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1. Marehbian J, Arrighi HM, Hass S, Tian H, Sandborn WJ: Adverse events associated with common therapy regimens for moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease. Am J Gastroenterol; 2009 Oct;104(10):2524-33
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  • [Title] Adverse events associated with common therapy regimens for moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease.
  • OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine whether treatment with steroids, immunosuppressives (ISs), and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents is associated with an increased risk of adverse events in patients with Crohn's disease (CD).
  • Patients were classified by treatment with steroids, ISs, anti-TNF agents, combinations of two or three, and none of these medications.
  • Follow-up adverse events in patients with CD and controls were compared across different treatment categories and are presented as hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
  • Within the CD patients, a subset analysis examined the relationship between therapies and outcomes.
  • Within the CD patient population subgroup, monotherapy with steroids, ISs, or anti-TNF agents was associated with an increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) (HR 2.7; 95% CI, 1.0-7.3), candidiasis (HR 2.7; 95% CI, 1.8-4.0), herpes zoster (HR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-2.7), sepsis (HR 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5), demyelinating conditions (HR 3.2; 95% CI, 1.5-6.9), and cervical dysplasia (HR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-2.0) as compared with patients not receiving these medications.
  • The use of two or three of these medications further increased these risks: TB (HR 7.4; 95% CI, 2.1-26.3), candidiasis (HR 3.8; 95% CI, 2.0-7.6), herpes zoster (HR 3.7; 95% CI, 1.8-7.5), sepsis (HR 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.1), and cervical dysplasia (HR 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-3.0).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with steroids, ISs, or anti-TNF agents singly and in combination in patients with CD is associated with increased risks of infection, demyelinating disorders, and cervical dysplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / adverse effects. Crohn Disease / drug therapy. Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Steroids / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] 6-Mercaptopurine / adverse effects. 6-Mercaptopurine / therapeutic use. Adalimumab. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Azathioprine / adverse effects. Azathioprine / therapeutic use. Budesonide / adverse effects. Budesonide / therapeutic use. Case-Control Studies. Comorbidity. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Infliximab. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Methotrexate / adverse effects. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Prednisone / adverse effects. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Prevalence. Proportional Hazards Models. United States / epidemiology

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  • [CommentIn] Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2010 Aug;16(8):1443-4 [19834975.001]
  • (PMID = 19532125.001).
  • [ISSN] 1572-0241
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Steroids; 51333-22-3 / Budesonide; B72HH48FLU / Infliximab; E7WED276I5 / 6-Mercaptopurine; FYS6T7F842 / Adalimumab; MRK240IY2L / Azathioprine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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2. Ruan YH, Wei WL, Zhang HX, Liang ZN, Liu BY, Chen Y: [Comparison and analysis of expression of c-myc and p16 in cervical carcinoma]. Ai Zheng; 2003 Jun;22(6):602-6
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  • [Title] [Comparison and analysis of expression of c-myc and p16 in cervical carcinoma].
  • It is still unclear whether abnormal expression of c-myc and p16 cooperate in the occurrence and progression of cervical carcinoma, and whether there exists a connection between the expression of two genes and the chemotherapy response of cervical carcinoma.
  • This study was designed to investigate the correlation between the expression of c-myc and p16 and their roles in the genesis and development of the uterine cervical carcinoma and chemotherapy response.
  • METHODS: Using in situ hybridization, 37 cases of cervical carcinoma (including 11 cases after chemotherapy), 21 cases of precancerous lesion and 5 cases of normal cervix were observed for c-myc and p16 mRNA with dig-labeled probes.
  • RESULTS: The positive expression rates of p16 in normal cervix,CIN (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia) and cervical carcinoma were 100%, 71.4%, and 21.6%, respectively (P=0.0001), whereas the expression rates of c-myc were 0%, 42.9%, and 75.7% (P=0.0011), respectively.
  • The expression of positive signals of c-myc increased with the increase of malignant degree, and the positive signals in CIN III were also higher than that in CIN II and CIN I.
  • The expression rates of c-myc were decreased in cervical carcinoma after chemotherapy.
  • There was a tendency of negative correlation between the expression of c-myc and p16(r(s)=-0.907).
  • Expression of p16 and c-myc showed no significant difference between effectual and ineffectual chemotherapy groups.
  • CONCLUSION: Both over expression of c-myc and descended expression of p16 may play an important role in the genesis and development of uterine cervical carcinoma.
  • The increased expression of c-myc in different grade CIN suggests that carcinogenesis of cervix be progressive.
  • [MeSH-major] Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / genetics. Genes, myc. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Genes, p16. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. RNA, Messenger / analysis

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  • (PMID = 12948409.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ai Zheng
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger
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3. Ichimura H, Yamaguchi S, Kojima A, Tanaka T, Niiya K, Takemori M, Hasegawa K, Nishimura R: Eradication and reinfection of human papillomavirus after photodynamic therapy for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Int J Clin Oncol; 2003 Oct;8(5):322-5
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  • [Title] Eradication and reinfection of human papillomavirus after photodynamic therapy for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.
  • BACKGROUND: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been proven to be a promising therapeutic modality for selected dysplasias and malignancies in a variety of organs.
  • We assessed the effectiveness of PDT for treating cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) by cytological and histological examinations and investigated its impact on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection.
  • METHODS: A series of 31 patients with CIN (2 with CIN2, 29 with CIN3) were given polyhematoporphyrin ether/ester (PHE) 2 mg/kg IV.
  • HPV-DNA extracted from cervical smears was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and typed for HPV using restriction fragment length polymorphism.
  • RESULTS: At 3 months after PDT, cytology and directed biopsy of the cervix revealed regression of the disease in 28 [complete remission (CR) rate 90%] of 31 patients, and HPV-DNA could be no longer detected in the cervical smears of 22 (76%) of 29 HPV-positive patients.
  • After 12 months, all 31 patients had achieved a CR on biopsy, although HPV-DNA was still present in the cervical smears of 6 patients.
  • The types of HPV-DNA detected 12 months after PDT were different from those seen before PDT in each of the 6 patients, suggesting that they might be reinfected with other HPV types after PDT.
  • CONCLUSION: PDT is effective not only in improving the cytological and histological measures when treating CIN but also for eradicating cervical HPV.
  • [MeSH-major] Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / drug therapy. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / virology. Papillomaviridae / isolation & purification. Photochemotherapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Cervix Uteri / virology. DNA, Viral / analysis. Dihematoporphyrin Ether / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Papillomavirus Infections / drug therapy. Recurrence

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  • (PMID = 14586759.001).
  • [ISSN] 1341-9625
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral; 97067-70-4 / Dihematoporphyrin Ether
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4. Soergel P, Wang X, Stepp H, Hertel H, Hillemanns P: Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with hexaminolevulinate. Lasers Surg Med; 2008 Nov;40(9):611-5
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  • [Title] Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with hexaminolevulinate.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: CIN is a disease of women in their reproductive years, and treatment includes excisional techniques with increased risk of preterm deliveries.
  • Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using topical precursor of photoactive porphyrins may be a non-invasive alternative with minimal side effects.
  • This study assessed the feasibility and response rate of PDT with hexaminolevulinate (HAL) in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection.
  • STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty four patients with a CIN 2 or 3 or a persistent CIN 1 and a positive high-risk HPV-DNA test were included.
  • Each patient had gynaecologic examination including cervical cytology, HPV DNA testing, colposcopy and biopsy.
  • Ten milliliters of HAL-thermogel (10 mM) were topically applied to the cervix for 3-5 hours, followed by 1,000 seconds of illumination of both ecto- and endocervical canal with red coherent light (wave length 633 nm) using a PDT laser and a special light catheter.
  • RESULTS: Seven, 10, and 7 patients had a CIN 1, 2, or 3, respectively.
  • Treatment could be accomplished in all cases and no severe side effects were encountered.
  • Fifteen out of the 24 patients had a complete response (15/24 = 63%) and a HPV remission 6 months after 1-3 treatments.
  • The remission rates were 71%, 50%, and 71% for CIN 1, 2 and 3.
  • CONCLUSION: HAL PDT seems to be a non-invasive, repeatable procedure for CIN and cervical HPV infection with minimal side effects which can be easily performed on outpatient basis.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminolevulinic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Feasibility Studies. Female. Humans. Papillomavirus Infections / drug therapy. Papillomavirus Infections / pathology. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult


5. Paulino AC, Wen BC, Brown CK, Tannous R, Mayr NA, Zhen WK, Weidner GJ, Hussey DH: Late effects in children treated with radiation therapy for Wilms' tumor. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2000 Mar 15;46(5):1239-46
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  • [Title] Late effects in children treated with radiation therapy for Wilms' tumor.
  • PURPOSE: To determine the frequency and types of late effects in children receiving radiation therapy (RT) for Wilms' tumor.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 1968 to 1994, 55 children received megavoltage RT at our institution as part of treatment for Wilms' tumor.
  • There were 25 female and 17 male patients with a median age at diagnosis of 48 months (range, 7-126 months).
  • There were 12 Stage I, eight Stage II, 15 Stage III, six Stage IV, and one Stage V patient.
  • Whole-lung RT was delivered to 13 patients either at diagnosis or pulmonary relapse.
  • All patients received chemotherapy; the most common agents were actinomycin-D/vincristine/adriamycin in 13 and actinomycin-D/vincristine in 18.
  • RESULTS: Of 42 patients, 13 (31.0%) did not have late effects of treatment.
  • The number of patients who developed muscular hypoplasia, limb length inequality, kyphosis, and iliac wing hypoplasia were seven (16.7%), five (11.9%), three (7.1%), and three (7.1%), respectively.
  • Median time to development of scoliosis was 102 months, with a range of 16-146 months.
  • Only one of 12 Group A patients developed scoliosis.
  • Of 23 patients, five irradiated within 10 days of surgery and one of 19 irradiated after 10 days developed bowel obstruction (p = 0.09, log rank test).
  • Three patients developed hypertension with normal blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine levels; another patient had chronic renal insufficiency in a nonirradiated kidney.
  • One patient developed diffuse interstitial pneumonitis.
  • Four patients developed benign neoplasms; three were in the RT field (two osteochondroma, one lipoma) and one outside (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia II).
  • There were three second malignancies (chronic myelogenous leukemia at 9 years, osteosarcoma at 11 years, and breast cancer at 25 years after initial diagnosis of nephroblastoma); both solid malignancies occurred in the RT field.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Late effects of therapy were seen in more than two thirds of children treated for Wilms' tumor.
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Female. Fertility / radiation effects. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Intestinal Obstruction / etiology. Intestine, Small / radiation effects. Kidney Diseases / etiology. Kyphosis / etiology. Male. Muscles / radiation effects. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Puberty, Delayed / etiology. Scoliosis / etiology. Time Factors


6. Van Pachterbeke C, Bucella D, Rozenberg S, Manigart Y, Gilles C, Larsimont D, Vanden Houte K, Reynders M, Snoeck R, Bossens M: Topical treatment of CIN 2+ by cidofovir: results of a phase II, double-blind, prospective, placebo-controlled study. Gynecol Oncol; 2009 Oct;115(1):69-74
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  • [Title] Topical treatment of CIN 2+ by cidofovir: results of a phase II, double-blind, prospective, placebo-controlled study.
  • OBJECTIVE: Randomized controlled trial evaluating a topical treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 and 3 (CIN 2+) using cidofovir.
  • METHODS: Fifty-three women with a biopsy-proven CIN 2+ were randomly assigned, 6 weeks before their planned conisation, either 3 applications of 3 ml 2% cidofovir in Intrasite gel in a cervical cap or a placebo (the same volume of Intrasite alone).
  • A cervical sample for high-risk types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) (Hybrid Capture 2 or HC2) was taken before treatment and before conisation.
  • Fourteen of the 23 cones were free of any CIN (60.8%) in the cidofovir group.
  • Only 5 of 25 cones were free of any CIN (20%) in the placebo group (p<0.01).
  • CONCLUSION: The medical topical treatment with cidofovir, at this point, cannot replace conisation, but it is a promising candidate for topical chemotherapy of CIN 2+ lesions; a larger prospective randomized study is needed to confirm our results.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / drug therapy. Cytosine / analogs & derivatives. Organophosphonates / administration & dosage. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Conization. Contraceptive Devices, Female. Double-Blind Method. Female. Gels / administration & dosage. Humans. Papillomavirus Infections / pathology. Papillomavirus Infections / virology. Placebos. Prospective Studies


7. Farley JH, Truong V, Goo E, Uyehara C, Belnap C, Larsen WI: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled phase II trial of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor Celecoxib in the treatment of cervical dysplasia. Gynecol Oncol; 2006 Nov;103(2):425-30
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  • [Title] A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled phase II trial of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor Celecoxib in the treatment of cervical dysplasia.
  • OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of daily Celecoxib in the regression of moderate and severe cervical dysplasia, when compared to placebo.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Women, over the age of 18, with the histologic diagnosis of moderate or severe cervical dysplasia were enrolled in this IRB approved study.
  • Both examining physician and patients were blinded to treatment option.
  • Follow-up colposcopy with cervical cytology was obtained at 2-month intervals for 6 months, with cytologic and histologic specimens.
  • RESULTS: From June 2002 until October 2003, a total of 25 patients were enrolled in this randomized phase II study.
  • The mean time to response was 72 days.
  • 33% of patients in the Celecoxib group had complete pathologic response to therapy, which was higher than the placebo group 15%.
  • CONCLUSION: We have observed that Celecoxib could have activity in the treatment of high-grade cervical dysplasia.
  • As a result, medical treatment of cervical dysplasia with Celecoxib could offer a minimally invasive treatment with minor morbidity and time constraints.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Pyrazoles / therapeutic use. Sulfonamides / therapeutic use. Uterine Cervical Dysplasia / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Celecoxib. Double-Blind Method. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Papillomaviridae. Papillomavirus Infections / complications. Placebos

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  • (PMID = 16677697.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Placebos; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Sulfonamides; JCX84Q7J1L / Celecoxib
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8. Kiatpongsan S, Niruthisard S, Mutirangura A, Trivijitsilp P, Vasuratna A, Chaithongwongwatthana S, Lertkhachonsuk R: Role of human papillomavirus DNA testing in management of women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2006 Jan-Feb;16(1):262-5
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  • [Title] Role of human papillomavirus DNA testing in management of women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance.
  • To find the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the high-risk group human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing as a triage tool to detect high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs, ie, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] 2 or worse) in women with a cytologic smear showing atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US).
  • Cervical cell samplings were done by cervical cytobrush technique and tested for high-risk group HPV with the Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) test.
  • Then cervicographs were taken before colposcopic-directed cervical biopsies were done.
  • Of the 90 ASC-US cases enrolled, the pathologic results were normal in 30.0%, squamous metaplasia in 16.7%, CIN 1 in 37.8%, CIN 2 in 1.1%, CIN 3 in 11.1%, and microinvasive cervical carcinoma in 3.3%.
  • The prevalence of HSILs and the prevalence of high-risk HPV detection were 15.6% and 38.9%, respectively.
  • Using pathologic results from cervical biopsy as the gold standard, the HC2 has the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 85.7%, 69.7%, 34.3%, and 96.4%, respectively, to detect HSILs.
  • High-risk group HPV detection can be used as an additional triage test to detect HSILs in women having ASC-US with high sensitivity and negative predictive value.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / virology. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / virology. DNA, Viral / analysis. Papillomaviridae / isolation & purification. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Biopsy, Needle. Cohort Studies. DNA Probes, HPV. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Middle Aged. Papillomavirus Infections / diagnosis. Papillomavirus Infections / drug therapy. Risk Assessment. Sensitivity and Specificity. Thailand. Triage


9. TOMBOLA Group: Biopsy and selective recall compared with immediate large loop excision in management of women with low grade abnormal cervical cytology referred for colposcopy: multicentre randomised controlled trial. BMJ; 2009 Jul 28;339:b2548
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  • [Title] Biopsy and selective recall compared with immediate large loop excision in management of women with low grade abnormal cervical cytology referred for colposcopy: multicentre randomised controlled trial.
  • OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness of punch biopsy and selective recall for treatment versus a policy of immediate treatment by large loop excision in the management of women with low grade abnormal cervical cytology referred for colposcopy.
  • DESIGN: Multicentre individually randomised controlled trial, nested within the NHS cervical screening programmes.
  • INTERVENTIONS: Immediate large loop excision or up to four targeted punch biopsies taken immediately with recall for treatment (by large loop excision) if these showed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II or III or worse.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical end points: cumulative incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II or worse and grade III or worse at three years.
  • RESULTS: 879 women (44%) had a normal transformation zone at colposcopy and had no further procedures at that time.
  • Of women randomised to biopsy and recall, 157 (16%) required a second clinic visit for treatment.
  • Specimens from almost 60% (n=296) of women who underwent immediate large loop excision showed no cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (31%; n=156) or showed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade I (28%; n=140).
  • The percentages of women diagnosed with grade II or worse up to and including the exit examination were 22% (n=216) in the biopsy and recall arm and 23% (n=228) in the immediate large loop excision arm.
  • There was no significant difference between the arms in cumulative incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II or worse (adjusted relative for risk large loop excision v biopsy 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.86 to 1.25) or grade III or worse (1.03, 0.79 to 1.34).
  • A greater proportion of disease was detected at initial investigation and less during follow-up and at exit in the immediate large loop excision arm, but time of detection did not differ significantly between arms.
  • Higher proportions of women randomised to large loop excision reported moderate or more severe bleeding and discharge.
  • CONCLUSION: A policy of targeted punch biopsies with subsequent treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II or III and cytological surveillance for grade I or less provides the best balance between benefits and harms for the management of women with low grade abnormal cytology referred for colposcopy.

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  • [CommentIn] BMJ. 2009;339:b3014 [19638653.001]
  • (PMID = 19638647.001).
  • [ISSN] 1756-1833
  • [Journal-full-title] BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMJ
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ISRCTN/ ISRCTN34841617
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G9700808
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2718084
  • [Investigator] Cruickshank M; Murray G; Parkin D; Smart L; Walker E; Waugh N; Avis M; Chilvers C; Fielding K; Hammond R; Jenkins D; Johnson J; Neal K; Russell I; Seth R; Whynes D; Duncan I; Robertson A; Little J; Sharp L; Russell I; Walker L; Anthony B; Bell S; Bowie A; Brown K; Brown J; Chew K; Cochran C; Cotton S; Dean J; Dunn K; Edwards J; Evans D; Fenty J; Finlayson A; Gallagher M; Gray N; Heddle M; Innes A; Jobson D; Keillor M; MacGregor J; Mackenzie S; Mackie A; McPherson G; Okorocha I; Reilly M; Rodgers J; Thornton A; Yeats R; Alexander L; Buchanan L; Henderson S; Iterbeke T; Lucas S; Manderson G; Nicol S; Reid G; Robinson C; Sandilands T; Adrian M; Al-Sahab A; Bentley E; Brook H; Bushby C; Cannon R; Cooper B; Dowell R; Dunderdale M; Gabrawi; Guo L; Heideman L; Jones S; Lawson S; Philips Z; Platt C; Prabhakaran S; Rippin J; Thompson R; Williams E; Woolley C; Boroujerdi M; Cotton S; Harrild K; Norrie J; Day N; Marteau T; Parmar M; Patnick J; Woodman C; Altman D; Moss S; Wells M; Sharp L; Cruickshank M; Little J; Cotton S; Harrild K; Cochran C; Duncan I; Gray N; Hammond R; Smart L; Thornton A; Waugh N; Woolley C
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10. Orbell S, Hagger M, Brown V, Tidy J: Appraisal theory and emotional sequelae of first visit to colposcopy following an abnormal cervical screening result. Br J Health Psychol; 2004 Nov;9(Pt 4):533-55
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Appraisal theory and emotional sequelae of first visit to colposcopy following an abnormal cervical screening result.
  • OBJECTIVES: Attendance at colposcopy following an abnormal cervical smear is potentially a highly distressing event.
  • We also compare the psychological sequelae of immediate treatment at first colposcopy (See and Treat, ST) vs. colposcopy with treatment deferred to a later date (Diagnose and Defer, DD).
  • RESULTS: Diagnosis and cognitive appraisals were each significantly associated with emotion, together accounting for between 3 and 15% of variance in different emotions.
  • Women with Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) 2 or CIN 3 undergoing 'ST' were less anxious, less embarrassed and significantly more relieved compared with a matched sample of women undergoing 'DT', and perceived their first appointment as more motivationally congruent.
  • CONCLUSION: Diagnosis, motivationally incongruent experiences and low emotion-focused coping potential are the most important determinants of anxiety after colposcopy.
  • [MeSH-major] Affect. Attitude to Health. Colposcopy / psychology. Office Visits. Psychological Theory. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / diagnosis. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cognition. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Surveys and Questionnaires. Time Factors


11. Di Roma E, Parlavecchio E, Vettraino G, Corosu R: [CIN: multicentric study of therapeutic strategies]. Minerva Ginecol; 2001 Dec;53(6):379-2
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [CIN: multicentric study of therapeutic strategies].
  • [Transliterated title] CIN: studio multicentrico sulle strategie terapeutiche.
  • BACKGROUND: Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) is a dysplastic lesion that precedes cervical cancer.
  • The diagnosis is made by colposcopic, cytologic and bioptic exams.
  • Therapy may be physical, pharmacological or surgical.
  • Our aim was to evaluate their therapeutic strategies for CIN and cervical condylomata.
  • We referred to SIGO 1999 guidelines for CIN therapy and to European guidelines for cervical condylomata therapy.
  • RESULTS: The centers used drugs more for HPV infections (57%) than for dysplasia (33%).
  • Drug therapy was used more in the past (66.67%).
  • Actually they prefer treating CIN I with electrocoagulation diathermy (DTC), CIN II with loop electrosurgical excision procedures (LEEP) or Laser, CIN III with cold knife conization or LEEP, cervical condylomata with laser or DTC.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results show that the centers prefer physical therapy.
  • Therapeutic strategies comply with SIGO 1999 guidelines for therapy of CIN and with European guidelines for cervical condylomata partially.
  • [MeSH-major] Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Conization. Electrocoagulation. Electrosurgery. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy. Interferons / therapeutic use. Interviews as Topic. Italy. Laser Therapy. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Surveys and Questionnaires


12. Istomin YP, Lapzevich TP, Chalau VN, Shliakhtsin SV, Trukhachova TV: Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades II and III with Photolon. Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther; 2010 Sep;7(3):144-51
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades II and III with Photolon.
  • The objective of the present study was to test in clinics a previously developed novel organ-saving approach for the treatment of CIN using PDT with the photosensitizer Photolon applied in women of a childbearing age with CIN II and III.
  • A total number of 112 patients aged 35.2+/-1.6 with morphologically proven diagnosis of CIN II and III were enrolled into the study.
  • In 3 months after treatment a complete eradication of the HPV infection was proven by PCR-analysis in 47 (53.4%) from 88 patients who have been infected with HPV of a highly oncogenic strains before PDT.
  • PDT with Photolon is an alternative approach for the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia which can be recommended for women of childbearing age.
  • The simplicity of the procedure as well as its' high therapeutic efficacy defines the reasonability of its' introduction into the clinical practice as a new organ-saving method for the treatment of patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy / methods. Photosensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Povidone / therapeutic use. Protoporphyrins / therapeutic use. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Papillomavirus Infections / complications. Papillomavirus Infections / drug therapy






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