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1. Silva RG, Dahmoush L, Gerke H: Pancreatic metastasis of an ovarian malignant mixed Mullerian tumor identified by EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and Trucut needle biopsy. JOP; 2006;7(1):66-9
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  • [Title] Pancreatic metastasis of an ovarian malignant mixed Mullerian tumor identified by EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and Trucut needle biopsy.
  • CONTEXT: Malignant mixed Mullerian tumors are rare ovarian neoplasms that account for less than 2% of ovarian malignancies.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first report of a malignant mixed Mullerian tumor with metastasis to the pancreas.
  • The metastatic tumor was identified by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and Trucut needle biopsy of the pancreas.
  • CASE REPORT: We describe a 69-year-old female with concomitant Duke's C adenocarcinoma of the colon and stage III-C malignant mixed Mullerian tumor that presented with malignant ascites, increasing abdominal girth and a pancreatic head mass.
  • EUS revealed an 11 cm cystic mass in the head of the pancreas that was characterized as a carcinosarcoma/malignant mesodermal mixed tumor by EUS-FNA and Trucut needle biopsy.
  • The tumor was morphologically identical to the surgical specimen of her ovarian mass.
  • The patient was treated with palliative chemotherapy and a three-month follow up CT scan did not reveal any new metastatic lesions.
  • Although ovarian adenocarcinoma has been reported as a primary site of pancreatic metastasis, it has not been previously described originating from a mixed Mullerian tumor of the ovary presenting as a cystic pancreatic head mass.
  • [MeSH-major] Mixed Tumor, Mullerian / secondary. Ovarian Neoplasms / pathology. Pancreatic Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biopsy, Fine-Needle / methods. Endosonography. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Pancreas / pathology. Pancreas / radiography. Prognosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


2. Nahas CS, Akhurst T, Yeung H, Leibold T, Riedel E, Markowitz AJ, Minsky BD, Paty PB, Weiser MR, Temple LK, Wong WD, Larson SM, Guillem JG: Positron emission tomography detection of distant metastatic or synchronous disease in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Ann Surg Oncol; 2008 Mar;15(3):704-11
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  • [Title] Positron emission tomography detection of distant metastatic or synchronous disease in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving preoperative chemoradiation.
  • Choice of optimal treatment--neoadjuvant chemoradiation versus systemic chemotherapy alone--depends on accurate assessment of distant disease.
  • We prospectively evaluated the ability of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to detect distant disease in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were otherwise eligible for combined modality therapy (CMT).
  • Sites other than the rectum, mesorectum, or the area along the inferior mesenteric artery were considered distant and were divided into nine groups: neck, lung, mediastinal lymph node (LN), abdomen, liver, colon, pelvis, peripheral LN, and soft tissue.
  • A score greater than 3 was considered malignant.
  • Confirmation was based on tissue diagnosis, surgical exploration, and subsequent imaging.
  • Greatest accuracy was demonstrated in detection of liver (accuracy = 99.9%, sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 98.8%) and lung (accuracy = 99.9%, sensitivity = 80%, specificity = 100%) disease; PET detected 11/12 confirmed malignant sites in liver and lung.
  • All 10 were correctly staged by pre-CMT PET; abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scans accurately detected nine of them.
  • CONCLUSION: Baseline PET in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer reliably detects metastatic disease in liver and lung.
  • PET may play a significant role in defining extent of distant disease in selected cases, thus impacting the choice of neoadjuvant therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / radionuclide imaging. Positron-Emission Tomography. Rectal Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Rectal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Prospective Studies. Single-Blind Method

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  • [ErratumIn] Ann Surg Oncol. 2008 Apr;15(4):1265. Leibold, Tobias [added]
  • (PMID = 17882490.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-4681
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / R01 82534-01
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Ohana P, Schachter P, Ayesh B, Mizrahi A, Birman T, Schneider T, Matouk I, Ayesh S, Kuppen PJ, de Groot N, Czerniak A, Hochberg A: Regulatory sequences of H19 and IGF2 genes in DNA-based therapy of colorectal rat liver metastases. J Gene Med; 2005 Mar;7(3):366-74
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  • [Title] Regulatory sequences of H19 and IGF2 genes in DNA-based therapy of colorectal rat liver metastases.
  • BACKGROUND: Malignant tumors of the liver are among the most common causes of cancer-related death throughout the world.
  • Current therapeutic approaches fail to control the disease in most cases.
  • This study seeks to explore the potential utility of transcriptional regulatory sequences of the H19 and insulin growth factor 2 (IGF2) genes for directing tumor-selective expression of a toxin gene (A fragment of diphtheria toxin), delivered by non-viral vectors.
  • METHODS: The therapeutic potential of the toxin vectors driven by the H19 and the IGF2-P3 regulatory sequences was tested in a metastatic model of rat CC531 colon carcinoma in liver.
  • RESULTS: Intratumoral injection of these vectors into colon tumors implanted in the liver of rats induced an 88% and a 50% decrease respectively in the median tumor volume as compared with the control groups.
  • This therapeutic action was accompanied by increased necrosis of the tumor.
  • Importantly, no signs of toxicity were detected in healthy animals after their treatment by the toxin expression vectors.
  • CONCLUSIONS: DT-A was preferentially expressed in liver metastases after being transfected with H19 or IGF2-P3 promoter-driven DT-A expression plasmids, causing a very significant inhibition of tumor growth as a result of its cytotoxic effect.
  • Our findings strongly support the feasibility of our proposed therapeutic strategy, which may contribute to open new gene therapeutic options for human liver metastases.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms. DNA / metabolism. Genetic Therapy / methods. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Proteins / genetics. RNA, Untranslated / genetics. Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Genes, Reporter. Humans. Insulin-Like Growth Factor II. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis. RNA, Long Noncoding. Rats. Reproducibility of Results

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • (PMID = 15521051.001).
  • [ISSN] 1099-498X
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of gene medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gene Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / H19 long non-coding RNA; 0 / IGF2 protein, human; 0 / Proteins; 0 / RNA, Long Noncoding; 0 / RNA, Untranslated; 67763-97-7 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor II; 9007-49-2 / DNA
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4. Azab AK, Kleinstern J, Srebnik M, Rubinstein A: The metastatic stage-dependent mucosal expression of sialic acid is a potential marker for targeting colon cancer with cationic polymers. Pharm Res; 2008 Feb;25(2):379-86
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The metastatic stage-dependent mucosal expression of sialic acid is a potential marker for targeting colon cancer with cationic polymers.
  • PURPOSE: Locoregional recurrence is the most common complication after adenocarcinoma resection in the colon, despite adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Therapy efficacy could be improved if designed to target malignant cells by incorporating specific recognition factors in the drugs or the drug vehicles.
  • The aim of this study was to elucidate whether the overexpression of sialic acid (SA) on colonic malignant tissues could be utilized for drug targeting by cationic polymers.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cell lines (IEC-6, SW-480 and SW-620) and colon polyps and normal adjacent tissues harvested from dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced rats were used as in vitro and in vivo models of different metastatic stages of colon cancer.
  • The binding of FITC labeled cationic polymers of various degrees of cationization to normal and malignant colonic cells and tissue was measured.
  • RESULTS: SA was overexpressed on malignant colonic cells and tissues, and its expression correlated to the metastatic stage in vitro.
  • The binding of the cationic copolymers to the cell lines and tissues correlated with the charge density of the polymer and with the metastatic stage of the cell line.
  • The interaction between the malignant colonic cells and tissues with the polymers was SA dependent and increased after mucus removal.
  • CONCLUSION: Cationic polymers could be used as a targeting tool to colonic malignant epithelium, to be implemented in drug delivery and diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Acrylamides / pharmacology. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. N-Acetylneuraminic Acid / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. Intestinal Mucosa / metabolism. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Rats. Wheat Germ Agglutinins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17960470.001).
  • [ISSN] 0724-8741
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmaceutical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharm. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Acrylamides; 0 / Wheat Germ Agglutinins; GZP2782OP0 / N-Acetylneuraminic Acid
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5. Lloyd JM, McIver CM, Stephenson SA, Hewett PJ, Rieger N, Hardingham JE: Identification of early-stage colorectal cancer patients at risk of relapse post-resection by immunobead reverse transcription-PCR analysis of peritoneal lavage fluid for malignant cells. Clin Cancer Res; 2006 Jan 15;12(2):417-23
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  • [Title] Identification of early-stage colorectal cancer patients at risk of relapse post-resection by immunobead reverse transcription-PCR analysis of peritoneal lavage fluid for malignant cells.
  • PURPOSE: Colorectal cancer patients diagnosed with stage I or II disease are not routinely offered adjuvant chemotherapy following resection of the primary tumor.
  • However, up to 10% of stage I and 30% of stage II patients relapse within 5 years of surgery from recurrent or metastatic disease.
  • The aim of this study was to determine if tumor-associated markers could detect disseminated malignant cells and so identify a subgroup of patients with early-stage colorectal cancer that were at risk of relapse.
  • Immunobead reverse transcription-PCR of five tumor-associated markers (carcinoembryonic antigen, laminin gamma2, ephrin B4, matrilysin, and cytokeratin 20) was used to detect the presence of colon tumor cells in peripheral blood and within the peritoneal cavity of colon cancer patients perioperatively.
  • A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was done to determine whether detection of tumor cells was an independent prognostic marker for disease relapse.
  • RESULTS: Overall, 41 of 125 (32.8%) early-stage patients were positive for disseminated tumor cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Ascitic Fluid / pathology. Carcinoembryonic Antigen / blood. Carcinoembryonic Antigen / genetics. Female. Humans. Keratin-20. Keratins / blood. Keratins / genetics. Laminin / blood. Laminin / genetics. Male. Matrix Metalloproteinase 7 / blood. Matrix Metalloproteinase 7 / genetics. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Peritoneal Lavage. Prognosis. RNA, Messenger / analysis. Receptors, Eph Family / blood. Receptors, Eph Family / genetics. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Risk Factors. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 16428481.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen; 0 / KRT20 protein, human; 0 / Keratin-20; 0 / LAMC2 protein, human; 0 / Laminin; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 68238-35-7 / Keratins; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptors, Eph Family; EC 3.4.24.23 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 7
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6. Plotnikov A, Tichler T, Korenstein R, Keisari Y: Involvement of the immune response in the cure of metastatic murine CT-26 colon carcinoma by low electric field-enhanced chemotherapy. Int J Cancer; 2005 Dec 10;117(5):816-24
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  • [Title] Involvement of the immune response in the cure of metastatic murine CT-26 colon carcinoma by low electric field-enhanced chemotherapy.
  • Low electric field cancer treatment-enhanced chemotherapy (LEFCT-EC) is a new treatment modality that combines chemotherapeutic agents and low electric field stimulation.
  • LEFCT-EC was found to destroy malignant mouse tumors and cause massive death of tumor cells.
  • This may enable the immune system cells to efficiently recognize and eliminate tumor cells at the primary tumor site and at metastatic foci.
  • Mice with 15 mm diameter intracutaneous colon carcinomas (CT-26) were injected with BCNU (35 mg/kg), and 2 min later the tumors were exposed to low electric fields (intensity 40 V/cm, pulse duration 180 micros, frequency 500 Hz) for 12 min (LEFCT-EC).
  • We found that treatment with LEFCT-EC achieved complete cure of 93% of the animals.
  • In comparison, electric fields alone (13% cure), chemotherapy alone (0%), surgery (15%) or a combination of surgery and bis-chloroethyl-nitrosurea, carmustine (BCNU; 84%) treatments resulted in lower cure rates.
  • After treatment and cure with LEFCT-EC, 50% of the cured mice developed resistance to a tumor challenge (surgery + BCNU only 15%).
  • Furthermore, splenocytes from cured animals protected naive animals from a tumorigenic dose of tumor cells.
  • FACS analysis revealed restoration of normal splenocyte subpopulation proportions impaired by cytotoxic chemotherapy.
  • Our results suggest that LEFCT-EC can directly destroy primary tumors and facilitate the destruction of metastatic disease by enforcement of antitumor immune responses.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Carmustine / therapeutic use. Colonic Neoplasms / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Flow Cytometry. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Neoplasm Metastasis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc
  • (PMID = 15981217.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; U68WG3173Y / Carmustine
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7. Pahlavan PS, Kanthan R: Goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix. World J Surg Oncol; 2005 Jun 20;3:36
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  • BACKGROUND: Goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) of the appendix is a rare neoplasm that share histological features of both adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor.
  • While its malignant potential remains unclear, GCC's are more aggressive than conventional carcinoid.
  • The clinical presentations of this neoplasm are also varied.
  • The focus is on its diagnosis, histopathological aspects, clinical manifestations, and management.
  • Accurate diagnosis of this neoplasm requires astute observations within an acutely inflamed appendix as this neoplasm has a prominent pattern of submucosal growth and usually lacks the formation of a well-defined tumor mass.
  • The mesoappendix was involved in 21.64% followed by perineural involvement in 2.06%.
  • The most common surgical treatment of choice was appendectomy with right hemicolectomy in 34.70% followed by simple appendectomy in 24.57%.
  • Concomitant distant metastasis at diagnosis was present in 11.16% of patients with the ovaries being the most common site in 3.60% followed by disseminated abdominal carcinomatosis in 1.03%.
  • Local lymph node involvement was seen in 8.76% of patients at the time of diagnosis.
  • GCC's of the appendix remains a neoplasm of unpredictable biological behavior and thus warrants lifelong surveillance for recurrence of the disease upon diagnosis and successful surgical extirpation.
  • CONCLUSION: GCC of the appendix is a rare neoplasm.
  • Due to its wide range of presentation, this tumor should be considered as a possible diagnosis in many varied situations leading to abdominal surgery.
  • The advocated plan of management recommended for patients with tumors that involve the adjacent caecum or with high-grade tumors with histological features such as an increased mitotic rate involve initial appendectomy with completion right hemicolectomy due to the high possibility of local recurrence with intraperitoneal seeding prior to lymph node involvement and a 20% risk of metastatic behavior.
  • In cases with obvious spread of the disease chemotherapy, mostly with 5-FU and leucovorin is advised.
  • Cytoreductive surgery with adjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy can offer improved survival in cases with advanced peritoneal dissemination.

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  • (PMID = 15967038.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-7819
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1182398
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8. Moozar KL, Wong CS, Couture J: Anorectal malignant melanoma: treatment with surgery or radiation therapy, or both. Can J Surg; 2003 Oct;46(5):345-9
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  • [Title] Anorectal malignant melanoma: treatment with surgery or radiation therapy, or both.
  • INTRODUCTION: Anorectal malignant tumours are increasing in frequency for unknown reasons.
  • Surgery is the principal treatment, and the role of adjuvant therapy has not been defined.
  • METHODS: We reviewed the charts of all registered patients with anorectal malignant melanoma (AMM) treated with surgery or radiotherapy, or both, at the hospital between 1980 and 1999, paying particular attention to survival, and local and distant recurrences.
  • RESULTS: There were 14 patients, all of whom were followed up to the time of death or for a minimum of 28 months for surviving patients.
  • The mean ages at diagnosis were 56 years for men and 68 years for women.
  • Clinical staging was as follows: local, 10 patients; locoregional, 3 patients and metastatic disease, 1 patient.
  • Local therapy included local resection alone in 7 cases and abdominoperineal resection in 7.
  • Seven patients received pelvic irradiation at some time during their disease, using different doses and fractionation schemes.
  • Three of them had concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy with no tumour regression.
  • Six patients were alive 1 year after treatment (median survival 32.5 mo [range from 21-51 mo]).
  • Eleven of the 12 patients who died had metastatic disease.
  • The overall survival was poor regardless of local treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / therapy. Melanoma / therapy. Rectal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Colostomy. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose Fractionation. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Palliative Care. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Reoperation. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 14577706.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-428X
  • [Journal-full-title] Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3211713
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9. Kinuya S, Kawashima A, Yokoyama K, Kudo M, Kasahara Y, Watanabe N, Shuke N, Bunko H, Michigishi T, Tonami N: Anti-angiogenic therapy and radioimmunotherapy in colon cancer xenografts. Eur J Nucl Med; 2001 Sep;28(9):1306-12
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  • [Title] Anti-angiogenic therapy and radioimmunotherapy in colon cancer xenografts.
  • Angiogenesis is critical to the growth and metastatic process of malignant tumors.
  • Experimental RIT with 4.63 MBq of 131I-A7, an IgG1 anti-colorectal monoclonal antibody, was conducted in mice xenografted with LS 180 human colon cancer cells.
  • 2-ME administration suppressed tumor growth and improved the efficacy of RIT in comparison to RIT alone.
  • Tumor volumes on day 13, expressed as a ratio relative to the initial volume, were 12.7 +/- 2.95 in the nontreated control, 4.73 +/- 0.89 with 2-ME, 3.05 +/- 0.37 with RIT and 0.97 +/- 0.20 with RIT+2-ME.
  • Immunohistochemistry of tumor sections stained with an antibody against factor VIII demonstrated a decrease in microvessel number within tumors treated with 2-ME (7.9 +/- 0.8/200x field) as compared with that in control tumors (29.9 +/- 2.5).
  • Cell proliferation assay at increasing concentrations of 2-ME showed direct cytotoxicity of 2-ME in vitro at 5 microM and greater.
  • The direct cytotoxicity of 2-ME appears to have contributed to this improvement.
  • Anti-angiogenic therapy may prolong the dormancy of microscopic metastases while RIT may exterminate this population of cells.
  • Therefore, the combined treatment may improve the therapeutic outcome of patients with disseminated cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Colonic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Estradiol / analogs & derivatives. Estradiol / therapeutic use. Radioimmunotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Cell Division / drug effects. Cell Survival / drug effects. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. In Vitro Techniques. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Transplantation. Tumor Cells, Cultured / drug effects. Tumor Cells, Cultured / pathology. Tumor Stem Cell Assay

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  • (PMID = 11585288.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-6997
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of nuclear medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Nucl Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol; 6I2QW73SR5 / 2-methoxyestradiol
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10. Sakakibara T, Kurasawa T, Narumi K, Kamano T, Tsurumaru M: T-cell malignant lymphoma of the ileum causing ileac fistulas: report of a case. Surg Today; 2002;32(6):536-40
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  • [Title] T-cell malignant lymphoma of the ileum causing ileac fistulas: report of a case.
  • We herein present a rare case of three fistulas caused by a recurrence of T-cell lymphoma of the ileum.
  • Upper and lower gastrointestinal examinations did not reveal any abnormal findings, but an abdominal aortic aneurysm was diagnosed by computed tomography, and thus was determined to be the source of the pain.
  • The patient was referred to our hospital to undergo a grafting operation; however, a laparotomy performed in July 1997 revealed an unexpected small intestinal tumor, and therefore a partial ileectomy between 15 and 70cm in an oral direction from the terminal ileum was carried out instead.
  • Histopathological and genetic examinations demonstrated diffuse small malignant lymphocytic T-cell lymphomas of the ileum invading all layers.
  • Metastasis of the facial skin and local recurrence were recognized 5 months later, and chemotherapy with THP-COP and ESHAP only resulted in progressive disease.
  • An autopsy revealed three fistulas caused by metastatic tumors, one of which communicated with the duodenum from the ileum, one with the skin from the ileum, and one to the transverse colon from the ileum.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local

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  • (PMID = 12107782.001).
  • [ISSN] 0941-1291
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgery today
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg. Today
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Number-of-references] 10
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11. Yeg├╝ez JF, Martinez SA, Sands DR, Sands LR, Hellinger MD: Colorectal malignancies in HIV-positive patients. Am Surg; 2003 Nov;69(11):981-7
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  • Due to the development of more effective medications, those infected with HIV are living longer.
  • A retrospective review of HIV/AIDS patients with colorectal malignant tumors was undertaken.
  • We included adult patients, with ELISA and Western blot test positive for HIV, and primary malignant tumors located in the colon or rectum.
  • Malignant neoplasms of the anus were excluded for the purposes of this study.
  • Twelve patients (9 males and 3 females), mean age 41 years, were identified with the following neoplasm: 6 adenocarcinomas (ACA), 5 non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), and 1 small-cell carcinoma.
  • Intravenous drug abuse was the main risk factor for HIV.
  • No patient had identified risk factors for colorectal neoplasm.
  • Five out of six patients with ACA had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis.
  • One patient with stage II ACA developed early liver metastases after colonic resection.
  • These patients developed tumors at earlier ages and were diagnosed at an advanced stage.
  • The use of the new antiretroviral therapy regimens should be further evaluated to know its impact in the survival.


12. Djeu JY, Wei S: Clusterin and chemoresistance. Adv Cancer Res; 2009;105:77-92
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  • Resistance to anticancer agents is one of the primary impediments to effective cancer therapy.
  • Chemoresistance occurs not only to clinically established therapeutic agents but also to novel targeted therapeutics.
  • Both intrinsic and acquired mechanisms have been implicated in drug resistance but it remains controversial which mechanisms are responsible that lead to failure of therapy in cancer patients.
  • Its role has been documented in prostate cancer for paclitaxel/docetaxel resistance as well as in renal, breast, and lung tumor cells.
  • Moreover, it is abnormally upregulated in numerous advanced stage and metastatic cancers spanning prostate, renal, bladder, breast, head and neck, colon, cervical, pancreatic, lung carcinomas, melanoma, and lymphoma.
  • Resistance to targeted death-inducing molecules, tumor necrosis factor, Fas and TRAIL, or histone deacetylase inhibitors can also be mediated by sCLU.
  • Expression of sCLU may be an adaptive response to genotoxic and oxidative stresses but this adaptive response could pose a threat in malignant cells being treated with cytotoxic agents by enhancing their survival potential.
  • The actual mechanisms for sCLU induction are unclear but STAT1 is required for its constitutive upregulation in docetaxel-resistant tumor cells.
  • Thus, sCLU has a key role in preventing apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents and has the potential to be targeted for cancer therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Clusterin / physiology. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Resistance, Multiple. Humans. Oxidative Stress

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  • (PMID = 19879424.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-230X
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA098080
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CLU protein, human; 0 / Clusterin
  • [Number-of-references] 78
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS539156; NLM/ PMC3889866
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13. Srivastava K, Singh S, Srivastava M, Srivastava AN: Incisional skin metastasis of a squamous cell cervical carcinoma 3.5 years after radical treatment--a case report. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2005 Nov-Dec;15(6):1183-6
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  • [Title] Incisional skin metastasis of a squamous cell cervical carcinoma 3.5 years after radical treatment--a case report.
  • Metastatic carcinoma in an abdominal wall incision from internal malignant neoplasm is an uncommon and often a preterminal event.
  • Most commonly metastatic skin incisional cancers have been reported with cancers of colon, kidney, and bladder.
  • We report a postoperative case of squamous cell carcinoma cervix FIGO stage IIA in a patient who after 3.5 years of completion of radical treatment (postoperative external and intravaginal radiation therapy) developed incisional skin metastasis followed by extensive subcutaneous metastasis in the vulval region.
  • She received salvage chemotherapy; however, she did not show any response and finally succumbed to the disease.
  • The intent of treatment remains palliation either by radiation/chemotherapy/surgery alone or in combinations.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / secondary. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Fatal Outcome. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Gynecologic Surgical Procedures. Humans. Radiotherapy


14. Osei DA, Alvandi F, Brooks JS, Ogilvie CM: PEComa of the Upper Extremity: A Unique Case and Description of an Initial Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy. Sarcoma; 2007;2007:53056
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  • [Title] PEComa of the Upper Extremity: A Unique Case and Description of an Initial Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.
  • Purpose. Tumors of the perivascular epithelial cell tumor (PEComa), first described in 1992, represent a rare soft tissue neoplasm of varying malignant potential.
  • To date, most malignant cases of PEComa have been resistant to chemotherapy, and as such, an appropriate therapy is not known.
  • Open biopsy revealed a high-grade malignant lesion, and the patient subsequently underwent both neoadjuvant therapy with doxorubicin, ifosfamide and mensa, and radiation therapy prior to wide surgical resection.
  • After six cycles of chemotherapy, the tumor underwent an 80% reduction in size.
  • Subsequent neoadjuvant radiation therapy of 5000 cGy did not further reduce the size of the tumor.
  • Following limb sparing radical resection, pathology showed 20% necrosis within a high-grade malignant lesion.
  • Twenty one months after beginning treatment, the patient shows no sign of local recurrence, but metastatic disease was confirmed after resection of a lung nodule.
  • Conclusion. Given the favorable albeit partial response seen in this patient, the course of therapy outlined here may represent a good starting point for neoadjuvant treatment in a tumor with a historically bleak prognosis.
  • In addition, the diagnosis of PEComa must now be entertained in the differential diagnosis of upper extremity soft tissue sarcoma.

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  • (PMID = 18274609.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-714X
  • [Journal-full-title] Sarcoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sarcoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2225462
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15. Catani M, De Milito R, Simi M: [New orientations in the management of advanced, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST): combination of surgery and systemic therapy with imatinib in a case of primary gastric location]. Chir Ital; 2005 Jan-Feb;57(1):127-33
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  • [Title] [New orientations in the management of advanced, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST): combination of surgery and systemic therapy with imatinib in a case of primary gastric location].
  • [Transliterated title] Nuovi orientamenti nella cura dei tumori stromali gastroenterici (GIST) avanzati e metastatici: trattamento combinato intervento chirurgico-terapia sistemica con imatinib in un caso a localizzazione primitiva gastrica.
  • Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are rare neoplasms originating from connective tissue in the digestive tract with an incidence of less than 1% and account for most non-epithelial primitive digestive tumours.
  • Metastasis diagnosed at the time of disease discovery confirms GIST malignancy.
  • Resistance to conventional chemotherapy is commonly shown by malignant GIST.
  • Most patients with advanced malignant GIST achieve clinical benefit with imatinib mesilate, an orally administered selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase receptor.
  • At the time of the first operation the patient had lost 10 kg body weight over the previous months and was seriously cachectic.
  • Considering the action mechanism of imatinib and the extent of the lesion we decided to perform a total gastrectomy procedure.
  • At the time of the operation the stomach seemed to have a modified volume and shape: it appeared to be divided into two sacs, the larger and deeper of which was the original gastric cavity, while the superficial, smaller one seemed to be a protrusion of the organ.
  • The stomach was indistinguishable from the spleen, the transverse colon and the distal pancreatic tract.
  • The neoplasm was directly linked to the left liver and to the inferior diaphragmatic surface.
  • We performed total gastrectomy and resection of the tail of the pancreas, the spleen, and the transverse colon all in one and the same session.
  • The patient was discharged on postoperative day 8 and commenced imatinib therapy 30 days after the operation with 4 tablets per day.
  • One year after the operation the outcome appears to be lasting and the patient has tolerated the drug treatment well.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Gastrectomy. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors / therapy. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Stomach Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Benzamides. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Male. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15832750.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-4773
  • [Journal-full-title] Chirurgia italiana
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chir Ital
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate
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16. Cambien B, Karimdjee BF, Richard-Fiardo P, Bziouech H, Barthel R, Millet MA, Martini V, Birnbaum D, Scoazec JY, Abello J, Al Saati T, Johnson MG, Sullivan TJ, Medina JC, Collins TL, Schmid-Alliana A, Schmid-Antomarchi H: Organ-specific inhibition of metastatic colon carcinoma by CXCR3 antagonism. Br J Cancer; 2009 Jun 2;100(11):1755-64
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  • [Title] Organ-specific inhibition of metastatic colon carcinoma by CXCR3 antagonism.
  • Recent research has indicated that CXCR3/chemokines interactions that orchestrate haematopoetic cell movement are implicated in the metastatic process of malignant tumours, including that of CRC cells to lymph nodes.
  • In vivo, systemic CXCR3 antagonism by preventive or curative treatments with AMG487 markedly inhibited the implantation and the growth of human and mouse CRC cells within lung without affecting that in the liver.
  • Altogether, our findings indicate that activation of CXCR3 receptors by its cognate ligands facilitates the implantation and the progression of CRC cells within lung tissues and that inhibition of this axis decreases pulmonary metastasis of CRC in two murine tumour models.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Movement. Humans. Ligands. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / metabolism. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / metabolism. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Mice. Neoplasm Transplantation. Organ Specificity. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 19436305.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Ligands; 0 / Receptors, CXCR3
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2695685
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17. Wolpin BM, Mayer RJ: Systemic treatment of colorectal cancer. Gastroenterology; 2008 May;134(5):1296-310
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  • [Title] Systemic treatment of colorectal cancer.
  • Over the past 12 years, significant progress has been made in the systemic treatment of this malignant condition.
  • Six new chemotherapeutic agents have been introduced, increasing median overall survival for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from less than 9 months with no treatment to approximately 24 months.
  • For patients with stage III (lymph node positive) colon cancer, an overall survival benefit for fluorouracil-based chemotherapy has been firmly established, and recent data have shown further efficacy for the inclusion of oxaliplatin in such adjuvant treatment programs.
  • For patients with stage II colon cancer, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial, but may be appropriate in a subset of individuals at higher risk for disease recurrence.
  • Ongoing randomized clinical trials are evaluating how best to combine currently available therapies, while smaller studies are evaluating new agents, with the goal of continued progress in prolonging life among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and increasing cure rates among those with resectable disease.

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  • (PMID = 18471507.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0012
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009172-34; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / IP50CA127003-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA009172-34; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009172; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32CA09001
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 0 / Prodrugs; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; 7673326042 / irinotecan; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
  • [Number-of-references] 182
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS58868; NLM/ PMC2528832
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18. Garin L, Corbinais S, Boucher E, Blanchot J, Le Guilcher P, Raoul JL: Adenocarcinoid of the appendix vermiformis: complete and persistent remission after chemotherapy (folfox) of a metastatic case. Dig Dis Sci; 2002 Dec;47(12):2760-2
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adenocarcinoid of the appendix vermiformis: complete and persistent remission after chemotherapy (folfox) of a metastatic case.
  • All pathology specimens exhibited an adenocarcinomatous component associated with carcinoid proliferation related to an appendicular tumor leading to the diagnosis of appendicular adenocarcinoid with ovarian, peritoneal, and nodal metastases.
  • Chemotherapy (Folfox 4 regimen) was given, and the patient improved within six weeks.
  • Presently, more than three years after the end of the treatment, the patient is still alive and in complete remission.
  • Prognosis is intermediate between adenocarcinoma and malignant carcinoid.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Appendiceal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Leucovorin / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Organoplatinum Compounds. Ovarian Neoplasms / secondary

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  • (PMID = 12498298.001).
  • [ISSN] 0163-2116
  • [Journal-full-title] Digestive diseases and sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dig. Dis. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; Folfox protocol
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19. Hornick JL, Jaffe ES, Fletcher CD: Extranodal histiocytic sarcoma: clinicopathologic analysis of 14 cases of a rare epithelioid malignancy. Am J Surg Pathol; 2004 Sep;28(9):1133-44
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  • Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm that occurs in lymph nodes, skin, and the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Seven tumors arose in soft tissue (6 lower limb; 1 upper limb), 5 in the gastrointestinal tract (1 involving both stomach and colon, 1 ileum, 2 rectum, 1 anus), 1 in the nasal cavity, and 1 in the lung.
  • Binucleated cells were common, and 6 cases contained tumor giant cells.
  • Six patients were treated with postoperative radiation and 7 with chemotherapy (CHOP or ProMACE-MOPP).
  • Two tumors recurred locally, and 5 patients developed distant spread: 3 to lymph nodes, 1 to lung, and 1 to bone.
  • At the last follow-up, 2 patients have died of disseminated disease, 4 and 5 months following initial diagnosis.
  • Histiocytic sarcoma may arise primarily in soft tissue and shows reproducible histologic features, including abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm and a prominent inflammatory infiltrate.
  • Metastatic carcinoma, metastatic melanoma, and large cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas should be excluded by immunohistochemistry.
  • Tumor size may be a prognostic factor.


20. Ishii M, Iwai M, Harada Y, Kishida T, Asada H, Shin-Ya M, Itoh Y, Imanishi J, Okanoue T, Mazda O: Soluble TRAIL gene and actinomycin D synergistically suppressed multiple metastasis of TRAIL-resistant colon cancer in the liver. Cancer Lett; 2007 Jan 8;245(1-2):134-43
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  • [Title] Soluble TRAIL gene and actinomycin D synergistically suppressed multiple metastasis of TRAIL-resistant colon cancer in the liver.
  • Metastatic liver tumors are highly malignant and refractory to conventional therapies.
  • Co-administration of soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL) gene and ACD suppressed the metastatic liver tumors of CT-26, significantly inducing apoptosis in the tumors, while such effects were not demonstrated in mice that received either the sTRAIL gene or ACD alone.
  • The gene therapy of sTRAIL with a suboptimal dose of an anticancer drug is a new strategy for treatment of multiple liver metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / therapy. Dactinomycin / pharmacology. Liver Neoplasms / therapy. TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis / genetics. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cell Survival / genetics. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Drug Synergism. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Mice. Microscopy, Fluorescence. Neoplasms, Experimental / genetics. Neoplasms, Experimental / pathology. Neoplasms, Experimental / therapy. Plasmids. Protein Synthesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Solubility. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 16478647.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-3835
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protein Synthesis Inhibitors; 0 / TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 1CC1JFE158 / Dactinomycin
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21. Lee SC, Wu CJ, Wu PY, Huang YL, Wu CW, Tao MH: Inhibition of established subcutaneous and metastatic murine tumors by intramuscular electroporation of the interleukin-12 gene. J Biomed Sci; 2003 Jan-Feb;10(1):73-86
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Inhibition of established subcutaneous and metastatic murine tumors by intramuscular electroporation of the interleukin-12 gene.
  • Intramuscular EP of pIL-12 resulted in complete regression or substantial inhibition of 38C13 B-cell lymphoma, whereas pIL-12 delivered by gene gun or intramuscular injection without EP showed little therapeutic effect.
  • Impressive antitumor activity by intramuscular EP was also demonstrated in animals with advanced malignant disease.
  • At day 14 after 38C13 tumor inoculation, all animals were found to carry large tumors and to have metastases; without treatment, most died within a week.
  • Moreover, animals that were previously cured of 38C13 tumors by in vivo EP treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth when challenged 60 days later.
  • In vivo EP of the IL-12 gene was also effective in suppressing subcutaneous and lung metastatic tumors of CT-26 colon adenocarcinoma and B16F1 melanoma cells.
  • Together, these results show that intramuscular electrotransfer of the IL-12 gene may represent a simple and effective strategy for cancer treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Genetic Therapy / methods. Interleukin-12 / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Metastasis / prevention & control. Neoplasms, Experimental / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Electroporation. Female. Lung Neoplasms / prevention & control. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Mice. Mice, Inbred Strains. Muscle, Skeletal. Survival Rate. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 12566989.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-7770
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of biomedical science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biomed. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 187348-17-0 / Interleukin-12
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22. Curtis BR, Kaliszewski J, Marques MB, Saif MW, Nabelle L, Blank J, McFarland JG, Aster RH: Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to oxaliplatin. Am J Hematol; 2006 Mar;81(3):193-8
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  • Thrombocytopenia developing in the course of chemotherapy for malignant disease is usually attributed to drug-induced marrow suppression and/or marrow replacement by tumor.
  • We describe two patients who developed severe thrombocytopenia and hemorrhagic symptoms while being treated with oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and leukovorin for metastatic colon cancer in whom platelet destruction appears to have been caused by oxaliplatin-dependent antibodies specific for the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa complex (alpha(IIb)/beta(3) integrin).
  • Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) should be considered in patients who experience a sudden, isolated drop in platelet levels while being treated with chemotherapeutic agents, especially when adequate numbers of megakaryocytes are present in the bone marrow.

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  • (PMID = 16493620.001).
  • [ISSN] 0361-8609
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Hematol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL013629; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-13629
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Autoantibodies; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; 12001-76-2 / Vitamin B Complex; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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23. Micke P, Ostman A: Tumour-stroma interaction: cancer-associated fibroblasts as novel targets in anti-cancer therapy? Lung Cancer; 2004 Aug;45 Suppl 2:S163-75
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tumour-stroma interaction: cancer-associated fibroblasts as novel targets in anti-cancer therapy?
  • Stroma cells, together with extracellular matrix components, provide the microenvironment that is pivotal for cancer cell growth, invasion and metastatic progression.
  • Characteristic stroma alterations accompany or even precede the malignant conversion of epithelial cells.
  • Seminal functional studies in various cancer types, including breast, colon, prostate and lung cancer, have confirmed the concept that fibroblasts can determine the fate of the epithelial cell, since they are able to promote malignant conversion as well as to revert tumour cells to a normal phenotype.
  • Finally, a laser-capture- and microarray-based approach is presented, which comprehensively characterises carcinoma-associated fibroblasts in their in vivo environment for the identification of potential targets for anti-cancer therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Fibroblasts / drug effects. Fibroblasts / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Stromal Cells / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Epithelial Cells / drug effects. Epithelial Cells / pathology. Humans. Muscle Cells / drug effects. Muscle Cells / pathology. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Metastasis. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor / metabolism. Transforming Growth Factor beta / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15552797.001).
  • [ISSN] 0169-5002
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Platelet-Derived Growth Factor; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta
  • [Number-of-references] 140
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24. Manuelli M, De Luca L, Iaria G, Tatangelo P, Sforza D, Perrone L, Bellini MI, Angelico R, Anselmo A, Tisone G: Conversion to rapamycin immunosuppression for malignancy after kidney transplantation. Transplant Proc; 2010 May;42(4):1314-6
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  • INTRODUCTION: Malignancies are a well-known complication of immunosuppressive therapy among renal transplant recipients, representing an important cause of long-term morbidity and mortality.
  • Rapamycin has been shown to limit the proliferation of a number of malignant cell lines in vivo and in vitro.
  • METHODS: Fifteen patients developed the following malignancies at a mean of 90.3 months (range = 10-252) after kidney transplantation: metastatic gastric cancer (n = 1), metastatic colon cancer (n = 1), bilateral nephrourothelioma (n = 1), skin cancer (n = 2), Kaposi's sarcoma (n = 2), posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD; n = 4), renal cell carcinoma T1 (n = 1), MALT lymphoma (n = 1), intramucous colon carcinoma (n = 1), liposarcoma of the spermatic cord (n = 1).
  • After the diagnosis of malignancy, the patients were switched from calcineurin inhibitor-based immunosuppression to rapamycin (monotherapy, n = 3), or associated with steroids (n = 6) or with mycophenolate mofetil (n = 6).
  • RESULTS: Both patients with metastatic cancer underwent chemotherapy but succumbed after 6 and 13 months.
  • Two patients with PTLD who underwent chemotherapy died after 12 and 36 months.
  • Renal graft function remained stable in all other patients from diagnosis throughout follow-up.
  • Nevertheless, it is difficult to assess whether tumor regression was due to rapamycin treatment or to the reduced immunosuppression.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation / immunology. Neoplasms / immunology. Sirolimus / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Division / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor. Colonic Neoplasms / immunology. Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Genital Neoplasms, Male / immunology. Genital Neoplasms, Male / pathology. Humans. Immunosuppression / methods. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Liposarcoma / immunology. Liposarcoma / pathology. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis. Skin Neoplasms / immunology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Stomach Neoplasms / immunology. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • (PMID = 20534289.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2623
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
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25. Meinardi MT, Gietema JA, van Veldhuisen DJ, van der Graaf WT, de Vries EG, Sleijfer DT: Long-term chemotherapy-related cardiovascular morbidity. Cancer Treat Rev; 2000 Dec;26(6):429-47
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  • [Title] Long-term chemotherapy-related cardiovascular morbidity.
  • As a consequence of the successful use of chemotherapy in the treatment of curable neoplasms such as germ cell tumours and malignant lymphomas, and the increasing application of primary and adjuvant chemotherapy for various tumour types, the number of patients with a prolonged life expectancy after treatment is rising.
  • In this review we evaluate the literature on long-term cardiovascular toxicity related to chemotherapy in adult patients.
  • Two categories of patient with favourable life expectancy have been reviewed, namely patients cured of metastatic disease by chemotherapy and patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • In the first category, the literature on long-term cardiovascular morbidity in survivors of metastatic testicular cancer and lymphomas is discussed, while in the second category this is done for patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for breast and colon cancer.
  • As well as the direct toxic effects of chemotherapy on the cardiovascular system, the indirect toxic effects such as chemotherapy-related metabolic changes that may cause cardiovascular morbidity are also discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Cardiovascular Diseases / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Female. Humans. Lymphoma / drug therapy. Male. Morbidity. Neoplasm Metastasis. Testicular Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.
  • (PMID = 11139373.001).
  • [ISSN] 0305-7372
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer treatment reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Treat. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Number-of-references] 191
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