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1. Kitamura M, Wada N, Nagata S, Iizuka N, Jin YF, Tomoeda M, Yuki M, Naka N, Araki N, Yutani C, Tomita Y: Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, with metastasis to the heart: a case report. Diagn Pathol; 2010;5:2
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, with metastasis to the heart: a case report.
  • A rare case is presented of a 61-year-old man with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, with metastasis to the heart.
  • The primary tumor originated in the right thigh in 1982.
  • Since then, the patient has had repeated local recurrences in spite of repeated surgical treatment and adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • He has developed previous metastases of the lung and heart.
  • The patient died of cardiac involvement.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / secondary. Neurofibromatosis 1 / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Amputation. Autopsy. Biopsy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / therapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Thigh. Treatment Outcome


2. Coutts MA, Borthwick NJ, Hungerford JL, Cree IA: Post-menopausal bleeding: a rare presentation of metastatic uveal melanoma. Pathol Oncol Res; 2006;12(3):184-7
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  • [Title] Post-menopausal bleeding: a rare presentation of metastatic uveal melanoma.
  • Uveal melanoma differs from cutaneous melanoma in many ways, including its pattern of metastasis, and exhibits latency with clinical evidence of metastasis sometimes appearing many years after primary diagnosis.
  • Most patients develop metastasis within the liver, but some may present with metastasis to other sites.
  • We report a case of uveal melanoma that presented with post-menopausal bleeding due to metastasis.
  • Further investigation revealed widespread metastatic disease and the patient was not fit for chemotherapy.
  • She died two months after presentation: autopsy revealed metastases in many sites, including the uterus, right ovarian fibroma, kidney, mesentery, liver, lung, thyroid, bone marrow and skin.
  • The immediate cause of death was cardiac tamponade due to a malignant effusion secondary to cardiac metastasis.
  • This case illustrates the widespread metastatic potential of uveal melanoma and highlights the potential for unusual presentation of metastatic disease from this eye tumor.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged, 80 and over. Endometrial Neoplasms / secondary. Female. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Metastasis. Postmenopause

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  • (PMID = 16998600.001).
  • [ISSN] 1219-4956
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology oncology research : POR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Oncol. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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3. Candeias CM, Luís I, Ribeiro J, Costa L, de Almeida LS, Gomes MM, Barreto L, Brito-Avô L, Ducla-Soares JL: Extended remission of metastatic epithelioid angiosarcoma of the heart with liposomal doxorubicin. BMJ Case Rep; 2010;2010

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Extended remission of metastatic epithelioid angiosarcoma of the heart with liposomal doxorubicin.
  • Angiosarcoma is the most common primary malignant tumour of the heart.
  • It is a rare and aggressive neoplasm that almost always has a short and fatal evolution.
  • By the time it produces symptoms it has usually progressed to a mass causing haemodynamic compromise.
  • Initial presentation with metastatic disease is unusual.
  • The skin biopsy was diagnosed as intravascular metastasis of epithelioid angiosarcoma.
  • Body computed tomography scan disclosed a solid mass in the left atrium.
  • The tumour was judged unresectable and the patient was treated with systemic chemotherapy, consisting of liposomal doxorubicin, which resulted in a complete clinical response.
  • The excellent clinical evolution of our patient verifies that liposomal doxorubicin may be effective in the treatment of these tumours and significantly prolong patients' lifespan.

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  • (PMID = 22347886.001).
  • [ISSN] 1757-790X
  • [Journal-full-title] BMJ case reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMJ Case Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3027499
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4. Onan B, Onan IS, Polat B: Surgical resection of solitary metastasis of malignant melanoma to the right atrium. Tex Heart Inst J; 2010;37(5):598-601
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  • [Title] Surgical resection of solitary metastasis of malignant melanoma to the right atrium.
  • Malignant melanoma has a very high tendency to metastasize to the heart.
  • Although most cardiac metastases of melanomas are clinically silent, the lesions may present with life-threatening cardiac morbidities, including dysrhythmia, right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, myocardial dysfunction, pericardial effusion, or heart failure.
  • In selected patients who have a solitary intracardiac melanoma, surgical resection can provide relief from clinical symptoms and minimize potential cardiac sequelae of the tumor.
  • Because tumor embolization of cardiac melanoma has been reported, the presence of atrial metastatic melanoma can be another indication for surgery.Herein, we present the case of a 31-year-old man who had a right atrial metastatic melanoma of unknown primary origin.
  • He underwent surgical resection of the tumor before beginning a course of chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 20978580.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-6702
  • [Journal-full-title] Texas Heart Institute journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tex Heart Inst J
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2953215
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Endocardium/pathology / heart atria/surgery/ultrasonography / heart neoplasms/complications/diagnosis/pathology/secondary/surgery / image interpretation, computer-assisted/methods / melanoma/diagnosis/secondary/surgery / neoplasm metastasis / neoplasms, unknown primary / prognosis / treatment outcome
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5. Szmit S, Zagrodzka M, Kurzyna M, Opolski G, Szczylik C: Sunitinib malate, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is effective in the treatment of restrictive heart failure due to heart metastases from renal cell carcinoma. Cardiology; 2009;114(1):67-71
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  • [Title] Sunitinib malate, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is effective in the treatment of restrictive heart failure due to heart metastases from renal cell carcinoma.
  • Few systematic trials have studied metastatic tumors to the heart and there are currently no guidelines for the treatment of heart metastases and its associated symptoms.
  • This article presents the first known case of effective pharmacological treatment of heart failure due to metastases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • Due to pressure caused by metastatic tissue on the left atrium and the decreased blood inflow to the left ventricle, the 61-year-old male patient suffered from dyspnea.
  • Treatment with sunitinib, an oral multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was initiated and led to a decrease in the mass of the metastasis infiltrating the left atrium.
  • Arterial hypertension caused by sunitinib therapy was effectively controlled by the use of an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor.
  • Therapy with sunitinib reduced the symptoms of exercise intolerance; the patient felt much better and was able to return to his family and resume professional activity.
  • Further studies are required to confirm the utility of sunitinib therapy in patients with symptoms of heart failure due to heart metastases from RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Heart Failure / drug therapy. Indoles / administration & dosage. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / administration & dosage. Pyrroles / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Renal Cell. Echocardiography. Heart Neoplasms / complications. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Poland. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 19372677.001).
  • [ISSN] 1421-9751
  • [Journal-full-title] Cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cardiology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
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6. Anderson KM, Darweesh M, Jajah A, Tsui P, Guinan P, Rubenstein M: Does homeobox-related "positional" genomic information contribute to implantation of metastatic cancer cells at non-random sites? Anticancer Res; 2007 Jul-Aug;27(4B):2141-53
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  • [Title] Does homeobox-related "positional" genomic information contribute to implantation of metastatic cancer cells at non-random sites?
  • Reasons for the lodgment of metastases from several types of solid cancer at apparently non-random sites have not been established.
  • Essentially, a Cartesian coordinate system identifying fibroblasts originally resident at anterior or more posterior, proximal or distal and dermal or non-dermal (heart, lung, etc.) locations was proposed.
  • To the extent that HOX or other homeobox genes are expressed in ectodermal, mesodermal or endodermally-derived, malignantly transformed cells, they might contribute "positional" information to nidation of specific malignant clones at non-random sites.
  • As understood in the past, interdiction of HOX or homeobox-related gene expression might reduce the probability of cancer cell implantation or alter their destinations in complex ways.
  • Ideally, by interfering with HOX or other homeobox gene-related expression of antigenic determinants potentially contributing to their "homing" and nidation, reduced implantation of circulating cancer cells could render them more susceptible to systemic chemotherapy or immunotherapy, as demonstrated in mice.
  • Furthermore, HOX or other homeobox genes or their products could provide novel intra- or extracellular targets for therapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Gene Expression. Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis

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  • (PMID = 17695497.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Number-of-references] 115
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7. Pamukçu B, Bilge AK, Meriç M, Atilgan D: Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma involving the right ventricle. Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars; 2008 Dec;36(8):546-8
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  • [Title] Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma involving the right ventricle.
  • Cardiac metastasis of Ewing's sarcoma is rare.
  • She had a seven-year history of radical right tibial resection for Ewing's sarcoma and was also receiving chemotherapy for lung metastasis of Ewing's sarcoma.
  • The mass showed partial contrast enhancement, suggesting a malignant metastatic mass.
  • Surgical resection was not considered due to accompanying lung metastasis and potentially poor outcome of the operation.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Echocardiography / methods. Heart Neoplasms / diagnosis. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Sarcoma, Ewing / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / diagnosis. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Metastasis. Prognosis. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19223721.001).
  • [ISSN] 1016-5169
  • [Journal-full-title] Türk Kardiyoloji Derneği arşivi : Türk Kardiyoloji Derneğinin yayın organıdır
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
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8. Karpuz V, Ikitimur B, Karpuz H: [A survey of heart tumors: clinical and echocardiographic approach]. Anadolu Kardiyol Derg; 2007 Dec;7(4):427-35

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [A survey of heart tumors: clinical and echocardiographic approach].
  • Heart tumors can be primary in origin, can develop from direct extension of a neighboring tumor or they can be the manifestation of metastasis of a distant tumor.
  • Myxomas are the most frequently encountered primary benign cardiac tumors.
  • Primary malignant tumors of the heart are rare, and they are mostly sarcomatous in structure.
  • Secondary heart tumors constitute a wide spectrum, nevertheless they most frequently originate from lung cancer, breast cancer and hematological malignancies.
  • Heart tumors may involve myocardium, endocardium, epicardium, pericardium, or any combination of the aforementioned layers.
  • On the other hand, the usual site for metastasis to the heart is the pericardium.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography may be helpful for selected cases.
  • Surgery is the principal therapeutic option in benign tumors and when recurrences are not taken into account, they have favorable prognoses.
  • Since surgical resection is usually incomplete in malignant tumors, therapy must be individualized for each patient; even with adjuvant chemotherapy, postoperative survival is usually short.
  • Metastases to the heart are usually approached symptomatically except for exceptional cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Echocardiography, Transesophageal. Fibroma / diagnosis. Fibroma / pathology. Fibroma / radiography. Fibroma / ultrasonography. Hemangioma / diagnosis. Hemangioma / pathology. Hemangioma / radiography. Hemangioma / ultrasonography. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Myoma / diagnosis. Myoma / pathology. Myoma / radiography. Myoma / ultrasonography. Myxoma / diagnosis. Myxoma / pathology. Myxoma / radiography. Myxoma / ultrasonography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 18065342.001).
  • [ISSN] 1308-0032
  • [Journal-full-title] Anadolu kardiyoloji dergisi : AKD = the Anatolian journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anadolu Kardiyol Derg
  • [Language] tur
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
  • [Number-of-references] 49
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9. Miller ES, Hoekstra AV, Hurteau JA, Rodriguez GC: Cardiac metastasis from poorly differentiated carcinoma of the cervix: a case report. J Reprod Med; 2010 Jan-Feb;55(1-2):78-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cardiac metastasis from poorly differentiated carcinoma of the cervix: a case report.
  • BACKGROUND: Disease metastatic to the heart from cervical carcinoma is rare and associated with a poor prognosis.
  • Multimodality treatment has been shown to provide palliative benefit.
  • CASE: A woman presented with stage Ib2 cervical cancer metastatic to the tricuspid valve.
  • She presented with small bowel obstruction from a small bowel metastasis 4 years after initial treatment with chemoradiation.
  • Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showed a tricuspid mass.
  • Endomyocardial biopsy confirmed metastatic disease consistent with a cervical primary.
  • The patient was treated with bowel resection, systemic chemotherapy and cardiac radiation.
  • She died of cardiac failure 8 months after diagnosis of the cardiac lesion.
  • CONCLUSION: Cervical cancer metastatic to the heart is rare and associated with a poor prognosis.
  • Selected patients may benefit from multimodality treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / secondary. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Tricuspid Valve / pathology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 20337214.001).
  • [ISSN] 0024-7758
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of reproductive medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Reprod Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. Savoia P, Fierro MT, Zaccagna A, Bernengo MG: Metastatic melanoma of the heart. J Surg Oncol; 2000 Nov;75(3):203-7
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  • [Title] Metastatic melanoma of the heart.
  • BACKGROUND: Malignant melanoma has an unpredictable biologic behavior and is the neoplasm with the greatest propensity for cardiac involvement.
  • Although relatively frequent at autopsy, cardiac metastases are rarely identified antemortem.
  • METHODS: We reviewed 2,810 patients with histologically confirmed malignant melanoma, who were diagnosed and followed up by our clinic.
  • RESULTS: Five cases of metastatic melanoma of the heart were identified out of 314 melanoma patients with visceral involvement.
  • One case of a 53-year-old woman, who died unexpectedly during her first chemotherapy course, is described in detail.
  • Postmortem examination determined the cause of death to be the presence of multiple melanoma metastases in the heart, even though the patient had shown no signs of cardiac involvement.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The unpredictable biologic behavior of melanoma may lead to unusual metastatic sites, and, therefore, the heart also should be included in routine examinations.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / pathology. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Melanoma / pathology. Melanoma / secondary

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 11088053.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4790
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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11. Bien E, Stachowicz-Stencel T, Balcerska A, Godzinski J, Kazanowska B, Perek-Polnik M, Madziara W, Rybczynska A, Kurylak A, Zalewska-Szewczyk B, Peregud-Pogorzelski J: Angiosarcoma in children - still uncontrollable oncological problem. The report of the Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours Study. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl); 2009 Jul;18(4):411-20
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  • The report of the Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours StudyAngiosarcoma is a rare, highly malignant vascular neoplasm with little data available on its clinical course and management in children.
  • Ten children with angiosarcoma (M/F: 6/4; aged 2, 3-16 years) registered in Polish Paediatric Rare Tumours and Soft Tissue Sarcomas Studies between 1992 and 2006.
  • Primary tumour exceeded 5 cm in seven patients and affected mainly deep tissues (heart-2, head/neck, bladder, brain, liver and upper limb - one patient each).
  • Four patients had regional and two metastatic diseases (lungs and bones).
  • All patients received supplementing chemotherapy with no response in four.
  • Three of five secondary tumour resections proved complete.
  • Seven patients experienced relapses (mainly metastatic) and two continuous progression.
  • Relapsed patients received chemotherapy +/- radiotherapy and surgery (three).
  • Nine patients died of disease (overall survival 6-66 months), and one child after mutilating secondary resection is alive.
  • The response to chemotherapy is poor and the large number of metastatic recurrences suggests a need for systemic therapy modifications.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemangiosarcoma / pathology. Hemangiosarcoma / therapy. Sarcoma / pathology. Sarcoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease Progression. Humans. Male. Poland / epidemiology. Prognosis. Radiotherapy. Recurrence. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 19490008.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2354
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Cancer Care (Engl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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12. Liassides C, Katsamaga M, Deretzi G, Koutsimanis V, Zacharakis G: Cerebral metastasis from heart angiosarcoma presenting as multiple hematomas. J Neuroimaging; 2004 Jan;14(1):71-3
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  • [Title] Cerebral metastasis from heart angiosarcoma presenting as multiple hematomas.
  • The authors present the case of a 24-year-old woman with cerebral metastasis from a primary heart angiosarcoma, which appeared as multiple cerebral hematomas.
  • Primary or metastatic brain angiosarcomas are exceedingly rare, and only a few cases have been reported with hemorrhage.
  • A computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed 2 hematomas in the left parietal and occipital lobes.
  • A thoracic CT scan revealed angiosarcoma of the right atrium of the heart with multiple infiltrations of the lung.
  • The patient underwent surgical removal and systemic chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Cerebral Hemorrhage / etiology. Heart Neoplasms / pathology. Hemangiosarcoma / secondary. Hematoma / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Brain / pathology. Brain / radiography. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 14748213.001).
  • [ISSN] 1051-2284
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuroimaging : official journal of the American Society of Neuroimaging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Neuroimaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Hughes DP, Crutchley M, Douglas WI, Munsell MF, Vaporciyan AA, Herzog C, Tsai FW, Huh W: Incidence, detection, and management of cardiac metastasis in pediatric sarcoma patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10060

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence, detection, and management of cardiac metastasis in pediatric sarcoma patients.
  • : 10060 Background: Sarcoma metastasizing to the heart is a difficult and complicated clinical problem, yet local control is feasible and effective for select patients with cardiac metastasis.
  • Diligence is required to detect these lesions while still amenable to treatment, and echocardiogram remains the best tool for detecting cardiac disease.
  • Anderson Cancer Center between 1997 and 2008.
  • Measures of cardiac function and pathology (including size of ventricles and atria, function of ventricles and valves, presence of metastasis, and presence of pericardial effusion) were assigned numerical values.
  • Fisher's exact test and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test compared clinical characteristics of patients with and without cardiac metastases.
  • RESULTS: The prevalence of cardiac metastases was 1.6% (5/307) with 95% confidence interval 0.5% to 3.8%.
  • The presence of cardiac metastasis positively correlated with pericardial effusion (p = 0.001) and tricuspid valve insufficiency (p = 0.014).
  • The probability of a patient with pericardial effusion having a cardiac metastasis was 28.6% (95% CI: 3.7%-71%).
  • Of the 5 patients with documented sarcoma metastasis to the heart, 3 had widespread refractory disease, were given no cardiac-specific therapy, and rapidly died from disease.
  • One patient who had widespread disease controlled with chemotherapy and radiation had open resection of 2 cardiac metastases which resulted in site-specific disease control for 6 months before succumbing to progressive extra-cardiac disease.
  • Another patient had isolated cardiac metastasis, treated with open resection of 2 metastases followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, and has been without recurrent cardiac metastases for 5 years and 9 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Durable local control for sarcoma metastasizing to the heart is possible and effective for select patients.
  • Pericardial effusion merits evaluation for potential associated cardiac metastasis.
  • Echocardiogram monitoring of sarcoma patients remains important, and should include screening for possible cardiac metastasis.

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  • (PMID = 27962495.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Sarjeant JM, Butany J, Cusimano RJ: Cancer of the heart: epidemiology and management of primary tumors and metastases. Am J Cardiovasc Drugs; 2003;3(6):407-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cancer of the heart: epidemiology and management of primary tumors and metastases.
  • Cardiac tumors, benign or malignant, are rare and most are benign.
  • The most common benign tumor is the cardiac myxoma.
  • Malignant cardiac tumors are usually sarcomas.
  • The pericardium can be the site of benign and malignant cardiac tumors, though metastatic tumors occur here far more commonly than do primary tumors.
  • Successful treatment for benign cardiac tumors is usually achieved by surgical resection.
  • Surgery for primary malignant tumors is, however, much less successful as complete resection is usually not possible.
  • Primary cardiac lymphoma may be successfully treated by chemotherapy.
  • Tumors that metastasize to the heart from other organs occur 100- to 1000-fold more commonly than primary cardiac tumors.
  • Metastatic spread to the heart has been identified in approximately one-fifth of all patients who have metastatic cancer with lung carcinoma being the most common primary tumor.
  • Symptoms of cardiac metastases vary, and they depend on the site and extent of the lesions.
  • Treatment varies depending on the pathology of the primary tumor.
  • However, the aim of treatment is usually symptomatic relief.
  • With the advent of AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma and high grade B cell lymphomas have also been identified in cardiac tissue.
  • The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathology and treatment of cardiac tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms
  • [MeSH-minor] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Carcinoid Heart Disease / diagnosis. Carcinoid Heart Disease / pathology. Hematologic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Hematologic Neoplasms / pathology. Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis. Pericardium / pathology

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  • (PMID = 14728061.001).
  • [ISSN] 1175-3277
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of cardiovascular drugs : drugs, devices, and other interventions
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Cardiovasc Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Number-of-references] 62
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15. Kisselbach C, Ristic AD, Pankuweit S, Karatolius K, Maisch B: [Women and pericardial neoplastic manifestations of the heart and pericardium]. Herz; 2005 Aug;30(5):409-15; quiz 429-30
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  • [Title] [Women and pericardial neoplastic manifestations of the heart and pericardium].
  • In the Western world more than 450,000 women succumb to heart disease annually.
  • Despite the proportions, most women believe that heart disease is a man's disease and that they will die of breast cancer.
  • Data on epidemiology and incidence are rare: there is only an estimated incidence of cardiac neoplasm at necropsy ranging from 0,001% to 0,3%.
  • The most common tumor entity is benign cardiac myxoma.
  • Malignant heart tumors are less common.
  • Most often they are different types of sarcomas, which have a poor outcome and affect more males than females.
  • Metastatic tumors of the heart are 100 times more common than the primary ones.
  • They originate mainly from melanomas, leukemias, lymphomas, and cancer, especially of the lung or breast.
  • Indeed in women breast cancer is the most common metastatic tumor associated with pericardial effusion.
  • To prevent death from tamponade, pericardiocentesis, in addition to the systemic chemotherapy, is mandatory, best when instillation of chemotherapeutics (cisplatin or thiotepa) or radioisotopes is given into the pericardial sac to prevent recurrence of the effusion.
  • However, more of the malignant tumors may be curable if exactly diagnosed at an earlier stage.
  • METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted of all patients with cardiac and pericardial neoplasm exactly diagnosed by endomyocardial or epicardial biopsy and pericardiocentesis, using hospital medical records and a biopsy and pericardiocentesis registry from 2000-2005 with 297 patients.
  • RESULTS: In 76 cases (25.6%) a neoplasm was the reason for a pericardial effusion.
  • 36 women suffered from the breast carcinoma (47%) and 40 males lung cancer (42%) as the firstly metastatic tumor.
  • CONCLUSION: Females are more often affected by primary cardiac tumors than males with an excellent outcome.
  • By contrast, the preventive checkup and aftercare will gain more prognostic importance, especially in case of breast cancer, to earlier recognize a secondary cardiac neoplasm by biopsy and pericardiocentesis with intrapericardial treatment of neoplastic pericarditis.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / epidemiology. Breast Neoplasms / secondary. Heart Neoplasms / epidemiology. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Registries. Risk Assessment / methods

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  • (PMID = 16132244.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-9937
  • [Journal-full-title] Herz
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Herz
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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16. Chrissos DN, Stougiannos PN, Mytas DZ, Katsaros AA, Andrikopoulos GK, Kallikazaros IE: Multiple cardiac metastases from a malignant melanoma. Eur J Echocardiogr; 2008 May;9(3):391-2
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  • [Title] Multiple cardiac metastases from a malignant melanoma.
  • Metastatic tumors in the pericardium or the heart are more common than primary tumors and their incidence has increased during the last decades due to the prolonged survival of patients with cancer and the increased prevalence of the disease in the general population.
  • He had a history of a malignant skin melanoma surgically removed 4 years ago.
  • The echo study identified multiple metastases in the heart involving the pericardium, the myocardium and the right atrium, where the tumor was mobile creating mechanical tricuspid valve stenosis.
  • Malignant metastasis was confirmed by pericardiocentesis and, although treatment with chemotherapy was promptly initiated, the patient died 4 months later.
  • Despite the difficulty in clinical diagnosis of cardiac melanoma, early detection has important therapeutic and prognostic implications.
  • Echocardiography is the most common diagnostic modality and transesophageal approach may be the technique of choice to image intracardiac metastatic tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / ultrasonography. Melanoma / ultrasonography. Skin Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17347051.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2114
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of echocardiography : the journal of the Working Group on Echocardiography of the European Society of Cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Echocardiogr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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17. Elliott KS, Borowsky ME, Bakdounes K, Huang J, Abulafia O, Lee YC: Malignant thymoma metastatic to the pelvis: a rare case and considerations for management. Gynecol Oncol; 2005 Oct;99(1):228-31

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant thymoma metastatic to the pelvis: a rare case and considerations for management.
  • BACKGROUND: Thymoma is the most common tumor of the anterior mediastinum.
  • Due to its relative rarity, its inconsistent clinical course and its frequent proximity to vital thoracic structures, management of this generally indolent tumor varies considerably.
  • We present an unusual case of recurrent thymoma metastatic to the pelvis and review treatment experience employing surgical, radiotherapeutic and medical modalities.
  • CASE REPORT: The present case is that of a 46-year-old woman with recurrent thymoma metastatic to a distal pelvic lymph node.
  • Resection of the pelvic recurrence followed many years of local and systemic treatment for her thoracic primary tumor.
  • Her case is unique for its involvement of pelvic anatomy and her clinical course marked by treatment-related congestive heart failure.
  • CONCLUSION: While the indolent clinical course of thyomoma frequently necessitates re-treatment and multi-modality therapy in patients suffering recurrences, treatment selection must take into account potential long-term morbidity and attendant quality of life.
  • When anatomically and technically feasible, resection of recurrent disease should be considered in attempts to avoid potential cumulative and long-term toxicity resultant from radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Pelvic Neoplasms / secondary. Thymoma / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16055177.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Haq B, Geyer CE: Role of trastuzumab in the adjuvant treatment of HER2-positive early breast cancer. Womens Health (Lond); 2009 Mar;5(2):135-47
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  • [Title] Role of trastuzumab in the adjuvant treatment of HER2-positive early breast cancer.
  • This novel transforming gene was identified in 1985, and in 1987 HER2 amplification was demonstrated to be central to the aggressive, malignant phenotype of these cancers and a significant predictor of both time to relapse and overall survival.
  • These observations led to the development of the first monoclonal antibody targeting the extracellular domain of HER2, trastuzumab (Herceptin, Genentech and Hoffman LaRoche, Switzerland), which was approved by the US FDA for metastatic breast cancer in 1998.
  • In 2005, results from four major trastuzumab adjuvant trials demonstrated a marked reduction in risk of recurrence, and trastuzumab is now an essential component of the adjuvant treatment of HER2-positive early breast cancer.
  • Concerns regarding cardiac safety and mechanisms of resistance to trastuzumab remain important issues and are being addressed in ongoing research efforts.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms / genetics. Genes, erbB-2
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Heart Failure / chemically induced. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Trastuzumab


19. Moreno Antón F, Casado Herraez A, Puente Vázquez J, Gómez Díaz R, Aragoncillo P, Díaz-Rubio García E: Cardiac metastasis from uterine leiomyosarcoma. Clin Transl Oncol; 2006 May;8(5):375-8
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  • [Title] Cardiac metastasis from uterine leiomyosarcoma.
  • Cardiac metastases are more frequent than primary heart neoplasias.
  • Nearly any malignant tumour may metastasize to the heart, but the most common are carcinomas rather than sarcomas.
  • We report the case of a patient who presented with heart metastasis 6 years after resection of an uterine leiomyosarcoma.
  • The patient died thirty months after surgical resection without evidence of cardiac recurrence.
  • Although cardiac metastases from uterine leiomyosarcoma are exceptional, they should be suspected in the presence of suggestive symptoms, since they can be associated with long survival after surgical treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Leiomyosarcoma / secondary. Uterine Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Diagnostic Errors. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Leiomyoma / diagnosis. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / surgery. Middle Aged. Ovariectomy. Taxoids / administration & dosage. Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted

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  • (PMID = 16760015.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-048X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Taxoids; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide; YF1K15M17Y / temozolomide
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20. Butany J, Nair V, Naseemuddin A, Nair GM, Catton C, Yau T: Cardiac tumours: diagnosis and management. Lancet Oncol; 2005 Apr;6(4):219-28
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cardiac tumours: diagnosis and management.
  • Primary cardiac tumours are rare, with an autopsy incidence ranging from 0.001% to 0.030%.
  • Metastases to the heart are far more common than primary cardiac tumours.
  • Primary cardiac tumours present with one or more of the symptoms of the classic triad of: cardiac symptoms and signs resulting from intracardiac obstruction; signs of systemic embolisation; and systemic or constitutional symptoms.
  • Whereas surgery is indicated in patients with benign tumours, systemic chemotherapy is indicated in those who have widespread or unresectable malignant disease, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy are usually combined in treatment of patients with primary cardiac lymphomas.
  • The prognosis after surgery is usually excellent in the case of benign tumours but is unfortunately still limited in localised malignant diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms
  • [MeSH-minor] Echocardiography. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Prognosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 15811617.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-2045
  • [Journal-full-title] The Lancet. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 57
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21. Moreno-Vega AL, Fuentes-Pradera J, Gordón-Santiago Mdel M, Vargas-Machuca JC: Intraventricular metastases from rectal-sigmoid adenocarcinoma. Clin Transl Oncol; 2006 Apr;8(4):296-7
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  • [Title] Intraventricular metastases from rectal-sigmoid adenocarcinoma.
  • Secondary cardiac tumours are rare.
  • The new diagnostic technology and more effective chemotherapy schedules for primary tumours, leading to a longer survival, have increased the frequency of such tumors.
  • Adenocarcinoma accounted for around 40% of all metastases to the heart; the most frequently involved sites are pericardium and epicardium.
  • We present a patient with an unusual intraventricular metastases from adenocarcinoma of rectal-sigmoid origin.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Rectal Neoplasms / pathology. Sigmoid Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Capecitabine. Cardiac Tamponade / etiology. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Dyspnea / etiology. Fatal Outcome. Female. Fluorouracil / analogs & derivatives. Heart Ventricles / diagnostic imaging. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Palliative Care. Radiography. Ultrasonography

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  • (PMID = 16648108.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-048X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 6804DJ8Z9U / Capecitabine; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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22. Rafajlovski S, Tatić V, Ilić S, Kanjuh V: [Frequency of metastatic tumors in the heart]. Vojnosanit Pregl; 2005 Dec;62(12):915-20

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Frequency of metastatic tumors in the heart].
  • INTRODUCTION: Secondary or metastatic tumors in the heart occur more frequently than primary ones, and, according to the published series, their frequency found in autopsic material ranges from 1.6% to 20.6%.
  • Metastatic tumors in the heart are rarely clinically symptomatic, and, therefore, they are rarely diagnosed within the lifetime.
  • The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of metastatic tumors of the heart, their primary localization, as well as the localization of the metastases found in the autopsic material within the period 1972-2004.
  • METHODS: During the autopsy of the patients died of metastatic tumors, we microscopically and macroscopically analyzed all the organs and tissues to determine the metastases of primary tumors in other organs, especially in the heart and pericardium.
  • In 2 928 (25.6%) out of 11 403 autopsies, the presence of malignant tumor was diagnosed, and in 79 (2.7%) of these cases, metastasis of the heart was found out.
  • Only in 5 of the cases, the presence of metastasis in the heart was diagnosed during the lifetime.
  • The most frequent metastases in the heart were caused by pulmonary carcinoma (18 cases), leukemia and malignant lymphoma (8 cases, each), then pancreatic and breast carcinoma, while the metastases of other carcinomas were rather rare.
  • In 40 (60.76%) cases, the metastasis was localized in the myocardium, but more often in the left ventricle, in 24 (30.38%) cases in the pericardium, in 4 cases in the epicardium and in the 3 of them in the mitral and tricuspid valve.
  • Only in one case of renal carcionoma, metastasis was found in the right atrium and it occurred by spreading (dissemination) through the lumen of the inferior vena cava.
  • CONCLUSION: Metastatic tumors of the heart are rather rare, and rarely clinically symptomatic, and, thus, rarely diagnosed during life.
  • The methods of choice for the diagnosis of the metastasis in the heart are echocardiography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, cytological analysis of the pericardial effusion and biopsy.
  • The treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / secondary

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  • (PMID = 16375220.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-8450
  • [Journal-full-title] Vojnosanitetski pregled
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vojnosanit Pregl
  • [Language] srp
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Serbia and Montenegro
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23. Debourdeau P, Gligorov J, Teixeira L, Aletti M, Zammit C: [Malignant cardiac tumors]. Bull Cancer; 2004 Nov;91 Suppl 3:136-46

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Malignant cardiac tumors].
  • [Transliterated title] Tumeurs cardiaques malignes.
  • Cardiac neoplasms are a rare occurrence in clinical practice.
  • The various frequencies of primary and secondary malignant tumors vary from report to report, approximately 1% in most autopsy series and 4% in cancer patient's autopsies.
  • Cardiac malignancies account for less 1% of cardiac surgery and about for 0.1% of cardiac echographic studies.
  • The presence of metastatic tumor to the heart usually indicates widespread metastases.
  • Lung carcinomas are the most commonly encountered tumor followed by breast and pancreas cancer and melanoma.
  • Apart from primary pericardial mesothelioma, primary cardiac tumors are high-grade sarcomas with a high metastatic potency that often becomes evident early after surgery.
  • Symptoms are non specific, occur late in the disease and affect few patients; especially secondary neoplasms of the heart take their course so fast that they cannot become symptomatic.
  • The signs of cardiac neoplasms are divided into systemic symptoms (fever, arthralgias and myalgias), cardiac symptoms (congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, chest pain) and uncommon embolisms.
  • Diagnosis is actually made easier with cardiac echography.
  • Cardiac RMI is helpful to estimate vessels and pericardium involvement.
  • Due to its poor prognosis, treatment of cardiac metastases is restricted to best supportive care.
  • For primary cardiac neoplasms, surgery must be carefully discussed because operative intervention is often followed by rapid widespread metastases that adjuvant chemotherapy cannot avoid in most cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms

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  • (PMID = 15899620.001).
  • [ISSN] 1769-6917
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin du cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull Cancer
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 53
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24. Maksym RB, Tarnowski M, Grymula K, Tarnowska J, Wysoczynski M, Liu R, Czerny B, Ratajczak J, Kucia M, Ratajczak MZ: The role of stromal-derived factor-1--CXCR7 axis in development and cancer. Eur J Pharmacol; 2009 Dec 25;625(1-3):31-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of stromal-derived factor-1--CXCR7 axis in development and cancer.
  • Cancer metastasis is a major clinical problem that contributes to unsuccessful therapy.
  • Augmenting evidence indicates that metastasizing cancer cells employ several mechanisms that are involved in developmental trafficking of normal stem cells.
  • The SDF-1-CXCR4 axis regulates trafficking of normal and malignant cells.
  • Based on the available literature, this review addresses the biological significance of SDF-1's interaction with CXCR7, which may act as a kind of decoy or signaling receptor depending on cell type.
  • Augmenting evidence suggests that CXCR7 is involved in several aspects of tumorogenesis and could become an important target for new anti-metastatic and anti-cancer drugs.

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  • (PMID = 19835865.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0712
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] None / None / / R01 CA106281-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA106281-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA10628; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK074720; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK074720-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA106281; None / None / / R01 DK074720-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / CXCR7 protein, human; 0 / Chemokine CXCL11; 0 / Chemokine CXCL12; 0 / Receptors, CXCR; 0 / Receptors, CXCR4
  • [Number-of-references] 99
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS152928; NLM/ PMC2783873
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25. Mazzoccoli G, Carughi S, La Viola M, De Cata A, Puzzolante F, Camagna A, Russo A, Caparrotti S: [Cardiac metastasis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of unknown primary site]. Ital Heart J Suppl; 2002 Nov;3(11):1112-6

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Cardiac metastasis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of unknown primary site].
  • [Transliterated title] Metastasi cardiache di adenocarcinoma poco differenziato a sede primitiva occulta.
  • Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple metastatic lesions, computed tomography of the chest, abdomen and pelvis showed intraatrial masses and whole body nuclear scanning evidenced bone lesion.
  • It was not possible to find the primary tumor by other instrumental or laboratory exams.
  • The patient was transferred to the operating room for cardiac surgery, the mass at risk for embolization was resected and the specimen consisted of fibrous and fibrino-necrotic tissue infiltrated by poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma.
  • The patient received brain and bone radiotherapy and chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbin.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Echocardiography. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 12506513.001).
  • [ISSN] 1129-4728
  • [Journal-full-title] Italian heart journal. Supplement : official journal of the Italian Federation of Cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ital Heart J Suppl
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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26. Rubiales AS, Reyes A, Renedo AF, Torrego JC, Puertas J, Marcos G: Heart metastases and superior vena cava syndrome. Clin Transl Oncol; 2007 Aug;9(8):540-2
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Superior vena cava syndrome.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Heart metastases and superior vena cava syndrome.
  • Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) may be due to a tumour infiltrating the right atrium.
  • The first one was secondary to solitary atrial metastases of rectal adenocarcinoma and benefited from palliative chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Atria. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Superior Vena Cava Syndrome / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, B-Cell / pathology. Radiography

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  • (PMID = 17720658.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-048X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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27. Stefanou D, Goussia AC, Arkoumani E, Metafratzi ZM, Syminelakis S, Arkoumani E, Agnantis NJ: Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the thymus: a case presentation and a literature review. Pathol Res Pract; 2004;200(7-8):567-73
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Thymus Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the thymus is an unusual, but well-recognized variant of thymic malignant tumors.
  • High grade tumors can be aggressive neoplasms with a tendency to invade and develop metastases.
  • As heart function tests were normal, the patient underwent radiologic examination, which showed a well-demarcated mass in the anterior mediastinum.
  • Histologic examination of the surgically resected mass showed features of a mucoepidermoid carcinoma with associated infiltration of the pleural tissue.
  • Postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy were performed, and the patient died two months after initial diagnosis.
  • In case of the absence of metastatic disease or other common primary neoplasms of the thymus, the diagnosis of a mucoepidermoid thymic carcinoma should be taken into consideration, although this tumor is rare.
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Pleura / pathology. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 15462505.001).
  • [ISSN] 0344-0338
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology, research and practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Res. Pract.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 11
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28. Díaz ML, Villanueva A, Bastarrika G, Zudaire B, del Barrio LG, Noguera JJ: Non-electrocardiogram-gated multidetector-row computed tomography findings of cardiac pathology in oncologic patients. Curr Probl Diagn Radiol; 2009 Sep-Oct;38(5):206-17
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Heart Diseases.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Non-electrocardiogram-gated multidetector-row computed tomography findings of cardiac pathology in oncologic patients.
  • Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) plays an essential role in oncologic imaging as the modality of mapping out the treatment strategy at staging, assessing response to the treatment, and following up patient outcome after the treatment.
  • Even without electrocardiogram gating, MDCT provides accurate information about the heart.
  • In the group of oncologic patients, different tumoral and non-tumoral-related heart disorders can be found, for example, metastatic cardiac involvement (approximately 10% of patients with lung or breast cancer will develop metastases to the heart), paraneoplastic cardiac disorders, non-tumor-related heart disorders, and chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-related cardiac side effects.
  • MDCT plays a role in the detection of these entities.
  • We show the non-electrocardiogram-gated MDCT findings of oncology-related cardiac disorders to encourage radiologists to recognize and report cardiac findings in oncologic patients.
  • Appropriate knowledge of tumoral and non-tumoral-related MDCT features allows a complete evaluation of oncologic patients with ancillary cardiac findings.
  • An adequate knowledge of the patient's medical history, previous treatments, and concomitant illnesses is essential to interpret heart findings in oncologic patients who undergo MDCT.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Diseases / complications. Heart Diseases / radiography. Heart Neoplasms / radiography. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasms / pathology. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoid Heart Disease / radiography. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / radiography. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Melanoma / radiography. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Pericardial Effusion / etiology. Pericardial Effusion / radiography. Pericardium. Prostatic Neoplasms / complications. Retrospective Studies

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - CT Scans.
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  • (PMID = 19632498.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-6302
  • [Journal-full-title] Current problems in diagnostic radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Probl Diagn Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 22
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29. Orcurto MV, Delaloye AB, Letovanec I, Martins Favre M, Prior JO: Detection of an asymptomatic right-ventricle cardiac metastasis from a small-cell lung cancer by F-18-FDG PET/CT. J Thorac Oncol; 2009 Jan;4(1):127-30
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lung Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Detection of an asymptomatic right-ventricle cardiac metastasis from a small-cell lung cancer by F-18-FDG PET/CT.
  • A right heart metastasis of a small-cell lung cancer was found on the whole-body F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-FDG-PET/CT) of a 69-year-old smoker investigated for a right pulmonary mass discovered on chest radiography after a fracture of the right humerus.
  • CT-guided lung biopsy revealed a small-cell lung cancer and myocardial biopsy confirmed the presence of a cardiac metastasis.
  • The patient was treated with six cycles of chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy, which included the heart lesion.
  • At follow-up PET/CT 2 months after the end of treatment, the abnormal cardiac uptake had disappeared, whereas increased FDG uptake persisted in the pulmonary residual mass.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Heart Ventricles / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Positron-Emission Tomography. Small Cell Lung Carcinoma / radionuclide imaging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Fatal Outcome. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Male. Radiopharmaceuticals

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  • (PMID = 19096320.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-1380
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of thoracic oncology : official publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Thorac Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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30. Helige C, Hofmann-Wellenhof R, Fink-Puches R, Smolle J: Mofarotene-induced inhibition of melanoma cell motility by increasing vinculin-containing focal contacts. Melanoma Res; 2004 Dec;14(6):547-54
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Tumour cell motility, which is dependent on the organization of the cytoskeleton, is considered to play an important role in the spread of malignant melanoma.
  • In this study, the effects of the arotinoid mofarotene on single cell motility and vinculin organization of the highly metastatic melanoma cell line K-1735-M2 were determined.
  • Cell movements were evaluated quantitatively from time-lapse video recordings using an IBAS image analysis system.
  • Vinculin distribution was evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy and a specially developed computerized image analysing program.
  • In addition, melanoma cell invasion was tested on the embryonic chick heart model.
  • Furthermore, the compound reduced the invasiveness of melanoma cells in a three-dimensional tissue culture model.
  • In conclusion, our data demonstrate that mofarotene, an already almost forgotten synthetic retinoid, shows interesting effects on melanoma cells, which may be relevant for a slowdown of tumour spread.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Movement / drug effects. Focal Adhesions / drug effects. Melanoma, Experimental / drug therapy. Morpholines / pharmacology. Retinoids / pharmacology. Vinculin / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Actins / metabolism. Animals. Cell Adhesion / drug effects. Chick Embryo. Chickens. Collagen / metabolism. Drug Combinations. Heart / drug effects. Laminin / metabolism. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / metabolism. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Mice. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Proteoglycans / metabolism. Skin Neoplasms. Spheroids, Cellular / drug effects. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 15577329.001).
  • [ISSN] 0960-8931
  • [Journal-full-title] Melanoma research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Melanoma Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Actins; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Laminin; 0 / Morpholines; 0 / Proteoglycans; 0 / Retinoids; 119978-18-6 / matrigel; 125361-02-6 / Vinculin; 8K3CVY8F8V / mofarotene; 9007-34-5 / Collagen
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31. Güray Y, Tuncel C, Sakaoğullari Z, Boyaci A, Birincioğlu L: Pulmonary stenosis due to metastatic malignant melanoma. Anadolu Kardiyol Derg; 2010 Feb;10(1):E3
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Melanoma.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pulmonary stenosis due to metastatic malignant melanoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / diagnosis. Melanoma / complications. Melanoma / drug therapy. Pulmonary Subvalvular Stenosis / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Dyspnea / etiology. Fatal Outcome. Heart Rate. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Pulmonary Embolism / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / complications. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Venous Thrombosis / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 20149994.001).
  • [ISSN] 1308-0032
  • [Journal-full-title] Anadolu kardiyoloji dergisi : AKD = the Anatolian journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anadolu Kardiyol Derg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
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