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1. Silveira NJ, Varuzza L, Machado-Lima A, Lauretto MS, Pinheiro DG, Rodrigues RV, Severino P, Nobrega FG, Head and Neck Genome Project GENCAPO, Silva WA Jr, de B Pereira CA, Tajara EH: Searching for molecular markers in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) by statistical and bioinformatic analysis of larynx-derived SAGE libraries. BMC Med Genomics; 2008;1:56
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  • [Title] Searching for molecular markers in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) by statistical and bioinformatic analysis of larynx-derived SAGE libraries.
  • BACKGROUND: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the most common malignancies in humans.
  • When detected early, HNSCC has a good prognosis, but most patients present metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, which significantly reduces survival rate.
  • METHODS: Aiming to identify differentially-expressed genes involved in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) development and progression, we generated individual Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) libraries from a metastatic and non-metastatic larynx carcinoma, as well as from a normal larynx mucosa sample.
  • RESULTS: Statistical data analysis identified a subset of 1,216 differentially expressed tags between tumor and normal libraries, and 894 differentially expressed tags between metastatic and non-metastatic carcinomas.
  • Three genes displaying differential regulation, one down-regulated (KRT31) and two up-regulated (BST2, MFAP2), as well as one with a non-significant differential expression pattern (GNA15) in our SAGE data were selected for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a set of HNSCC samples.
  • Consistent with our statistical analysis, quantitative PCR confirmed the upregulation of BST2 and MFAP2 and the downregulation of KRT31 when samples of HNSCC were compared to tumor-free surgical margins.
  • As expected, GNA15 presented a non-significant differential expression pattern when tumor samples were compared to normal tissues.
  • CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting SAGE data in head and neck squamous cell tumors.
  • Statistical analysis was effective in identifying differentially expressed genes reportedly involved in cancer development.
  • The differential expression of a subset of genes was confirmed in additional larynx carcinoma samples and in carcinomas from a distinct head and neck subsite.
  • This result suggests the existence of potential common biomarkers for prognosis and targeted-therapy development in this heterogeneous type of tumor.

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  • (PMID = 19014460.001).
  • [ISSN] 1755-8794
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC medical genomics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Med Genomics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2629771
  • [Investigator] Curry PM; de Carvalho MB; Dias-Neto E; Figueiredo DL; Fukuyama EE; Góis-Filho JF; Leopoldino AM; Mamede RC; Michaluart-Junior P; Moreira-Filho CA; Moyses RA; Nóbrega FG; Nóbrega MP; Nunes FD; Ojopi EP; Okamoto OK; Serafini LN; Severino P; Silva AM; Silva WA Jr; Silveira NJ; Souza SC; Tajara EH; Wünsch-Filho V; Zago MA; Amar A; Arap SS; Araújo NS; Araújo-Filho V; Barbieri RB; Bandeira CM; Bastos AU; Braconi MA; Brandão LG; Brandão RM; Canto AL; Carmona-Raphe J; Carvalho-Neto PB; Casemiro AF; Cerione M; Cernea CR; Cicco R; Chagas MJ; Chedid H; Chiappini PB; Correia LA; Costa A; Costa AC; Cunha BR; Curioni OA; Dias TH; Durazzo M; Ferraz AR; Figueiredo RO; Fortes CS; Franzi SA; Frizzera AP; Gallo J; Gazito D; Guimarães PE; Gutierres AP; Inamine R; Kaneto CM; Lehn CN; López RV; Macarenco R; Magalhães RP; Martins AE; Meneses C; Mercante AM; Montenegro FL; Pinheiro DG; Polachini GM; Porsani AF; Rapoport A; Rodini CO; Rodrigues AN; Rodrigues-Lisoni FC; Rodrigues RV; Rossi L; Santos AR; Santos M; Settani F; Silva FA; Silva IT; Silva-Filho GB; Smith RB; Souza TB; Stabenow E; Takamori JT; Tavares MR; Turcano R; Valentim PJ; Vidotto A; Volpi EM; Xavier FC; Yamagushi F; Cominato ML; Correa PM; Mendes GS; Paiva R; Ramos O; Silva C; Silva MJ; Tarlá MV
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2. Choong N, Vokes E: Expanding role of the medical oncologist in the management of head and neck cancer. CA Cancer J Clin; 2008 Jan-Feb;58(1):32-53
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  • [Title] Expanding role of the medical oncologist in the management of head and neck cancer.
  • The multidisciplinary approach to treating squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is complex and evolving.
  • This article aims to review some recent developments in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, in particular the expanding role of chemotherapy in its management.
  • Surgery and radiotherapy have remained the mainstay of therapy.
  • Chemotherapy is increasingly being incorporated into the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
  • Previously, radiotherapy following surgery was the standard approach to the treatment of locoregionally advanced resectable disease.
  • Chemoradiotherapy is also the recommended approach for unresectable disease.
  • Induction chemotherapy has been useful in resectable disease where organ preservation is desirable, but this approach was inferior for the goal of larynx preservation, while leading to similar survival when compared with concomitant chemoradiotherapy.
  • There is recent evidence that taxanes added to induction chemotherapy with cisplatin and fluorouracil result in improved survival outcomes.
  • Novel targeted agents, such as epidermal growth factor receptor antagonists, are showing promise in the treatment of patients with both locoregionally advanced and recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Alcohol Drinking / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / etiology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Papillomavirus Infections / complications. Physician's Role. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Risk Factors. Smoking / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 18096865.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-9235
  • [Journal-full-title] CA: a cancer journal for clinicians
  • [ISO-abbreviation] CA Cancer J Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
  • [Number-of-references] 206
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3. Shah JP, Gil Z: Current concepts in management of oral cancer--surgery. Oral Oncol; 2009 Apr-May;45(4-5):394-401
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Current concepts in management of oral cancer--surgery.
  • Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with a high prevalence in South Asia.
  • Tobacco and alcohol consumption remain the most dominant etiologic factors, however HPV has been recently implicated in oral cancer.
  • Surgery is the most well established mode of initial definitive treatment for a majority of oral cancers.
  • The factors that affect choice of treatment are related to the tumor and the patient.
  • Primary site, location, size, proximity to bone, and depth of infiltration are factors which influence a particular surgical approach.
  • Reconstruction of major surgical defects in the oral cavity requires use of a free flap.
  • The radial forearm free flap provides excellent soft tissue and lining for soft tissue defects in the oral cavity.
  • Over the course of the past thirty years there has been improvement in the overall survival of patients with oral carcinoma largely due to the improved understanding of the biology of local progression, early identification and treatment of metastatic lymph nodes in the neck, and employment of adjuvant post-operative radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy.
  • The role of surgery in primary squamous cell carcinomas in other sites in the head and neck has evolved with integration of multidisciplinary treatment approaches employing chemotherapy and radiotherapy either sequentially or concurrently.
  • Thus, larynx preservation with concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become the standard of care for locally advanced carcinomas of the larynx or pharynx requiring total laryngectomy.
  • On the other hand, for early staged tumors of the larynx and pharynx, transoral laser microsurgery has become an effective means of local control of these lesions.
  • Surgery thus remains the mainstay of management of a majority of neoplasms arising in the head and neck area.
  • Similarly, the role of the surgeon is essential throughout the life history of a patient with a malignant neoplasm in the head and neck area, from initial diagnosis through definitive treatment, post-treatment surveillance, management of complications, rehabilitation of the sequelae of treatment, and finally for palliation of symptoms.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Protocols. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Combined Modality Therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / surgery. Humans. Patient Selection. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures. Skin Neoplasms / surgery. Skull Base Neoplasms / surgery. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery. Surgical Flaps. Treatment Outcome


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4. Morales-Puebla JM, Toro-Rojas M, Segura-Saint-Gerons R, Fanego-Fernández J, López-Villarejo P: Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma: report of five cases. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal; 2010 May;15(3):e451-5
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  • [Title] Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma: report of five cases.
  • OBJECTIVES: To document the clinical and histopathological characteristics of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC).
  • CASES: retrospective review of five cases with the diagnosis of BSCC of the larynx.
  • Three patients presented with stage-IV disease and the other two with stage-I disease.
  • Surgery supplemented with radiation was used in three patients, partial surgery was used in another case and radiation and associated chemotherapy in the other one.
  • Eight neck dissections were performed, six of them were functional and the other two radical dissections.
  • Two cases were found to have metastatic lymph nodes.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell. Laryngeal Neoplasms

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  • (PMID = 20038913.001).
  • [ISSN] 1698-6946
  • [Journal-full-title] Medicina oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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5. Gagnon PJ, Galderisi C, Page BR, Holland JM: Angiosarcoma developing after curative induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx. Head Neck; 2009 Jun;31(6):829-32
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  • [Title] Angiosarcoma developing after curative induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx.
  • BACKGROUND: Angiosarcoma arising after radiation is described in breast cancer but occurs elsewhere.
  • Here, we present an angiosarcoma of the neck occurring after curative chemoradiation.
  • METHODS: This is a case of angiosarcoma developing 5 years after curative therapy for T3N0 squamous cell carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx.
  • Therapy consisted of 3 cycles of induction cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy.
  • The patient did well until developing a rapidly progressive lesion of the left neck.
  • CT scans assessed the local extent of the tumor and ruled out metastatic disease prior to initiating therapy.
  • RESULTS: Therapy consisted of 4 cycles of paclitaxel chemotherapy.
  • At completion, examination revealed mild induration of the neck with near-complete resolution of the mass.
  • CONCLUSION: This rare therapy-related second malignancy developed after curative larynx-preserving treatment.
  • Paclitaxel was an effective therapy in this setting.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Hemangiosarcoma / etiology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Radiotherapy, High-Energy / adverse effects. Skin Neoplasms / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy, Needle. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Remission Induction. Risk Assessment. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  • (PMID = 18853452.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0347
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & neck
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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6. Cripps C, Winquist E, Devries MC, Stys-Norman D, Gilbert R, Head and Neck Cancer Disease Site Group: Epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapy in stages III and IV head and neck cancer. Curr Oncol; 2010 Jun;17(3):37-48
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  • [Title] Epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapy in stages III and IV head and neck cancer.
  • QUESTION: What are the benefits associated with the use of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapies in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC)?
  • Anti-EGFR therapies of interest included cetuximab, gefitinib, lapatinib, zalutumumab, erlotinib, and panitumumab.
  • PERSPECTIVES: Head-and-neck cancer includes malignant tumours arising from a variety of sites in the upper aerodigestive tract.
  • The most common histologic type is squamous cell carcinoma, and most common sites are the oral cavity, the oropharynx, the hypopharynx, and the larynx.
  • Worldwide, HNSCC is the sixth most common neoplasm, and despite advances in therapy, long-term survival in HNSCC patients is poor.
  • Primary surgery followed by chemoradiation, or primary chemoradiation, are the standard treatment options for patients with locally advanced (stages III-IVB) HNSCC; however, meta-analytic data indicate that the benefit of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy disappears in patients over the age of 70 years.
  • Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody approved for use in combination with radiation in the treatment of patients with untreated locally advanced HNSCC and as monotherapy for patients with recurrent or metastatic (stage IVC) HNSCC who have progressed on platinum-based therapy.
  • Given the interest in anti-EGFR agents in advanced HNSCC, the Head and Neck Cancer Disease Site Group (DSG) of Cancer Care Ontario's Program in Evidence-Based Care (PEBC) chose to systematically review the literature pertaining to this topic so as to develop evidence-based recommendations for treatment.
  • OUTCOMES: Outcomes of interest included overall and progression-free survival, quality of life, tumour response rate and duration, and the toxicity associated with the use of anti-EGFR therapies.
  • The resulting recommendations were approved by the Report Approval Panel of the PEBC, and by the Head and Neck Cancer DSG.
  • Only four phase iii trials met the inclusion criteria for the present guideline.
  • The randomized controlled trials (RCTS) involved three distinct patient populations: those with locally advanced HNSCC being treated for cure, those with incurable advanced recurrent or metastatic HNSCC being treated with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, and those with incurable advanced recurrent or metastatic HNSCC who had disease progression despite, or who were unsuitable for, first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.
  • PRACTICE GUIDELINE: These recommendations apply to adult patients with locally advanced (nonmetastatic stages iii-ivb) or recurrent or metastatic (stage IVC) HNSCC.
  • Platinum-based chemoradiation remains the current standard of care for treatment of locally advanced HNSCC.
  • In patients with locally advanced HNSCC who are medically unsuitable for concurrent platinum based chemotherapy or who are over the age of 70 years (because concurrent chemotherapy does not appear to improve overall survival in this patient population), the addition of cetuximab to radical radiotherapy should be considered to improve overall survival, progression-free survival, and time to local recurrence.Cetuximab in combination with platinum-based combination chemotherapy is superior to chemotherapy alone in patients with recurrent or metastatic HNSCC, and is recommended to improve overall survival, progression-free survival, and response rate.The role of anti-EGFR therapies in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC is currently under study in large randomized trials, and patients with HNSCC should continue to be offered clinical trials of novel agents aimed at improving outcomes.
  • However, five ongoing trials are investigating the effect of the addition of EGFR inhibitors concurrently with, before, or after chemoradiotherapy; those trials should provide direction about the best integration of cetuximab into standard treatment.
  • In patients with recurrent or metastatic HNSCC who experience progressive disease despite, or who are unsuitable for, first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, gefitinib at doses of 250 mg or 500 mg daily, compared with weekly methotrexate, did not increase median overall survival [hazard ratio (hr): 1.22; 96% confidence interval (ci): 0.95 to 1.57; p = 0.12 (for 250 mg daily vs. weekly methotrexate); hr: 1.12; 95% ci: 0.87 to 1.43; p = 0.39 (for 500 mg daily vs. weekly methotrexate)] or objective response rate (2.7% for 250 mg and 7.6% for 500 mg daily vs. 3.9% for weekly methotrexate, p > 0.05).
  • As compared with methotrexate, gefitinib was associated with an increased incidence of tumour hemorrhage (8.9% for 250 mg and 11.4% for 500 mg daily vs. 1.9% for weekly methotrexate).

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  • (PMID = 20567625.001).
  • [ISSN] 1718-7729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current oncology (Toronto, Ont.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2880902
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Head-and-neck cancer / egfr inhibitors / epidermal growth factor receptor / overall survival / progression-free survival / tumour response rate
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7. Wang SJ, Wong G, de Heer AM, Xia W, Bourguignon LY: CD44 variant isoforms in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma progression. Laryngoscope; 2009 Aug;119(8):1518-30
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  • [Title] CD44 variant isoforms in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma progression.
  • The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the CD44 v3, v6, and v10 variant isoforms in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumor progression behaviors.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Laboratory study involving cell cultures and clinical tissue specimens.
  • METHODS: Analysis of the expression of standard CD44s and the CD44 variant isoforms v3, v6, and v10 was carried out in the HNSCC cell line, HSC-3.
  • Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on clinical tissue specimens obtained from a series of 82 HNSCC patients.
  • The expression of standard CD44s and the CD44 v3, v6, and v10 variants in primary tumor specimens (n = 82) and metastatic cervical lymph nodes (n = 24) were analyzed with respect to various clinicopathologic variables.
  • Compared with primary tumors, a greater proportion of metastatic lymph nodes demonstrated strong expression of CD44 v3 (lymph node 14/24 vs. primary tumor 38/82), CD44 v6 (lymph node 18/24 vs. primary tumor 26/82), and CD44 v10 (lymph node 14/24 vs. primary tumor 16/82), while expression of standard CD44 was not significantly different in metastatic lymph nodes and primary tumors (lymph node 10/24 vs. primary tumor 60/82).
  • Expression of CD44 variant isoforms were associated with advanced T stage (v3 and v6), regional (v3) and distant (v10) metastasis, perineural invasion (v6), and radiation failure (v10).
  • CD44 v6 and CD44 v10 were also significantly associated with shorter disease-free survival.
  • Furthermore, expression of certain CD44 variants may be important molecular markers for HNSCC progression and should be investigated as potential therapeutic targets for therapy.

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  • (PMID = 19507218.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-4995
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA066163-14; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA078633-10; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / P01 AR039448-190007; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA078633-10; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA066163-14; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA66163; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / P01 AR039448; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA078633; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR039448-190007; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / P01 AR39448; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA066163
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD44; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Protein Isoforms
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS113866; NLM/ PMC2718060
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8. Galetta D, Giotta F, Rosati G, Gebbia V, Manzione L, Di Bisceglie M, Borsellino N, Colucci G: Carboplatin in combination with raltitrexed in recurrent and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A multicentre phase II study of the Gruppo Oncologico Dell'Italia Meridionale (G.O.I.M.). Anticancer Res; 2005 Nov-Dec;25(6C):4445-9
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  • [Title] Carboplatin in combination with raltitrexed in recurrent and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A multicentre phase II study of the Gruppo Oncologico Dell'Italia Meridionale (G.O.I.M.).
  • BACKGROUND: The combination of cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a standard regimen for the treatment of recurrent and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
  • This combination shows a relevant toxicity and new chemotherapy associations with a more favourable toxicity profile are awaited.
  • Raltitrexed (R) is a potent and specific thymidylate synthase inhibitor with activity comparable to that of 5-FU in colorectal cancer; moreover, it showed activity as a single agent in HNSCC.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Since 2001, a multicentre, phase II trial has been underway to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the CB+R combination in untreated patients with recurrent or metastatic HNSCC.
  • Patients had a histo/cytologically proven recurrent or metastatic HNSCC; patients with locally advanced disease not amenable to CDDP+5-FU treatment were also included.
  • Patients had to be >18 years old with ECOG PS of 0-2 and adequate bone marrow, renal and liver functions.
  • CB (AUC 5) and R (3 mg/m2) were administered intravenously every 3 weeks.
  • Twelve patients were staged III and 20 were metastatic (10 recurrent).
  • The oral cavity/oropharynx were the primary site in 20 patients and the larynx in 10 patients.
  • The median time to progression was 4.2 months and median duration of survival was 9.8 months.
  • RESULTS: Seven patients achieved a partial response (22%), 10 patients showed a stable disease (31%), while 13 patients (48%) had progressive disease.
  • Eight patients (25%) had a G 3-4 neutropenia, while G 3-4 anaemia was observed in 2 patients and thrombocytopenia in 1 patient.
  • A persistent G 2 hepatic toxicity led a patient to drop out from the study.
  • CONCLUSION: In our phase II trial, CB in combination with R showed a moderate activity with safe administration on an outpatient basis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 16334124.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Quinazolines; 0 / Thiophenes; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; FCB9EGG971 / raltitrexed
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9. Erisen LM, Coskun H, Ozuysal S, Basut O, Onart S, Hizalan I, Tezel I: Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx: a report of four new cases. Laryngoscope; 2004 Jul;114(7):1179-83
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  • [Title] Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx: a report of four new cases.
  • OBJECTIVES: This study is designed to report the clinical and pathologic features and outcome of cases of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC) of the larynx treated in our clinic.
  • METHODS: Four cases of BSCC of the larynx were treated in our department.
  • Histopathologic slides were reevaluated to confirm the diagnosis.
  • RESULTS: All patients were male (mean 57), with supraglottic or transglottic larynx tumors.
  • Two patients presented with stage-II disease and the other 2 with stage-IV disease.
  • Initial diagnosis was invasive squamous cell carcinoma in 3 patients and BSCC in one patient.
  • Two patients who had stage-II disease underwent partial laryngectomy and bilateral neck dissections; total laryngectomy and bilateral neck dissections were performed in stage-IV patients.
  • Three patients received adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy, and 2 of them also received additional chemotherapy.
  • Patients with stage-IV disease were found to have 4 and 27 metastatic lymph nodes on histopathologic examination and died because of distant metastases at 11 and 14 months, respectively.
  • Patients with stage-II disease did not have cervical metastasis on histopathologic examination and were alive and free of disease at 52 and 72 months respectively.
  • CONCLUSION: In contrast with the literature reporting the tendency of more aggressive clinical behavior of the BSCC, we can say that BSCC has a behavior similar to conventional squamous cell carcinoma based on our 4 cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Basosquamous / therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Neck Dissection. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15235344.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-852X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. Abo H, Tsukuda M, Matsuda H, Horiuchi C, Taguchi T, Watanabe M, Niho T: [Successful treatment results of S-1 administration in 2 patients, one with a remnant tumor of the larynx and metastatic tumors to the lung, and another with a metastatic tumor in the neck from the hypopharynx]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2009 Oct;36(10):1707-9
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  • [Title] [Successful treatment results of S-1 administration in 2 patients, one with a remnant tumor of the larynx and metastatic tumors to the lung, and another with a metastatic tumor in the neck from the hypopharynx].
  • We report two successful remnant and recurrent cases of head and neck cancer treated with S-1.
  • Case 1, a 52-year-old man, was diagnosed as supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma (T3N2cM0, squamous cell carcinoma: SCC) on January 25, 2000, and concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) was applied.
  • After the treatment, a remnant tumor in the larynx was found by biopsy.
  • Pulmonary metastasis was detected by chest CT on June 14, 2001, and the administration of S-1 was started.
  • The administration of S-1 is still continuing and remnant tumors have not been found.
  • Case 2, a 76-year-old man, was diagnosed with hypopharyngeal carcinoma (T3N2bM0, SCC) on December 14, 2001, and CCRT was applied resulting in CR in the hypopharynx and the neck.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oxonic Acid / therapeutic use. Tegafur / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Drug Combinations. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19838032.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid
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11. Pignon JP, Bourhis J, Domenge C, Designé L: Chemotherapy added to locoregional treatment for head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma: three meta-analyses of updated individual data. MACH-NC Collaborative Group. Meta-Analysis of Chemotherapy on Head and Neck Cancer. Lancet; 2000 Mar 18;355(9208):949-55
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  • [Title] Chemotherapy added to locoregional treatment for head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma: three meta-analyses of updated individual data. MACH-NC Collaborative Group. Meta-Analysis of Chemotherapy on Head and Neck Cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Despite more than 70 randomised trials, the effect of chemotherapy on non-metastatic head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma remains uncertain.
  • We did three meta-analyses of the impact of survival on chemotherapy added to locoregional treatment.
  • We included patients with carcinoma of the oropharynx, oral cavity, larynx, or hypopharynx.
  • FINDINGS: The main meta-analysis of 63 trials (10,741 patients) of locoregional treatment with or without chemotherapy yielded a pooled hazard ratio of death of 0.90 (95% CI 0.85-0.94, p<0.0001), corresponding to an absolute survival benefit of 4% at 2 and 5 years in favour of chemotherapy.
  • There was no significant benefit associated with adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Chemotherapy given concomitantly to radiotherapy gave significant benefits, but heterogeneity of the results prohibits firm conclusions.
  • Meta-analysis of six trials (861 patients) comparing neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radiotherapy with concomitant or alternating radiochemotherapy yielded a hazard ratio of 0.91 (0.79-1.06) in favour of concomitant or alternating radiochemotherapy.
  • Three larynx-preservation trials (602 patients) compared radical surgery plus radiotherapy with neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radiotherapy in responders or radical surgery and radiotherapy in non-responders.
  • The hazard ratio of death in the chemotherapy arm as compared with the control arm was 1.19 (0.97-1.46).
  • INTERPRETATION: Because the main meta-analysis showed only a small significant survival benefit in favour of chemotherapy, the routine use of chemotherapy is debatable.
  • For larynx preservation, the non-significant negative effect of chemotherapy in the organ-preservation strategy indicates that this procedure must remain investigational.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / mortality. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Humans. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / mortality. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / mortality. Laryngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / mortality. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Proportional Hazards Models. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Treatment Outcome


12. Al-Zahid S, Singh V: Tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis in a patient with laryngeal carcinoma. J Laryngol Otol; 2010 Jan;124(1):90-2

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis in a patient with laryngeal carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: We report an extremely rare presentation of concomitant tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis in a patient with carcinoma of the larynx.
  • CASE REPORT: A 66-year-old man presented with a nine-month history of hoarseness.
  • Biopsy of the vocal fold lesion revealed invasive squamous cell carcinoma.
  • The patient was treated with radiotherapy to the larynx and concomitant anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy.
  • Five months following treatment, there was no sign of laryngeal cancer recurrence; however, the patient continued to have a productive cough and night sweats.
  • CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first report of a laryngeal carcinoma with concurrent tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis.
  • In the face of an unhelpful fine needle aspiration cytology examination, an assumption of metastatic neck disease could have been made.
  • Subsequent surgical and/or oncological intervention would have been highly inappropriate, with potentially catastrophic effects.
  • This case highlights the importance of proper diagnosis, and emphasises the fact that tuberculosis should always be borne in mind in the differential diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / complications. Laryngeal Neoplasms / complications. Tuberculosis, Lymph Node / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antitubercular Agents / therapeutic use. Biopsy. Humans. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Treatment Outcome. Vocal Cords / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19646297.001).
  • [ISSN] 1748-5460
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of laryngology and otology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Laryngol Otol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antitubercular Agents
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13. Calais G: [Docetaxel and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck]. Bull Cancer; 2004 Feb;91(2):167-71
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  • [Title] [Docetaxel and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck].
  • [Transliterated title] Docetaxel et carcinomes de la tête et du cou.
  • Chemotherapy in head and neck carcinoma is used as palliative treatment but also as induction treatment or combined treatment with concurrent radiation therapy.
  • Docetaxel is an active drug for treating head and neck carcinoma.
  • For patients with recurrent or metastatic disease, docetaxel could be used either as a second line chemotherapy or a first line for patients who received previously platinum or 5FU.
  • In combination with platinum and 5FU, used as induction chemotherapy the TPF regimen is a very active treatment with an overall response rate of 85 to 90% with a manageable acute toxicity rate.
  • This approach is under investigation in terms of ability to obtain more larynx preservation compared to the standard approach with platinum and 5FU.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Taxoids / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Remission Induction

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  • [Copyright] Copyright John Libbey Eurotext 2003.
  • (PMID = 15047456.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-4551
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin du cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull Cancer
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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14. Biel MA: Photodynamic therapy of head and neck cancers. Methods Mol Biol; 2010;635:281-93
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  • [Title] Photodynamic therapy of head and neck cancers.
  • Over 1,500 patients have been treated with PDT using Photofrin, HPD, ALA, or Foscan for head and neck cancers.
  • These patients include a mixture of presentations including primary, recurrent, and metastatic lesions.
  • The predominant histology is squamous cell carcinoma, but other histologies treated include mucosal melanoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, adenocarcinoma, metastatic breast carcinoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma.
  • Several multi-institutional phase II clinical trials evaluating PDT treatment of head and neck cancers have demonstrated the efficacy of this minimally invasive therapy in the treatment of early oropharyngeal primary and recurrent cancers as well as the palliative treatment of refractory head and neck cancers.
  • Patients with early stage cancers or early recurrences in the oral cavity and larynx (Cis, T1, T2) tend to have an excellent response to PDT.
  • Of 518 patients treated with Cis, T1, or T2 cancers of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and nasopharynx, 462 (89.1%) obtained a complete clinical response after one PDT treatment.
  • Laryngeal cancers, comprising 171 patients in this group, obtained a durable complete response rate of 89% with up to a 16-year follow-up.
  • Photodynamic therapy is as effective as conventional therapies for the treatment of early (Cis, T1, T2) squamous cell cancers of the head and neck.
  • It is also a promising therapy to be used in association with surgery to increase tumor-free margins and therefore increase cure rates.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20552353.001).
  • [ISSN] 1940-6029
  • [Journal-full-title] Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Methods Mol. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Levine MA, Saunders JR, Zinreich E, Kunar D, Price J, Hirata RM, Williams M: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in a community hospital. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):5558

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Concurrent chemoradiation therapy for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in a community hospital.
  • : 5558 Background: Concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy have made organ preservation feasible in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
  • This study evaluates the use of chemotherapy with hyperfractionated radiation therapy in a community hospital and the importance of elective lymph node dissection for N2 and N3 patients.
  • METHODS: Forty-six patients with HNSCC stage III and IV (42/46 male, 35/46 oropharynx, 4 hypopharynx, 7 larynx, 25 N0-1, 21 N2-3) were treated.
  • Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was administered twice daily with an interval of at least six hours and a total dose of 7000cGy to the primary site and 5-6000cGy to the adjacent lymph node bearing areas.
  • Chemotherapy was administered during weeks 1 and 6 of radiation therapy and consisted of cis-platin 12mg/M2 IVPB days 1-5 and 5-fluorouracil 600mg/M2 continuous IV infusion over 20 hours days 1-5.
  • Twenty of twenty-one patients with N2-3 disease underwent neck dissection 6-8 weeks following completion of XRT.
  • 20 of 21 N2-3 underwent neck dissection.
  • Two pts died in remission from intercurrent illnesses more than 11 months after completion of therapy.
  • Of the remaining 44 pts, 38 remain NED (86%) (3 pts died from recurrent disease, 2 pts recurred locally and were salvaged surgically, one is alive with metastatic disease).
  • TOXICITY: short term, all pts developed confluent mucositis but hospitalization for dehydration or infection was rare; long term, mouth dryness was common but manageable and most pts were PEG independent within three months of completion of therapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Aggressive chemo-XRT is feasible in a community hospital and affords advanced HNSCC pts the opportunity for organ preservation.
  • Pts with N2 or N3 disease should undergo neck dissection following chemo-XRT since thirty percent of these pts will have node metastases.

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  • (PMID = 28013960.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Castro G, Snitcovsky IM, Gebrim EM, Diz MD, Nadalin W, Federico MH: Patients (pts) with stage IV, non-metastatic advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) submitted to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCR) present with manageable toxicity. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8228

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Patients (pts) with stage IV, non-metastatic advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) submitted to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCR) present with manageable toxicity.
  • METHODS: In this phase IV trial, previously untreated pts with locoregionally advanced, unresectable, HNSCC received 70 Gy, 200 cGy/d concurrent with cisplatin 100 mg/m<sup>2</sup> on days 1, 22 and 43.
  • Eligibility criteria included a histological proof of SCC, from oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx or paranasal sinus; stage III/IV, M0 (AJCC, 2002); age 18-70 yrs; ECOG-PS 0-2; adequate organ function; measurable disease; assigned informed consent.
  • Toxicity was graded according to the NCI-CTC v. 2.0 and tumor response by RECIST criteria.
  • Pain (rate 0-10) and nutritional status were evaluated before and after treatment.
  • RESULTS: To date, 18 pts entered the trial, median age 54.5 yrs (37-68); 15 male; 16 PS1 and 1 PS2; 15 pts were able to eat orally; median body-mass index 19.7 kg/m<sup>2</sup> (13.8-27.3); primary site: oropharynx (10 pts), oral cavity (6), larynx (2); TNM: T3N1 (1 pt), T3N3 (1), T4N1 (5), T4N2 (5), T4N3 (6).
  • 11 pts completed radiation therapy (median time 64 d); median number of chemotherapy cycles: 2.
  • Tumor response in 8 evaluable pts was: 1 CR, 3 PR, 1 SD and 3 PD (RR 50%).
  • Pain score decreased by 3±3 after treatment (95%CI 1-5, p=0.007; paired t-test).
  • 3 pts died, 2 from disease progression.
  • CCR is a feasible treatment strategy in this group of pts of locoregionally advanced HNSCC.

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  • (PMID = 28016852.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Blumenschein G, Lu C, Kies M, Glisson B, Papadimitrakopoulou V, Zinner R, Kim E, Gillenwater A, Chiao J, Hong W: Phase II clinical trial of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in patients (pts) with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer(SCCHN). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):5578

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II clinical trial of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in patients (pts) with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer(SCCHN).
  • In a phase I trial of oral SAHA administered once a day or twice a day, a partial response was observed in a pt with metastatic laryngeal carcinoma.
  • METHODS: Eligible pts must have recurrent and/or metastatic SCCHN unresponsive to or intolerant of conventional chemotherapy (up to two prior chemotherapies including neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and concomitant chemotherapy/radiation); ECOG performance status 0-2; adequate hematologic, hepatic, and renal function; able to swallow capsules; have measurable disease; = 4 weeks from prior chemotherapy, radiation therapy, major surgery or investigational anticancer therapy and have recovered from prior toxicities.
  • Study endpoints included response rate, duration of stable disease and progression-free survival.
  • 1 pt withdrew consent prior to starting therapy.
  • Prior therapies included radiation in 9 pts and chemotherapy in all 12 pts; 11 patients received platinum, 8 patients received both taxanes and platinum.
  • Tumor shrinkage by CT scan (minor response) was seen in 1 pt.
  • 4 pts had stable disease lasting 3 to 6 months.
  • Toxicity has been acceptable with 1 pt discontinuing therapy for grade 3 anorexia.
  • Other grade 3-4 drug-related toxicities included anemia (n=1), anorexia (n=1), back pain (n=1), fatigue (n=1), and thrombocytopenia (n=3).

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  • (PMID = 28014002.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Fayette J, Montella A, Bachelot T, Pommier P, Girodet D, Racadot S, Montbarbon X, Favier B, Zrounba P: Paclitaxel in relapsed squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SSCHN): Retrospective study of a single institution. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17047

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Paclitaxel in relapsed squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SSCHN): Retrospective study of a single institution.
  • : e17047 Background: For relapse or metastatic SCCHN the standard treatment is the combination of cisplatin and 5FU that showed higher response rate than methotrexate but similar overall survival.
  • Cetuximab demonstrated in a phase III (N Engl J Med.
  • 2008;359:1116) its efficacy and paclitaxel showed efficacy in a phase II study (Cancer. 1998;82:2270).
  • METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 56 pts with relapse or metastatic SSCHN treated with P in a single institution in Lyon (France) between June 2002 and February 2008.
  • P was administered in first line for locally advanced disease, in first line for relapsed or metastatic disease, or in second or more line.
  • Localizations of primitive tumor: oral cavity (14%), oropharynx (30%), hypopharynx (39%) larynx (7%), rhinopharynx (4%), or other (6%).
  • All patients received adequate initial treatment with surgery and/or radiotherapy, 47% had have neoadjuvant chemotherapy (71% with cddp-5fu, but 5 pts received P).
  • Five patients received P as neoadjuvant treatment.
  • Among 52 evaluable patients, 33 received P in first line of treatment after relapse, 12 in second line.
  • The overall survival (OS) of all patients was 6.3 months (95% CI 3.9-7.9 m), and 7.7 m (95% CI 3.9-11 m) and 5.2 m (95% CI 2.8-7.9 m) in first and second line, respectively.

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  • (PMID = 27961770.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Bourhis J, Lefebvre JL, Vermorken JB: Cetuximab in the management of locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer: expanding the treatment options? Eur J Cancer; 2010 Jul;46(11):1979-89
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cetuximab in the management of locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer: expanding the treatment options?
  • The treatment of locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) has evolved in recent years as a consequence of a better understanding of the potential benefits associated with altered radiation fractionation regimens, concurrently administered chemotherapy and radiotherapy (chemoradiotherapy) and induction chemotherapy.
  • Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is a treatment option for technically resectable disease, where functional morbidity precludes the use of surgery.
  • Induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy may also be used in this setting, and has been validated for larynx preservation.
  • Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is a standard treatment approach for medically fit patients with locoregionally advanced unresectable disease.
  • However, the toxicity burden of additional chemotherapy in both the concurrent chemoradiotherapy and induction chemotherapy settings can have implications for treatment compliance and may impede the administration of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy to schedule.
  • The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted IgG1 monoclonal antibody, cetuximab (Erbitux), has shown significant clinical benefits in the treatment of both locoregionally advanced and recurrent and/or metastatic SCCHN.
  • A phase III study in locoregionally advanced disease demonstrated significant improvements in locoregional control and progression-free and overall survival with cetuximab plus radiotherapy compared with radiotherapy alone, and overall survival benefits were maintained at 5 years.
  • Taken together, these data support an important role for cetuximab in the treatment paradigm for locoregionally advanced SCCHN.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Cetuximab. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Papillomavirus Infections / complications

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20561781.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0852
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; PQX0D8J21J / Cetuximab
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20. Scarpatetti M, Tsybrovskyy O, Popper HH: Cytokeratin typing as an aid in the differential diagnosis of primary versus metastatic lung carcinomas, and comparison with normal lung. Virchows Arch; 2002 Jan;440(1):70-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cytokeratin typing as an aid in the differential diagnosis of primary versus metastatic lung carcinomas, and comparison with normal lung.
  • Due to more efficient chemotherapy protocols, the number of second and even third primary carcinomas is steadily increasing.
  • To denominate the possible origin of a carcinoma, different markers are available as an aid, e.g. hormones, proteins and lipoproteins, secretion products and cytoskeletal proteins.
  • As expected, immunohistochemical investigation gave no clear-cut results, but, with statistical analysis, lung adenocarcinomas could be separated from metastatic adenocarcinomas using CK 5 and 18 and HMW CK (specificity 92.5%, sensitivity 62.5%).
  • Lung clear cell carcinomas and large cell carcinomas with clear cell areas could be distinguished from metastatic renal clear cell carcinomas by the CK 7 staining reaction.
  • Squamous cell carcinomas of the lung and metastatic squamous cell carcinomas of the larynx, pharynx and oesophagus could not reliably be separated in part due to the few number of cases available.
  • CK polypeptide typing is thus an additional aid in the differential diagnosis of lung carcinomas versus carcinomas metastatic to the lung.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / chemistry. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / chemistry. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Immunohistochemistry

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  • (PMID = 11942579.001).
  • [ISSN] 0945-6317
  • [Journal-full-title] Virchows Archiv : an international journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Virchows Arch.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 68238-35-7 / Keratins
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21. Labourey JL, Cupissol D, Calais G, Tourani JM, Kohser F, Borel C, Eymard JC, Germann N, Tubiana-Mathieu N: Docetaxel plus gemcitabine in recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a phase II multicenter study. Am J Clin Oncol; 2007 Jun;30(3):278-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Docetaxel plus gemcitabine in recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a phase II multicenter study.
  • OBJECTIVES: This phase II study was conducted to assess the efficacy of docetaxel plus gemcitabine in locally recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty patients with pharynx or larynx cancer were included and treated with an intravenous infusion of docetaxel 75 mg/m2 on day 8 and gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 day 1 and day 8 every 3 weeks for 6 cycles.
  • RESULTS: Among the 40 patients included, 17 had metastatic disease and 18 had received prior chemotherapy.
  • Thirteen patients (32.5%) had stable disease, whereas 11 patients (27.5%) had progressive disease.
  • Three treatment-related deaths due to infection were reported.
  • CONCLUSION: The docetaxel and gemcitabine combination is an active treatment of recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer.
  • However, this regimen is associated with a high hematologic toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Female. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Recurrence. Taxoids / administration & dosage. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17551305.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-453X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Taxoids; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine
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22. Massa E, Dessì M, Gaspardini G, Saba F, Cherchi V, Mantovani G: Phase II study of vinorelbine/cetuximab in patients with recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck progressing after at least two chemotherapy regimens. Oral Oncol; 2010 Nov;46(11):818-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II study of vinorelbine/cetuximab in patients with recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck progressing after at least two chemotherapy regimens.
  • The aim of the present study was to identify a potentially effective new treatment regimen for patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in disease progression after at least two previous chemotherapy regimens.
  • The regimen was administered to patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck previously treated with surgery, radiotherapy or both and progressing after at least two chemotherapy regimens.
  • Twenty-four patients with histologically confirmed tumors of oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx and larynx were enrolled.
  • All patients were stage IV and 91.6% had an ECOG PS 0-1.
  • After 3 cycles of treatment 23 patients (95.8%) were evaluable for response: 4 patients had partial response; 12 stable disease and 7 progressive disease.
  • Disease control rate was 69.5%.
  • The present study shows that the combination of Vinorelbine and Cetuximab in recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck patients is effective, feasible and has a good safety profile.
  • Our findings warrant further investigation in a wider patient population.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20920877.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0593
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; PQX0D8J21J / Cetuximab; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; Q6C979R91Y / vinorelbine
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23. Hasegawa Y, Goto M, Hanai N, Ijichi K, Adachi M, Terada A, Hyodo I, Ogawa T, Furukawa T: Evaluation of optimal drug concentration in histoculture drug response assay in association with clinical efficacy for head and neck cancer. Oral Oncol; 2007 Sep;43(8):749-56
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of optimal drug concentration in histoculture drug response assay in association with clinical efficacy for head and neck cancer.
  • Induction chemotherapy or concomitant chemoradiotherapy has been used increasingly to improve survival, organ preservation and function in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).
  • Therefore, reliable chemosensitivity assays are needed to accurately predict the response to chemotherapy and guide the selection and treatment of patients with HNC.
  • The main purpose of this study was to examine the optimal drug concentrations for evaluating in vitro chemosensitivity using the histoculture drug response assay (HDRA).
  • The tested tumor specimens included 7 from oral cavities (14.3%), 12 from oropharynx (24.5%), 10 hypopharynx (20.4%), 3 larynx (6.1%), 5 sinonasal (10.2%), 2 salivary glands (4.1%), and 10 from metastatic lymph nodes (20.4%), respectively.
  • Histopathologic types of all 49 specimens were squamous cell carcinoma.
  • We investigated the optimal drug concentrations in HDRA searching at doses of 4-100 microg/ml for cisplatin and 60-1500 microg/ml for 5-FU.
  • As for cisplatin sensitivity in vitro, the 50% cut-off inhibition index (I.I.) was found to have a significant association with the clinical response to chemotherapy, with an accurate prediction rate of 77.8%.
  • The HDRA shows a predictive value for chemosensitivity in HNC patients using the optimal drug concentration cut-off with this site specificity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor / methods. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / pharmacology. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / pharmacology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 17112769.001).
  • [ISSN] 1368-8375
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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24. Rajendran ES: Homeopathy as a supportive therapy in cancer. Homeopathy; 2004 Apr;93(2):99-102
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pain.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Homeopathy as a supportive therapy in cancer.
  • Three cases of cancer in which homeopathic treatment was used in a complementary role are described: A 64-year-old male with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the rectum.
  • A 77-year-old female with terminal squamous cell carcinoma of the cheek previously treated with radiotherapy.
  • There was intense pain not relieved by available treatment.
  • A 70-year-old male with carcinoma of the larynx.
  • He had been receiving homeopathic treatment after the diagnosis because of his faith in it.
  • He was advised to have surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, which he underwent immediately.
  • This treatment was followed by homeopathic constitutional treatment.
  • Homeopathic medicines prescribed on constitutional grounds may play a useful role in supportive and palliative for patients with malignant disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Homeopathy. Neoplasms / therapy. Pain Management
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Combined Modality Therapy. Facial Neoplasms / therapy. Female. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Male. Pain / etiology. Rectal Neoplasms / therapy. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15139095.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-4916
  • [Journal-full-title] Homeopathy : the journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Homeopathy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
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25. de Groot JW, Zonnenberg BA, van Ufford-Mannesse PQ, de Vries MM, Links TP, Lips CJ, Voest EE: A phase II trial of imatinib therapy for metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma. J Clin Endocrinol Metab; 2007 Sep;92(9):3466-9
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  • [Title] A phase II trial of imatinib therapy for metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma.
  • CONTEXT: Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) metastasizes early in its clinical course.
  • No effective systemic therapy is available.
  • OBJECTIVE: We investigated imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potential treatment in patients with disseminated MTC.
  • DESIGN: A phase II study was initiated using 600 mg imatinib daily with a possible dose increase to 800 mg in case of progression.
  • Standard Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors were used using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging every 2 months.
  • Four patients had stable disease over 24 months.
  • Three patients stopped treatment due to toxic effects [fatigue (n = 2) and nausea (n = 1)].
  • In four cases the dose of imatinib was decreased because of toxicity [rash and malaise (n = 2) and laryngeal swelling (n = 2)].
  • Emergency tracheotomy was performed in two cases due to mucosal swelling of the larynx in patients with recurrent nerve palsy and a narrow vocal cleft.
  • In nine patients with a history of a thyroidectomy, the dose of supplemental thyroid hormone was increased because of serious hypothyroidism.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Imatinib therapy yielded no objective responses and induced considerable toxicity in patients with MTC.
  • A minority of patients had stable disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Medullary / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Medullary / pathology. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Thyroid Neoplasms / drug therapy. Thyroid Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzamides. Female. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17579194.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-972X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ISRCTN/ ISRCTN13256080
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate
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26. Jia SS, Wang YY, Pei R, Sun J: [Pathological feature and management of occult lymphatic metastasis in supraglottic carcinoma]. Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2005 Feb;40(2):103-5

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Pathological feature and management of occult lymphatic metastasis in supraglottic carcinoma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the pathologic feature and management methods of occult lymphatic metastasis in patients with supraglottic carcinoma.
  • (1) Supraglottic squamous cell carcinoma;.
  • (3) no preoperative radiotherapy and (or) chemotherapy.
  • Ipsilateral supraomohyoid neck dissections were performed in all cases.
  • RESULTS: Six of 30 cases were positive nodes histologically in first operation, 3 were occurrence neck metastasis in opposite side during follow ups.
  • 527 lymph nodes were collected in all of 30 patients, average 17.6 nodes in every side neck.
  • The distribution of metastatic lymph nodes was 9 in level II, 1 in level III, no in level I.
  • N0 recurrence in larynx and (or) at the neck after dissection.
  • Two years survival rates was 86.7% (26/30) without tumor.
  • CONCLUSION: Occult metastasis rate of supraglottic carcinoma is as high as 30%.
  • The selective lateral neck dissection of level II, III and occasionally, level IV was recommended.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Lymph Nodes / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neck Dissection. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 16429726.001).
  • [ISSN] 1673-0860
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Chinese journal of otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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27. Lamont EB, Vokes EE: Chemotherapy in the management of squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Lancet Oncol; 2001 May;2(5):261-9
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  • [Title] Chemotherapy in the management of squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
  • Previously reserved for palliation, chemotherapy is now also a central component of several curative approaches to the management of patients with advanced-stage head and neck cancer.
  • Here we review the results of both induction chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy trials in patients with curable disease, and chemotherapy trials in patients with recurrent and metastatic disease, and we highlight current areas of investigation.
  • Compared with traditional treatment modalities, chemotherapy given on induction schedules to patients with advanced laryngeal cancer allows greater organ preservation without compromise to survival; when given concomitantly with radiotherapy to patients with resectable or unresectable advanced disease, chemotherapy again improves survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Research. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11905780.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-2045
  • [Journal-full-title] The Lancet. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 80
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28. Erdağ TK, Karas C, Ikiz AO, Güneri EA, Ceryan K, Sarioğlu S: [The incidence of level I metastasis in laryngopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma]. Kulak Burun Bogaz Ihtis Derg; 2003 Dec;11(6):166-9
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  • [Title] [The incidence of level I metastasis in laryngopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma].
  • OBJECTIVES: We investigated the incidence of level I metastasis in patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: The records of 126 patients who underwent primary tumor excision with radical neck dissection (RND) or its modifications for laryngeal or hypopharyngeal SCC were retrospectively reviewed.
  • Preoperative tumor and neck stages, the sites and the number of metastatic lymph nodes were recorded.
  • Patients treated with selective neck dissection (SND) or preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy were excluded.
  • RESULTS: Of 155 RND or modified RND performed for 113 laryngeal and 13 hypopharyngeal SCC, lymph node metastases were detected in 51 specimens, all of which spared level I.
  • CONCLUSION: Selective neck dissection sparing level I may be appropriate for clinically and radiologically N0 patients with laryngopharyngeal carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / epidemiology. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / epidemiology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Incidence. Lymph Node Excision. Male. Medical Records. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Turkey / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 15567930.001).
  • [ISSN] 1300-7475
  • [Journal-full-title] Kulak burun boğaz ihtisas dergisi : KBB = Journal of ear, nose, and throat
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kulak Burun Bogaz Ihtis Derg
  • [Language] tur
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
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29. Ohba S, Fujimori M, Ito S, Matsumoto F, Hata M, Takayanagi H, Wada R, Ikeda K: A case report of metastasizing myoepithelial carcinoma of the parotid gland arising in a recurrent pleomorphic adenoma. Auris Nasus Larynx; 2009 Feb;36(1):123-6
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  • [Title] A case report of metastasizing myoepithelial carcinoma of the parotid gland arising in a recurrent pleomorphic adenoma.
  • Myoepithelial carcinoma, arising in a recurrent or in a pre-existing pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland is an extremely rare cancer.
  • We herein report the case of myoepithelial carcinoma occurring in a recurrent pleomorphic adenoma, which showed a high metastatic potential.
  • A total parotidectomy and a thoracoscopic biopsy of the lung lesion revealed both lesions to be myoepithelial carcinoma.
  • The patient died about 12 months later despite undergoing intensive chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 18650039.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1476
  • [Journal-full-title] Auris, nasus, larynx
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Auris Nasus Larynx
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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30. Tanaka A, Ohsawa H, Ikeda H, Koshiba R: [Therapeutic strategy for a patient suffering from a peripheral pulmonary tumor in the right upper lobe and an endotracheal tumor in the carina]. Kyobu Geka; 2002 Jul;55(7):537-40
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  • [Title] [Therapeutic strategy for a patient suffering from a peripheral pulmonary tumor in the right upper lobe and an endotracheal tumor in the carina].
  • A 64-year-old male, who had received successful radiotherapy for the previous laryngeal cancer, was admitted to our department for the treatment of a peripheral pulmonary tumor in the right upper lobe and an endotracheal tumor in the carina.
  • The endotracheal biopsy of the carinal tumor demonstrated squamous cell carcinoma, though preoperative examination of the intrapulmonary tumor was unable to clarify it's pathological type.
  • The intrapulmonary tumor required right upper lobectomy and R2 lymph node dissection as a measure against the possibility of primary lung cancer.
  • Since the endotracheal cancer was diagnosed as an intra mucosal tumor by the preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans and the bronchoscopic examination, laser abrasion therapy to the endotracheal tumor was performed 4 days before the lobectomy of the intrapulmonary tumor.
  • After the pulmonary operation, the intrapulmonary tumor was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma without lymph node metastasis, and it was suggested to be a metastatic tumor of the previous laryngeal cancer.
  • Both radiotherapy to the carina and general chemotherapy with docetaxel hydrate and carboplatin were used as adjuvant therapies 36 days after the lobectomy.
  • One year after the pulmonary surgery, there is no recurrence of the tumor in the lung or carina.
  • Laser abrasion therapy to the endotracheal tumor is very useful and safe for the patient, who should then receive pulmonary resection soon after the therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Lung Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / surgery. Paclitaxel / analogs & derivatives. Pneumonectomy. Taxoids. Tracheal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Laser Therapy. Lymph Node Excision. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 12136580.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-5252
  • [Journal-full-title] Kyobu geka. The Japanese journal of thoracic surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kyobu Geka
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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31. Hoshikawa H, Mitani T, Nishiyama Y, Yamamoto Y, Ohkawa M, Mori N: Evaluation of the therapeutic effects and recurrence for head and neck cancer after chemoradiotherapy by FDG-PET. Auris Nasus Larynx; 2009 Apr;36(2):192-8
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  • [Title] Evaluation of the therapeutic effects and recurrence for head and neck cancer after chemoradiotherapy by FDG-PET.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to detect early stage recurrence or a residual tumor after chemoradiotherapy by FDG-PET.
  • METHODS: A total of 51 head and neck cancer lesions in 27 patients were examined-including primary sites and metastatic lymph nodes.
  • The therapeutic effects were evaluated by visual inspection, pre-treatment SUV, post-treatment SUV and % change in SUV.
  • RESULTS: No local recurrence was observed in 37 of the lesions, while recurrence or a residual tumor was observed in the other 14 lesions after therapy.
  • A significant difference was found between the two groups regarding the post-treatment SUV and the % change in SUV.
  • Taking the post-treatment SUV of 3 and the % change of 60 as a cut-off value, a significant difference was thus found between the recurrence cases and non-recurrence cases.
  • When all lesions were divided into two groups-including the post-treatment SUV>3 and the % change in the SUV<60 group, and the post-treatment SUV<3 or the % change in SUV>60 group, the overall accuracy was 88.2% (45/51).
  • Therefore, it is more useful to predict the prognosis after chemoradiotherapy by a combined analysis of the post-treatment SUV and the % change in SUV.
  • According to the post-treatment PET period, namely, within 4 weeks and from 5 to 15 weeks after treatment, the accuracy was 85.7% (24/28) and 91.3% (21/23), respectively (p=0.5385).
  • CONCLUSION: The results suggest that it may be possible to predict the recurrence even at 4 weeks after treatment.
  • Therefore, the use of a semi-quantitative analysis of FDG-PET between the pre-treatment and post-treatment findings is thus considered to be helpful in choosing the optimal therapy and for making an accurate prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / radiotherapy. Image Processing, Computer-Assisted. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radionuclide imaging. Neoplasm, Residual / radionuclide imaging. Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Positron-Emission Tomography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Lymphatic Metastasis / radionuclide imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Sensitivity and Specificity. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 18606510.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1476
  • [Journal-full-title] Auris, nasus, larynx
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Auris Nasus Larynx
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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32. Sarkar S, Kundu AK, Chakrabarti S: Lungs: victim of synchronous double malignancies. J Assoc Physicians India; 2007 Mar;55:235-7
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  • A 20 year young man was referred to our institution with superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome, multiple lung opacities and a mass lesion in the right upper zone (RUZ).
  • CT-guided FNAC from the mass lesion was consistent with the diagnosis of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC).
  • Both FNAC and excisional biopsy of the testicular mass confirmed the diagnosis of immature teratoma with choriocarcinoma, a form of non-seminomatous germ cell tumour (NSGCT).
  • With chemotherapy all metastatic lesions of lung and SVC syndrome disappeared, and the tumour-marker levels decreased.
  • However, the opacity in RUZ progessed to involve right recurrent laryngeal nerve at thoracic inlet, metastasized to the brain, and the patient expired after 4th cycle of chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Choriocarcinoma / diagnosis. Lung Neoplasms / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / diagnosis. Teratoma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Humans. Male. Paraneoplastic Syndromes / etiology. Superior Vena Cava Syndrome / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17598338.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-5772
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Assoc Physicians India
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
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33. Watanabe N, Inohara H, Akahani S, Yamamoto Y, Moriwaki K, Kubo T: Synchronous squamous cell carcinoma and malignant lymphoma in the head and neck region. Auris Nasus Larynx; 2007 Jun;34(2):273-6
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  • [Title] Synchronous squamous cell carcinoma and malignant lymphoma in the head and neck region.
  • Synchronous malignancy of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and malignant lymphoma (ML) in the head and neck region is extremely rare.
  • Here, we report the case of a 57-year-old man with a right-sided neck mass; he was referred to our hospital in September 2001.
  • The metastatic lymph nodes showed poor response to the radiotherapy, and the patient was surgically salvaged by modified radical neck dissection.
  • Although systemic chemotherapy against ML was scheduled, he refused the treatment and died of disseminated ML.
  • It is essential to determine the lesion that should be given priority treatment in case of double primary malignancies; this can be facilitated by determining the prognosis of each malignancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, B-Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease Progression. Endoscopy. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neck Dissection. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 16949236.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-8146
  • [Journal-full-title] Auris, nasus, larynx
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Auris Nasus Larynx
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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34. Kawecki A, Jagielska B, Falkowski S: [Chemotherapy for metastatic or recurrent laryngeal cancer: tolerance and early results]. Otolaryngol Pol; 2000;54 Suppl 31:21-3
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  • [Title] [Chemotherapy for metastatic or recurrent laryngeal cancer: tolerance and early results].
  • [Transliterated title] Ocena tolerancji i wczesnych wyników paliatywnej chemioterapii u chorych na rozsianego lub nawrotowego raka krtani.
  • In the Head and Neck Cancer Department of Cancer Centre in Warsaw between 1994 and 1998 fifty three patients with recurrent or metastatic laryngeal cancer were treated with methotrexate-based chemotherapy.
  • Chemotherapy protocol consist of methotrexate, vinblastine, 5-fluorouracil, bleomycin, cyclophosphamide and steroids used every two weeks.
  • Before treatment, unresectable local recurrence was observed in 35 patient and distant secondaries in 18 others.
  • Tolerance of treatment was acceptable.
  • Partial regression of the tumor was obtained in 30% of patients.
  • Presented program is an effective alternative to supportive treatment in patients with recurrent or metastatic laryngeal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / secondary. Laryngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Laryngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 10974834.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6657
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologia polska = The Polish otolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Pol
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] POLAND
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35. Walvekar RR, Pantvaidya GH, Desai SB, Chaukar DA, D'Cruz AK: Urinary bladder metastasis--an unusual presentation of distant spread from a primary pyriform sinus cancer: a case report. Auris Nasus Larynx; 2006 Dec;33(4):493-5
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  • [Title] Urinary bladder metastasis--an unusual presentation of distant spread from a primary pyriform sinus cancer: a case report.
  • We present a report of a patient with a treated and controlled pyriform sinus cancer who presented with complaints of dysuria, 8 months after completion of treatment.
  • Cystoscopy revealed a bladder mass and biopsy confirmed it to be a metastatic squamous cell carcinoma.
  • On further investigation, the patient was found to have disseminated disease for which chemotherapy was instituted.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Cystoscopy. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Male. Neck Dissection. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant

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  • (PMID = 16920307.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-8146
  • [Journal-full-title] Auris, nasus, larynx
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Auris Nasus Larynx
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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36. Cathomas R, Köberle D, Ruhstaller T, Mayer G, Räss A, Mey U, von Moos R: Heated (37 degrees C) oxaliplatin infusion in combination with capecitabine for metastatic colorectal carcinoma: can it reduce neuropathy? Support Care Cancer; 2010 Oct;18(10):1263-70
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  • [Title] Heated (37 degrees C) oxaliplatin infusion in combination with capecitabine for metastatic colorectal carcinoma: can it reduce neuropathy?
  • BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Oxaliplatin-associated neuropathy remains a dose-limiting toxicity of the standard chemotherapy regimen of oxaliplatin and capecitabine for metastatic colorectal cancer.
  • METHODS: In this open-label pilot feasibility trial, patients with no prior chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer were included.
  • Treatment consisted of capecitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) bid on days 1-14 and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 on day 1 of a 21-day cycle.
  • The primary endpoint was feasibility and drug reactions during the infusion.
  • RESULTS: Twenty patients were enrolled, and a total of 95 cycles administered.
  • Apart from one patient with laryngeal spasm, no other infusion-related adverse events were observed.
  • The overall response rate was 45% (95% CI 23-67%; 5% complete remission; 40% partial remission) and stable disease was achieved in another 30% of patients.
  • While we have observed a relatively low rate of chronic cumulative neuropathy with heated oxaliplatin, this procedure appears not promising enough for us to recommend its further clinical evaluation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hot Temperature. Neurotoxicity Syndromes / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Capecitabine. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Feasibility Studies. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / analogs & derivatives. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Pilot Projects. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19756772.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-7339
  • [Journal-full-title] Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Support Care Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 6804DJ8Z9U / Capecitabine; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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37. Sauter A, Soulsby H, Hormann K, Naim R: Sulindac sulfone induces a decrease of beta-catenin in HNSCC. Anticancer Res; 2010 Feb;30(2):339-43
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  • BACKGROUND: The most common neoplasm arising in the upper gastrointestinal tract is head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
  • Among these factors, beta-catenin is considered to be the most important for reducing cell-cell adhesions in malignant tissue.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were performed after treatment of the UMSCC 11A cell line with different concentrations of sulindac sulfone (100, 200, 400, 600 and 800 microMol) for 48 hours.
  • It is presumed that reduction of cell-cell adhesion, which is predominately affected by beta-catenin, is an essential step in the progression from localized malignancy to stromal and vascular invasion and ultimately metastatic disease.
  • The reduction in the level of mural expression of beta-catenin has been associated with loss of differentiation in laryngeal carcinomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Down-Regulation / drug effects. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sulindac / analogs & derivatives. beta Catenin / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Blotting, Western. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 20332437.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / beta Catenin; 184SNS8VUH / Sulindac; K619IIG2R9 / sulindac sulfone
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38. Burns P, Sheahan P, Doody J, Kinsella J: Clavicular osteomyelitis: a rare complication of head and neck cancer surgery. Head Neck; 2008 Aug;30(8):1124-7
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  • [Title] Clavicular osteomyelitis: a rare complication of head and neck cancer surgery.
  • BACKGROUND: We report the 10th case in the English-language literature describing clavicular osteomyelitis that presented after radical treatment for laryngeal carcinoma and discuss the pertinent diagnostic and therapeutic measures.
  • The differential diagnosis included tumor recurrence, metastatic bone disease, and postradiotherapy complications.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: A 45-year-old man who was a heavy smoker and known drug abuser presented with acute airway compromise and was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma involving the glottis and subglottis.
  • Total laryngectomy, total thyroidectomy, and bilateral neck dissection were performed, and the patient underwent chemoradiotherapy.
  • On follow-up 1 year later, the patient was seen with left stomal dehiscence and a large area of cellulitis extending across the left clavicle and down to the axilla.
  • Biopsy showed no evidence of tumor.
  • After aggressive treatment, the patient remains disease free.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This condition is rarely encountered after major head and neck surgery.
  • Aggressive surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy remains the mainstay of treatment.
  • Prompt diagnosis and treatment are mandatory due to the potential life-threatening complications associated with the condition.
  • [MeSH-major] Clavicle / microbiology. Escherichia coli Infections / diagnosis. Osteomyelitis / etiology. Postoperative Complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Laryngectomy. Male. Middle Aged. Neck Dissection. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Staphylococcal Infections / diagnosis. Surgical Stomas. Surgical Wound Dehiscence / microbiology. Surgical Wound Dehiscence / surgery. Thyroidectomy

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  • (PMID = 18228522.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0347
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & neck
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Lesinski-Schiedat A, Hemmanouil I, Sauer-Gönen M, Flemming P, Freihorst I, Kempf HG, Lenarz T: [Malignant transformation of a juvenile papilloma in a 11 year old boy]. Laryngorhinootologie; 2005 Aug;84(8):602-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Malignant transformation of a juvenile papilloma in a 11 year old boy].
  • BACKGROUND: The juvenile laryngeal papilloma is the most common benign neoplasm in children.
  • Often the entity shows an elongated recurrent course of disease with an expansion into the tracheo-bronchial system.
  • Sporadic malignant transformation in adults with a papilloma was reported after treatment with radiotherapy alone or in combination with the intake of additional toxins (e. g. nicotine).
  • Similar reports of a malignant transformation of juvenile papillomas without additional risk factors is very rarely reported.
  • CASE REPORT: We report about an 11 year old boy, who suffered from a juvenile laryngeal papilloma.
  • The multiple laser surgical procedures and a therapy with interferon resulted in a short-term remissions.
  • Seven months after the first diagnosis of the papilloma a regional metastatic squamous cell carcinoma was found.
  • In spite of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy the boy died 11 months later.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The spontaneous malignant transformation of a juvenile papilloma in a squamous cell carcinoma is extremely rare.
  • The surgical intervention as well the radiotherapy and chemotherapy using interferon was unsuccessful due to the high grade of malignancy.
  • In view of the very short time interval between first diagnosis of juvenile papilloma and the subsequent malignant transformation, one must consider either the potential presence of a very aggressive form of papilloma or alternative two coincident independent diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / pathology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Papilloma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Humans. Interferons / therapeutic use. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Remission Induction. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 16080063.001).
  • [ISSN] 0935-8943
  • [Journal-full-title] Laryngo- rhino- otologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngorhinootologie
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 9008-11-1 / Interferons
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40. Righini CA, Bettega G, Lequeux T, Chaffanjeon P, Lebeau J, Reyt E: Use of tubed gastro-omental free flap for hypopharynx and cervical esophagus reconstruction after total laryngo-pharyngectomy. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2005 May;262(5):362-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Use of tubed gastro-omental free flap for hypopharynx and cervical esophagus reconstruction after total laryngo-pharyngectomy.
  • In case of total laryngo-pharyngectomy (TLP), replacement of the pharyngoesophageal segment is more often done with jejunal flap; however, in some cases, this flap doesn't represent the best surgical technique of reconstruction.
  • The tubed gastro-omental free flap (TGO) offers an alternative procedure in selective cases.
  • The objective of the study was to assess the TGO as a method of pharyngoesophageal reconstruction.
  • Our study was based on a literature review and a retrospective study of six consecutive cases of TGO reconstruction after TLP.
  • Five patients had previously received systemic chemotherapy and external irradiation at curative doses, and three had undergone previous surgery.
  • Four patients died of loco-regional tumor evolution or distant metastatic disease.
  • For both of the patients who survived (mean follow-up, 40 months), a normal diet and an esophageal voice were obtained.
  • The TGO offers a safe method of reconstructing the pharyngoesophageal segment in a surgical field compromised of previous multimodal therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Esophagus / surgery. Hypopharynx / surgery. Laryngectomy. Pharyngectomy. Surgical Flaps
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Cutaneous Fistula / etiology. Cutaneous Fistula / surgery. Esophageal Neoplasms / surgery. Humans. Larynx / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Omentum / surgery. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures. Retrospective Studies. Stomach / surgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15378313.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-4477
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 13
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41. Garufi C, Nisticò C, Brienza S, Vaccaro A, D'Ottavio A, Zappalà AR, Aschelter AM, Terzoli E: Single-agent oxaliplatin in pretreated advanced breast cancer patients: a phase II study. Ann Oncol; 2001 Feb;12(2):179-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Single-agent oxaliplatin in pretreated advanced breast cancer patients: a phase II study.
  • PURPOSE: Oxaliplatin (L-OHP), a new platinum analogue, is an active drug in colorectal and ovarian cancer.
  • In this phase II study we explored tolerability and activity of oxaliplatin as a single agent in metastatic breast carcinoma patients.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fourteen anthracycline pretreated advanced breast cancer patients were enrolled.
  • Three patients developed acute transient laryngeal symptoms.
  • Three patients displayed a partial response (21%), (95% confidence interval (CI): 0%-43%), two stable disease (14%) and nine progressed (64%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this limited experience, oxaliplatin appeared to be well tolerated and moderately active in advanced anthracycline-pretreated breast cancer patients.
  • Combination chemotherapy with other active drugs such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), anthracyclines and taxanes should represent the next step of development of this new drug.

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  • (PMID = 11300320.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin
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42. Marioni G, Blandamura S, Calgaro N, Ferraro SM, Stramare R, Staffieri A, De Filippis C: Distant muscular (gluteus maximus muscle) metastasis from laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Acta Otolaryngol; 2005 Jun;125(6):678-82
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Carcinoma, Squamous Cell.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Distant muscular (gluteus maximus muscle) metastasis from laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Clinical evidence of non-lymphatic distant metastasis has been reported in approximately 10% of cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
  • A 65-year-old male underwent supraglottic laryngectomy and left modified neck dissection for a carcinoma of the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis extending to both false cords.
  • Eight months later the patient underwent right radical modified neck dissection for hypodermal metastatic disease involving the underlying (sternocleidomastoid) muscle.
  • Thirty-two months later, surgical excision of a lesion in the right gluteus maximus muscle was performed.
  • Histological study diagnosed a muscular metastasis with the same morphological aspect as the laryngeal carcinoma.
  • Although skeletal muscles represent approximately 50% of total body mass and receive a large proportion of total cardiac output, haematogenous metastases to skeletal muscle are extremely uncommon.
  • Treatment options, depending upon the clinical setting, include observation, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and excision; these approaches rarely alter the patient outcome.
  • The prognosis associated with skeletal muscle metastasis is thought to be poor, consistent with the fact that it generally occurs as a feature of systemic spread.
  • [MeSH-major] Buttocks / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Laryngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Muscle Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Laryngectomy. Lymph Node Excision. Male. Neck Muscles / pathology. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 16076722.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6489
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oto-laryngologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otolaryngol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Norway
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