90(9):1720-6
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  • Small-cell carcinoma (SmCC) of the gastrointestinal tract is a very rare and aggressive malignancy.
  • To better define its clinicopathological features, the records of all patients with this disease seen at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center between 1980 and 2002 (n=64) were reviewed.
  • The most common primary tumour locations were in the large bowel and oesophagus.
  • Predisposing medical conditions for non-small-cell cancers, positive family cancer history, and metachronous tumours were common.
  • In all, 37% had mixed tumour histology and 48% presented with extensive disease, according to the Veterans' Administration Lung Study group (VALSG) staging system used for small-cell lung cancer.
  • Treatment outcome in limited disease (LD) suggested a role for surgery and chemotherapy.
  • The 2-year survival was 23% and two prognostic factors were identified, the extent of disease according to the VALSG system (P<0.01) and TNM stage (P=0.03).
  • Mixed tumour histology is common and may affect therapy.
  • Surgery, combined with chemotherapy, should be considered for LD.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Small Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Small Cell / pathology. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / mortality. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15150595.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2409752
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53. Shvidel L, Sigler E, Shtalrid M, Feldberg E, Berrebi A: Parotid gland involvement, the presenting sign of high grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma in two patients with Gaucher disease and sicca syndrome. J Inherit Metab Dis; 2007 Oct;30(5):825
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  • [Title] Parotid gland involvement, the presenting sign of high grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma in two patients with Gaucher disease and sicca syndrome.
  • Increased risk of haematological malignancies has been described in Gaucher disease patients; however, high-grade lymphoma has been rarely observed.
  • We report two patients with Gaucher disease and sicca syndrome diagnosed with aggressive lymphoma involving the parotid gland.
  • A 29-year-old woman with Gaucher disease developed tumour of the left parotid gland.
  • Bone biopsy revealed focal lymphomatous infiltration consistent with stage IV disease.
  • MACOP-B chemotherapy regimen (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, methotrexate, bleomycin, vincristine, prednisone) resulted in complete remission for 15 years.
  • A 76-year-old patient with Gaucher disease suffered from dry-mouth feeling.
  • He developed a left parotid gland tumour.
  • Accumulation of the glucocerebroside in Gaucher disease activates macrophages, inducing release of pro-inflammatory cytokines which may be involved in the pathogenesis of second malignancy.
  • Patients with Gaucher disease bear an increased risk of haematological malignancies; however, aggressive lymphoma has been described only occasionally.
  • The underlying Gaucher disease and sicca syndrome might be implicated as immunological triggers for lymphoma occurrence and its propensity for the parotid gland in these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Gaucher Disease / complications. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / diagnosis. Parotid Neoplasms / diagnosis. Sjogren's Syndrome / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, B-Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, B-Cell / etiology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / etiology. Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell / etiology. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Treatment Outcome


54. Foltz LM, Song KW, Connors JM: Hodgkin's lymphoma in adolescents. J Clin Oncol; 2006 Jun 1;24(16):2520-6
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  • PURPOSE: To compare the clinical presentation, response to treatment, and long-term outcome of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) presenting in adolescents and young adults.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: The British Columbia Cancer Agency Lymphoid Cancer database was used to identify adolescents (16 years to 21 years) and young adults (22 years to 45 years) receiving primary treatment for HL between 1981 and 2004.
  • There were no significant differences in histologic subtypes, sex, stages, or presence of B symptoms or bulky disease between adolescents and adults.
  • Equal proportions of adolescents and adults were treated with radiation alone (38% v 35%), chemotherapy alone (13% v 15%), or combined-modality programs (49% v 50%).
  • In limited stage disease, 10-year PFS was 89% for adolescents and 89% for adults and OS 96% and 96%, respectively.
  • In advanced stage disease, 10-year PFS was 71% for adolescents and 75% for adults and OS 88% and 86%, respectively.
  • Actuarial risk of second malignancy for adolescents and adults was not different (P = .68).
  • The use of adult treatment protocols is a safe and effective strategy for treating adolescents with HL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hodgkin Disease / diagnosis. Hodgkin Disease / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. British Columbia. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Incidence. Male. Mechlorethamine / administration & dosage. Medical Record Linkage. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasms, Second Primary / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Second Primary / therapy. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Procarbazine / administration & dosage. Prospective Studies. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Registries. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Vinblastine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 16735704.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 35S93Y190K / Procarbazine; 50D9XSG0VR / Mechlorethamine; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; ABVD protocol; MOPP protocol
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55. Stark B, Sharon R, Rechavi G, Attias D, Ballin A, Cividalli G, Burstein Y, Sthoeger D, Abramov A, Zaizov R: Effective preventive central nervous system therapy with extended triple intrathecal therapy and the modified ALL-BFM 86 chemotherapy program in an enlarged non-high risk group of children and adolescents with non-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: the Israel National Study report. Cancer; 2000 Jan 1;88(1):205-16
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  • [Title] Effective preventive central nervous system therapy with extended triple intrathecal therapy and the modified ALL-BFM 86 chemotherapy program in an enlarged non-high risk group of children and adolescents with non-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: the Israel National Study report.
  • BACKGROUND: Preventive cranial radiotherapy (CRT) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), although effective, may be associated with neurologic sequelae and second malignancies.
  • Attempts to replace CRT with intensified intrathecal therapy (IT) have shown promise in lower risk subgroups.
  • In the Israel National Study (INS) 89 trial, the efficacy of extended triple IT (TIT) alone for cranial prophylaxis in an enlarged non-high risk group (Non-HRG) was assessed in the context of a modified ALL-Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM) systemic chemotherapy program.
  • In the INS 89 protocol, all Non-HRG patients were treated with extended TIT x 18 times and systemic therapy based on the BFM 86 protocol, with the addition of etoposide x 4 times.
  • At a median follow-up of 58 months (range, 2-8.5 years), the overall 5-year event free survival (EFS) was 73.5% +/- 3% (standard error ¿SE), and the cumulative central nervous system (CNS) recurrence rate was 4.3% +/- 1.4% (SE) (isolated, 2.3%; combined, 2%).
  • Of the 220 eligible children, 189 (86%) were in the Non-HRG group, and their 5-year EFS was 77.8% +/- 3% (SE).
  • The cumulative CNS recurrence rate for patients without CNS disease at presentation was 3.1% +/- 1% (SE) (isolated, 1.7%; combined, 1.4%).
  • Within the risk subsets defined by the BFM 86 of the Non-HRG, the 5-year EFS rates of the RG (148 patients) and the SRG (41 patients) were 74.8% +/- 4% (SE) and 89.5% +/- 5% (SE), respectively, and the rates of CNS recurrence (isolated and combined) were 4% and 0%, respectively.
  • For the HRG (31 patients), the 5-year EFS and CNS recurrence rates were 47.9% +/- 9% (SE) and 8.
  • 5% +/- 6% (SE), respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Early extended TIT therapy in the context of modified BFM 86 systemic chemotherapy was found to provide adequate CNS protection and systemic leukemia control in patients with non-high risk ALL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / prevention & control. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / secondary. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Hydrocortisone / administration & dosage. Infant. Injections, Spinal. Israel. Life Tables. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Risk. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 10618625.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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56. Raderer M, Püspök A, Stummvoll G, Längle F, Chott A: Early cancer of the stomach arising after successful treatment of gastric MALT lymphoma in patients with autoimmune disease. Scand J Gastroenterol; 2003 Mar;38(3):294-7
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  • [Title] Early cancer of the stomach arising after successful treatment of gastric MALT lymphoma in patients with autoimmune disease.
  • BACKGROUND: Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) arises in lymphoid tissue acquired through chronic antigenic stimulation as exemplified by Helicobacter pylori.
  • The detection of a signet ring cell carcinoma during follow-up endoscopy after successful therapy of MALT lymphoma in a patient with Sjögren's syndrome prompted us to analyse the frequency of subsequent gastric cancer in patients with underlying autoimmune disease (AD).
  • Data analysed included the type of AD, stage of MALT lymphoma, H. pylori status, treatment for MALT lymphoma and response, follow-up, the presence of a secondary cancer, and time to development of cancer.
  • In all patients, histologic samples were reassessed for the extent of gastritis, presence of intestinal metaplasia or focal atrophy at the time of lymphoma diagnosis.
  • RESULTS: A total of eight patients with overt AD at the time of diagnosis of MALT lymphoma were identified.
  • All patients had early stage MALT lymphoma restricted to the mucosa and submucosa at the time of diagnosis, and the presence of H. pylori was found in all cases.
  • Two of these patients achieved complete remission (CR) of the lymphoma following H. pylori eradication, while six were judged unresponsive and underwent chemotherapy, resulting in CR in all cases.
  • One patient died from stroke while being in CR for 2 months following chemotherapy.
  • Two patients (25%) developed early cancer limited to the gastric mucosa while being in CR from lymphoma for 9 and 27 months, respectively, and underwent partial gastrectomy.
  • In the remaining 4 patients, no evidence of lymphoma recurrence or a second malignancy has been found so far by regular follow-up every 3 months for a time-span between 52 and 63 months after initial diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Autoimmune Diseases / therapy. Gastric Mucosa / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Austria. Biopsy. Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell / therapy. Endosonography. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Metaplasia. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Polymyalgia Rheumatica / diagnosis. Polymyalgia Rheumatica / therapy. Pyloric Antrum / pathology. Remission Induction. Severity of Illness Index. Sjogren's Syndrome / diagnosis. Sjogren's Syndrome / therapy. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12737445.001).
  • [ISSN] 0036-5521
  • [Journal-full-title] Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Scand. J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Norway
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57. Kochbati L, Boussen H, Benna F, Belhaj Ali Z, Gammoudi A, Bouaouina N, Besbes M, Ghilen L, Rahal K, Maalej M: [Second malignancies following Hodgkin's disease treatment in Tunisia. Retrospective study of 26 cases observed at the institute Salah-Azaïz]. Cancer Radiother; 2003 Oct;7(5):302-7
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  • [Title] [Second malignancies following Hodgkin's disease treatment in Tunisia. Retrospective study of 26 cases observed at the institute Salah-Azaïz].
  • [Transliterated title] Tumeurs secondaires après traitement pour maladie de Hodgkin en Tunisie. Etude rétrospective à propos de 26 cas observés à l'institut Salah-Azaïz.
  • PURPOSE: To collect second cancers in patients treated for Hodgkin disease (HD) during adolescence and young adulthood at Salah Azaïz Institute of Tunis.
  • METHODS AND PATIENTS: We consider as second cancer all tumours other than HD observed in patients after treatment for HD.
  • RESULTS: Twenty-five patients among 614 treated for HD between 1975 and 1991 developed 26 secondary tumours (4.2%).
  • The first treatment was combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in 22 cases and only chemotherapy in three cases (stage IV).
  • Mean dose was 41.3 Gy (2 Gy/fraction in 21 and 3.3 in one).
  • Chemotherapy was MOPP (13), MOPP and vinblastine (four), MOPP-ABVD (five), ABVD (two) and vinblastine only in one.
  • Mean delay of second tumours was 114.5 months (40-276).
  • There was five acute myeloid leukaemia, two digestive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, five nodal high-grade lymphomas, three breast cancers (one in man associated with thyroid cancer), five lung cancers (three non-small cell and two of small cell type), two gastric tumours and one rectal cancer, one synovialosarcoma of the knee and one malignant Schwannoma of the neck.
  • CONCLUSION: Second cancer risk after treatment for HD is not low.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy. Hodgkin Disease / radiotherapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology

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  • (PMID = 14522350.001).
  • [ISSN] 1278-3218
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer radiothérapie : journal de la Société française de radiothérapie oncologique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Radiother
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 35S93Y190K / Procarbazine; 50D9XSG0VR / Mechlorethamine; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; ABVD protocol; MOPP protocol
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58. Dietl B, Marienhagen J, Schaefer C, Pohl F, Kölbl O: [Frequency and distribution pattern of distant metastases in patients with ENT tumors and their consequences for pretherapeutic staging]. Strahlenther Onkol; 2007 Mar;183(3):138-43
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  • [Transliterated title] Häufigkeit und Topographie von Fernmetastasen bei Patienten mit HNO-Tumoren und ihre onsequenzen für das prätherapeutische Staging.
  • The distribution of primary tumor site and stage (AJCC) was as follows: oropharynx: n = 161 (26.8%), hypopharynx: n = 187 (31.2%), oral cavity: n = 89 (14.8%), larynx: n = 118 (19.7%), cancer of unknown origin: n = 13 (2.2%), others: n = 32(5.3%), I: n = 24 (4%), II: n = 49 (8.2%), III: n = 89 (14.8%), IV: n = 438 (73%).
  • The following parameters were analyzed in association with distant metastases: tumor localization, T- and N-category, primary treatment, local tumor control, and second neoplasms.
  • RESULTS: 114/600 patients (19%) developed distant metastases, 29/600 (4.9%) at presentation, 50% within 9.3 months after diagnosis of the primary tumor.
  • Distant metastases were most frequent in stage IV (24.2%), carcinoma of the hypopharynx (25.7%), local recurrence (24.3%), and second neoplasm (31.7%) with the following distribution pattern: pulmonary 61/114 (53.5%), pleural 15/114 (13.1%), osseous 45/114 (39.5%), hepatic 14/114 (12.3%), cerebral 8/114 (7%), cutaneous 14/114 (12.3%).
  • 82/600 (13.6%) patients additionally had second neoplasms, 20 corresponding with synchronous or metachronous bronchial tumors.
  • CONCLUSION: With locally advanced ENT tumor stage IVa/b, carcinoma of the hypopharynx, local recurrence or second neoplasms, at least a pretherapeutic CT of the thorax should be performed because every seventh patient (88/600) developed metastases or second primary tumors within the thoracic space during the course of disease.
  • Regarding the side effects and costs of curative therapy, the definition of generally accepted guidelines for the systemic staging of locally advanced ENT tumors should be undertaken.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Bronchogenic / pathology. Carcinoma, Bronchogenic / secondary. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / pathology. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / radiotherapy. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / surgery. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Positron-Emission Tomography. Retrospective Studies. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 17340072.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-7158
  • [Journal-full-title] Strahlentherapie und Onkologie : Organ der Deutschen Röntgengesellschaft ... [et al]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Strahlenther Onkol
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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59. Brusamolino E, Lunghi F, Orlandi E, Astori C, Passamonti F, Baraté C, Pagnucco G, Baio A, Franchini P, Lazzarino M, Bernasconi C: Treatment of early-stage Hodgkin's disease with four cycles of ABVD followed by adjuvant radio-therapy: analysis of efficacy and long-term toxicity. Haematologica; 2000 Oct;85(10):1032-9
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  • [Title] Treatment of early-stage Hodgkin's disease with four cycles of ABVD followed by adjuvant radio-therapy: analysis of efficacy and long-term toxicity.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The use of combined modality therapy in early-stage Hodgkin's disease can spare staging laparotomy and reduces the risk of relapse compared to radiation alone.
  • This paper reports on the efficacy and long-term events of a combined modality approach consisting of a brief course of chemotherapy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, without laparotomy, in early-stage Hodgkin's disease.
  • DESIGN AND METHODS: This study included 78 patients with Hodgkin's disease (20 in stage I and 58 in stage II); 60% had mediastinal enlargement (12% had bulky disease) and 5% had subdiaphragmatic disease.
  • The treatment program consisted of four cycles of ABVD followed by adjuvant radiation to involved sites (43 patients) or involved and contiguous sites of disease (35 patients); radiation doses ranged from 30 to 36 Gy to uninvolved and involved sites, respectively; bulky disease received up to 44 Gy.
  • RESULTS: The treatment program was completed in a median of 6.2 months (range: 5-10).
  • The 5-year relapse-free survival was 97% and overall survival 98%; three patients died, one of disease progression and two of small cell lung carcinoma.
  • Long-term events included three cases of pulmonary fibrosis with symptomatic interstitial disease, one case of dilated cardiomyopathy with cardiac failure (all had received mediastinal radiation) and four cases of dysthyroidism.
  • Second neoplasms included two small cell lung carcinomas and one breast carcinoma.
  • INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: In early-stage Hodgkin's disease, four cycles of ABVD followed by adjuvant radiotherapy produced a 5-year overall survival of 98%.
  • Prolonged monitoring for therapy-related long term complications is mandatory in these potentially curable patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy. Hodgkin Disease / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Bleomycin / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Dacarbazine / adverse effects. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Vinblastine / administration & dosage. Vinblastine / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 11025593.001).
  • [ISSN] 0390-6078
  • [Journal-full-title] Haematologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Haematologica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ITALY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; ABVD protocol
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60. Packer RJ, Gajjar A, Vezina G, Rorke-Adams L, Burger PC, Robertson PL, Bayer L, LaFond D, Donahue BR, Marymont MH, Muraszko K, Langston J, Sposto R: Phase III study of craniospinal radiation therapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy for newly diagnosed average-risk medulloblastoma. J Clin Oncol; 2006 Sep 1;24(25):4202-8
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  • [Title] Phase III study of craniospinal radiation therapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy for newly diagnosed average-risk medulloblastoma.
  • METHODS: Four hundred twenty-one patients between 3 years and 21 years of age with nondisseminated medulloblastoma (MB) were prospectively randomly assigned to treatment with 23.4 Gy of CSRT, 55.8 Gy of posterior fossa RT, plus one of two adjuvant chemotherapy regimens: lomustine (CCNU), cisplatin, and vincristine; or cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and vincristine.
  • EFS was unaffected by sex, race, age, treatment regimen, brainstem involvement, or excessive anaplasia.
  • There were seven second malignancies.
  • CONCLUSION: This study discloses an encouraging EFS rate for children with nondisseminated MB treated with reduced-dose craniospinal radiation and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cerebellar Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cerebellar Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Child. Child, Preschool. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Lomustine / administration & dosage. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasms, Second Primary / diagnosis. Prognosis. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Risk Factors. Survival Analysis. Vincristine / administration & dosage


61. Kristinsson SY, Vidarsson B, Agnarsson BA, Haraldsdottir V, Olafsson O, Johannesson GM, Eyjolfsson GI, Bjornsdottir J, Onundarson PT, Reykdal S: Epidemiology of hairy cell leukemia in Iceland. Hematol J; 2002;3(3):145-7
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  • This is the first study in which all cases diagnosed nationwide over a long period of time in a well defined population are analysed.
  • We report the epidemiology of all HCL patients in Iceland, their clinical characteristics, treatment and follow-up.
  • One patient had a variant of HCL and did not respond to any therapy and one patient died of sepsis before any chemotherapy could be given.
  • Three patients developed a second malignancy (19%).

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  • (PMID = 12111650.001).
  • [ISSN] 1466-4860
  • [Journal-full-title] The hematology journal : the official journal of the European Haematology Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol. J.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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62. Sklar CA, Mertens AC, Mitby P, Occhiogrosso G, Qin J, Heller G, Yasui Y, Robison LL: Risk of disease recurrence and second neoplasms in survivors of childhood cancer treated with growth hormone: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. J Clin Endocrinol Metab; 2002 Jul;87(7):3136-41
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  • [Title] Risk of disease recurrence and second neoplasms in survivors of childhood cancer treated with growth hormone: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.
  • The impact of GH therapy on disease recurrence has been studied in survivors of pediatric brain tumors, but few data are available on the risk of disease recurrence in survivors of other tumor types who are treated with GH.
  • Likewise, the risk of second neoplasms (SN) associated with GH use has not been systematically evaluated.
  • We studied 361 GH-treated cancer survivors (including 172 brain tumor survivors) from among 13,539 survivors enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a cohort of 5-yr survivors of childhood cancer.
  • Using a time-dependent Cox model, we compared risk of recurrence, risk of SN, and risk of death between survivors who did and did not receive treatment with GH.
  • The relative risk of disease recurrence was 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.37-1.86; P = 0.65) for GH-treated survivors.
  • We conclude that GH therapy does not appear to increase the risk of disease recurrence or death in survivors of childhood cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Growth Hormone / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology. Survivors
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Cohort Studies. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Leukemia / drug therapy. Male. Proportional Hazards Models. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment

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  • (PMID = 12107213.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-972X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U24 CA 55727
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9002-72-6 / Growth Hormone
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63. Aurello P, Cicchini C, De Angelis R, D'Angelo F, Ramacciatos G, Valabrega S, Indinnimeo M: Synchronous and metachronous retroperitoneal sarcomas: two case reports. Anticancer Res; 2002 Jul-Aug;22(4):2409-12
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  • [Title] Synchronous and metachronous retroperitoneal sarcomas: two case reports.
  • BACKGROUND: Retroperitoneal sarcomas represent less than 1% of all diagnosed human neoplasias.
  • The value of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are difficult to evaluate and the dominating factor in the outcome is the ability to resect the tumor.
  • In each of them at least two primary retroperitoneal tumors were diagnosed.
  • The neoplasms were histologically different, thus they cannot be considered local recurrence but rather primary tumors.
  • CONCLUSION: This is the first report underlying the synchronous or metachronous presence of different histological subtypes in this neoplastic pathology.
  • In explanation of the occurrence of satellite tumors and multiple primary tumors, a virus-associated etiology or polyclonality of the tumor or pluripotentiality of tumor stem cells should be considered.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Second Primary / surgery. Retroperitoneal Neoplasms / surgery. Sarcoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology

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  • (PMID = 12174935.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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64. Aleman BM, Klokman WJ, van Leeuwen FE: [Second primary tumors in patients treated at an early age for Hodgkin's disease; consequences for the follow-up]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd; 2000 Aug 5;144(32):1517-20
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  • [Title] [Second primary tumors in patients treated at an early age for Hodgkin's disease; consequences for the follow-up].
  • [Transliterated title] Tweede primaire tumoren bij mensen die op jonge leeftijd behandeld zijn voor de ziekte van Hodgkin; consequenties voor de follow-up.
  • As curative treatment is now available for a substantial group of cancer patients, it is increasingly important to evaluate how late complications of treatment affect their long-term survival.
  • Two recent publications summarize the second malignancies in survivors of Hodgkin's disease treated during adolescence or young adulthood.
  • After more than 20 years' follow-up, the risk of solid tumours is still much greater in survivors of Hodgkin's disease than in the population at large.
  • Age at treatment has a major effect on the occurrence of second malignancy.
  • The data of these studies suggest that chemotherapy may increase the risk of solid tumours from radiotherapy.
  • Special alertness to symptoms of second malignancies is advised during follow-up after treatment for Hodgkin's disease, especially in patients treated below the age of 20.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Disease-Free Survival. Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions. Follow-Up Studies. Great Britain / epidemiology. Humans. Netherlands / epidemiology. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Risk. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 10949633.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-2162
  • [Journal-full-title] Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd
  • [Language] dut
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
  • [Number-of-references] 6
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65. Rüther U, Dieckmann KP, Bussar-Maatz R, Eisenberger F: Second malignancies following pure seminoma. Oncology; 2000;58(1):75-82
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  • [Title] Second malignancies following pure seminoma.
  • PURPOSE: Second malignancies in patients with pure testicular seminoma were studied in order to look for adverse late effects of treatment and to study the significance of second malignancies during follow-up.
  • Thirty-seven patients had been excluded from the study because they already had had either a contralateral testicular germ cell tumor or another malignancy.
  • 758 patients received radiotherapy, 76 underwent chemotherapy, 5 had surveillance only.
  • The expected rate of second cancers was calculated according to the data of the cancer registry of Saarland, Germany.
  • RESULTS: Twenty-two second cancers (13 contralateral testicular tumors, 9 extratesticular malignancies) were recorded.
  • The overall risk of having a second cancer was RR = 4.8 (95% CI 3. 0-7.3).
  • The risk of having a subsequent testicular tumor is RR = 44.
  • 1.1% of the patients developed a nontesticular second tumor.
  • The risk of having a nontesticular second cancer is RR = 2.1 (95% CI 1.0-4.0).
  • None of the second cancers were directly located within the radiation field; 5 neoplasms arose at the border of the radiation field.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study confirmed the increased risk of having a second testicular germ cell cancer.
  • There is also a small but definitely increased overall risk of having a nontesticular second cancer.
  • Treatment-unrelated factors - possibly genetic predisposition - must be considered for a substantial number of these second tumors, since in the present study the follow-up was rather short and most of the second cancers were located outside of the radiation fields.
  • Second cancer is a real hazard following treatment of testicular cancers and should always be considered during follow-up.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Seminoma / radiotherapy. Testicular Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Risk

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 10644944.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-2414
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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66. Sakaguchi H, Aizawa K, Muramatsu S, Matsushita A, Kumaki T, Kasuga Y: [A case of recurrence with liver metastasis after total gastrectomy for StageIA gastric carcinoma successfully treated with S-1/CDDP combination followed by S-1 chemotherapy]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 Jun;37(6):1121-3
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  • [Title] [A case of recurrence with liver metastasis after total gastrectomy for StageIA gastric carcinoma successfully treated with S-1/CDDP combination followed by S-1 chemotherapy].
  • One year after operation, abdominal CT revealed a metastatic tumor in the left lateral posterior segment of the liver.
  • He was given S-1/ CDDP combination chemotherapy(S-1 120mg/body, day 1-21, CDDP 95mg/body, day 8)every 5weeks as first-line treatment.
  • After 2 courses of the treatment, the liver tumor was not detected by PET-CT.
  • After total 5 courses of the treatment, we changed to a single administration of S-1(120mg/body, day 1- 14)every 3 or 4 weeks as second-line chemotherapy.
  • S-1/CDDP and S-1 chemotherapy are effective for metachronous liver metastasis from gastric carcinoma, although prognosis of the disease is poor.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oxonic Acid / therapeutic use. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tegafur / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Drug Combinations. Gastrectomy. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Positron-Emission Tomography. Recurrence. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 20567120.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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67. Fujita S, Akasu T, Moriya Y: Resection of synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2000 Jan;30(1):7-11
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  • Thus, patient selection for hepatic resection is essential to improve the poor results of the procedure.
  • Some reports have shown that the prognosis for patients with synchronous liver metastases is worse than that for those with metachronous liver metastases.
  • Therefore, determination of the factors that influence outcome after resection of synchronous liver metastases is more important than with metachronous liver metastasis.
  • RESULTS: Among the 12 prognostic factors studied (age, gender, adjuvant chemotherapy, tumor site, CEA level, tumor differentiation, tumor size, regional lymph node metastatic status, distribution of liver metastases, number of liver metastases, tumor size and pathological margin), regional lymph node metastatic status and pathological margin were significant prognostic factors by univariate analysis (p = 0.0002 and 0.005, respectively).
  • For these patients, other treatment modalities should be considered.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Hepatectomy. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Rectal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Analysis of Variance. Carcinoembryonic Antigen / analysis. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Patient Selection. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Sex Factors. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 10770561.001).
  • [ISSN] 0368-2811
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen
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68. Kubota M, Lin YW, Hamahata K, Sawada M, Koishi S, Hirota H, Wakazono Y: Cancer chemotherapy and somatic cell mutation. Mutat Res; 2000 Oct 31;470(2):93-102
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  • [Title] Cancer chemotherapy and somatic cell mutation.
  • The occurrence of a second neoplasm is one of the major obstacles in cancer chemotherapy.
  • The elucidation of the genotoxic effects induced by anti-cancer drugs is considered to be helpful in identifying the degree of cancer risk.
  • Numerous investigations on cancer patients after chemotherapy have demonstrated: (i) an increase in the in vivo somatic cell mutant frequency (Mf) at three genetic loci, including hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (hprt), glycophorin A (GPA), and the T-cell receptor (TCR), and (ii) alterations in the mutational spectra of hprt mutants.
  • However, the time required for and the degree of such changes are quite variable among patients even if they have received the same chemotherapy, suggesting the existence of underlying genetic factor(s).
  • Accordingly, some cancer patients prior to chemotherapy as well as patients with cancer-prone syndrome have been found to show an elevated Mf.
  • Based on the information obtained from somatic cell mutation assays, an individualized chemotherapy should be considered in order to minimize the risk of a second neoplasm.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Mutation. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Neoplasms, Second Primary / chemically induced. Neoplasms, Second Primary / genetics

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  • (PMID = 11027962.001).
  • [ISSN] 0027-5107
  • [Journal-full-title] Mutation research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mutat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 68
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69. Bilchik AJ, Wood TF, Chawla SP, Rose DM, Chung MH, Stern SS, Foshag LJ, Ramming KP: Systemic irinotecan or regional floxuridine chemotherapy prolongs survival after hepatic cryosurgery in patients with metastatic colon cancer refractory to 5-fluorouracil. Clin Colorectal Cancer; 2001 May;1(1):36-42
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  • [Title] Systemic irinotecan or regional floxuridine chemotherapy prolongs survival after hepatic cryosurgery in patients with metastatic colon cancer refractory to 5-fluorouracil.
  • Most colorectal cancers metastatic to the liver are resistant to chemotherapy and are not amenable to surgical resection.
  • The patients then received either hepatic arterial floxuridine (FUDR), systemic CPT-11, or no postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Number, size, and location of hepatic metastases, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels, and type of postoperative treatment were analyzed.
  • One to 15 lesions were frozen (median number, 3; median size, 6 cm), for a total of 73 synchronous and 80 metachronous lesions.
  • Overall median survival was 28.4 months from the date of diagnosis of liver metastases and 16.1 months from the time of CSA.
  • Predictors of survival included preoperative CEA, postoperative reduction in CEA, and adjuvant chemotherapy (P < 0.05).
  • Neither size, number of lesions, nor tumor location impacted survival.
  • The 25 patients who underwent a second CSA had a median survival of 28.4 months from CSA and 40 months from the date of diagnosis of liver metastases.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Camptothecin / administration & dosage. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Floxuridine / administration & dosage. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prodrugs / administration & dosage. Topoisomerase I Inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Cryosurgery. Disease-Free Survival. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / mortality. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiography. Survival Analysis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12445377.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-0028
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical colorectal cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Colorectal Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Prodrugs; 0 / Topoisomerase I Inhibitors; 039LU44I5M / Floxuridine; 7673326042 / irinotecan; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
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70. Logue JP, Harris MA, Livsey JE, Swindell R, Mobarek N, Read G: Short course para-aortic radiation for stage I seminoma of the testis. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2003 Dec 1;57(5):1304-9
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  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 1988 and December 2000, 431 men with Stage I seminoma were treated with para-aortic radiation to a midplane dose of 20 Gy in 8 fractions over 10 days.
  • RESULTS: At a median follow-up of 62 months, 15 patients (3.5%) had relapsed, with a median time to relapse of 13 months (range: 9 to 39 months).
  • Nine patients had pelvic nodal relapse; in addition, 1 patient had para-aortic involvement, and 2 had distant disease.
  • Four had metastatic disease only (mediastinum 2, lung 2).
  • One patient had scrotal recurrence, and 1 was treated for progressive rise in human chorionic gonadotrophin without identifiable disease.
  • Initial treatment at relapse was chemotherapy (12), radiation (2), and surgery (1).
  • One patient died from progressive disease.
  • Thirteen men (3%) have developed second malignancies, including 7 contralateral testicular tumors, 5 solid malignancies, and 1 leukemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Seminoma / radiotherapy. Testicular Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Analysis of Variance. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology

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  • (PMID = 14630266.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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71. Bouchahda M, Karaboué A, Saffroy R, Innominato P, Gorden L, Guettier C, Adam R, Lévi F: Acquired KRAS mutations during progression of colorectal cancer metastases: possible implications for therapy and prognosis. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2010 Aug;66(3):605-9
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  • [Title] Acquired KRAS mutations during progression of colorectal cancer metastases: possible implications for therapy and prognosis.
  • PURPOSE: Documentation of a wild-type (wt) KRAS gene in tumor has become mandatory for the prescription of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC).
  • Acquired KRAS mutations have seldom been reported in metastases from wt KRAS primary CRC.
  • We report the first case of multiple KRAS mutations acquired during the metastatic phase of CRC, and retrospectively reviewed all patients with CRC, in whom KRAS was analyzed in at least two tumor samples from distinct lesions.
  • METHODS: Genomic DNA purified from paraffin-embedded tissues was used after histological quantification of tumor tissue.
  • RESULTS: A 35-year-old woman with CRC liver metastasis, resistant to all conventional cytotoxic agents, experienced for the first time significant tumor shrinkage while cetuximab was added, allowing hepatic resection.
  • No mutation in KRAS was detected in the primary colon tumor or in synchronous liver metastases.
  • In contrast, in metachronous liver metastasis samples, two distinct mutations at codon 13 and 12 were detected.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that late switch in KRAS mutational status could occur more frequently than currently recognized and account for acquired resistance to anti-EGFR therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / genetics. ras Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Drug Resistance, Multiple. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Mutation. Neoplasm Metastasis. Retrospective Studies


72. Borgonovo G, Razzetta F, Assalino M, Varaldo E, Puglisi M, Ceppa P: Rectal hepatoid carcinoma with liver metastases in a patient affected by ulcerative colitis. Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int; 2008 Oct;7(5):539-43
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  • BACKGROUND: Hepatoid tumors (HTs) are rare extra-hepatic neoplasms with the histological features, biochemical profile and, sometimes, even clinical course of hepatocellular carcinoma.
  • We present a case of rectal hepatoid adenocarcinoma with metachronous liver metastases.
  • The patient was well during the first 6 months and refused any adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • The preoperative diagnosis of this tumor requires a high degree of suspicion, the availability of a panel of immunohistochemical markers, and a certain amount of luck.
  • The prognosis is poor despite an aggressive and multimodal therapeutic strategy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / secondary. Colitis, Ulcerative / complications. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Rectal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biopsy. Chemoembolization, Therapeutic. Diagnostic Errors. Fatal Outcome. Hepatectomy. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Proctocolectomy, Restorative. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


73. Granone P, Margaritora S, D'Andrilli A, Cesario A, Kawamukai K, Meacci E: Non-small cell lung cancer with single brain metastasis: the role of surgical treatment. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg; 2001 Aug;20(2):361-6
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  • [Title] Non-small cell lung cancer with single brain metastasis: the role of surgical treatment.
  • OBJECTIVE: The prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with brain metastasis is very poor, with median survival rate below 6 months, even if treated with palliative radio and/or chemotherapy.
  • To assess the effectiveness of surgical treatment for this kind of patients we reviewed our experience.
  • METHODS: From January 1989 to October 1999, 30 patients (26 males and four females; mean age: 58.7 years) with NSCLC and single brain metastasis underwent surgical treatment of both primary lung cancer and secondary cerebral lesion.
  • In group 2 (G2) 10 pts (eight males and two females) presented a metachronous brain metastasis during the follow-up period (range 3-24 months since the primary tumor).
  • Whole brain radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy was the post-operative choice treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We can conclude that combined surgical therapy is, nowadays, the choice treatment for this kind of patients, even though restricted to selected cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / secondary. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / surgery. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / mortality. Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies


74. Uppin MS, Paul TR, Rajappa S, Gayathri K, Jacob R, Uppin SG: Leukemia as a second malignancy. Indian J Pathol Microbiol; 2007 Jul;50(3):644-7
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  • [Title] Leukemia as a second malignancy.
  • To study the occurrence of leukemia as a second malignancy following various primary solid and hematological malignancies.
  • Total 11 cases of leukemia presenting as a second malignancy were studied over a period of 15 years from 1990 to 2005.
  • The primary malignancies included carcinoma breast (4), multiple myeloma (3) and one each of Hodgkin's lymphoma, mediastinal germ cell tumor, papillary carcinoma thyroid and myxopapillary ependymoma.
  • Ten patients had received chemotherapy with combination radiotherapy in six patients.
  • The commonest type of leukemia was AML-M2.
  • The risk benefit ratio of chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be considered before starting the patients on treatment.
  • A high degree of suspicion and follow up with hematological parameters is required for therapy related complications.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute. Neoplasms, Second Primary. Radiotherapy / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 17883171.001).
  • [ISSN] 0377-4929
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of pathology & microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Pathol Microbiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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76. Honda I, Kobayashi D, Fukumoto R, Matsushita H, Hattori M, Nagata M, Watanabe S: [Second malignancy after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer-is there any evidence that adjuvant chemotherapy for early gastric cancer causes a second malignancy ?]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2008 Aug;35(8):1341-5
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  • [Title] [Second malignancy after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer-is there any evidence that adjuvant chemotherapy for early gastric cancer causes a second malignancy ?].
  • The common causes of post-operative death in early gastric cancer are other diseases and second malignancy.
  • In Japan, adjuvant chemotherapy using oral administration of 5-fluorouracil is widely accepted in spite of no statistical evidence until the presentation by Kinoshita in 2005.
  • In 1999, Fujimoto mentioned that adjuvant chemotherapy and chemo-immune-therapy cause a second malignancy.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy was once the standard treatment for early gastric cancer patients.
  • So, we investigated the relation between adjuvant chemotherapy and second malignancy for early gastric cancer patients.
  • As a result, adjuvant chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil(Tegafur)did was not cause second malignancy under multivariate analysis.
  • The most important factor in second malignancy with post-operative early gastric cancer patients was heredity(cancer within first-degree relatives).
  • From this point of view, early gastric patients after gastrectomy and endoscopic treatment are necessary in regular examinations to detect other organ cancers and remnant gastric cancer, especially in patients with hereditary factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Gastrectomy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Risk Factors. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 18701845.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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77. Extermann M, Crane EJ, Boulware D: Cancer in nonagenarians: profile, treatments and outcomes. Crit Rev Oncol Hematol; 2010 Aug;75(2):160-4
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  • [Title] Cancer in nonagenarians: profile, treatments and outcomes.
  • However, very few data are available to guide treatment choices in this often frail population.
  • The charts of all patients registered at Moffitt Cancer Center between 1993 and 2006 who were aged 90 or older at the time of treatment/evaluation were reviewed, and those treated for an active cancer (n=177) were included in the analysis.
  • For 23.5% of patients, the index cancer was a second malignancy.
  • Initial treatments were: surgery 41%, chemotherapy 9%, radiation therapy 15%, concomitant chemo-radiation therapy 2%, hormonal therapy 12%, targeted therapy 8%, photodynamic therapy 1%, observation/supportive care 3%, hospice 9%.
  • Treatment related mortality was low (1.1%).
  • In conclusion, our nonagenarians underwent a broad range of treatments with low treatment related mortality.
  • Second cancers are frequent in older cancer survivors.
  • [MeSH-major] Aged, 80 and over. Neoplasms / diagnosis. Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Comorbidity. Female. Humans. Male. Prognosis. Registries. Sickness Impact Profile. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • (PMID = 20656211.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0461
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical reviews in oncology/hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Rev. Oncol. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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78. Geva R, Jiveliouk I, Inbar M, Meller I, Friedman E, Merimsky O: The co-occurrence of breast cancer and soft tissue sarcoma in a single cohort series. Am J Clin Oncol; 2009 Feb;32(1):34-7
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  • [Title] The co-occurrence of breast cancer and soft tissue sarcoma in a single cohort series.
  • BACKGROUND: The incidence of breast cancer (BC) and soft tissue sarcoma (STS) in the Israeli general population is 97/10 women and 1.5/10 persons.
  • RESULTS: One hundred thirty-four patients with STS had multiple primary malignancies.
  • Of 8 STS-first, only 1 got chemotherapy before BC.
  • Median interval between first to second malignancies was 6.9 years for BC-first, and 3.8 for BC-later.
  • The incidence of BC among all patients with STS-first followed by a second malignancy is 8/58 (14%), or 27/890 (3%) of all women STS-patients in the registry.
  • The incidence of STS among the BC patients was low, and most of our cases were therapy unrelated.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / pathology. Carcinoma, Medullary / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Sarcoma / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology


79. Pajor A, Murlewska A, Józefowicz-Korczyńska M: [Tonsillar carcinoma--clinical assessment and analysis of treatment results]. Otolaryngol Pol; 2002;56(3):319-22
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  • [Title] [Tonsillar carcinoma--clinical assessment and analysis of treatment results].
  • The aim of the study was an evaluation of the clinical signs and treatment results of the patients with tonsillar cancer treated in the ENT Clinic Medical University in Łódź during 10 years (1985-1994).
  • Twenty four patients (55%) had tumor with T3-T4 stage and 21 patients (52.5%)--palpable lymph neck nodes.
  • The most frequent treatment modality was combined therapy (surgery with radio/chemotherapy) introduced in 25 persons (62.5%), surgery alone was performed in 10 cases (25%).
  • Distant metastases developed in 6 patients (15%) and the second primary neoplasm in 5 patients (12.5%).
  • We stress the importance of careful clinical assessment before planning the treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell. Tonsillar Neoplasms
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Adenoid Cystic / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Adenoid Cystic / surgery. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / surgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12162020.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6657
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologia polska = The Polish otolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Pol
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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80. Rubino C, de Vathaire F, Diallo I, Shamsaldin A, Lê MG: Increased risk of second cancers following breast cancer: role of the initial treatment. Breast Cancer Res Treat; 2000 Jun;61(3):183-95
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  • [Title] Increased risk of second cancers following breast cancer: role of the initial treatment.
  • OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: The risk of second primary malignancies (SMN) was studied in a cohort of 4,416 one-year survivors of a breast cancer.
  • The role of the menopausal status and of the initial treatment modalities (surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy) was investigated.
  • RESULTS: Excluding second primary breast cancer and non-melanoma skin cancer, a total of 193 (4.4%) patients developed a SMN between 1973 and 1992, compared with 136 expected (Standardised Incidence Ratio, SIR = 1.4, 95% CI (1.2-1.6)).
  • No trend towards either an increase or a decrease was noted in the SIR with time after treatment (p = 0.2).
  • The greatest increase in the relative risk concerned soft tissue cancers (SIR = 13.0, 95% CI: 6.8-22.3), followed by leukaemia (SIR = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.7-5.0), melanoma (SIR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.4-4.8), kidney (SIR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.2-4.5), ovary (SIR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.2-3.1) and uterine tumours (SIR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.4-2.5).
  • The SIR was 3.0 (95% CI 1.8-4.7) in women under 40 at the time of the breast cancer, 1.9 (95% CI: 1.4-2.4) in those aged 40-49 and 1.2 (95% CI 1.0-1.4) in those aged 50 or more.
  • In the 2,514 women who had received radiotherapy as initial treatment without chemotherapy, the SIR for all SMN was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.1-2.3) fold higher than in those who had not received radiotherapy as initial treatment.
  • CONCLUSION: In conclusion, this study confirms the increased risk of second malignancies in women treated for a breast cancer, and particularly in those who were younger at the time of treatment for breast cancer.
  • Our results also suggest that radiotherapy may play a role in the onset of these second lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / etiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cohort Studies. Female. Follow-Up Studies. France / epidemiology. Humans. Incidence. Menopause. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Risk Factors. Survival Analysis. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 10965995.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-6806
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast cancer research and treatment
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
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81. Barredo JC, Devidas M, Lauer SJ, Billett A, Marymont M, Pullen J, Camitta B, Winick N, Carroll W, Ritchey AK: Isolated CNS relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with intensive systemic chemotherapy and delayed CNS radiation: a pediatric oncology group study. J Clin Oncol; 2006 Jul 1;24(19):3142-9
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  • [Title] Isolated CNS relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with intensive systemic chemotherapy and delayed CNS radiation: a pediatric oncology group study.
  • This study intensified systemic therapy by delaying CNS radiation for 12 months and tailored CNS radiation by CR1 duration.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seventy-six children with first isolated CNS relapse of ALL were treated with systemic chemotherapy that effectively penetrates into the CSF and intrathecal chemotherapy for 12 months.
  • Patients with CR1 of less than 18 months received craniospinal radiation (24 Gy cranial/15 Gy spinal), whereas those with CR1 of 18 months or more received cranial radiation only (18 Gy), followed by maintenance chemotherapy.
  • Additionally, asymptomatic patients were enrolled in a thiotepa up-front therapeutic window.
  • RESULTS: Seventy-four (97.4%) of 76 eligible patients achieved a second remission.
  • Most relapses involved the bone marrow, and three second malignancies were reported.
  • CONCLUSION: Twelve months of intensive systemic chemotherapy with reduced dose cranial radiation (18 Gy) is highly effective for children with isolated CNS relapse and CR1 of 18 months or more.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Cranial Irradiation. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome


82. Marulanda GA, Mont MA, Lucci A, Letson GD, Khakpour N: Orthopedic surgery implications of breast cancer. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther; 2008 Jun;8(6):949-56
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  • Breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of death in women.
  • The metastatic involvement of bone denotes disease progression and decreased survival.
  • Several breakthrough advances in imaging techniques aid in the detection, staging and follow-up of bone metastases.
  • Although usually responsive to hormonal therapy and pharmacologic interventions, skeletal metastases often require some type of surgical intervention.
  • Orthopedic surgeons should establish an active role in the multidisciplinary treatment of patients with breast cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Orthopedic Procedures
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Osteoblasts / metabolism. Osteoclasts / metabolism. Patient Care Team. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 18533804.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8328
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of anticancer therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 59
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83. van Leeuwen FE, Klokman WJ, Veer MB, Hagenbeek A, Krol AD, Vetter UA, Schaapveld M, van Heerde P, Burgers JM, Somers R, Aleman BM: Long-term risk of second malignancy in survivors of Hodgkin's disease treated during adolescence or young adulthood. J Clin Oncol; 2000 Feb;18(3):487-97
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  • [Title] Long-term risk of second malignancy in survivors of Hodgkin's disease treated during adolescence or young adulthood.
  • PURPOSE: To quantify the long-term risk of second primary cancers (SCs) in patients diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease (HD) during adolescence or young adulthood.
  • RESULTS: In all, 137 patients developed SCs, compared with 19.4 cases expected on the basis of incidence rates in the general population (relative risk [RR] = 7.0; 95% confidence interval, 5.9 to 8.3).
  • The RR of solid tumors increased greatly with younger age at the first treatment of HD, not only for breast cancer but also for all other solid tumors, with RRs of 4.9, 6.9, and 12.7 for patients first treated at ages 31 to 39 years, 21 to 30 years, and </= 20 years, respectively.
  • Among patients first treated at the age of 20 years or younger, the RR of developing a solid tumor before the age of 40 years was significantly greater than the RR of solid tumor development at ages 40 to 49 years (RR = 27.9 v RR = 4.2; P =.0001).
  • Patients who received salvage chemotherapy had significantly greater risk of solid cancers other than breast cancer than did patients whose treatment was restricted to initial radiotherapy or initial combined-modality treatment (RR = 9.4 and 4.7, respectively; P =. 004).
  • Reassuringly, the greatly increased risk of solid tumors in patients who were young (</= 20 years of age) at the first treatment seems to decrease as these patients grow older.
  • Our data suggest that chemotherapy may increase the risk of solid tumors from radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Risk Factors. Time Factors

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  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2000 May;18(10):2186-7 [10811685.001]
  • (PMID = 10653864.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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84. Prall F, Ostwald C, Schiffmann L, Barten M: Do thymidylate synthase gene promoter polymorphism and the C/G single nucleotide polymorphism predict effectiveness of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy in stage III colonic adenocarcinoma? Oncol Rep; 2007 Jul;18(1):203-9
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  • [Title] Do thymidylate synthase gene promoter polymorphism and the C/G single nucleotide polymorphism predict effectiveness of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy in stage III colonic adenocarcinoma?
  • Since 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy has become standard adjuvant treatment for patients with node-positive colonic adenocarcinoma, there has arisen the need for predictive factors.
  • All patients with a single, non-metachronous node-positive colonic adenocarcinoma who underwent a potentially curative resection at this institution in the years 1994-2002, and who received adjuvant 5-FU (n=95) were included in this study.
  • However, by careful histopathological examination a high-risk group of node-positive patients can be defined that could be candidates for studies of alternative (more aggressive) adjuvant treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colonic Neoplasms / genetics. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide. Promoter Regions, Genetic / genetics. Thymidylate Synthase / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / genetics. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease Progression. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Genotype. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 17549369.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; EC 2.1.1.45 / Thymidylate Synthase; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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85. Huynh E, Sigal D, Saven A: Cladribine in the treatment of hairy cell leukemia: initial and subsequent results. Leuk Lymphoma; 2009 Oct;50 Suppl 1:12-7
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  • [Title] Cladribine in the treatment of hairy cell leukemia: initial and subsequent results.
  • Although interferon alpha and pentostatin were initially found to be effective in this disease, cladribine has emerged as the preferred initial therapy.
  • Patients who relapse after purine analogue therapy, whether it be cladribine or pentostatin, can be successfully retreated with cladribine.
  • Patients with HCL may develop complications of recurrent infection and second malignancies.
  • Although both complications are postulated to be related to therapy, they may also be due to the duration and burden of the disease.
  • Minimal residual disease detected on bone marrow biopsy is thought to predict for future relapse.
  • [MeSH-major] Cladribine / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Hairy Cell / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Algorithms. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Models, Biological. Neoplasm, Residual. Purines / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 19814692.001).
  • [ISSN] 1029-2403
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Purines; 47M74X9YT5 / Cladribine
  • [Number-of-references] 27
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86. Kanamori M, Kumabe T, Watanabe M, Tominaga T: Anaplastic astrocytoma and anaplastic oligodendroglioma occurring 6 years after subtotal resection of a central neurocytoma. Case report. J Neurosurg; 2007 Jul;107(1):185-9
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  • The authors present the case of a 51-year-old man who presented with an anaplastic astrocytoma and anaplastic oligodendroglioma that developed 6 years after subtotal resection of a central neurocytoma in his right lateral ventricle.
  • He had received neither radiation therapy nor chemotherapy after the original resection.
  • Because both lesions extended to the right lateral ventricle wall, they were regarded as recurrent rather than metachronous tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Astrocytoma / pathology. Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neurocytoma / surgery. Oligodendroglioma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Transformation, Neoplastic. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Neurosurgical Procedures. Time Factors


87. Lin HM, Teitell MA: Second malignancy after treatment of pediatric Hodgkin disease. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2005 Jan;27(1):28-36
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  • [Title] Second malignancy after treatment of pediatric Hodgkin disease.
  • Although treatment of pediatric Hodgkin disease has become highly effective over the past 40 years, a number of patients have developed concerning late effects, such as secondary malignancies.
  • Etiology and risk factors for each cancer type vary but often include certain chemotherapy agents and radiation dosages.
  • The authors examined retrospective analyses of these secondary malignancies and present a summary of these findings.
  • The information may allow clinicians to better monitor childhood Hodgkin disease survivors and reduce mortality.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Child. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / epidemiology. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / pathology

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  • (PMID = 15654275.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA107300; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA90571
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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88. Engert A, Diehl V, Franklin J, Lohri A, Dörken B, Ludwig WD, Koch P, Hänel M, Pfreundschuh M, Wilhelm M, Trümper L, Aulitzky WE, Bentz M, Rummel M, Sezer O, Müller-Hermelink HK, Hasenclever D, Löffler M: Escalated-dose BEACOPP in the treatment of patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma: 10 years of follow-up of the GHSG HD9 study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 Sep 20;27(27):4548-54
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  • [Title] Escalated-dose BEACOPP in the treatment of patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma: 10 years of follow-up of the GHSG HD9 study.
  • PURPOSE: The HD9 trial of the German Hodgkin Study Group compared two different doses (baseline and escalated) of the bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (BEACOPP) chemotherapy regimen in 1,196 patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL).
  • The previous analysis with 5 years median follow-up had indicated improved tumor control with BEACOPP escalated.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients received one of three chemotherapy regimens: eight cycles of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (COPP) alternating with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD); eight cycles of BEACOPP baseline; or eight cycles of BEACOPP escalated.
  • At 10 years, freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) was 64%, 70%, and 82% with OS rates of 75%, 80%, and 86% for patients treated with COPP/ABVD (arm A), BEACOPP baseline (arm B), and BEACOPP escalated (arm C), respectively (P < .001).
  • A total of 74 second malignancies (6.2%) were documented, including acute myeloid leukemia (0.4%, 1.5%, and 3.0%), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (2.7%, 1.7%, and 1.0%), and solid tumors (2.7%, 3.4%, and 1.9%).
  • The corresponding overall secondary malignancy rates were 5.7%, 6.6%, and 6.0%, respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Procarbazine / administration & dosage. Treatment Outcome. Vinblastine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 19704068.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 35S93Y190K / Procarbazine; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; ABVD protocol; BEACOPP protocol; COPP protocol
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89. Derwich K, Wachowiaki J, Kaczmarek-Kanoldi M, Balcerska A, Balwierz W, Chybicka A, Kowalczyk JR, Matysiak M, Jackowska T, Sońta-Jakimczyk D, Wysocki M, Chełmecka-Hanuszewicz L, Cwiklińska M, Kołtan A, Malinowska I, Odój T, Płoszyńska A, Steczowicz M, Wojciechowska V, Wójtowicz A, Polish Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group: [Treatment results in children with the standard risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with high dose of methotrexate (5.0 g/m2). 11 years of the Polish Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group experience]. Przegl Lek; 2006;63(1):7-10
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  • [Title] [Treatment results in children with the standard risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with high dose of methotrexate (5.0 g/m2). 11 years of the Polish Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group experience].
  • Among them, 21 patients failed to respond to therapy: 2 (1.0%) early deaths, 2 (1.0%) deaths during I complete remission, 16 (8.2%) relapses, 1 (0.5%) second neoplasm.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Cohort Studies. Disease-Free Survival. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Poland / epidemiology. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome


90. Parker C, Waters R, Leighton C, Hancock J, Sutton R, Moorman AV, Ancliff P, Morgan M, Masurekar A, Goulden N, Green N, Révész T, Darbyshire P, Love S, Saha V: Effect of mitoxantrone on outcome of children with first relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL R3): an open-label randomised trial. Lancet; 2010 Dec 11;376(9757):2009-17
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  • We investigated the outcome of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who relapsed on present therapeutic regimens.
  • After three blocks of therapy, all high-risk group patients and those from the intermediate group with postinduction high minimal residual disease (≥10(-4) cells) received an allogenic stem-cell transplant.
  • Standard-risk and intermediate-risk patients with postinduction low minimal residual disease (<10(-4) cells) continued chemotherapy.
  • The primary outcome was progression-free survival and the method of analysis was intention-to-treat.
  • Differences in progression-free survival between groups were mainly related to a decrease in disease events (progression, second relapse, disease-related deaths; HR 0·56, 0·34-0·92, p=0·007) rather than an increase in adverse treatment effects (treatment death, second malignancy; HR 0·52, 0·24-1·11, p=0·11).
  • INTERPRETATION: As compared with idarubicin, mitoxantrone conferred a significant benefit in progression-free and overall survival in children with relapsed acute lymphobastic leukaemia, a potentially useful clinical finding that warrants further investigation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Idarubicin / therapeutic use. Mitoxantrone / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] 6-Mercaptopurine / administration & dosage. Adolescent. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Asparaginase / administration & dosage. Child. Child, Preschool. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Infant. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Leukocyte Count. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Polyethylene Glycols / administration & dosage. Recurrence. Risk Assessment. Treatment Outcome. United Kingdom. Vidarabine / administration & dosage. Vidarabine / analogs & derivatives. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 21131038.001).
  • [ISSN] 1474-547X
  • [Journal-full-title] Lancet (London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / / 14840; United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / /
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 7D96IR0PPM / pegaspargase; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; BZ114NVM5P / Mitoxantrone; E7WED276I5 / 6-Mercaptopurine; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase; FA2DM6879K / Vidarabine; P2K93U8740 / fludarabine; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; ZRP63D75JW / Idarubicin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3010035
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91. Nava VE, Cohen P, Bishop M, Fowler D, Jaffe ES, Ozdemirli M: Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma after intestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Am J Surg Pathol; 2007 Mar;31(3):476-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma after intestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • A rare case of enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) developed in a 47-year-old Chinese male 6 years after the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the small intestine.
  • The patient was treated aggressively with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and autologous bone marrow transplant, and complete remission was obtained.
  • Celiac disease was diagnosed concurrently.
  • The patient responded to chemotherapy, received allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from an HLA-matched sibling donor, and remains in remission.
  • To our best knowledge, this is the first reported case of metachronous ETL and DLBCL.
  • Possible associations between the 2 types of lymphoma are discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Intestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Lymphoma, T-Cell / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Celiac Disease / complications. Celiac Disease / diagnosis. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17325491.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
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92. Laccourreye O, Seccia V, Ménard M, Garcia D, Vacher C, Holsinger FC: Extended lateral pharyngotomy for selected squamous cell carcinomas of the lateral tongue base. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol; 2009 Jun;118(6):428-34
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  • METHODS: The adjunctive measures included induction chemotherapy, ipsilateral neck dissection, and postoperative radiotherapy, used in 96.1%, 96.1%, and 38.5% of patients, respectively.
  • The main causes of death were metachronous second primary tumor, intercurrent disease, and distant metastasis, resulting in 84.6%, 64%, and 46.9% 1-, 3-, and 5-year Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival estimates, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Such results suggest that extended lateral pharyngotomy should be integrated among the various conservative treatment options available to patients with selected carcinomas of the lateral tongue base.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Neck Dissection / methods. Pharynx / surgery. Tongue Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cohort Studies. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19663374.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4894
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Otol. Rhinol. Laryngol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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93. Otrock ZK, Mahfouz RA, Salem ZM: Four primary tumors of lung, bladder, prostate, and breast in a male patient. South Med J; 2005 Sep;98(9):946-9
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  • [Title] Four primary tumors of lung, bladder, prostate, and breast in a male patient.
  • It is a case of both synchronous and metachronous primary malignant neoplasms occurring in four different organs.
  • Immunohistochemical stains showed tumor cell nuclei to be negative for p53 over-expression.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first documented case with this combination of primary tumors.
  • We also review the medical literature for the possible causes of multiple primary malignant neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / complications. Carcinoma / complications. Lung Neoplasms / complications. Prostatic Neoplasms / complications. Urologic Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cystectomy. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Mastectomy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Shock, Septic / complications. Spinal Neoplasms / complications. Spinal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Spinal Neoplasms / secondary. Urinary Diversion


94. Ravandi F, Estey E, Jones D, Faderl S, O'Brien S, Fiorentino J, Pierce S, Blamble D, Estrov Z, Wierda W, Ferrajoli A, Verstovsek S, Garcia-Manero G, Cortes J, Kantarjian H: Effective treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia with all-trans-retinoic acid, arsenic trioxide, and gemtuzumab ozogamicin. J Clin Oncol; 2009 Feb 1;27(4):504-10
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  • [Title] Effective treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia with all-trans-retinoic acid, arsenic trioxide, and gemtuzumab ozogamicin.
  • PURPOSE: We examined the outcome of patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) treated with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) with or without gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) but without traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy.
  • From July 2007, the second cohort of 17 patients received ATRA and ATO concomitantly on day 1.
  • Seven patients died at a median of 4 days (range, 1 to 24 days) after inclusion in the study from disease-related complications.
  • Three patients died after being in CR for 14, 21, and 71 weeks, all from a second malignancy.
  • CONCLUSION: The combination of ATRA and ATO (with or without GO) as initial therapy for APL was effective and safe and can substitute chemotherapy-containing regimens.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Promyelocytic, Acute / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Aminoglycosides / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Arsenicals / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Oxides / administration & dosage. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Remission Induction. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. Tretinoin / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 19075265.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aminoglycosides; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Arsenicals; 0 / Oxides; 0 / gemtuzumab; 5688UTC01R / Tretinoin; S7V92P67HO / arsenic trioxide
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4881307
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95. Friedman DL, Himelstein B, Shields CL, Shields JA, Needle M, Miller D, Bunin GR, Meadows AT: Chemoreduction and local ophthalmic therapy for intraocular retinoblastoma. J Clin Oncol; 2000 Jan;18(1):12-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Chemoreduction and local ophthalmic therapy for intraocular retinoblastoma.
  • PURPOSE: To study the effectiveness of combined systemic chemotherapy and local ophthalmic therapy for retinoblastoma with the goal of avoiding enucleation and external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT).
  • Most (83%) also received ophthalmic treatment (cryotherapy, laser photocoagulation, thermotherapy, or plaque radiation therapy) during and/or after the chemotherapy.
  • Treatment of groups 4 and 5 was less successful, with 33% of six eyes and 53% of 30 eyes, respectively, requiring EBRT and/or enucleation.
  • Toxicities from chemotherapy were mild and included cytopenias (89%), fever and neutropenia (28%), infection (9%), and gastrointestinal symptoms, dehydration, and vincristine neurotoxicity (40%).
  • No patients developed a second malignancy, metastatic disease, renal disease, or ototoxicity.
  • CONCLUSION: In retinoblastoma patients with Reese-Ellsworth eye groups 1, 2, or 3, systemic chemotherapy used with local ophthalmic therapies can eliminate the need for enucleation or EBRT without significant systemic toxicity.
  • More effective therapy is required for Reese-Ellsworth eye groups 4 and 5.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Retinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Retinoblastoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Male. Prospective Studies. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 10623688.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / 3MO1RR00240-32S9
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
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96. Stein TJ, Pellin M, Steinberg H, Chun R: Treatment of feline gastrointestinal small-cell lymphoma with chlorambucil and glucocorticoids. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc; 2010 Nov-Dec;46(6):413-7
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  • [Title] Treatment of feline gastrointestinal small-cell lymphoma with chlorambucil and glucocorticoids.
  • Treatments for both large- and small-cell GI lymphoma have been described previously; however, multiple chemotherapy protocols were used, a minimal amount of histopathological characterization was provided, and, in most studies, the majority of diagnoses were obtained via endoscopic pinch biopsies.
  • Follow-up identified seven cats with relapsed disease-all of which were treated with a rescue protocol of cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoids; the response rate was 100%, and four of the 28 cats were diagnosed with a second malignancy.

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  • [Cites] J Vet Intern Med. 2003 May-Jun;17(3):326-31 [12774974.001]
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  • (PMID = 21041334.001).
  • [ISSN] 1547-3317
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Anim Hosp Assoc
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] None / None / / UL1 RR025011-01; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025011-03; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025011-01; None / None / / UL1 RR025011-05; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025011; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025011-02; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025011-05; None / None / / UL1 RR025011-03; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025011-04; None / None / / UL1 RR025011-04; None / None / / UL1 RR025011-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 18D0SL7309 / Chlorambucil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS290341; NLM/ PMC3092124
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97. Sarhan OM, El-Baz M, Sarhan MM, Ghali AM, Ghoneim MA: Bilateral Wilms' tumors: single-center experience with 22 cases and literature review. Urology; 2010 Oct;76(4):946-51
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVES: Bilateral Wilms' tumors represent a therapeutic challenge.
  • The primary aim of management is eradication of the neoplasm and preservation of renal function.
  • Of the 22 patients, 12 were girls and 10 were boys, with a median age of 3 years (range 1-9); 19 had a synchronous presentation and 3 a metachronous presentation.
  • Of the 22 patients, 6 underwent initial surgical resection followed by chemotherapy and 16 underwent initial biopsy and preoperative chemotherapy.
  • The survival for the initial chemotherapy and initial surgery groups was essentially similar.
  • Currently, treatment regimens involving initial chemotherapy followed by conservative surgery can achieve these goals in an important proportion of patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / epidemiology. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / epidemiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / epidemiology. Wilms Tumor / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Dactinomycin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Egypt / epidemiology. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Infant. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Mesna / administration & dosage. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Nephrectomy / methods. Nephrectomy / statistics & numerical data. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20708784.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1CC1JFE158 / Dactinomycin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; NR7O1405Q9 / Mesna; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
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98. Martin JM, Gorayski P, Zwahlen D, Fay M, Keller J, Millar J: Is radiotherapy a good adjuvant strategy for men with a history of cryptorchism and stage I seminoma? Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2010 Jan 1;76(1):65-70
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  • The primary endpoint was the 5-year relapse-free rate.
  • RESULTS: A total of 23 men were identified, most (n = 13) had had a tumor in a scrotal location after orchiopexy.
  • After orchiectomy, 5 men were managed with surveillance, and 18 underwent RT to a median dose of 25 Gy (range, 20-30 Gy).
  • After a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-148), 2 patients developed a relapse.
  • The other patient developed a relapse in the contralateral testis 46 months after having undergone RT.
  • It is likely that the latter patient had a metachronous primary rather than a relapse; hence, the 5-year relapse-free rate was 80% for surveillance and 100% for RT.
  • Both patients underwent successful salvage treatment, and all patients were disease free and alive at the last follow-up visit.
  • RT, surveillance, and adjuvant carboplatin chemotherapy are treatment options for these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Cryptorchidism / complications. Seminoma / radiotherapy. Testicular Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Databases, Factual. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Orchiopexy / adverse effects. Queensland. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Salvage Therapy. Tumor Burden. Victoria

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  • (PMID = 19362785.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
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99. Mackay HJ, Billingsley K, Gallinger S, Berry S, Smith A, Yeung R, Pond GR, Croitoru M, Swanson PE, Krishnamurthi S, Siu LL: A multicenter phase II study of "adjuvant" irinotecan following resection of colorectal hepatic metastases. Am J Clin Oncol; 2005 Dec;28(6):547-54
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  • OBJECTIVES: This study evaluates the efficacy and toxicity of single-agent irinotecan following hepatectomy for metachronous colorectal metastases, and examines the predictive value of p27 and p53 expression and of microsatellite instability (MSI) status.
  • Four patients failed to complete 6 cycles (2 progressive disease and 2 toxicity).
  • Duration of chemotherapy was the only significant predictive factor (P = 0.006).
  • CONCLUSION: The tolerability of this regimen after major liver resection supports further evaluation of irinotecan-based adjuvant chemotherapy in this group of patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Hepatectomy / methods. Liver Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27 / analysis. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Gastrointestinal Diseases / chemically induced. Humans. Life Tables. Male. Microsatellite Repeats. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / analysis

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  • (PMID = 16317262.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-453X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 147604-94-2 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27; 7673326042 / irinotecan; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
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100. Djeridane M, Oudard S, Escoffre-Barbe M, Lacotte-Thierry L, Desablens B, Briére J, Dib M, Cassasus P, Ghandour C, Lamy T, Lejeune F, Simon M, Traullé C, Vigier M, Maisonneuve H, Briére J, Colonna P, Andrieu JM: Treatment of patients with advanced or bulky Hodgkin disease with a 12-week doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine-like chemotherapy regimen followed by extended-field, full-dose radiotherapy: long-term results of the Groupe Ouest et Est des Leucémies et Autres Maladies de Sang H90-A/B Multicenter Randomized Trial. Cancer; 2002 Nov 15;95(10):2169-79
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  • [Title] Treatment of patients with advanced or bulky Hodgkin disease with a 12-week doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine-like chemotherapy regimen followed by extended-field, full-dose radiotherapy: long-term results of the Groupe Ouest et Est des Leucémies et Autres Maladies de Sang H90-A/B Multicenter Randomized Trial.
  • BACKGROUND: This Phase II study was performed in patients with advanced or bulky Hodgkin disease (HD) to evaluate the results of a 7-drug chemotherapy (CT) regimen that was administered over 12 weeks according to 2 randomized modalities followed by high-dose lymph node irradiation.
  • METHODS: From 1990 to 1996, 162 patients with HD at clinical stages (CS) I-III with bulky disease (mediastinal mass ratio >or= 0.45 and/or unilateral or bilateral pelvic plus lumboaortic disease; 86 patients) or CS IV (76 patients) were randomized to receive the same cumulated dose of a CT regimen consisting of epirubicin (240 mg/m(2)), bleomycin (60 mg/m(2)), vinblastine (20 mg/m(2)), vincristine (4 mg/m(2)), cyclophosphamide (4000 mg/m(2)), etoposide (900 mg/m(2)), and methotrexate (180 mg/m(2)) plus methylprednisolone (1500 mg/m(2)) over 12 weeks either every 4 weeks (Arm Y, 79 patients) or every 3 weeks (Arm Z, 83 patients).
  • Patients with disease in complete remission (CR) or partial remission after CT received extended-field lymph node irradiation (involved areas, 40 grays [Gy]; noninvolved areas, 30 Gy).
  • Thirty-five patients developed recurrent disease; most of those patients were in post-CT partial remission.
  • Thirty-eight patients died: 24 patients from HD, 3 patients from CT-related early sepsis, 1 patient from radiation-induced pneumonitis, 6 patients from a second malignancy, and 4 patients from causes unrelated to treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Prospective Studies. Radiotherapy Dosage. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 12412171.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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