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1. Harada K, Ferdous T, Itashiki Y, Takii M, Mano T, Mori Y, Ueyama Y: Effects of cepharanthine alone and in combination with fluoropyrimidine anticancer agent, S-1, on tumor growth of human oral squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. Anticancer Res; 2009 Apr;29(4):1263-70
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Oral Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effects of cepharanthine alone and in combination with fluoropyrimidine anticancer agent, S-1, on tumor growth of human oral squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.
  • BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy has shown little antitumor activity against advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients.
  • Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop more effective therapeutic methods for patients with advanced OSCC.
  • Cepharanthine is a biscoclaurine alkaloid extracted from Stephania cepharantha Hayata, which is widely used for the treatment of many acute and chronic diseases, and can exert antitumor effects on several human cancer cells.
  • S-1 is a new oral antineoplastic agent that can induce apoptosis in various types of cancer cells, including OSCC.
  • Hence combined treatment of cancer cells with cepharanthine and S-1 might exert dramatic antitumor effects on OSCC cells.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study, the response of human OSCC cells to cepharanthine alone and in combination with S-1 was examined using nude mouse xenograft models.
  • S-1 (10 mg/kg/day, 5 times/week) was administered orally and cepharanthine (20 mg/kg, 5 times/week) was injected into peritumoral tissue for three weeks.
  • RESULTS: Combined therapy of cepharanthine and S-1 exerted antitumor effects on human OSCC xenografts markedly and significantly induced apoptotic cells in tumors treated with cepharanthine plus S-1.
  • In the same way, microdissection and RT-PCR revealed that the expression of TS and DPD mRNA was down-regulated and that expression of OPRT mRNA was up-regulated in tumors administered the combined treatment.
  • Moreover, ELISA indicated that the protein levels of TS and DPD were down-regulated, and that OPRT was up-regulated in tumors treated with the combined therapy.
  • During the experimental period, no loss of body weight was observed in mice treated with the combined therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that the combination of cepharanthine and S-1 is effective against OSCC and has the potential of being a new therapeutic tool for future treatment of these tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Benzylisoquinolines / administration & dosage. Blotting, Western. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP) / metabolism. Drug Combinations. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Female. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Male. Mice. Mice, Nude. Orotate Phosphoribosyltransferase / metabolism. Oxonic Acid / administration & dosage. Tegafur / administration & dosage. Thymidylate Synthase / metabolism. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 19414373.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzylisoquinolines; 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; 7592YJ0J6T / cepharanthine; EC 1.3.1.2 / Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP); EC 2.1.1.45 / Thymidylate Synthase; EC 2.4.2.10 / Orotate Phosphoribosyltransferase
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2. Xu Q, Zhang Z, Zhang P, Chen W: Antisense oligonucleotides and all-trans retinoic acid have a synergistic anti-tumor effect on oral squamous cell carcinoma. BMC Cancer; 2008;8:159
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  • [Title] Antisense oligonucleotides and all-trans retinoic acid have a synergistic anti-tumor effect on oral squamous cell carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Antisense oligonucleotides against hTR (As-ODN-hTR) have shown promising results as treatment strategies for various human malignancies.
  • METHODS: In situ human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) models were established by subcutaneous injection of Tca8113 cells.
  • Telomerase activity was detected by a TRAP assay, apoptotic cells were evaluated with a Tunel assay, the expression of apoptosis-related proteins (Bcl-2 and Bax) was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural morphological changes in the tumor specimen were examined.
  • Furthermore, significant increases in the number of apoptotic cells, typical apoptotic morphology and a downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2 were observed in the treated tissues.
  • Therefore, combining As-ODN-hTR and ATRA may be an approach for the treatment of human oral squamous cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oligonucleotides, Antisense / therapeutic use. Tretinoin / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Drug Synergism. Female. Humans. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays / methods


3. Zhou H, Tang Y, Liang X, Yang X, Yang J, Zhu G, Zheng M, Zhang C: RNAi targeting urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor inhibits metastasis and progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma in vivo. Int J Cancer; 2009 Jul 15;125(2):453-62
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  • [Title] RNAi targeting urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor inhibits metastasis and progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma in vivo.
  • It has been admitted that urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) is overexpressed in many human malignant tumors including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and plays an important role in a variety of cancer key cellular events as a versatile signaling orchestrator.
  • In our study, a retroviral vector expressing u-PAR-specific siRNA was injected into OSCC xenografts of nude mice to observe its inhibitory effects on OSCC.
  • Our data demonstrate that siRNA targeting u-PAR markedly suppressed tumor growth, reduced the expression of proliferation-related gene, Ki-67 and increased cell apoptosis, accompanying with the efficient and specific inhibition of endogenous u-PAR expression in OSCC.
  • More importantly, the mRNA and protein expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, VEGF-C, VEGF-D and VEGFR-3 that are intimately involved in oral cancer invasion and metastasis, was simultaneously downregulated significantly as determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry; and Gelatin and fibrin zymography showed that MMP-9, MMP-2 and u-PA enzymatic activities were significantly reduced in u-PAR-specific siRNA group, compared to those in control groups.
  • In addition, the expression of MDR-1 gene related to drug resistance was obviously inhibited by silencing of u-PAR.
  • These findings suggest that RNAi targeting u-PAR could effectively inhibit the metastasis and progression of OSCC in vivo.
  • Thus, it may be used as a potent and specific therapy for oral cancer, especially in inhibiting and preventing cancer cell invasion and metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Disease Progression. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Metastasis / genetics. RNA Interference. Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Base Sequence. Cell Line, Tumor. DNA Primers. Female. Humans. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Mice. Mice, Nude. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 UICC.
  • (PMID = 19391133.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0215
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator
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4. Tang W, Tian WD, Li SW, Tang YC: [In situ expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 in the process of induction chemotherapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma]. Sichuan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban; 2004 Jan;35(1):42-3, 90
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  • [Title] [In situ expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 in the process of induction chemotherapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the differential expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1) in oral carcinoma and stroma lymphocytes by induction chemotherapy and inquire into the mechanism of TGF beta 1 information transmission.
  • METHODS: Forty cases of oral tumor were treated with MTX, CDDP and PYM via subcutaneous implantable drug pump, in situ hybridization method was adopted to detect the expression of TGF beta 1 mRNA.
  • RESULTS: The positive expression of TGF beta 1 mRNA was enhanced in oral carcinoma (P < 0.05).
  • After the induction chemotherapy via subcutaneous implantable drug pump, not only the expression level of TGF beta 1 in malignant cells of invading front zone was up-regulated (P < 0.05), but the expression level of stroma lymphocytes was higher than before.
  • CONCLUSION: These data demonstrated that TGF beta 1 not only has transforming potential, but also enhances the malignant progression of oral carcinoma.
  • It was clear that TGF beta 1 can act as a tumor suppressor and a significant stimulator of T-cell-mediated tumor cytotoxity as well.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bleomycin / analogs & derivatives. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Transforming Growth Factor beta / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 14981811.001).
  • [ISSN] 1672-173X
  • [Journal-full-title] Sichuan da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Sichuan University. Medical science edition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sichuan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / TGFB1 protein, human; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta1; 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 77108-50-0 / zhengguangmycin; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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5. Mallery SR, Zwick JC, Pei P, Tong M, Larsen PE, Shumway BS, Lu B, Fields HW, Mumper RJ, Stoner GD: Topical application of a bioadhesive black raspberry gel modulates gene expression and reduces cyclooxygenase 2 protein in human premalignant oral lesions. Cancer Res; 2008 Jun 15;68(12):4945-57
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  • [Title] Topical application of a bioadhesive black raspberry gel modulates gene expression and reduces cyclooxygenase 2 protein in human premalignant oral lesions.
  • Reduced expression of proapoptotic and terminal differentiation genes in conjunction with increased levels of the proinflammatory and angiogenesis-inducing enzymes, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), correlate with malignant transformation of oral intraepithelial neoplasia (IEN).
  • Accordingly, this study investigated the effects of a 10% (w/w) freeze-dried black raspberry gel on oral IEN histopathology, gene expression profiles, intraepithelial COX-2 and iNOS proteins, and microvascular densities.
  • Oral IEN tissues were hemisected to provide samples for pretreatment diagnoses and establish baseline biochemical and molecular variables.
  • Treatment of the remaining lesional tissue (0.5 g gel applied four times daily for 6 weeks) began 1 week after the initial biopsy.
  • Additional epithelial gene-specific quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analyses facilitated the assessment of target tissue treatment effects.
  • These data show that berry gel application modulated oral IEN gene expression profiles, ultimately reducing epithelial COX-2 protein.
  • In a patient subset, berry gel application also reduced vascular densities in the superficial connective tissues and induced genes associated with keratinocyte terminal differentiation.

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  • (PMID = 18559542.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7445
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA111210-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA111210; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA111210-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Gels; EC 1.14.13.39 / NOS2 protein, human; EC 1.14.13.39 / Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 1.14.99.1 / PTGS2 protein, human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS202118; NLM/ PMC2892791
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6. Kudo Y, Kitajima S, Ogawa I, Kitagawa M, Miyauchi M, Takata T: Small interfering RNA targeting of S phase kinase-interacting protein 2 inhibits cell growth of oral cancer cells by inhibiting p27 degradation. Mol Cancer Ther; 2005 Mar;4(3):471-6
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  • [Title] Small interfering RNA targeting of S phase kinase-interacting protein 2 inhibits cell growth of oral cancer cells by inhibiting p27 degradation.
  • It is well known that reduced expression of p27 is frequently observed in various cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma and is due to an enhancement of its protein degradation.
  • Our previous study showed that overexpression of Skp2 was frequently found in oral squamous cell carcinoma and inversely correlated with p27 expression.
  • In the present study, we investigated if small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing of Skp2 can be employed in order to inhibit p27 down-regulation in oral squamous cell carcinoma.
  • We used a siRNA plasmid vector, which has an advantage over synthetic siRNAs in determining the effects of decreasing the high constitutive levels of Skp2 protein in oral squamous cell carcinoma.
  • We showed that Skp2 siRNA transfection decreased Skp2 protein and induced the accumulation of p27 protein in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.
  • Interestingly, Skp2 siRNA inhibited the cell proliferation of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo.
  • Our findings suggest that siRNA-mediated gene silencing of Skp2 can be a novel modality of cancer gene therapy for suppression of p27 down-regulation.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Cycle Proteins / metabolism. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. RNA, Small Interfering. S-Phase Kinase-Associated Proteins / genetics. S-Phase Kinase-Associated Proteins / metabolism. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Blotting, Western. Bromodeoxyuridine / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27. Down-Regulation. Gene Silencing. Humans. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Mice. Mice, Nude. Models, Genetic. Plasmids / metabolism. Proteasome Inhibitors. RNA Interference. Time Factors. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 15767556.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-7163
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Cdkn1b protein, mouse; 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / Proteasome Inhibitors; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 0 / S-Phase Kinase-Associated Proteins; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 147604-94-2 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27; G34N38R2N1 / Bromodeoxyuridine
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7. Yeh CC, Deng YT, Sha DY, Hsiao M, Kuo MY: Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid sensitizes human oral cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through increase DR5 expression. Mol Cancer Ther; 2009 Sep;8(9):2718-25
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  • [Title] Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid sensitizes human oral cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through increase DR5 expression.
  • Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid has been shown to selectively induce tumor apoptosis in cell cultures and animal models in several types of cancers and is about as a promising new class of chemotherapeutic agents.
  • Here, we report suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid also induced apoptosis in human oral cancer cells.
  • Furthermore, subtoxic concentrations of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid sensitize two TRAIL resistant human oral cancer cells, SAS and Ca9-22, to exogenous recombinant TRAIL-induced apoptosis in a p53-independent manner.
  • Combined treatment of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and TRAIL may be used as a new promising therapy for oral cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Hydroxamic Acids / pharmacology. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand / metabolism. TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Blotting, Western. Cell Cycle. Cell Line, Tumor. Drug Synergism. Humans. In Situ Nick-End Labeling

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  • (PMID = 19737941.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-8514
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hydroxamic Acids; 0 / Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / TNFSF10 protein, human; 58IFB293JI / vorinostat
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8. Suzuki H, Sugimura H, Hashimoto K: p16INK4A in oral squamous cell carcinomas--a correlation with biological behaviors: immunohistochemical and FISH analysis. J Oral Maxillofac Surg; 2006 Nov;64(11):1617-23
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  • [Title] p16INK4A in oral squamous cell carcinomas--a correlation with biological behaviors: immunohistochemical and FISH analysis.
  • PURPOSE: The p16(INK4A) gene and Rb gene are key tumor suppressor genes in a cell cycle regulatory pathway that is commonly inactivated in various cancers.
  • The disruption of p16(INK4A) expression has been reported in several types of carcinoma but sparse in the area of oral oncology.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 66 cases who were diagnosed as oral squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Immunohistochemical p16(INK4A) and pRb expression, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis were performed to the resected materials.
  • As to histopathological grading of the effect of chemotherapy, almost all the p16(INK4A)-positive cases (9 cases out of 10) exhibited the histological feature of being rather sensitive to chemotherapy (2B and better response according to Ohboshi and Shimosato's criteria) versus 17 of 33 negative cases (P = .02).
  • These results indicate we can use p16(INK4A) as a marker of a prognostic prediction of oral cancer and it is useful for management of OSCCs.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / chemistry. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16 / analysis. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16 / genetics. Mouth Neoplasms / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Chi-Square Distribution. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Prognosis. Retinoblastoma Protein / analysis. Retinoblastoma Protein / genetics. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17052587.001).
  • [ISSN] 0278-2391
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16; 0 / Retinoblastoma Protein
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9. Henriksson E, Baldetorp B, Borg A, Kjellen E, Akervall J, Wennerberg J, Wahlberg P: p53 mutation and cyclin D1 amplification correlate with cisplatin sensitivity in xenografted human squamous cell carcinomas from head and neck. Acta Oncol; 2006;45(3):300-5
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  • [Title] p53 mutation and cyclin D1 amplification correlate with cisplatin sensitivity in xenografted human squamous cell carcinomas from head and neck.
  • To investigate the response of tumour growth to cisplatin treatment, in relation to p53 mutation and cyclin D1 dysregulation on DNA and protein level, biopsies from seven xenografted human squamous cell carcinomas from the head and neck were analysed with immunohistochemistry for p53 expression and cyclin D1 expression.
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed to analyse cyclin D1 amplification.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Cyclin D1 / genetics. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Gene Amplification. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / genetics. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cheek / pathology. Flow Cytometry. Gingival Neoplasms / drug therapy. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mice. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mutation. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / drug therapy. Statistics as Topic

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  • (PMID = 16644573.001).
  • [ISSN] 0284-186X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Norway
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 136601-57-5 / Cyclin D1; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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10. Leunig A, Mehlmann M, Betz C, Stepp H, Arbogast S, Grevers G, Baumgartner R: Fluorescence staining of oral cancer using a topical application of 5-aminolevulinic acid: fluorescence microscopic studies. J Photochem Photobiol B; 2001 Apr;60(1):44-9
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  • [Title] Fluorescence staining of oral cancer using a topical application of 5-aminolevulinic acid: fluorescence microscopic studies.
  • INTRODUCTION: Topical application of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) by means of a rinsing solution has been shown to be a promising new procedure in the diagnosis of oral malignancies.
  • However, for assessing the reliability of this method regarding fluorescence-guided tumor resections and photodynamic therapy, further information on the distribution and penetration depth of 5-ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in the tissue is needed.
  • METHODS: 24 patients suffering from oral cancer were included in this investigation.
  • RESULTS: PPIX fluorescence in the tissue was limited to the epithelium.
  • The aim of further investigations will be to assess the tissue distribution and depth of penetration of PPIX following systemic application of 5-ALA.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminolevulinic Acid / therapeutic use. Carcinoma in Situ / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11386680.001).
  • [ISSN] 1011-1344
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of photochemistry and photobiology. B, Biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Photochem. Photobiol. B, Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 0 / Protoporphyrins; 553-12-8 / protoporphyrin IX; 88755TAZ87 / Aminolevulinic Acid
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11. Prasad ML, Busam KJ, Patel SG, Hoshaw-Woodard S, Shah JP, Huvos AG: Clinicopathologic differences in malignant melanoma arising in oral squamous and sinonasal respiratory mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2003 Aug;127(8):997-1002
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  • [Title] Clinicopathologic differences in malignant melanoma arising in oral squamous and sinonasal respiratory mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract.
  • We compare melanomas arising in 2 histologically different mucosa, the stratified oral squamous mucosa and pseudostratified sinonasal respiratory mucosa, to investigate the clinicopathologic influence of native mucosal histology on the tumor.
  • METHODS: Clinicopathologic features of 36 melanomas arising in the squamous mucosa of the oral cavity were compared with 59 melanomas arising in the sinonasal respiratory mucosa.
  • RESULTS: The median age of patients was 61 and 63 years for oral and sinonasal melanomas, respectively, with the squamous and respiratory mucosa covering the maxilla being most frequently involved (68.7% and 66%, respectively).
  • The oral melanomas were more likely to be detected in the early in situ or microinvasive stage (4 cases vs none, P =.008) and were more frequently amelanotic (14 vs 12, P =.049) than sinonasal melanomas.
  • The sinonasal melanomas were frequently thicker (median thickness, 9 vs 2.6 mm), polypoid (29 vs none), ulcerated (57 vs 20), and necrotic (57 vs 14) than oral melanoma (P <.001).
  • Pseudopapillary architecture was more frequent in sinonasal melanomas (16 tumors vs none, P <.001), and desmoplastic melanomas were more frequent in the oral mucosa (6 vs 1, P =.005).
  • Sinonasal melanoma showed vascular and deep tissue invasion more frequently than oral melanoma; however, no significant difference in disease-specific survival was noted (median survival, 2.8 years vs 3.0 years; 5-year survival, 37% vs 35%, respectively).
  • CONCLUSION: Sinonasal melanomas demonstrated aggressive morphologic features significantly more frequently than oral melanomas; however, prognosis remained similar in both groups.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms / pathology. Melanoma / pathology. Mouth Mucosa / pathology. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Nose Neoplasms / pathology. Respiratory Mucosa / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Nasal Mucosa / drug effects. Nasal Mucosa / pathology. Nasal Mucosa / surgery. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / drug therapy. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / mortality. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / pathology. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / surgery


12. Li AC, Warnakulasuriya S, Thompson RP: Neoplasia of the tongue in a patient with Crohn's disease treated with azathioprine: case report. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2003 Feb;15(2):185-7
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  • Azathioprine is now widely used for the maintenance treatment of Crohn's disease, but there are concerns whether azathioprine could predispose to malignancy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
  • We report here a case of a 39-year-old non-smoking male with Crohn's disease who had been treated for 3 years with azathioprine and developed a lingual ulcer.
  • Biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma, a tumour not previously associated with Crohn's disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites / adverse effects. Azathioprine / adverse effects. Carcinoma in Situ / chemically induced. Crohn Disease / drug therapy. Tongue Neoplasms / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Humans. Male. Mouth Mucosa / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 12560764.001).
  • [ISSN] 0954-691X
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of gastroenterology & hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites; MRK240IY2L / Azathioprine
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13. Mitani T, Hoshikawa H, Mori T, Hosokawa T, Tsukamoto I, Yamaguchi F, Kamitori K, Tokuda M, Mori N: Growth inhibition of head and neck carcinomas by D-allose. Head Neck; 2009 Aug;31(8):1049-55
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  • BACKGROUND: An inhibitory effect of D-allose, a rare sugar, on several cancer cell lines has been reported.
  • This study aimed to investigate the growth inhibition of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells by D-allose.
  • METHODS: We treated 3 head and neck carcinoma cell lines with D-allose, D-fructose, D-psicose, and D-glucose.
  • Cell growth assays as well as analyses of messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, cell cycle, apoptosis, and uptake of 14C-glucose were performed.
  • RESULTS: D-allose had inhibitory effects on all 3 cell lines and tended to upregulate mRNA expression of glucose transporters, p21 and p53, and downregulate mRNA expression of cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and CDC2.
  • We observed that D-allose tended to interfere with the intracellular uptake of D-glucose and induced apoptosis.
  • CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that D-allose inhibits the growth of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Glucose / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Cell Cycle / physiology. Cell Growth Processes / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Humans. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Probability. RNA, Messenger / analysis. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  • (PMID = 19340872.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0347
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & neck
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger; 6038-51-3 / allose; IY9XDZ35W2 / Glucose
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14. Harada K, Kawaguchi S, Supriatno, Onoue T, Yoshida H, Sato M: Combined effects of the oral fluoropyrimidine anticancer agent, S-1 and radiation on human oral cancer cells. Oral Oncol; 2004 Aug;40(7):713-9
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  • [Title] Combined effects of the oral fluoropyrimidine anticancer agent, S-1 and radiation on human oral cancer cells.
  • We evaluated the orally administered S-1, in combination with ionizing radiation both in vivo and in vitro against human oral cancer cell lines.
  • Human oral cancer cell lines were used as subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice.
  • S-1 (10 mg/kg) was administered orally 1 h before radiation treatments (1.5 Gy), or 1 h after radiation for five consecutive days.
  • For in vitro analysis, attached cells were treated with S-1 (50 microg/ml) for 1 h and then irradiated (3, 6, 9, 12, 15 Gy), or they were treated with S-1 for 1 h after radiation.
  • Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay.
  • The combination of S-1 and radiation was more effective than either agent alone.
  • Moreover, the combination of S-1 and radiation could induce apoptosis significantly than either agent alone (P < 0.01).
  • These data demonstrate that the combination of S-1 and fractionated radiotherapy is more effective against human oral cancer xenografts than either agent alone, and that S-1 administration before radiation is more effective than after radiation, suggesting a potential clinical applicability of combination treatment of S-1 and radiation in oral cancer therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Oxonic Acid / therapeutic use. Pyridines / therapeutic use. Tegafur / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis / radiation effects. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cell Survival / radiation effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Combinations. Humans. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Transplantation. Transplantation, Heterologous. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Tumor Stem Cell Assay

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  • (PMID = 15172641.001).
  • [ISSN] 1368-8375
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Pyridines; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid
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15. Copper MP, Triesscheijn M, Tan IB, Ruevekamp MC, Stewart FA: Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of multiple primary tumours in the head and neck, located to the oral cavity and oropharynx. Clin Otolaryngol; 2007 Jun;32(3):185-9
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  • [Title] Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of multiple primary tumours in the head and neck, located to the oral cavity and oropharynx.
  • This study aims at evaluating meta-tetrahydroxy-phenyl chlorin-mediated photodynamic therapy for second or multiple primary tumours in the head and neck.
  • DESIGN: Retrospective study of all patients with second or multiple primary tumours treated by photodynamic therapy over a 10-year period.
  • PARTICIPANTS: A total of 27 patients with 42 the second or the multiple primary head and neck tumours were treated by photodynamic therapy (0.15 mg/kg meta-tetrahydroxy-phenyl chlorin).
  • Cure rates for stage I or in situ disease were 85%versus 38% for stage II/III.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cure rates for photodynamic therapy of the multiple primary head and neck tumours were lower than previously described for first primaries, but were still very encouraging for this difficult patient population.
  • The high cure rate obtained in stage I multiple primaries emphasises the importance of a meticulous follow-up of patients treated for the head and neck cancer to detect new tumours at a curable stage.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Porphyrins / therapeutic use. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Clin Otolaryngol. 2008 Apr;33(2):159-60; author reply 160 [18429885.001]
  • (PMID = 17550506.001).
  • [ISSN] 1749-4478
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical otolaryngology : official journal of ENT-UK ; official journal of Netherlands Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology & Cervico-Facial Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Otolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 0 / Porphyrins; 2683-84-3 / chlorin
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16. Date M, Sakata I, Fukuchi K, Ohura K, Azuma Y, Shinohara M, Matsuzaki K, Namiki Y, Takahashi H: Photodynamic therapy for human oral squamous cell carcinoma and xenografts using a new photosensitizer, PAD-S31. Lasers Surg Med; 2003;33(1):57-63
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  • [Title] Photodynamic therapy for human oral squamous cell carcinoma and xenografts using a new photosensitizer, PAD-S31.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel and promising cancer treatment that employs a combination of photosensitizer and visible light.
  • We examined the effect of PDT using a new photosensitizer, PAD-S31, and the 670-nm diode laser in human oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC).
  • STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: SAS and HSC-4 cell lines were used in all the experiments.
  • Cell viability was determined by a modified MTT assay.
  • Two methods were used for the determination of apoptosis in human oral SCC cells: TUNEL assay and detection of fragmented mono- and oligo-nucleosomes by ELISA.
  • Xenografts of human oral SCC cells were generated in KSN S1c nude mice.
  • RESULTS: In vitro PDT using PAD-S31 and the 670-nm diode laser showed cytotoxicity that was a function of laser energy, drug concentration, and time to the SAS and HSC-4 cell lines.
  • On the other hand, PAD-S31 without irradiation had no effect on cell viability.
  • PDT-mediated cell death occurred predominantly by apoptosis in vitro and in vivo.
  • Furthermore, it is expected that this therapy will be clinically useful for the treatment of patients with oral carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Porphyrins / therapeutic use. Transplantation, Heterologous
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis / radiation effects. Cell Line, Tumor. Disease Models, Animal. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Humans. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. In Vitro Techniques. Mice. Mice, Nude

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 12866122.001).
  • [ISSN] 0196-8092
  • [Journal-full-title] Lasers in surgery and medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lasers Surg Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 13,17-bis(1-carboxypropionyl)carbamoylethyl-3-ethenyl-8-ethoxyiminoethylidene-7-hydroxy-2,7,12,18-tetramethyl porphyrin; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; 0 / Porphyrins
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17. Yang CC, Tu SF, Wu CH, Chang RC, Kao SY: In vitro growth inhibition by indomethacin on human oral squamous cell carcinoma lines synergistically suppressed by all-trans retinoic acid correlating to apoptosis. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi (Taipei); 2002 Dec;65(12):600-7
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  • [Title] In vitro growth inhibition by indomethacin on human oral squamous cell carcinoma lines synergistically suppressed by all-trans retinoic acid correlating to apoptosis.
  • Inhibition in the some cell lines of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has also been reported.
  • The purpose of this study was primarily to explore the cellular response of human OSCC lines after indomethacin or retinoic acid (RA) treatment and its correlation to apoptosis phenomenon.
  • METHODS: Five human OSCC cell lines--KB, SCC15, SCC25, OEC-M1 and OC2--were used for this in vitro study.
  • By direct cell number counting, the cellular response was observed under incremental indomethacin concentrations of 50 microM, 100 microM, 200 microM and 400 microM, in order to select the most appropriate concentration for further study.
  • While in the 3rd part, TdT-mediated-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) method was used for in situ apoptosis assay to see if the apoptosis rate varied with these two agents.
  • RESULTS: All 5 cell lines constantly showed growth suppression with positive dosage effect of indomethacin.
  • Synergistic inhibition by combined treatment of indomethacin and RA was seen in RA responsive lines of SCC15 and SCC25, whereas other RA-resistant clones showed no synergism of this combined treatment.
  • The in situ detection of apoptosis by TUNEL assay revealed a significantly higher ratio of apoptotic cells in the indomethacin/RA treated SCC15 and SCC25 than in controls.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The study provides the value of further exploration on the mechanism of how indomethacin inhibiting cancer cell growth and how RA-sensitive OSCC cell lines are synergistically suppressed by conjoint treatment of RA and indomethacin.
  • This study also highlights the value to see how the apoptotic pathway responds differently to the indomethacin/RA treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Indomethacin / pharmacology. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tretinoin / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Synergism. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Tumor Cells, Cultured


18. Suzuki M, Shinohara F, Endo M, Sugazaki M, Echigo S, Rikiishi H: Zebularine suppresses the apoptotic potential of 5-fluorouracil via cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway against human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2009 Jul;64(2):223-32
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  • [Title] Zebularine suppresses the apoptotic potential of 5-fluorouracil via cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway against human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.
  • PURPOSE: During tumorigenesis, tumor suppressor and tumor-related genes are commonly silenced by aberrant DNA methylation in their promoter regions, which is one of the important determinants of susceptibility to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells.
  • METHOD: We investigated the effect of a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, zebularine (Zeb), on the chemosensitivity of 5-FU and cisplatin (CDDP) by MTT and TUNEL methods, and compared the molecular mechanism of action with those of a GSK3beta inhibitor, LiCl, and an Hsp90 inhibitor, 17-AAG.
  • RESULTS: A significant apoptotic effect by a combination of Zeb or 17-AAG was found in CDDP treatment; however, considerable suppression of 5-FU-induced apoptosis was observed after incubation with Zeb, 17-AAG, or LiCl.
  • These results indicate that combination therapies have to be carefully investigated due to potential harmful effects in the clinical application of DNMT inhibitors.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein / metabolism. Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases / metabolism. Cytidine / analogs & derivatives. Fluorouracil / antagonists & inhibitors. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adjuvants, Immunologic / pharmacology. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Benzoquinones / pharmacology. Blotting, Western. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cisplatin / pharmacology. DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferase / antagonists & inhibitors. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 / antagonists & inhibitors. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 / metabolism. HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins / metabolism. Humans. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Lactams, Macrocyclic / pharmacology. Lithium Chloride / pharmacology. NF-kappa B / metabolism. Phosphorylation / drug effects. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / metabolism. Signal Transduction / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 18830594.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0843
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzoquinones; 0 / CREB1 protein, human; 0 / Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein; 0 / HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins; 0 / Lactams, Macrocyclic; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 3690-10-6 / pyrimidin-2-one beta-ribofuranoside; 4GY0AVT3L4 / tanespimycin; 5CSZ8459RP / Cytidine; EC 2.1.1.37 / DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferase; EC 2.7.11.1 / glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta; EC 2.7.11.11 / Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.11.26 / Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3; G4962QA067 / Lithium Chloride; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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19. Yamachika E, Habte T, Oda D: Artemisinin: an alternative treatment for oral squamous cell carcinoma. Anticancer Res; 2004 Jul-Aug;24(4):2153-60
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  • [Title] Artemisinin: an alternative treatment for oral squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Artemisinin (AR) is a widely used antimalarial drug.
  • Recently, additional uses for AR as an anticancer drug were discovered.
  • Cell cycle by flow cytometry results showed that only 5-FU-treated cells demonstrated a significant S-phase rate increase to 45%.
  • In conclusion, our results indicate that AR is cytotoxic to transformed oral epithelial cells through apoptosis, while 5-FU is cytotoxic primarily through cell toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Artemisinins / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sesquiterpenes / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD40 / metabolism. CD40 Ligand / metabolism. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Flow Cytometry. Fluorouracil / pharmacology. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / metabolism. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / metabolism. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / metabolism. bcl-2-Associated X Protein

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  • (PMID = 15330155.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD40; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Artemisinins; 0 / BAX protein, human; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / Sesquiterpenes; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 0 / bcl-2-Associated X Protein; 147205-72-9 / CD40 Ligand; 9RMU91N5K2 / artemisinine; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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20. Kuo WP, Whipple ME, Sonis ST, Ohno-Machado L, Jenssen TK: Gene expression profiling by DNA microarrays and its application to dental research. Oral Oncol; 2002 Oct;38(7):650-6
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  • The technology permits the simultaneous analysis of tens of thousands of genes for the purposes of gene discovery, disease diagnosis. improved drug development, and therapeutics tailored to specific disease processes.
  • Since many genes contribute to normal functioning, research efforts are moving from the search for a disease specific gene to the understanding of the biochemical and molecular functioning of a variety of genes and how complicated networks of interaction can lead to a disease state, such as oral cancer.
  • With the incorporation of DNA micro-array based research, we can look forward to more accurate diagnosis and surgical treatment/drug-delivery therapy based on an individual patient's genetic profile.
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / genetics. Computational Biology / methods. DNA, Circular / genetics. Head and Neck Neoplasms / genetics. Humans. In Situ Hybridization / methods. Mouth Neoplasms / genetics. Oligonucleotides / genetics. RNA, Messenger / genetics

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  • (PMID = 12353490.001).
  • [ISSN] 1368-8375
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NLM NIH HHS / LM / 5T15 LM 07092-07
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Circular; 0 / Oligonucleotides; 0 / RNA, Messenger
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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21. Sandalon Z, Fusenig NE, McCutcheon J, Taichman LB, Garlick JA: Suicide gene therapy for premalignant disease: a new strategy for the treatment of intraepithelial neoplasia. Gene Ther; 2001 Feb;8(3):232-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Suicide gene therapy for premalignant disease: a new strategy for the treatment of intraepithelial neoplasia.
  • The potential of gene therapy to treat premalignant disease or recurrent cancer has not been investigated.
  • The goal of the present investigation was to explore the efficacy of pro-drug-mediated, suicide gene therapy as a strategy to treat incipient neoplasia in stratified squamous epithelium.
  • To test this strategy, a tissue model of premalignancy was generated by mixing normal human keratinocytes (NHK) that express the bacterial cytosine deaminase gene (CD) with premalignant keratinocytes which have been genetically marked with the bacterial gene for beta-galactosidase (II-4-beta-gal) in skin-like organotypic cultures.
  • Preliminary studies in monolayer cultures demonstrated that CD-transduced NHK (NHK/CD) efficiently expressed the transgene and deaminated the pro-drug 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to the toxic product 5-fluorouracil (5FU).
  • In submerged cultures, it was found that CD-mediated killing of II-4-beta-gal cells did not require cell-cell contact and that the LD(50) of 5FC for efficient bystander killing of II-4-beta-gal was 0.5 mM.
  • When this concentration of pro-drug was used in organotypic cultures, a significant number of dysplastic II-4-beta-gal cells were eliminated from the tissue.
  • These findings demonstrated that potentially malignant keratinocytes could be eliminated from a dysplastic tissue through activation of pro-drug and killing of adjacent cells through the bystander effect.
  • By establishing an in vitro model to eliminate premalignant cells using suicide gene therapy, these studies provide a new approach for the treatment of incipient cancer as it develops, thereby preventing invasive disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma in Situ / therapy. Genetic Therapy / methods. Mouth Neoplasms / therapy. Precancerous Conditions / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antimetabolites / pharmacology. Cell Culture Techniques. Cell Death / drug effects. Cytosine Deaminase. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Flucytosine / pharmacology. Gene Expression. Humans. Infant, Newborn. Keratinocytes / drug effects. Keratinocytes / enzymology. Male. Nucleoside Deaminases / genetics. Prodrugs / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 11313795.001).
  • [ISSN] 0969-7128
  • [Journal-full-title] Gene therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gene Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK11250; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK49093
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites; 0 / Prodrugs; D83282DT06 / Flucytosine; EC 3.5.4.- / Nucleoside Deaminases; EC 3.5.4.1 / Cytosine Deaminase
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22. Blant SA, Glanzmann TM, Ballini JP, Wagnières G, van den Bergh H, Monnier P: Uptake and localisation of mTHPC (Foscan) and its 14C-labelled form in normal and tumour tissues of the hamster squamous cell carcinoma model: a comparative study. Br J Cancer; 2002 Dec 2;87(12):1470-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Uptake and localisation of mTHPC (Foscan) and its 14C-labelled form in normal and tumour tissues of the hamster squamous cell carcinoma model: a comparative study.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of meta(tetrahydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC) on different tissues of interest in a hamster tumour model and to confirm our earlier animal studies on semi-quantitative fluorescence microscopy.
  • Following intracardiac injection of 0.5 mg kg(-1) mTHPC, groups of five tumour-bearing animals were used for in situ light-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.
  • The presence of radioactivity in serum and tissues was determined after chemical digestion in scintillation fluid using a scintillation counter.
  • For each analysed tissue, a good correlation was observed between the three evaluation methods.
  • The lowest level of mTHPC was noted in striated muscle at all times.
  • No selectivity in dye localisation was observed between early squamous cell carcinoma and healthy mucosa.
  • Soon after the injection, a significant selectivity was noted for advanced squamous cell carcinoma as compared to healthy cheek pouch mucosa or striated muscle.
  • Finally, this study demonstrated the usefulness of non-invasive in situ spectroscopic measurements to be performed systematically prior to photodynamic therapy as a real-time monitoring for each treated patient in order to individualise and adapt the light dosimetry and avoid over or under treatments.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Mesoporphyrins / pharmacokinetics. Mouth Neoplasms / metabolism. Photochemotherapy. Photosensitizing Agents / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Carbon Isotopes. Cricetinae. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Female. Humans. Light. Mesocricetus. Species Specificity. Spectrometry, Fluorescence. Tissue Distribution

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 Cancer Research UK
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  • (PMID = 12454779.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carbon Isotopes; 0 / Mesoporphyrins; 0 / Photosensitizing Agents; FU21S769PF / temoporfin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2376296
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23. Harada K, Ferdous T, Yoshida H: Investigation of optimal schedule of concurrent radiotherapy with S-1 for oral squamous cell carcinoma. Oncol Rep; 2007 Nov;18(5):1077-83
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  • [Title] Investigation of optimal schedule of concurrent radiotherapy with S-1 for oral squamous cell carcinoma.
  • In the present study, we examined the appropriate schedule of S-1 medication in the combination with radiation by investigating the safety, the clinical efficacy, and antitumor effects on tumors in nude mice.
  • In the patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), S-1 was given orally according to a 4-week application followed by 2-week rest regimen (4-week regimen), or a 2-week application followed by a 1-week rest regimen (2-week regimen).
  • Radiation was given (2 Gy/day; 5 days/week) for a total of 60 Gy.
  • In nude mouse models, human oral cancer cell lines were used as subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice.
  • The mice were treated by S-1 (10 mg/kg) and radiation (1 Gy) with a 4-week regimen or a 2-week regimen.
  • These results suggested that the 2-week regimen might reduce adverse effects, and enhance therapeutic effects compared to the 4-week regimen.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis / radiation effects. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / therapy. Oxonic Acid / therapeutic use. Tegafur / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Animals. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Combinations. Female. Humans. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Mice. Mice, Nude. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy Dosage. Tumor Cells, Cultured / drug effects. Tumor Cells, Cultured / radiation effects

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  • (PMID = 17914556.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid
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