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1. Xu CT, Meng SY, Pan BR: Drug therapy for ulcerative colitis. World J Gastroenterol; 2004 Aug 15;10(16):2311-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Drug therapy for ulcerative colitis.
  • Drug therapy is not the only choice for UC treatment and medical management should be as a comprehensive whole.
  • Systemic corticosteroids (prednisone, prednisolone, cortisone, etc.) are potent and fast-acting drugs for treating UC, Crohn's ileitis and ileocolitis.
  • Serious side effects can result from prolonged corticosteroid treatment.
  • In patients with corticosteroid-dependent or unresponsive to corticosteroid treatment, surgery or immunomodulator is considered.
  • Immunomodulators used for treating severe UC include azathioprine/6-MP, methotrexate, and cyclosporine.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Anti-Ulcer Agents / therapeutic use. Colitis, Ulcerative / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] 6-Mercaptopurine / analogs & derivatives. 6-Mercaptopurine / therapeutic use. Adrenal Cortex Hormones / adverse effects. Adrenal Cortex Hormones / therapeutic use. Cyclosporine / therapeutic use. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Medicine, Chinese Traditional

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  • [CommentIn] World J Gastroenterol. 2005 Jun 7;11(21):3327 [15929195.001]
  • (PMID = 15285010.001).
  • [ISSN] 1007-9327
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Anti-Ulcer Agents; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / azathiopurine; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; E7WED276I5 / 6-Mercaptopurine
  • [Number-of-references] 44
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4576279
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2. Tam LC, Kiang AS, Campbell M, Keaney J, Farrar GJ, Humphries MM, Kenna PF, Humphries P: Prevention of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa by systemic drug therapy targeting heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Hum Mol Genet; 2010 Nov 15;19(22):4421-36
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  • [Title] Prevention of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa by systemic drug therapy targeting heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90).
  • Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most prevalent cause of registered visual handicap among working aged populations of developed countries.
  • Up to 40% of autosomal dominant cases of disease are caused by mutations within the rhodopsin, RDS-peripherin and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase type 1 (IMPDH1) genes, at least 30 mutations within which give rise to proteins that cause disease pathology by misfolding and aggregation.
  • Given the genetic complexity of this disease, therapies that simultaneously target multiple mutations are of substantial logistic and economic significance.
  • We show here, in a murine model of autosomal dominant RP (RP10) involving expression of an Arg224Pro mutation within the IMPDH1 gene, that treatment with the low-molecular-weight drug, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an ansamycin antibiotic that binds to heat shock protein Hsp90, activating a heat shock response in mammalian cells, protects photoreceptors against degeneration induced by aggregating mutant IMPDH1 protein, systemic delivery of this low-molecular-weight drug to the retina being facilitated by RNA interference-mediated modulation of the inner-blood retina barrier.
  • 17-AAG has an orphan drug status and is in current clinical use for the treatment of non-ocular diseases.
  • These data show that a single low-molecular-weight drug has the potential to suppress a wide range of mutant proteins causing RP.

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  • (PMID = 20817636.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-2083
  • [Journal-full-title] Human molecular genetics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Mol. Genet.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Wellcome Trust / / 083866/2/07/2
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzoquinones; 0 / HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins; 0 / Lactams, Macrocyclic; 4GY0AVT3L4 / tanespimycin; 9009-81-8 / Rhodopsin; EC 1.1.1.205 / IMP Dehydrogenase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2957325
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3. Guo Y, Köck K, Ritter CA, Chen ZS, Grube M, Jedlitschky G, Illmer T, Ayres M, Beck JF, Siegmund W, Ehninger G, Gandhi V, Kroemer HK, Kruh GD, Schaich M: Expression of ABCC-type nucleotide exporters in blasts of adult acute myeloid leukemia: relation to long-term survival. Clin Cancer Res; 2009 Mar 01;15(5):1762-9
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  • [Title] Expression of ABCC-type nucleotide exporters in blasts of adult acute myeloid leukemia: relation to long-term survival.
  • PURPOSE: Successful treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a therapeutic challenge, with a high percentage of patients suffering from persistent or relapsed disease.
  • Resistance to drug therapy can develop from increased drug export and/or altered intracellular signaling.
  • Both mechanisms are mediated by the efflux transporters ABCC4 (MRP4), ABCC5 (MRP5), and ABCC11 (MRP8), which are involved in cellular efflux of endogenous signaling molecules (e.g., cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate and cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate) and nucleoside analogues.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Expression of ABCC transporters MRP4, MRP5, and MRP8 in blast samples from 50 AML patients was investigated by real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis and correlated with clinical outcome measures.
  • RESULTS: Regression analysis revealed that high expression of MRP8 is associated with a low probability of overall survival assessed over 4 years (P<0.03).
  • Furthermore, AraC monophosphate was transported by MRP8-enriched membrane vesicles (116+/-6 versus 65+/-13 pmol/mg/10 minutes by control vesicles), and MRP8-transfected cells were resistant to AraC.
  • CONCLUSION: These data suggest that MRP8 is differentially expressed in AML blasts, that expression of MRP8 serves as a predictive marker for treatment outcome in AML, and that efflux of AraC metabolites by MRP8 is a mechanism that contributes to resistance of AML blasts.
  • [MeSH-major] ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters / metabolism. Blast Crisis. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / metabolism. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / pathology. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cell Membrane / metabolism. Cytarabine / metabolism. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. LLC-PK1 Cells. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Stem Cells / metabolism. Stem Cells / pathology. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 19240178.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA057629; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA113474; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA73728; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA114574; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA57629; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA073728
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ABCC11 protein, human; 0 / ABCC4 protein, human; 0 / ABCC5 protein, human; 0 / ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters; 0 / Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine
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4. Li F, Fridley BL, Matimba A, Kalari KR, Pelleymounter L, Moon I, Ji Y, Jenkins GD, Batzler A, Wang L, Weinshilboum RM: Ecto-5'-nucleotidase and thiopurine cellular circulation: association with cytotoxicity. Drug Metab Dispos; 2010 Dec;38(12):2329-38
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  • Thiopurine drugs such as 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and 6-thioguanine (6-TG) are used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia of childhood.
  • To test the hypothesis that variation in the expression of genes within the "thiopurine pathway" might influence 6-MP and 6-TG sensitivity, we generated basal gene expression profiles and IC(50) values for both of these thiopurine drugs using a model system consisting of 194 Human Variation Panel lymphoblastoid cell lines.
  • Association analysis showed that thiopurine S-methyltransferase, ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E), and multidrug resistance protein 4 (ABCC4) expression were correlated with thiopurine cytotoxicity.
  • Those observations suggested the possible existence of a "thiopurine cellular circulation" involving nucleotide efflux by ABCC4, hydrolysis of thiopurine nucleotide monophosphates outside of the cell by NT5E, and subsequent transport of thiopurine nucleosides back into the cell by nucleoside transporters.
  • The thiopurine cellular circulation and genetic polymorphisms for genes encoding the proteins involved should be incorporated into future studies of thiopurine drug therapy and effect.

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  • (PMID = 20855458.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-009X
  • [Journal-full-title] Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drug Metab. Dispos.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM028157; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA132780; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01-GM28157; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / U01 GM061388; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA132780; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K22 CA130828; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM061388-10; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K22-CA130828; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA132780-04; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM028157-30; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / U01 GM061388-10; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / U01-GM61388; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA138461; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA138461
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ABCC4 protein, human; 0 / Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins; E7WED276I5 / 6-Mercaptopurine; EC 2.1.1.- / Methyltransferases; EC 2.1.1.67 / thiopurine methyltransferase; EC 3.1.3.5 / 5'-Nucleotidase; FTK8U1GZNX / Thioguanine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2993460
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5. Beduneau A, Ma Z, Grotepas CB, Kabanov A, Rabinow BE, Gong N, Mosley RL, Dou H, Boska MD, Gendelman HE: Facilitated monocyte-macrophage uptake and tissue distribution of superparmagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles. PLoS One; 2009;4(2):e4343
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  • [Title] Facilitated monocyte-macrophage uptake and tissue distribution of superparmagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles.
  • BACKGROUND: We posit that the same mononuclear phagocytes (MP) that serve as target cells and vehicles for a host of microbial infections can be used to improve diagnostics and drug delivery.
  • We also theorize that physical and biological processes such as particle shape, size, coating and opsonization that affect MP clearance of debris and microbes can be harnessed to facilitate uptake of nanoparticles (NP) and tissue delivery.
  • IgG coated SPIO was synthesized by covalent linkage and uptake into monocytes and MDM investigated related to size, time, temperature, concentration, and coatings.
  • T(2) measures using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to monitor tissue distribution in animals.
  • Compared to unconjugated SPIO, intravenous injection of IgG-SPIO afforded enhanced and sustained lymphoid tissue distribution over 24 hours as demonstrated by MRI.
  • Uptake was linked to particle size and was time and concentration dependent.
  • The ability of SPIO to be rapidly taken up and distributed into lymphoid tissues also demonstrates feasibility of macrophage-targeted nanoformulations for diagnostic and drug therapy.

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  • (PMID = 19183814.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P30 AI42845; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P01 NS043985; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / P01MH64570; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P01 NS031492; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / U54NS43011-01; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P01 NS31492; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P30 AI042845; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / 1T32 NS07488; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / U54 NS043011; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / 2R01 NS034239; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / P20RR15635; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / P01 MH064570; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R37 NS036126; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / T32 NS007488; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / P20 RR015635; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / 2R37 NS36126; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R01 NS034239; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P01 NS43985
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Ferric Compounds; 1K09F3G675 / ferric oxide
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2629545
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6. Sampath J, Adachi M, Hatse S, Naesens L, Balzarini J, Flatley RM, Matherly LH, Schuetz JD: Role of MRP4 and MRP5 in biology and chemotherapy. AAPS PharmSci; 2002;4(3):E14
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Role of MRP4 and MRP5 in biology and chemotherapy.
  • Nucleotide efflux (especially cyclic nucleotides) from a variety of mammalian tissues, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes has been studied for several decades.
  • Identification of the subfamily of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette transporters, multidrug resistance protein (MRP) subfamily, permitted rapid advances because some recently identified MRP family members transport modified nucleotide analogs (ie, chemotherapeutic agents).
  • We first identified, MRP4, based on its ability to efflux antiretroviral compounds, such as azidothymidine monophosphate (AZT-MP) and 9-(2-phosphonyl methoxyethyl) adenine (PMEA), in drug-resistant and also in transfected cell lines.
  • MRP4 and MRP5 confer resistance to cytotoxic thiopurine nucleotides, and we demonstrate MRP4 expression varies among acute lymphoblastic leukemias, suggesting this as a factor in response to chemotherapy with these agents.
  • The ability of MRP4 and MRP5 to transport 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) suggests they may play a biological role in cellular signaling by these nucleotides.

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  • (PMID = 12423063.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-1059
  • [Journal-full-title] AAPS pharmSci
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AAPS PharmSci
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-63203; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-23099; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA21765; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM-60904; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA77641
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ABCC4 protein, human; 0 / ABCC5 protein, human; 0 / Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins; 0 / Nucleotides, Cyclic
  • [Number-of-references] 62
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2751353
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7. Harasawa H, Yamada Y, Kudoh M, Sugahara K, Soda H, Hirakata Y, Sasaki H, Ikeda S, Matsuo T, Tomonaga M, Nobori T, Kamihira S: Chemotherapy targeting methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) deficiency in adult T cell leukemia (ATL). Leukemia; 2002 Sep;16(9):1799-807
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Chemotherapy targeting methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) deficiency in adult T cell leukemia (ATL).
  • In the present study, we expanded our series and used a real-time quantitative PCR assay for accurate diagnosis of the deletion and nine of 65 primary ATL samples (13.8%) were MTAP negative.
  • In spite of this low incidence, ATL cells showed significantly higher sensitivity to L-alanosine, an inhibitor of de novo adenosine monophosphate (AMP) synthesis, than normal lymphocytes, suggesting that the MTAP gene is inactivated not only by deletion but also by other mechanisms.
  • Indeed, a real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay disclosed that primary ATL cells had significantly lower MTAP mRNA expression than normal lymphocytes.
  • Since MTAP-negative ATL cell lines also showed much higher sensitivity to L-alanosine than MTAP-positive ATL cell lines, we used these cell lines to investigate whether it is possible to develop selective therapy targeting MTAP deficiency.
  • These results support the rationale for a chemotherapy regimen of L-alanosine combined with 5'-deoxyadenosine rescue in MTAP-deficient ATL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / drug therapy. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / enzymology. Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase / deficiency
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenosine Monophosphate / metabolism. Blotting, Southern. Cell Division. Colony-Forming Units Assay. DNA Primers / chemistry. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Gene Deletion. Humans. Lymphocyte Activation. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. RNA, Neoplasm / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Thymidine / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 12200696.001).
  • [ISSN] 0887-6924
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leukemia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 415SHH325A / Adenosine Monophosphate; EC 2.4.2.1 / Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase; EC 2.4.2.28 / 5'-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase; VC2W18DGKR / Thymidine
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8. Gur S, Kadowitz PJ, Hellstrom WJ: Guide to drug therapy for lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with benign prostatic obstruction : implications for sexual dysfunction. Drugs; 2008;68(2):209-29
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Guide to drug therapy for lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with benign prostatic obstruction : implications for sexual dysfunction.
  • Current medical treatment of LUTS/BPO consists of monotherapy with alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists or 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, a combination of these two agents or, in some cases, various phytotherapeutic approaches.
  • When choosing a drug therapy, it is important to recognize that while 5alpha-reductase inhibitors increase the risk of ED and ejaculatory disorders, and combined therapy carries the cumulative risk of causing sexual dysfunction, some alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonists have been reported to improve overall sexual function.
  • Therefore, the successful evaluation and management of older men with LUTS associated with BPO should include an assessment of baseline sexual function and subsequent monitoring of medication-induced sexual adverse effects.
  • In this review, we detail the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in LUTS/BPO-associated ED, including reduced nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate system activity, enhanced endothelin-1/rhoA/rho kinase pathway activity, sympathetic overactivity, pelvic organ atherosclerosis and potential preventive approaches.
  • [MeSH-major] Erectile Dysfunction / drug therapy. Prostatic Hyperplasia / drug therapy. Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Impotence, Vasculogenic / drug therapy. Impotence, Vasculogenic / physiopathology. Male. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Prostate / drug effects. Prostate / pathology. Prostate / physiopathology. Urinary Bladder / drug effects. Urinary Bladder / physiopathology


9. Yu LX, Jia YB, Zhang Y: Management of acute rejection of kidney allograft. Di Yi Jun Yi Da Xue Xue Bao; 2002 Aug;22(8):752-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted in 86 cases of AR developed after primary kidney transplantation in the light of therapeutic measures, clinical outcome and prognosis.
  • RESULTS: Among these patients, 81 survived AR after treatment.
  • In patients with pulse treatment with methylprednisolone (MP), 48 out of 68 managed to survive the crises, while in those who received ATG as the first line drug therapy 10 out of 11 patients survived and in other cases, 6 out of 7 did due to first-line OKT3 administration.
  • All the 20 patients who did not respond to MP received ATG or OKT3 instead, with 14 recovered.
  • Of the 8 patients who failed to be cured by the management above, 6 with previous CSA treatment took FK506 and 3 were consequently cured.
  • CONCLUSIONS: MP therapy is still the most commonly used primary treatment for acute rejection episodes.
  • Increase of SCr by more than 10% on days 2 and 3 of MP therapy indicates poor prognosis.
  • ATG or OKT3 can be effective against acute rejection not only as first-line but also as second-line drug.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents / therapeutic use. Graft Rejection / drug therapy. Kidney Transplantation. Methylprednisolone / therapeutic use. Muromonab-CD3 / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 12376272.001).
  • [ISSN] 1000-2588
  • [Journal-full-title] Di 1 jun yi da xue xue bao = Academic journal of the first medical college of PLA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Di Yi Jun Yi Da Xue Xue Bao
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Muromonab-CD3; X4W7ZR7023 / Methylprednisolone
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10. Xu LP, Huang XJ, Liu DH, Chen YH, Shi HX, Chen DB: [A clinical study of lymphoproliferative disorders following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation]. Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi; 2007 Dec;46(12):996-9
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  • 9 patients developed PTLD.
  • The morphology of biopsy appeared as small B-lymphocytic lymphoma; there was no response to chemotherapy and the patients died.
  • One patient recovered by reducing immunosuppressive drug therapy combined with MP and one patient recovered by reducing immunosuppressive/antivirus therapy and donor lymphocyte infusion.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Post HSCT PTLD occurs characteristically as disseminated disease with a rapidly progressive and often fulminant course and had a high mortality.
  • It is essential to keep a vigilant eye on it especially in high risk patients.

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  • (PMID = 18478915.001).
  • [ISSN] 0578-1426
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua nei ke za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / HLA Antigens
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11. Ozdemir A, Mas MR, Sahin S, Sağlamkaya U, Ateşkan U: Detection of Helicobacter pylori colonization in dental plaques and tongue scrapings of patients with chronic gastritis. Quintessence Int; 2001 Feb;32(2):131-4
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  • [Title] Detection of Helicobacter pylori colonization in dental plaques and tongue scrapings of patients with chronic gastritis.
  • OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that the oral cavity and dental plaque might be a reservoir for Helicobacter pylori (Hp).
  • In this study, our aims were to detect the prevalence of Hp colonization in dental plaque and tongue scrapings of patients with chronic gastritis and to investigate the effect of systemic treatment upon this colonization and eradication of Hp from gastric mucosa.
  • After 14 days of triple drug therapy (omeprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin), Hp was eradicated from the gastric mucosa of almost all of the patients, whereas no changes were detected in dental plaque and tongue scrapings by CLO test examination.
  • CONCLUSION: Helicobacter pylori colonization, which seemed to be high in dental plaque and on the tongue, might play an important role in the pathogenesis of the reinfection process.
  • In order to eradicate Hp from both the oral cavity and the gastric mucosa, studies should be performed to assess the effects of plaque control procedures in addition to present treatment modalities.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Amoxicillin / administration & dosage. Amoxicillin / therapeutic use. Anti-Bacterial Agents / administration & dosage. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Anti-Ulcer Agents / administration & dosage. Anti-Ulcer Agents / therapeutic use. Biopsy. Chronic Disease. Clarithromycin / administration & dosage. Clarithromycin / therapeutic use. Coloring Agents. Drug Therapy, Combination / therapeutic use. Female. Fluorescent Dyes. Gastric Mucosa / microbiology. Gastric Mucosa / pathology. Gastroscopy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Omeprazole / administration & dosage. Omeprazole / therapeutic use. Penicillins / administration & dosage. Penicillins / therapeutic use. Pyloric Antrum / microbiology. Pyloric Antrum / pathology

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  • (PMID = 12066673.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-6572
  • [Journal-full-title] Quintessence international (Berlin, Germany : 1985)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Quintessence Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Anti-Ulcer Agents; 0 / Coloring Agents; 0 / Fluorescent Dyes; 0 / Penicillins; 804826J2HU / Amoxicillin; H1250JIK0A / Clarithromycin; KG60484QX9 / Omeprazole
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12. Burduli NM, Gutnova SK: [State of humoral immunity and phagocytic activity of neutrophils in patients with ulcer and effect of low-intensity laser therapy]. Eksp Klin Gastroenterol; 2004;(4):29-32, 108
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  • [Title] [State of humoral immunity and phagocytic activity of neutrophils in patients with ulcer and effect of low-intensity laser therapy].
  • The aim of our investigation was to study the influence of low-intensity laser therapy at the immunologic parameters and Helicobacter pylori (HP) microbial contamination in patients with exacerbation of peptic and duodenal ulcer.
  • The experimental group (75 patients) underwent a complex drug and laser therapy of various therapeutic techniques.
  • The control group (25 patients) underwent only drug therapy.
  • The results of this study show the immunocorrective effect of different methods of low-intensity laser therapy in the exacerbation period and more essential decrease of HP microbial contamination in the experimental group.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibody Formation / radiation effects. Low-Level Light Therapy / methods. Neutrophils / radiation effects. Peptic Ulcer / immunology. Phagocytosis / radiation effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Anti-Ulcer Agents / therapeutic use. Helicobacter Infections / drug therapy. Helicobacter Infections / immunology. Helicobacter Infections / microbiology. Helicobacter Infections / radiotherapy. Helicobacter pylori / drug effects. Helicobacter pylori / isolation & purification. Helicobacter pylori / radiation effects. Humans. Immunoglobulins / analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15568664.001).
  • [ISSN] 1682-8658
  • [Journal-full-title] Ėksperimental'nai︠a︡ i klinicheskai︠a︡ gastroėnterologii︠a︡ = Experimental & clinical gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eksp Klin Gastroenterol
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Anti-Ulcer Agents; 0 / Immunoglobulins
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13. Laxman S, Beavo JA: Cyclic nucleotide signaling mechanisms in trypanosomes: possible targets for therapeutic agents. Mol Interv; 2007 Aug;7(4):203-15
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cyclic nucleotide signaling mechanisms in trypanosomes: possible targets for therapeutic agents.
  • Although adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) signaling and regulation have been widely studied in mammalian systems, and these pathways provide targets for the treatment of numerous pathologies, a molecular understanding of cAMP signaling in trypanosomes remains incomplete.
  • In this review, we discuss recent developments, emerging ideas, and gaps in knowledge in this area of research, highlighting aspects of enzymes in the cAMP signaling pathway that may be good targets for antitrypanosomal drug therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclic AMP / metabolism. Second Messenger Systems / physiology. Trypanocidal Agents. Trypanosoma / drug effects. Trypanosoma / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenylyl Cyclases / chemistry. Adenylyl Cyclases / metabolism. Animals. Carrier Proteins / metabolism. Chagas Disease / drug therapy. Chagas Disease / parasitology. Humans. Models, Molecular. Molecular Structure. Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases / classification. Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases / genetics. Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases / metabolism. Phylogeny. Protein Conformation. Protozoan Proteins / chemistry. Protozoan Proteins / metabolism. RNA Interference. Trypanosomiasis, African / drug therapy. Trypanosomiasis, African / parasitology

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  • (PMID = 17827441.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-0384
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular interventions
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Interv.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / Protozoan Proteins; 0 / Trypanocidal Agents; E0399OZS9N / Cyclic AMP; EC 3.1.4.- / Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases; EC 4.6.1.1 / Adenylyl Cyclases
  • [Number-of-references] 83
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14. Steers WD: Viability and safety of combination drug therapies for erectile dysfunction. J Urol; 2003 Aug;170(2 Pt 2):S20-3; discussion S23
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Viability and safety of combination drug therapies for erectile dysfunction.
  • PURPOSE: In some patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) oral, topical or intracavernous drug therapy fails.
  • However, several classes of drugs demonstrate efficacy for ED, creating the potential for pharmacological combinations preferable to implantation of a penile prosthesis.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Preliminary reports suggest that combining oral, topical or intracavernous drugs may salvage patients in whom monotherapy fails.
  • RESULTS: Agents that lead to activation or increases in cyclic nucleotides (cyclic adenosine monophosphate and guanosine monophosphate) with or without nitric oxide donors or nitrates, or alpha-adrenergic antagonists have been used to treat ED.
  • Combination strategies may allow lower drug doses and reduced adverse effects.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The encouraging preliminary observations combined with the potential for adverse events provide a scientific rationale for prospective, randomized clinical trials with adequate numbers of subjects.
  • [MeSH-major] Alprostadil / administration & dosage. Erectile Dysfunction / drug therapy. Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Piperazines / administration & dosage. Vasodilator Agents / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Apomorphine / administration & dosage. Dopamine Agonists. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Male. Purines. Sildenafil Citrate. Sulfones

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  • (PMID = 12853768.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dopamine Agonists; 0 / Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Purines; 0 / Sulfones; 0 / Vasodilator Agents; BW9B0ZE037 / Sildenafil Citrate; F5TD010360 / Alprostadil; N21FAR7B4S / Apomorphine
  • [Number-of-references] 20
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15. Albus C, Theissen P, Hellmich M, Griebenow R, Wilhelm B, Aslim D, Schicha H, Köhle K: Long-term effects of a multimodal behavioral intervention on myocardial perfusion--a randomized controlled trial. Int J Behav Med; 2009;16(3):219-26
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Recent advances in drug therapy question as to the additional impact behavioral interventions may have on the prognosis of patients with clinically stable coronary heart disease (CHD).
  • PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a multimodal, behavioral intervention on myocardial perfusion (MP) and cardiac events, compared to standardized cardiologic care, in patients with stable CHD.
  • MP was assessed by (201)Thallium MP-scintigrams (SPECT) at baseline, after 2, 3, and 7 years, respectively.
  • In all patients, the course of MP was significantly better in INT analysis of variance (ANOVA group x time p = 0.001); this was also true for patients without subsequent PCI/CABG (ANOVA group x time p = 0.002).
  • [MeSH-major] Behavior Therapy / methods. Coronary Circulation / physiology. Coronary Disease / therapy. Myocardial Perfusion Imaging. Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary / psychology. Combined Modality Therapy. Coronary Artery Bypass / psychology. Exercise / psychology. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Middle Aged. Myocardial Infarction / prevention & control. Myocardial Infarction / psychology. Patient Education as Topic. Psychotherapy, Group. Relaxation Therapy

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  • (PMID = 19424808.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-7558
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of behavioral medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Behav Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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16. Syed SK, Beeram M, Takimoto CH, Jakubowitz J, Kimura M, Ducharme M, Gadgeel S, De Jager R, Rowinsky E, Lorusso P: Phase I and Pharmacokinetics (PK) of DJ-927, an oral taxane, in patients (Pts) with advanced cancers. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):2028

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Pts were stratified based on prior therapy into minimally (MP) and heavily (HP) pretreated cohorts.
  • Primary tumors are colorectal [15], breast [4], pancreas [5], renal cell [3], soft tissue sarcoma [3] and others [10].
  • Minimal drug-related toxicities were observed at doses 5 days duration [7] and grade 3 thrombocytopenia [4] were the predominant hematological toxicities observed at 40 and 35 mg/m<sup>2</sup> doses.
  • CONCLUSIONS: DJ-927 generates predictable systemic drug exposures and has been well tolerated when orally administered.
  • Dose escalation ceased due to DLT in 2/3 MP + 2/5 HP at 40 mg/m2 and 2/6 MP + 2/2 HP at 35 mg/m<sup>2</sup>.
  • MTD has been defined as 27 mg/m<sup>2</sup> for MP and HP patients.

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  • (PMID = 28015577.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Argiris A, Li Y, Forastiere A: Prognostic factors and long-term survivorship in patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer (HNC): An analysis of two Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) randomized trials. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):5514

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 5514 Background: The ECOG conducted two successive phase III randomized trials comparing cisplatin-based doublets (E1393: cisplatin/paclitaxel, low dose vs. cisplatin/paclitaxel, high dose, and E1395: cisplatin/paclitaxel vs. cisplatin/5-FU) in patients (pts) with recurrent or metastatic HNC.
  • These studies found no significant differences in antitumor efficacy between treatment arms.
  • On multivariate analysis, independent unfavorable predictors of objective response were weight loss, performance status (PS) of 1 (vs. 0), residual disease at the primary, site other than oropharyngeal, history of radiation therapy (RT) (P=0.06), and well/moderate tumor differentiation (TD) (P=0.07).
  • Independent prognostic factors for OS were weight loss, PS 1 (vs. 0), poor TD (favorable), oral cavity (OC) or hypopharyngeal (HP) primary, and history of RT, and for time to progression (TTP): poor TD (favorable), OC or HP primary, and history of RT.
  • Response to chemotherapy could also be included in the prognostic models of OS and TTP as an independent predictor.
  • 2-y survivors were more likely to have had a response to chemotherapy, poor TD, white race, PS of 0, and no prior RT.
  • Two out of 49 pts surviving at least 2 ys developed a second primary tumor.
  • A small percentage of pts with recurrent or metastatic HNC achieves long-term survival.

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  • (PMID = 28014175.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Hegde UP, Chakraborty N, Chhabra A, Ray S: Metastatic melanoma in the elderly: Case series of clinical outcome and immune characteristics. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20018

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Imbalances of the immune system are described due to aging associated changes between CD4+, CD8+, T helper (Th) 1, Th 2 and T regulatory and T effector lymphocytes (lym).
  • METHODS: Between October 2002 and October 2008, 10 elderly pts with treatment naïve CMM, 6 males and 4 female, median ages 76, range 57-84 years were treated at the University of Connecticut Health Center.
  • Metastatic sites included soft tissue in 2 patients (pts), lung and/or liver with lymph node (LN) involvement (6 pts) and distant LN metastasis (2pts).
  • Eight pts opted for treatment and received single or combination chemotherapy (5pts), high dose Interleukin 2 (2 pts), complete tumor resection followed by tumor derived heat shock protein vaccine (1 pt on clinical trial) and bio chemotherapy (1pt).
  • One patient declined treatment (included in follow up).
  • In vitro immune characteristics were studied in HLA-A2 positive subgroup (5pts) and included cytotoxic T lym (CTL) generation against self and non self peptides (Mart-1 27-35 and influenza MP derived peptide flu 58-66), proliferative activity of CD4+ lym in response to anti CD3 antibody under Th1 and Th2 conditions and regulatory T lym activity of CD4+CD25+ lym against CTL.
  • RESULTS: All patients tolerated treatments well resulting in 1 complete response, 4 partial responses, and 4 stable diseases.

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  • (PMID = 27962552.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Baltz B, Gregory SA, Ehmann WC, Williams D: Initial dosing of epoetin alfa 60,000 U QW followed by Q2W maintenance for anemic patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8212

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Initial dosing of epoetin alfa 60,000 U QW followed by Q2W maintenance for anemic patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy.
  • Higher starting doses followed by less frequent maintenance dosing may shorten time to Hb response, and increase response rates.
  • Pts who achieved Hb ≥12 g/dL then received maintenance dosing of 60,000 U SC every 2 wks (Q2W; maintenance phase [MP]).
  • Pts are withdrawn for missed doses and for Hb <11 g/dL in MP.
  • Thirty-three pts entered MP after a median of 4 wks.
  • Mean Hb was 12.4 ± 0.3 g/dL (n = 33) at first MP dose and has been maintained for a median 7 wks of follow-up (mean Hb after 4 wks in MP, 12.4 ± 0.1 g/dL [n = 20]).
  • EPO dose was reduced to 40,000 U QW in 6 (11%) pts during IP and 40,000 U Q2W in 14/33 (42%) pts during MP.
  • Twenty-eight pts have been withdrawn (16 in IP; 12 in MP) due to Hb <11 g/dL in MP (n = 7), disease progression (n = 4), death (n = 3), loss to follow-up (n = 1), failure to reach Hb ≥12 g/dL in IP (n = 1), and other/missing (n = 12).

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  • (PMID = 28016883.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Palumbo A, Bertola A, Musto P, Nunzi M, De Stefano V, Catalano L, Caravita T, Cangialosi C, Bringen S, Boccadoro M: Oral melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide for newly diagnosed myeloma patients. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6549

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • No data are available on the association of T with oral Melphalan and Prednisone (MP) in newly diagnosed patients.
  • Here, we evaluated the potential additive and synergistic effect of the combination Melphalan, Prednisone and Thalidomide (MPT) Methods: Between June 2002 and June 2003, 42 patients (median age 72, range 61-80) with newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma received 6 courses of MP (melphalan 4 mg/sqm and prednisone 40 mg/sqm for 7 days every month) plus T 100 mg/day continuously until any sign of disease progression or relapse.
  • All patients have completed the 6 assigned MP courses and were evaluated for both toxicity and response rate.
  • RESULTS: T increased the hematologic toxicity induced by MP: grade 3-4 WHO neutropenia was observed in 14% of patients.
  • After treatment, partial responses (myeloma protein reduction >50%) were observed in 93% of patients, no responses (myeloma protein reduction <50%) in 7%.
  • Complete remissions (disappearance of monoclonal protein and negative immunofixation) were 26%, near complete remissions (disappearance of monoclonal protein and positive immunofixation) were 19%, responses with myeloma protein reduction 90-99% were 12%.
  • Time required to obtain the maximum response was 4 months in 88% of patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of infections and deep-vein thrombosis was high, suggesting the need for antibiotic and anticoagulant prophylaxis.
  • MPT induced a response rate significantly higher in comparison with any other conventional chemotherapy program.

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  • (PMID = 28016929.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Latifzadeh SZ, Entezari V: Effect of megestrol acetate, cyproheptadine, and their combination on appetite, body weight and quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8141

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • 1) >5%below IBW / IBW ± 5% or >5% above IBW 2) Complete or Partial response / stable or progressive disease 3) Cisplatin / Non-Cisplatin based chemotherapy and assigned (by minimization method) to four treatment arms: Megestrol Acetate (320mg/d, BID) + Placebo (MP), Cyproheptadine (8mg/d, BID) + Placebo (CP), Megestrol Acetate + Cyproheptadine (MC) and Placebo + Placebo (PP) for a period of one month.
  • RESULTS: During 1999 to 2003, 161 cancer patients included and 98 cases (60.9%) completed treatment period (85.4 % in stages III - IV).
  • During study, 75.6 % of cases received chemotherapy and 6 % undergone radiation.
  • Stratified parameters were balanced between treatment arms.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Appetite and body weight improvements occurred at most in megestrol acetate treatment group (MP) but its difference with other groups was not significant.
  • QOL parameters were not different between treatment arms (P values > 0.05).
  • Considering the short treatment period and difficulties in follow-up of end-stage cancer patients, qualified large-scale clinical trials is needed for defining therapeutic role of these medications.

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  • (PMID = 28015374.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Wang Y, Tai D, Zhao L, Gill J, Obasaju CK: Effect of race on the safety and efficacy outcomes of gemcitabine plus paclitaxel treated patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC): Analyses from a phase III trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1070

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 1070 Background: Population-based studies often attribute racial disparities in breast cancer outcomes to differences in access to treatment, quality of care, or other socioeconomic factors.
  • To evaluate the potential impact of race on outcomes in a controlled clinical setting, we retrospectively analyzed data from a phase III trial (B9E-MC-JHQG; NCT00006459 ) of patients (pts) with MBC.
  • Demographics, safety, and efficacy were analyzed using safety population data from 3 racial groups: Caucasian (CA), Asian (AS), and Hispanic (HP).
  • The logistic model was used to calculate odds ratios for tumor response and the Cox model was used to calculate hazard ratios for time-to-event parameters, adjusting for significant prognostic factors.
  • RESULTS: We report analyses of the gemcitabine (G) + paclitaxel (T) treatment arm.
  • Demographics were balanced across the 3 groups with the exception that ER+/PR+ status was lower for AS compared to CA and HP; unknown ER/PR status was higher for AS.
  • AS had significantly less neutropenia, fatigue, and nausea, but more anemia compared to CA and HP.
  • Median number of treatment cycles completed was lower, but mean dose intensities for G and T were slightly higher, for AS.
  • Overall survival (OS) and post-study chemotherapy (PSC) were significantly reduced for AS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis suggests that AS pts were better able to tolerate GT therapy compared to CA and HP pts.

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  • (PMID = 27961174.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Tay MH, George DJ, Gilligan TD, Kelly SM, Appleby L, Taplin ME, Febbo PG, Kantoff PW, Oh WK: Docetaxel plus carboplatin (DC) may have significant activity in hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) patients who have progressed after prior docetaxel-based chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):4679

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Docetaxel plus carboplatin (DC) may have significant activity in hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) patients who have progressed after prior docetaxel-based chemotherapy.
  • : 4679 Background: Chemotherapy is now increasingly used in HRPC management.
  • The two most frequently used regimens are mitoxantrone-prednisone (MP) and docetaxel-estramustine (DE) beyond which options are limited.
  • One of the potential reasons for disease progression in HRPC is increased neuroendocrine differentiation of the disease.
  • Although carboplatin, a drug active in neuroendocrinally differentiated tumor, has modest activity in HRPC as a single agent, we retrospectively report 3 of the 4 patients consecutively treated and responded with salvage docetaxel-carboplatin (DC) following failure to docetaxel-based chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: 4 patients with metastatic HRPC who had failed docetaxel based chemotherapy and at least one line of chemotherapy were treated with docetaxel at 60-70 mg/m<sup>2</sup> and carboplatin at AUC 4 given 3 weekly.
  • RESULTS: 3 of the 4 patients had > 50% PSA decrease, together with improvement of performance status, weight gain and decrease pain medication.
  • Prior treatments include D alone in patient 1, MP, epothilone analogue and DE in patient 2 and DE with bevacizumab in patient 3.
  • The significant response seen in these 3 patients suggest a possible synergistic effect of the two drugs.

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  • (PMID = 28015597.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Weiss GR, Mita A, Garrison M, Chu SQ, Syed S, Haider O, Bonate P, Hammond LA, Rowinsky EK: Phase I, pharmacokinetic (PK) study of synthadotin (SYN-D; ILX651), a next generation antitubulin, administered iv weekly x 3 weeks every 4 weeks (wx3q4w). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):3073

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 3073 Background: SYN-D is a pentapeptide with a unique mechanism of action that potentially differs from microtubule stabilizers (taxanes and epothilones) and tubulin inhibitors (vinca alkaloids and other dolastatins) as it is postulated to inhibit microtubule nucleation.
  • SYN-D possesses broad, potent antitumor activity, and favorable pharmacological and toxicity profiles preclinically, particularly with respect to cardiovascular effects.
  • METHODS: Based on the protracted nature of binding and retention of tubulin-binding agents in peripheral tissues and tumors, SYN-D administered IV for 30 mins wx3q4w was evaluated.
  • RESULTS: Thirty pts stratified by prior myelotoxic therapy into minimally and heavily pretreated (MP and HP, respectively) cohorts (median age 56; M/F=18/12; tumor types: colorectal [13], renal [4], melanoma [4] breast [2], NSCLC [2], larynx, ovary, mesothelioma, HCC and prostate cancers [1 each]) were treated with 66 courses (range 1-6) of SYN-D at 7.8, 15.6, 31.2, 46.8, 54.5, and 62.2 mg/m<sup>2</sup>.
  • Unacceptably high levels of dose-limiting neutropenia (precluding day 15 SYN-D administration; 1 complicated by fever) were seen in 2/3 MP pts treated at 62.2 mg/m<sup>2</sup> and in 3 and 2 MP and HP pts, respectively, at 54.5 mg/m<sup>2</sup>.

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  • (PMID = 28014756.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Sweeney CJ, Saif MW, Lorusso PM, Ducharme MP, Demnati R, Danna M, Rowinsky E, Mita M, Dejager R, Takimoto C: A phase I study of DX 8951f (exatecan mesylate for injection) in patients with renal dysfunction. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):2069

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Although the drug appears to be predominately cleared by the liver, the impact of renal dysfunction on its pharmacokinetic profile is unknown.
  • Once a DLT was observed, pts were stratified by prior therapy (heavily pre-treated-HP versus minimally pre-treated- MP).
  • The number of DLT events observed for each group are: Normal - 1/6 pts at 0.5 mg/m<sup>2</sup>; Mild -1/7 HP pts at 0.4 mg/m<sup>2</sup>; Moderate -1/3 HP pts and 0/3 MP pts at 0.4 mg/m<sup>2</sup>and 1/1 MP pt at 0.5 mg/m<sup>2</sup>; Severe -0/2 HP pts at 0.1 mg/m<sup>2</sup>.

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  • (PMID = 28015647.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. De Bernardi B, Sorrentino S, Pasino M, Gigliotti AR, Dau D, Scuderi F, Rosanda C: Bone marrow infiltration in infants with disseminated neuroblastoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10056

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The same 2 hematologists (CR, MP) examined the slides independently along the study period, blind for clinical data.
  • Whether chemotherapy for stage 4 is of advantage for these patients remains to be seen.

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  • (PMID = 27962452.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Masuda N, Ando M, Aogi K, Ino H, Iwata H, Tokuda Y, Nakamura S, Yamamoto N, Fujiwara Y: Randomized phase II study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and trastuzumab for operable breast cancer with overexpression of HER2. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):565

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Randomized phase II study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and trastuzumab for operable breast cancer with overexpression of HER2.
  • : 565 Background: Achievement of pathological complete response (pCR) by primary systemic therapy (PST) correlates with improved survival in operable breast cancer patients.
  • Based on data of the higher pCR rate with concomitant chemotherapy and trastuzumab (H) reported by some clinical trials, we performed a multi-center, prospective randomized phase II study to evaluate the efficacy of adding H to standard chemotherapy and to determine more effective agent which will show higher pCR by the comparison between weekly paclitaxel (P) and tri-weekly docetaxel (D) in neo-adjuvant setting for HER-2+ pts.
  • PST regimen was scheduled as the sequential chemotherapy with 4 cycles of CEF (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin 100 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, 5FU) followed by 4 cycles of q3w H with qw P 80 mg/m<sup>2</sup> (HP) or q3w D 75 mg/m<sup>2</sup> (HD).
  • 88 pts (86%) was successful on complete treatment course.
  • Pre-matured data was available for 60 pts whom central review had been completed: there was no significantly difference in pCR rate between two groups, 53% (95%CI: 35.4-71.1%) on HP and 47% (28.8-64.5%) on HD.
  • One after the HP course had experienced the cardiac failure to fall in LVEF to 39%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In HER-2+ pts, PST with CEF followed by HP or HD might be equally active and achieving high pCR without significant toxicity.

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  • (PMID = 27960723.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Takimoto CH, Saif MW, Lorusso PM, Sweeney C, Ducharme MP, Chu SQ, Schwartz GH, Danna M, De Jager RL, Rowinsky EK: A pharmacokinetic (PK) dose escalation study of DX-8951f (DX) in adult cancer patients with hepatic dysfunction: A comparison of the NCI hepatic dysfunction criteria and the Child-Pugh classification. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):2017

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Once a DLT was observed, pts were divided into minimally pretreated (MP) and heavily pretreated (HP) groups.
  • Dose escalation reached 0.5, 0.5, 0.4, and 0.2 mg/m<sup>2</sup> for MP pts and 0.4, 0.4, 0.2, 0.1 mg/m<sup>2</sup> for HP pts in Groups A, B, C and D, respectively.
  • DLT's were neutropenia and low platelets, observed at 0.4 and 0.2 mg/m<sup>2</sup> for MP and HP in group C, respectively.
  • The MTD and drug clearance (CL) strongly correlated with liver dysfunction.

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  • (PMID = 28015599.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Tryakin A, Tjulandin S, Titov D, Zakharova T, Figurin K, Feinstein I, Garin A: C-BOP-3BEP as induction chemotherapy (CT) in nonseminomatous germ cell tumor (NSGCT) patients with poor prognosis. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):4748

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] C-BOP-3BEP as induction chemotherapy (CT) in nonseminomatous germ cell tumor (NSGCT) patients with poor prognosis.
  • : 4748 Background: Based on the results of Horwich A. et al. (Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol 1997, No 1137) a phase II study the efficacy and toxicity C-BOP-3BEP regimen in the treatment of NSGCT pts with poor prognosis had been performed.
  • Pts characteristics: median age 24 (range 15 -43) years; primary site: testis - 21, retroperitoneal - 1, mediastinal (MP) - 13 pts.
  • 11 (31%) pts with partial response normalized their marker levels and 14 (40%) pts were classified as treatment failure (progression disease or incomplete resection of viable tumor).
  • For all pts 3-years PFS and OS were 44% and 53%, and for MP pts - 50% and 64%, respectively, which are very similar to results of BEP/VIP induction CT in our historical control.
  • CONCLUSIONS: our experience suggests that C-BOP-3BEP regimen unlikely improve treatment outcomes in NSGCT pts with poor prognosis.

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  • (PMID = 28017010.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Grosbach A, Langer CJ, Montoya V, Williams D: Epoetin alfa 60,000 U QW followed by 80,000 U Q3W maintenance in patients with anemia and cancer receiving chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8215

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Epoetin alfa 60,000 U QW followed by 80,000 U Q3W maintenance in patients with anemia and cancer receiving chemotherapy.
  • : 8215 Background: Epoetin alfa (EPO) at a starting dose of 40,000 U SC once weekly (QW) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia in cancer patients (pts).
  • It is hypothesized that higher starting doses followed by less frequent maintenance dosing may shorten time to Hb response and increase response rates.
  • Pts then received EPO 80,000 U SC every 3 weeks (Q3W; maintenance phase [MP]) to maintain Hb 11.5 g/dL to 12.5 g/dL.
  • Pts with Hb ≥12 g/dL during IP continued QW dosing until the start of next CT cycle, then began Q3W MP.
  • Pts were withdrawn for missed doses or Hb <11 g/dL during MP.
  • Nineteen pts entered the MP after a median of 5 wks; mean Hb was 12.0 ± 0.9 g/dL at start of MP therapy and has been maintained for a median of 7 wks.
  • EPO dose was reduced to 40,000 U QW in 9 (25%) pts in IP and 60,000 U Q3W in 7 (37%) pts in MP due to Hb>13 g/dL or Hb increase >1.3-g/dL in 2 wks.
  • Seventeen pts were withdrawn (8 in IP, 9 in MP) due to MP Hb <11 g/dL (n = 4), loss to follow-up (n = 3), not reaching target Hb ≥12 g/dL in the IP (n = 2), death (n = 1), AE (n = 1), and other/missing (n = 6).

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  • (PMID = 28016871.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Kang S, Hwang Y, Lee H, Jeong S, Choi J, Jo Y, Han S, Kim J, Han J: Helicobacter pylori infection as an independent prognostic factor for locally advanced gastric cancer with curative resection. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4562

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 4562 Background: A few studies reported the association between helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and better overall survival (OS) in resected gastric cancer patients (pts).
  • METHODS: We investigated the HP infection status and its association with clinicopathologic characteristics in 210 locally advanced gastric cancer patients (stage IB: 18, II: 61, IIIA: 62, IIIB: 31, IV: 38) who underwent adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX) after curative resection (≥D2 dissection).
  • HP infection status in hematoxlin and eosin stained peritumoral tissue was graded according to the updated Sydney System and categorized as HP(-) (normal or mild infection) and HP(+) (moderate or marked infection) (Am J Surg Pathol 20:1161, 1996).
  • HP (-) was significantly correlated with Bormann type IV, larger tumor size (>5.5cm),and stage IIIB.
  • In univariate analysis, patients with HP(-) (104 pts) demonstrated significantly poor 10-year OS compared with those with HP (+) (106 pts) (15.9% vs. 87.7%, p<0.0001).
  • HP(-) was associated with poor outcome in all stages except stage IB (p=0.075).
  • In multivariate analysis, HP(-) was the most significant independent prognostic factor of poor OS (hazard ratio 9.646, 95% CI 5.407-17.206, p<0.0001) followed by advanced stage (p=0.032), Bormann type IV (p=0.037) and old age (p=0.015).
  • CONCLUSIONS: HP infection status seems to have strong prognostic significance in locally advanced gastric cancer.
  • HP (-) pts may need intensified adjuvant treatment and careful follow-up.

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  • (PMID = 27963058.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Faller J, Hess B: [Medicamentous kidney protection in type 2 diabetic patients--is cheaper also more economical? A model calculation for Swiss health care]. Praxis (Bern 1994); 2002 May 8;91(19):836-44
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Medicamentous kidney protection in type 2 diabetic patients--is cheaper also more economical? A model calculation for Swiss health care].
  • Impaired renal function occurs in about 50% of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes, and diabetic nephropathy has become the leading cause of endstage renal disease.
  • Based on these data, demographics of the Swiss population, literature data on mortality rates of type 2 diabetics with impaired renal function and studies on true costs of antihypertensives, we calculated the costs of a longterm intervention (20 years) with antihypertensives in 3536 middle-aged Swiss patients with type 2 diabetes and macro-albuminuria whose antihypertensive regimen was based either on the ACEI lisinopril, or the ND-HP-CCB verapamil, or the betablocker atenolol.
  • Under atenolol, acquisition costs were lowest, whereas faster loss of renal function over time increased mortality rate and thus reduced the number of patients to be treated.
  • Thus, low acquisition cost is not necessarily the only important determinant of overall costs of drug therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antihypertensive Agents / economics. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / drug therapy. Diabetic Nephropathies / drug therapy. Drug Costs / statistics & numerical data. Kidney Failure, Chronic / drug therapy. Models, Economic
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Atenolol / adverse effects. Atenolol / economics. Atenolol / therapeutic use. Cost Savings. Cost-Benefit Analysis. Female. Humans. Kidney Function Tests. Lisinopril / adverse effects. Lisinopril / economics. Lisinopril / therapeutic use. Male. Middle Aged. Switzerland. Verapamil / adverse effects. Verapamil / economics. Verapamil / therapeutic use


33. Friedman S: Medical therapy and birth outcomes in women with Crohn's disease: what should we tell our patients? Am J Gastroenterol; 2007 Jul;102(7):1414-6
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Steroids.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Medical therapy and birth outcomes in women with Crohn's disease: what should we tell our patients?
  • Although it is ideal to be in remission during conception and pregnancy, women often flare during this critical time.
  • Paradoxically, while pregnant, women often stop the medications that have worked so well to maintain remission due to the fear that these drugs may harm the fetus.
  • Many women with IBD find it especially difficult to continue 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and azathioprine (AZA) during pregnancy.
  • There have been a number of studies of IBD and pregnancy but none have successfully separated out the effects of disease activity and drug therapy on pregnancy outcomes.
  • The study by Norgard et al. in this issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology is the first to combine the power of two national data registries of hospitalizations, outpatient visits, and births with a national prescription database.
  • The authors have detailed information on 900 babies born to mothers with Crohn's disease as well as information on every IBD drug prescribed during pregnancy from 1996 to 2004.
  • The worrisome results here are the greater risk of preterm birth and congenital abnormalities among patients prescribed AZA/6-MP throughout their pregnancies.
  • However, although the authors have accurate information on drug exposure during pregnancy, their measures of disease activity cannot be as accurate due to the nature of this database study.
  • Only a prospective pregnancy registry of IBD patients can adequately differentiate the effects of disease activity and medication use on adverse pregnancy outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Crohn Disease / drug therapy. Glucocorticoids / therapeutic use. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Pregnancy Complications. Truth Disclosure
  • [MeSH-minor] Congenital Abnormalities / epidemiology. Congenital Abnormalities / etiology. Drug Prescriptions. Female. Humans. Incidence. Infant, Newborn. Pregnancy. Pregnancy Outcome

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  • [CommentOn] Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 Nov;95(11):3165-70 [11095336.001]
  • (PMID = 17593158.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9270
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Editorial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
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34. Gur S, Kadowitz PJ, Hellstrom WJ: Exploring the potential of NO-independent stimulators and activators of soluble guanylate cyclase for the medical treatment of erectile dysfunction. Curr Pharm Des; 2010 May;16(14):1619-33
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Exploring the potential of NO-independent stimulators and activators of soluble guanylate cyclase for the medical treatment of erectile dysfunction.
  • Nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the receptor that catalyzes the formation of the intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP).
  • Binding of the physiological activator, NO, to the reduced heme moiety of sGC increases the conversion of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to cyclic GMP (cGMP) and engages crucial effector systems such as protein kinases, phosphodiesterases, and ion channels.
  • The development of compounds that activate sGC independent of NO release has therapeutic implications.
  • Recent studies have demonstrated the potential use of heme-dependent sGC stimulators (e.g.
  • BAY 58-2667, HMR-1766, S-3448, A-778935) in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.
  • Phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitors, produce an NO-dependent increase in intracellular cGMP concentration, have been a successful approach in the treatment of ED.
  • However, >30% of men with ED do not respond to PDE-5 inhibitor therapy, implying that endogenous NO production may be impaired to such an extent that inhibition of cGMP degradation produces no significant therapeutic advantage.
  • It is conceivable that sGC stimulators and/or activators may be more effective than PDE5 inhibitors in the treatment of ED in such circumstances by improving NO-sGC-cGMP signaling and erectile function.
  • This novel drug therapy approach for the treatment of ED shows promise.
  • [MeSH-major] Enzyme Activators / pharmacology. Erectile Dysfunction / drug therapy. Guanylate Cyclase / metabolism. Nitric Oxide / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20201788.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4286
  • [Journal-full-title] Current pharmaceutical design
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Pharm. Des.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzyme Activators; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; EC 4.6.1.2 / Guanylate Cyclase
  • [Number-of-references] 164
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35. Sommer F, Engelmann U: Future options for combination therapy in the management of erectile dysfunction in older men. Drugs Aging; 2004;21(9):555-64
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Future options for combination therapy in the management of erectile dysfunction in older men.
  • Oral drug therapy with the phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 5 inhibitor sildenafil fails in some patients with ED; however, several different classes of drugs demonstrate efficacy in treating ED, creating the potential for pharmacological combination therapy.
  • Pharmaceutical products that lead to the activation of or an increase in cyclic nucleotides (cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate), with or without nitric oxide donors or nitrates, as well as alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists, have been used to treat ED.
  • Various combination therapies for ED are being studied using PDE5 inhibitors, together with other agents, alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists, and testosterone replacement therapy for men with hypogonadism.
  • The combination of centrally acting agents with PDE5 inhibitors, e.g. a regimen of apomorphine plus PDE5 inhibitor, is an attractive approach because the two therapies target different mechanisms.
  • New PDE5 inhibitors such as vardenafil should be tried first as therapy for sildenafil nonresponders before exploring any combination therapy options.
  • Preliminary observations of combination therapy have been encouraging and provide a scientific rationale for prospective, randomised clinical trials with adequate numbers of patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Aged. Erectile Dysfunction / drug therapy. Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] 3',5'-Cyclic-GMP Phosphodiesterases. Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists / therapeutic use. Alprostadil / therapeutic use. Animals. Apomorphine / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 5. Dopamine Agonists / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Male. Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases / physiology. Testosterone / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15260511.001).
  • [ISSN] 1170-229X
  • [Journal-full-title] Drugs & aging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drugs Aging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists; 0 / Dopamine Agonists; 0 / Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors; 3XMK78S47O / Testosterone; EC 3.1.4.- / Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases; EC 3.1.4.35 / 3',5'-Cyclic-GMP Phosphodiesterases; EC 3.1.4.35 / Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 5; EC 3.1.4.35 / PDE5A protein, human; F5TD010360 / Alprostadil; N21FAR7B4S / Apomorphine
  • [Number-of-references] 59
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36. Keto Y, Ebata M, Okabe S: Gastric mucosal changes induced by long term infection with Helicobacter pylori in Mongolian gerbils: effects of bacteria eradication. J Physiol Paris; 2001 Jan-Dec;95(1-6):429-36
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Clarithromycin .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Using Mongolian gerbils, this study examined whether or not eradication of the bacteria with drugs at specified times after infection prevents the development of mucosal changes.
  • Four or 8 months after H. pylori inoculation, eradication was performed by concurrent treatment with omeprazole+clarithromycin.
  • Immediately after treatment ended, in both the 5 and 9 month groups, it was verified that H. pylori was completely eradicated.
  • Autopsy performed 18 months after H. pylori inoculation revealed gastric hyperplastic polyps with erosive lesions and ulcers that were grossly visible in the non-treated control group.
  • It was concluded that early eradication of H. pylori infection with drug therapy can prevent severe gastric mucosal changes, to include adenocarcinomas, in Mongolian gerbils.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Anti-Ulcer Agents / therapeutic use. Body Weight. Chronic Disease. Clarithromycin / therapeutic use. Gerbillinae. Male. Omeprazole / therapeutic use. Proton Pump Inhibitors. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 11595471.001).
  • [ISSN] 0928-4257
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of physiology, Paris
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Physiol. Paris
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Anti-Ulcer Agents; 0 / Proton Pump Inhibitors; H1250JIK0A / Clarithromycin; KG60484QX9 / Omeprazole
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37. Howell SB: Clinical applications of a novel sustained-release injectable drug delivery system: DepoFoam technology. Cancer J; 2001 May-Jun;7(3):219-27
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical applications of a novel sustained-release injectable drug delivery system: DepoFoam technology.
  • The therapeutic effectiveness of drugs is often limited by the inability to sustain therapeutic levels at the target site.
  • Encapsulation of drugs in multivesicular lipid-based particles for sustained release is a novel approach to improving the pharmacokinetics of drug therapy.
  • This paper reviews the preclinical and clinical literature on the applications and potential therapeutic benefits of DepoFoam technology, a novel sustained-release, injectable drug delivery system.
  • DepoFoam formulations of drugs, including anticancer agents (cytarabine, methotrexate, bleomycin, recombinant interferon alfa, 5-fluorouridine-5'-monophosphate, and others), anti-infective agents (dideoxycytidine, 2'-norcyclic guanosine monophosphate, cidofovir, tobramycin, gentamicin, amikacin), analgesics (morphine, bupivacaine), and macromolecules (insulin, interleukin-2), delivered intrathecally, subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or intralesionally, provide sustained therapeutic levels of drug at the intended target site and reduce systemic exposure and toxicity.
  • Pharmacokinetic studies have demonstrated that DepoFoam particle encapsulation effectively extends the half-life of drugs, thus prolonging the duration of therapeutic drug concentrations in local tissues or in body spaces into which the encapsulated drug is injected.
  • In the case of cell-cycle phase-specific chemotherapeutic agents, such formulations can improve efficacy and therapeutic ratio.
  • DepoFoam is a promising drug delivery system for sustained release of hydrophilic injectable drugs that has a wide range of potential applications in oncology, infectious disease, analgesia, and other therapeutic areas.

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  • (PMID = 11419030.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-9117
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer journal (Sudbury, Mass.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  • [Number-of-references] 64
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38. Nakamura H, Tanaka H, Yoshino S: Long-term results of multiple synovectomy for patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis. Effects on disease activity and radiological progression. Clin Exp Rheumatol; 2004 Mar-Apr;22(2):151-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVES: We developed a radical multiple synovectomy (RaMS) procedure designed to reduce disease activity in refractory RA patients involving the excision of all inflamed synovial tissues.
  • The beneficial effects continued for 4 years compared to patients treated with combination disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug therapy.
  • Articular destruction was less marked in the PIP, MP, wrist and ankle joints of patients who responded well to RaMS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: RaMS was effective for refractory RA in the short term and seemed to offer some advantages over other therapies in terms of slowing articular destruction.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antirheumatic Agents / therapeutic use. Arthrography. Blood Sedimentation. Cartilage, Articular / pathology. Disease Progression. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Severity of Illness Index. Treatment Outcome

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  • [ErratumIn] Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2005 Jan-Feb;23(1):127
  • (PMID = 15083881.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-856X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical and experimental rheumatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Exp. Rheumatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antirheumatic Agents
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39. Sharma MP, Bhatia V: Abdominal tuberculosis. Indian J Med Res; 2004 Oct;120(4):305-15
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  • Peritoneal tuberculosis occurs in three forms : wet type with ascitis, dry type with adhesions, and fibrotic type with omental thickening and loculated ascites.
  • Ileocaecal and small bowel tuberculosis presents with a palpable mass in the right lower quadrant and/or complications of obstruction, perforation or malabsorption especially in the presence of stricture.
  • Ascitic fluid examination reveals straw coloured fluid with high protein, serum ascitis albumin gradient less than 1.1 g/dl, predominantly lymphocytic cells, and adenosine deaminase levels above 36 U/l.
  • Management is with conventional antitubercular therapy for at least 6 months.
  • The recommended surgical procedures today are conservative and a period of preoperative drug therapy is controversial.

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  • (PMID = 15520484.001).
  • [ISSN] 0971-5916
  • [Journal-full-title] The Indian journal of medical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J. Med. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Number-of-references] 57
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40. Lennerz JK, Perry A, Mills JC, Huettner PC, Pfeifer JD: Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the cervix: another tumor with the t(11;19)-associated CRTC1-MAML2 gene fusion. Am J Surg Pathol; 2009 Jun;33(6):835-43
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  • By strict morphologic criteria, the tumor has features identical to those of salivary gland MEC and is characterized by nests composed of 3 cell types (epidermoid, intermediate, and mucin producing) in the absence of overt glandular differentiation.
  • Given the morphologic similarity between MEC of the cervix and MEC of the salivary glands, we sought to determine if MEC of the cervix harbors the t(11;19)(q21;p13) characteristic of MEC of the major and minor salivary glands, a rearrangement that results in fusion of the cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate coactivator CRTC1 to the Notch coactivator MAML2.
  • Our results demonstrate that cervical tumors defined as MEC by strict morphologic criteria harbor genetic aberrations involving the genes characteristically rearranged in MEC of the salivary glands, and suggest that cervical MEC is an entity distinct from conventional cervical adenosquamous carcinoma.
  • The development of drug therapy targeted to the genes rearranged in MEC underscores the importance of correct classification of cervical MEC because the diagnosis may hold therapeutic implications different from other cervical malignancies.

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  • (PMID = 19092631.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0979
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK079798-01A2; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K08 DK066062; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK079798; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK079798-01A2; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K08 DK066062-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK066062-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CRTC1 protein, human; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / MAML2 protein, human; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / Oncogene Proteins, Fusion; 0 / Transcription Factors
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41. Green BD, Gault VA, O'Harte FP, Flatt PR: A comparison of the cellular and biological properties of DPP-IV-resistant N-glucitol analogues of glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide. Diabetes Obes Metab; 2005 Sep;7(5):595-604
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  • AIM: The two major incretin hormones--glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP)--are being actively researched by the pharmaceutical industry because of their glucose-lowering and potential anti-diabetic properties.
  • METHODS: Using both the glucose-responsive pancreatic beta-cell line, BRIN BD11, and the obese diabetic (ob/ob) mouse, we assessed adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production and insulinotropic action in vitro as well as in vivo glucose-lowering and insulin-releasing actions.
  • Therefore, N-glucitol-GIP is a particularly attractive potential candidate molecule for drug therapy of type 2 diabetes.
  • [MeSH-major] Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 / pharmacology. Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide / pharmacology. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 / pharmacology. Insulin-Secreting Cells / drug effects. Sorbitol / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Glucose / drug effects. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Cell Culture Techniques. Cell Line. Cyclic AMP / biosynthesis. Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental / blood. Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental / drug therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Hypoglycemic Agents / pharmacology. Hypoglycemic Agents / therapeutic use. Insulin / metabolism. Mice. Mice, Obese. Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization

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  • (PMID = 16050953.001).
  • [ISSN] 1462-8902
  • [Journal-full-title] Diabetes, obesity & metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diabetes Obes Metab
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Hypoglycemic Agents; 0 / Insulin; 506T60A25R / Sorbitol; 59392-49-3 / Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide; 89750-14-1 / Glucagon-Like Peptide 1; E0399OZS9N / Cyclic AMP; EC 3.4.14.5 / Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4
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42. Gragasin FS, Michelakis ED, Hogan A, Moudgil R, Hashimoto K, Wu X, Bonnet S, Haromy A, Archer SL: The neurovascular mechanism of clitoral erection: nitric oxide and cGMP-stimulated activation of BKCa channels. FASEB J; 2004 Sep;18(12):1382-91
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  • Penile erection results from nitric oxide (NO) -induced cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) accumulation. cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) activates large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK(Ca)), thereby hyperpolarizing and relaxing vascular and trabecular smooth muscle cells, allowing engorgement.
  • Rat clitorises express components of the proposed pathway: neuronal and endothelial NO synthases, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), type 5 phosphodiesterase (PDE-5), and BK(Ca) channels.
  • Human BK(Ca) channels, transferred to Chinese hamster ovary cells via an adenoviral vector, and endogenous rat clitoral smooth muscle K+ current are activated by this PKG-dependent mechanism.
  • Laser confocal microscopy reveals protein expression of BK(Ca) channels on clitoral smooth muscle cells; these cells exhibit BK(Ca) channel activity that is activated by both DEANO and sildenafil.
  • The BK(Ca) channel is an appealing target for drug therapy of female erectile dysfunction.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. CHO Cells. Calcium / metabolism. Cricetinae. Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinases / metabolism. Electric Stimulation. Electrophysiology. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. In Vitro Techniques. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels. Lasers. Microdissection. Muscle Relaxation / drug effects. Muscle, Smooth / blood supply. Muscle, Smooth / drug effects. Muscle, Smooth / innervation. Muscle, Smooth / physiology. Piperazines / pharmacology. Purines. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Sildenafil Citrate. Sulfones

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  • (PMID = 15333581.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-6860
  • [Journal-full-title] FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] FASEB J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01-HL071115
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Potassium Channels, Calcium-Activated; 0 / Purines; 0 / Sulfones; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; BW9B0ZE037 / Sildenafil Citrate; EC 2.7.11.12 / Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinases; H2D2X058MU / Cyclic GMP; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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43. Szekeres L: Drug-induced delayed cardiac protection against the effects of myocardial ischemia. Pharmacol Ther; 2005 Dec;108(3):269-80
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  • [Title] Drug-induced delayed cardiac protection against the effects of myocardial ischemia.
  • Drug-induced delayed cardiac protection (DCP) against the effects of acute myocardial ischemia was first described 22 years ago by the author and his coworkers.
  • It can be initiated by noninjurious pharmacological doses of prostacyclin (PGI2), its stable analogues, and by catecholamines.
  • DCP is fundamentally different in concept to conventional drug therapy because the process appears to depend on the duration of the trigger and be related in a bell-shaped manner to the strength of the trigger.
  • Prolongation of the effective refractory period (ERP) and of the action potential duration (APD) may contribute to DCP suppression of arrhythmias.
  • The protection is time and dose dependent, with optimal effects 24 to 48 hr after treatment.
  • Stimulation of the adenylate-cyclase/cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) system appears to be a common feature of DCP.
  • The future therapeutic challenge is to identify new drugs that can mimic DCP.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenergic Antagonists / pharmacology. Animals. Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / pharmacology. Heart / drug effects. Heart / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 16098598.001).
  • [ISSN] 0163-7258
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmacology & therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharmacol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic Antagonists; 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents; 79821-50-4 / 7-oxoprostaglandin I2; DCR9Z582X0 / Epoprostenol
  • [Number-of-references] 45
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44. Bahorun T, Luximon-Ramma A, Gunness TK, Sookar D, Bhoyroo S, Jugessur R, Reebye D, Googoolye K, Crozier A, Aruoma OI: Black tea reduces uric acid and C-reactive protein levels in humans susceptible to cardiovascular diseases. Toxicology; 2010 Nov 28;278(1):68-74
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Black tea reduces uric acid and C-reactive protein levels in humans susceptible to cardiovascular diseases.
  • The effect of black tea on the level of uric acid (UA) and C-reactive proteins (CRP) in humans susceptible to ischemic heart diseases was assessed in a prospective randomized controlled study.
  • Black tea consumption induced a highly significant decrease in the high uric acid baseline groups > 6 mg/dL by 8.5%; p < 0.05.
  • C-reactive protein in the high risk group > 3mg/L was significantly decreased by 53.4% and 41.1% in men and women, respectively.
  • Tea supplementation-associated decrease in plasma uric acid and C-reactive protein levels may benefit humans at high risk of cardiovascular events and may augment drug therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] C-Reactive Protein / metabolism. Cardiovascular Diseases / blood. Tea. Uric Acid / blood

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19963031.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-3185
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tea; 268B43MJ25 / Uric Acid; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein
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45. Nagel MW, Wiersema KJ, Bates SL, Mitchell JP: Performance of large- and small-volume valved holding chambers with a new combination long-term bronchodilator/anti-inflammatory formulation delivered by pressurized metered dose inhaler. J Aerosol Med; 2002;15(4):427-33
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  • [Title] Performance of large- and small-volume valved holding chambers with a new combination long-term bronchodilator/anti-inflammatory formulation delivered by pressurized metered dose inhaler.
  • The treatment of both the bronchoconstriction and inflammatory aspects of asthma simultaneously by a single pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI) represents a significant advance in convenience to the patient.
  • However, a valved holding chamber (VHC) may still be needed to reduce the coarse component of the dose that is likely to deposit in the oropharyngeal region, and a small sized device may offer significant advantages to the patient from the standpoint of compliance with therapy.
  • VHCs representing small (adult AeroChamber Plus with mouthpiece, 149-mL) and large (Volumatic, 750-mL) devices have been compared in an in vitro evaluation with Seretide/Advair (hydro-fluoro alkane [HFA]-formulated fluticasone propionate [FP = 125 microg/dose] and salmeterol xinafoate [SX = 25 microg/dose]) by Andersen Mark-II eight-stage impactor operated at 28.3 L/min following compendial methodology.
  • However, this difference (approximately 20%) is close to the limit of resolution based on intermeasurement variability and is unlikely to have clinical significance, given the interpatient variability seen with inhaled drug therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Albuterol / administration & dosage. Albuterol / analogs & derivatives. Androstadienes / administration & dosage. Asthma / drug therapy. Bronchodilator Agents / administration & dosage. Nebulizers and Vaporizers
  • [MeSH-minor] Aerosols / administration & dosage. Analysis of Variance. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid. Drug Therapy, Combination. Equipment Design. Fluticasone. Humans. In Vitro Techniques. Particle Size. Salmeterol Xinafoate

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  • (PMID = 12581509.001).
  • [ISSN] 0894-2684
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of aerosol medicine : the official journal of the International Society for Aerosols in Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Aerosol Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aerosols; 0 / Androstadienes; 0 / Bronchodilator Agents; 6EW8Q962A5 / Salmeterol Xinafoate; CUT2W21N7U / Fluticasone; QF8SVZ843E / Albuterol
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46. Morinville VD, Lowe ME, Elinoff BD, Whitcomb DC: Hereditary pancreatitis amlodipine trial: a pilot study of a calcium-channel blocker in hereditary pancreatitis. Pancreas; 2007 Nov;35(4):308-12
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  • OBJECTIVES: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a form of recurrent acute pancreatitis (AP) mediated by mutations in cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1).
  • Because of the potential importance of hyperstimulation in triggering episodes of AP in HP, we designed a pilot study to evaluate the safety and potential benefit of CCB use in HP.
  • Drug was discontinued in one due to development of unilateral lower-extremity numbness.
  • Mean blood pressure, laboratory tests, physical findings, and daily pain scores did not clinically significantly differ before and during drug therapy, but all reported reduced symptoms.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Amlodipine is generally safe in subjects with HP and does not increase pain or episodes of AP.
  • Further research into the mechanism of CCB on pancreatitis would be important to provide a pathophysiologic basis to support further trials in HP.
  • [MeSH-major] Amlodipine / therapeutic use. Calcium Channel Blockers / therapeutic use. Pain / prevention & control. Pancreatitis / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adolescent. Adult. Analgesics / therapeutic use. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Child. Feasibility Studies. Female. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mutation. Pain Measurement. Patient Dropouts. Pilot Projects. Prospective Studies. Quality of Life. Recurrence. Risk Factors. Severity of Illness Index. Surveys and Questionnaires. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Trypsin. Trypsinogen / genetics

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  • (PMID = 18090235.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-4828
  • [Journal-full-title] Pancreas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pancreas
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000056
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics; 0 / Calcium Channel Blockers; 1J444QC288 / Amlodipine; 9002-08-8 / Trypsinogen; EC 3.4.21.4 / PRSS1 protein, human; EC 3.4.21.4 / Trypsin
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47. Zivadinov R, Rudick RA, De Masi R, Nasuelli D, Ukmar M, Pozzi-Mucelli RS, Grop A, Cazzato G, Zorzon M: Effects of IV methylprednisolone on brain atrophy in relapsing-remitting MS. Neurology; 2001 Oct 9;57(7):1239-47
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  • Eighty-eight patients with RR-MS with baseline Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores of < or =5.5 were randomly assigned to regular pulses of IVMP (1 g/day for 5 days with an oral prednisone taper) or IVMP at the same dose schedule only for relapses (IVMP for relapses) and followed without other disease-modifying drug therapy for 5 years.
  • RESULTS: Eighty-one of 88 patients completed the trial as planned, and treatment was well tolerated.
  • Patients on the pulsed IVMP arm received more MP than patients on the control arm of the study (p < 0.0001).
  • Mean change in T1 black hole volume favored pulsed IVMP therapy (+1.3 vs +5.2 mL; p < 0.0001), as did mean change in brain parenchymal volume (+2.6 vs -74.5 mL; p = 0.003).
  • There was no significant difference between treatment arms in the change in T2 volume or annual relapse rate during the study.
  • There was a 32.2% reduction (p </= 0.0001) in the probability of sustained EDSS score worsening in the pulsed MP arm compared with the relapse treatment arm.
  • At the end of the study, EDSS was better in the pulsed MP group (1.7 vs 3.4; p < 0.0001).
  • Prolonged treatment with pulsed IVMP was safe and well tolerated; only two patients dropped out for toxic side effects over 5 years.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with RR-MS, treatment with pulses of IVMP slows development of T1 black holes, prevents or delays whole-brain atrophy, and prevents or delays disability progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents / administration & dosage. Brain / pathology. Methylprednisolone / administration & dosage. Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting / drug therapy. Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Atrophy. Disability Evaluation. Female. Humans. Injections, Intravenous. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Pulse Therapy, Drug. Single-Blind Method. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11591843.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-3878
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; X4W7ZR7023 / Methylprednisolone
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48. Keto Y, Ebata M, Okabe S: [Pharmacological study on the pathological changes of the gastric mucosa in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils]. Nihon Yakurigaku Zasshi; 2001 Oct;118(4):259-68
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  • [Title] [Pharmacological study on the pathological changes of the gastric mucosa in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils].
  • Using Mongolian gerbils (M. gerbils), which are suitable for an H. pylori infection animal model, we examined 1) how H. pylori infection, indomethacin and their combination affects the healing of gastric ulcers and whether or not such factors provoke a relapse of healed acetic acid ulcers; and 2) whether or not eradication of the bacteria with drugs at specified times after infection prevents the development of mucosal changes, including gastric adenocarcinoma.
  • Indomethacin treatment showed a tendency to delay ulcer healing.
  • Ulcer healing in H. pylori-infected M. gerbils was significantly delayed by indomethacin. H. pylori infection resulted in a relapse of healed ulcers from 1 to 6 months after infection, with a gradual increase in size.
  • 2) Four or 8 months after H. pylori inoculation, eradication was performed by concurrent treatment with omeprazole + clarithromycin.
  • Immediately after treatment ended in both the 5 and 9 month groups, it was verified that H. pylori were completely eradicated.
  • Autopsy performed 18 months after H. pylori inoculation revealed gastric hyperplastic polyps with erosive lesions and ulcers that were grossly visible; and atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, carcinoids, and adenocarcinomas were histologically observed in the non-treated control group.
  • It was concluded that 1) H. pylori infection delayed the healing of preexisting gastric ulcers and resulted in the relapse of healed ulcers, yet indomethacin had little or no effect on ulcer healing or relapse; and 2) early eradication of H. pylori infection with drug therapy can prevent severe gastric mucosal changes, to include adenocarcinomas, in M gerbils.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / microbiology. Adenocarcinoma / prevention & control. Animals. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / adverse effects. Anti-Ulcer Agents / therapeutic use. Clarithromycin / therapeutic use. Disease Models, Animal. Gerbillinae. Indomethacin / adverse effects. Omeprazole / therapeutic use. Recurrence. Stomach Neoplasms / microbiology. Stomach Neoplasms / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 11680169.001).
  • [ISSN] 0015-5691
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon yakurigaku zasshi. Folia pharmacologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Yakurigaku Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Anti-Ulcer Agents; H1250JIK0A / Clarithromycin; KG60484QX9 / Omeprazole; XXE1CET956 / Indomethacin
  • [Number-of-references] 60
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49. Kwinta-Rybicka J, Wilkosz K, Wierzchowska-Słowiacze EK, Ogarek I, Moczulska A, Stec Z, Pełkowska A, Sancewicz-Pach K, Pietrzyk JA: [Mycophenolate mofetil in treatment of childhood nephrotic syndrome--preliminary report]. Przegl Lek; 2006;63 Suppl 3:44-8
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  • [Title] [Mycophenolate mofetil in treatment of childhood nephrotic syndrome--preliminary report].
  • Especially, the treatment of patients with steroid-resistant (SR) and steroid-dependent (SD) nephrotic syndrome, because they are at risk for developing complications from prolonged exposure to steroids, CsA and alkylating agents.
  • Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a selective and reversible inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase used above all in transplantology and recently also in patients with nephrotic syndrome.
  • The aim of this study was to tentatively assess the usefulness and the safety of MMF as an immunosuppressive agent in children with steroid-resistant NS, in whom remission was not obtained with previous treatment regimens, and those with steroid-dependent NS, in whom severe adverse reactions were observed in steroid and cyclosporine therapy.
  • All patients in groups II and III required multi-drug therapy (prednisone, cyclosporine A, methylprednisolone, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide) before MMF was introduced.
  • The clinical outcome analysis included decrease or disappearance of proteinuria, clinical improvement and/or possibility of tapering therapy intensity, especially the dosage of steroids and/or CsA.
  • All medication (apart from MMF) could be discontinued in 4 patients; in 15 cases, prednizone dose was reduced and in 9 cases CsA dose was reduced or discontinued.
  • In group I (SD) steroid treatment could be reduced from a mean prednisone dose of 22.8 to 3.6 mg/m2/48 hours (p=0.018), in groups II and III, in spite of 50 % reduction of a mean prednisone dose, the difference did not reach statistical significance.
  • During MMF therapy Csa treatment could be reduced from a mean CsA dose 4.3 to 2.9 mg/kg/24 hours (p=0.008).
  • The initial clinical observation of MMF treatment in nephrotic patients shows its best effect in the group of patients with steroid-dependent NS.
  • The introduction of MMF allows for reduction of other chronically used medications, especially CsA and steroids.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Cyclosporine / therapeutic use. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Mycophenolic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Mycophenolic Acid / therapeutic use. Nephrotic Syndrome / drug therapy. Steroids / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Male. Remission Induction. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16898486.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-2240
  • [Journal-full-title] Przegla̧d lekarski
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prz. Lek.
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Steroids; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; 9242ECW6R0 / mycophenolate mofetil; HU9DX48N0T / Mycophenolic Acid
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50. Guillevin L: [Indications for immunoglobulins. Recommendations of CEDIT of AP-HP in 2006]. Rev Med Interne; 2007 May;28 Spec No. 1:1-3
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  • [Title] [Indications for immunoglobulins. Recommendations of CEDIT of AP-HP in 2006].
  • [Transliterated title] Indications des immunoglobulines. Les recommandations du CEDIT de l'AP-HP en 2006.
  • To analyze and coordinate the prescription of IVIg in the university hospitals of the AP-HP, the CEDIT, an administrative office created to study new technologies and innovative drugs prescribed in Paris hospitals, nominated a group of experts in 1992.
  • 4) to establish a list of potential indications, based on the scientific literature and clinical experience, which extended beyond those authorized by the French Drug Agency and anticipated new uses.
  • CONCLUSION: The coordination of IVIg prescriptions in Paris hospitals resulted in optimization of indications, better adapted guidelines and their improved observance, and more prospective trials for potential indications.

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  • (PMID = 17768830.001).
  • [ISSN] 0248-8663
  • [Journal-full-title] La Revue de medecine interne
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Interne
  • [Language] FRE
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Conference; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunoglobulins, Intravenous; 0 / Immunologic Factors
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51. Cerván-López I, Sáenz-Francés-San-Baldomero F, Benítez-Del-Castillo JM, García-Sánchez J: [Reduction of corneal permeability in patients treated with HP-guar: a fluorophotometric study]. Arch Soc Esp Oftalmol; 2006 Jun;81(6):327-32
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  • [Title] [Reduction of corneal permeability in patients treated with HP-guar: a fluorophotometric study].
  • [Transliterated title] Reducción de la permeabilidad corneal en pacientes tratados con HP-guar: estudio fluorofotométrico.
  • The main treatment is still the use of artificial tears capable of improving the humidification and lubrication of the corneal epithelium, and avoiding its progressive functional failure.
  • HP-Guar is a new compound used for this purpose.
  • Corneal permeability measurements were performed by fluorophotometry after instilling 40 microL of a solution of 2% sodium fluorescein, before and after treatment with the HP-Guar drops.
  • RESULTS: A mean decrease in corneal permeability of 45%, after the use of HP-Guar drops was found (p=0.002).
  • CONCLUSIONS: HP-Guar provides a new therapeutic option significantly decreasing corneal epithelial permeability.
  • [MeSH-major] Cornea / metabolism. Dry Eye Syndromes / drug therapy. Epithelium, Corneal / metabolism. Ophthalmic Solutions

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  • (PMID = 16804776.001).
  • [ISSN] 0365-6691
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivos de la Sociedad Española de Oftalmología
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Soc Esp Oftalmol
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Ophthalmic Solutions
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52. Ishida T: [Chemotherapy for multiple myeloma]. Nihon Rinsho; 2007 Dec;65(12):2280-4
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  • [Title] [Chemotherapy for multiple myeloma].
  • The combination of the melphalan and prednisolone (MP) can induce objective responses in about 50% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) since its introduction in 1960.
  • Since then many combination chemotherapy regimens have been used, but a large metaanalysis showed that the combination of oral MP is as effective as combination regimens including intravenous drugs.
  • In recent years, many novel agents (including bortezomib, thalidomide, and liposomal doxorubicin) have been developed for the MM treatment.
  • More recently, MP has been used in combination with these novel agents.
  • The combination treatment of MP and thalidomide, overall survival was significantly better than seen in the MP treatment.
  • In the near future, primary induction therapy will be changed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Multiple Myeloma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Boronic Acids / administration & dosage. Bortezomib. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Melphalan / administration & dosage. Meta-Analysis as Topic. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Pulse Therapy, Drug. Pyrazines / administration & dosage. Thalidomide / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 18069273.001).
  • [ISSN] 0047-1852
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Rinsho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Pyrazines; 4Z8R6ORS6L / Thalidomide; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan; MP combination; VAD protocol
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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53. Maring JG, Groen HJ, Wachters FM, Uges DR, de Vries EG: Genetic factors influencing pyrimidine-antagonist chemotherapy. Pharmacogenomics J; 2005;5(4):226-43
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  • [Title] Genetic factors influencing pyrimidine-antagonist chemotherapy.
  • Pyrimidine antagonists, for example, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cytarabine (ara-C) and gemcitabine (dFdC), are widely used in chemotherapy regimes for colorectal, breast, head and neck, non-small-cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer and leukaemias.
  • Interindividual variation in the activity of metabolising enzymes can affect the extent of prodrug activation and, as a result, act on the efficacy of chemotherapy treatment.
  • In this review, proteins relevant for the efficacy and toxicity of pyrimidine antagonists will be summarised.
  • In addition, the role of germline polymorphisms, tumour-specific somatic mutations and protein expression levels in the metabolic pathways and clinical pharmacology of these drugs are described.
  • Germline polymorphisms of uridine monophosphate kinase (UMPK), orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT), thymidylate synthase (TS), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and gene expression levels of OPRT, UMPK, TS, DPD, uridine phosphorylase, uridine kinase, thymidine phosphorylase, thymidine kinase, deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotide hydrolase are discussed in relation to 5-FU efficacy.
  • Cytidine deaminase (CDD) and 5'-nucleotidase (5NT) gene polymorphisms and CDD, 5NT, deoxycytidine kinase and MRP5 gene expression levels and their potential relation to dFdC and ara-C cytotoxicity are reviewed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / metabolism. Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pharmacogenetics. Polymorphism, Genetic. Pyrimidines / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 16041392.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-269X
  • [Journal-full-title] The pharmacogenomics journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharmacogenomics J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Pyrimidines
  • [Number-of-references] 196
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54. Levine ME, Gillis MG, Koch SY, Voss AC, Stern RM, Koch KL: Protein and ginger for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced delayed nausea. J Altern Complement Med; 2008 Jun;14(5):545-51
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  • [Title] Protein and ginger for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced delayed nausea.
  • BACKGROUND: Nausea that develops during the period that begins 24 hours after the administration of chemotherapy is called delayed nausea, and occurs in many patients with cancer.
  • Meals high in protein decrease the nausea of motion sickness and pregnancy, possibly by reducing gastric dysrhythmias.
  • OBJECTIVES: To explore the use of protein meals with ginger for the treatment of the delayed nausea of chemotherapy.
  • DESIGN: Twenty-eight (28) patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy for the first time were assigned to 1 of 3 groups.
  • For 3 days beginning the day after their chemotherapy, Control Group patients continued with their normal diet, Protein Group patients consumed a protein drink and ginger twice daily, and High Protein Group patients consumed a protein drink with additional protein and ginger twice daily.
  • OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients recorded in a diary each day whether they had experienced nausea, whether their nausea had been frequent, whether their nausea had been bothersome, and whether they had needed any antiemetic medication.
  • Gastric myoelectrical activity was assessed in 5 patients before and after ingestion of a high protein meal and ginger.
  • RESULTS: Reports of nausea, frequent nausea, and bothersome nausea were significantly less common among High Protein Group patients than among Control and Protein Group patients.
  • Furthermore, significantly fewer patients in the High Protein Group used antiemetic medication.
  • Differences between the Protein and Control groups were not statistically significant.
  • In the 5 patients who had tests of gastric myoelectrical activity performed, a significant decrease in gastric dysrhythmia occurred after ingestion of the protein and ginger.
  • CONCLUSIONS: High protein meals with ginger reduced the delayed nausea of chemotherapy and reduced use of antiemetic medications.
  • Protein with ginger holds the potential of representing a novel, nutritionally based treatment for the delayed nausea of chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiemetics / administration & dosage. Dietary Proteins / administration & dosage. Ginger. Nausea / chemically induced. Nausea / prevention & control. Phytotherapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18537470.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-7708
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Altern Complement Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiemetics; 0 / Dietary Proteins
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55. Rybár I, Rovenský J, Masaryk P, Mateicka F, Révayová I: [Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in rheumatoid arthritis and its relationship to pharmacotherapy]. Vnitr Lek; 2004 Dec;50(12):911-6
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  • [Title] [Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in rheumatoid arthritis and its relationship to pharmacotherapy].
  • GOAL: To find out a serology prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to investigate its relationship to pharmacotherapy modes.
  • METHOD: To determine Hp IgG class and IgA class antibodies by ELISA method in hospitalised patients with active RA according to ACR criteria (1987).
  • Hp ELISA IgG antibodies were confirmed in 57% (78/137) of patients with RA, Hp ELISA IgA antibodies were confirmed in 60% of examined patients (82/137), and IgG + IgA antibodies simultaneously were found in 51% (70/137) of examined patients.
  • A comparison of basic demographic data, specific parameters of the disease, and clinical signs has not confirmed any differences between groups of Hp positive and Hp negative patients.
  • Patients with both types of Hp antibodies (IgG + IgA) had more frequent signs of RA in other places than joints (p = 0.046).
  • RA patients with anti-Hp IgG antibodies more frequently used anticoagulation drugs (p = 0.029) while patients with anti-Hp IgA antibodies more frequently used methotrexate (p = 0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Results point out more frequent incidence of Hp IgA antibodies in RA patients treated with methotrexate and more frequent incidence of both IgG and IgA antibodies in patients with RA signs in other places than joints.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Bacterial / analysis. Antirheumatic Agents / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Seroepidemiologic Studies


56. Donini LM, Pinto A, Cannella C: [High-protein diets and obesity]. Ann Ital Med Int; 2004 Jan-Mar;19(1):36-42
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  • [Title] [High-protein diets and obesity].
  • An increased protein intake is one of the most common approaches to the dietary management of obesity.
  • The authors analyze the issues related to protein requirement in normal-weight and obese subjects, to the use and to the usefulness of high-protein diets in the treatment of obesity.
  • Furthermore, the risks of harmful outcomes may be correlated to an excessive protein intake.
  • [MeSH-major] Dietary Proteins / administration & dosage. Obesity / diet therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone Resorption / etiology. Cardiovascular Diseases / epidemiology. Cardiovascular Diseases / etiology. Energy Metabolism / drug effects. Food Habits. Glucagon / secretion. Humans. Insulin / secretion. Kidney Diseases / etiology. Life Style. Muscle Proteins / metabolism. Risk Factors. Satiation / drug effects. Thermogenesis / drug effects. Weight Loss

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  • (PMID = 15176706.001).
  • [ISSN] 0393-9340
  • [Journal-full-title] Annali italiani di medicina interna : organo ufficiale della Società italiana di medicina interna
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Ital. Med. Int.
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dietary Proteins; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Muscle Proteins; 9007-92-5 / Glucagon
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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57. Bobeck DR, Schinazi RF, Coats SJ: Advances in nucleoside monophosphate prodrugs as anti-HCV agents. Antivir Ther; 2010;15(7):935-50
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  • [Title] Advances in nucleoside monophosphate prodrugs as anti-HCV agents.
  • Nucleoside monophosphate prodrugs that are eventually bioconverted to the active nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) offer the potential to deliver increased intracellular NTP levels and/or organ-specific NTP enhancement.
  • There are several classes of monophosphate prodrugs that have been applied to HCV drug discovery, and some of these approaches are currently being evaluated in humans.
  • This review discusses recent advances in monophosphate prodrug approaches to improve oral absorption, stability and pharmacokinetic profile, including their advantages and potential pitfalls.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / pharmacokinetics. Drug Evaluation. Nucleosides / pharmacokinetics. Prodrugs / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Drug Design. Hepacivirus / drug effects. Hepatocytes. Humans. Liver / drug effects. Liver / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 21041908.001).
  • [ISSN] 2040-2058
  • [Journal-full-title] Antiviral therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antivir. Ther. (Lond.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 2P30-AI-050409; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 5R37-AI-025899; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 5R37-AI-041980; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01-AI-076535
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Nucleosides; 0 / Prodrugs
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58. Stevens B, McKeever P, Booth M, Greenberg M, Daub S, Gafni A, Gammon J, Yamada J, Beamer M: Home chemotherapy for children with cancer: perspectives from health care professionals. Health Soc Care Community; 2004 Mar;12(2):142-9
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  • [Title] Home chemotherapy for children with cancer: perspectives from health care professionals.
  • The goal of this study was to determine the perspectives of healthcare professionals (HPs) from community and hospital settings involved in a paediatric home chemotherapy programme.
  • (1) perceived family benefits, (2) human resources and service delivery considerations and (3) impact on the role of the HP.
  • All HPs reported that home chemotherapy helped reduce both disruption to family life and psychological stress.
  • Both groups emphasised the need for consistency in care and for specific chemotherapy training.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Data Collection. Female. Humans. Job Satisfaction. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / nursing. Ontario. Prospective Studies. Qualitative Research. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Surveys and Questionnaires. Workload. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19777723.001).
  • [ISSN] 0966-0410
  • [Journal-full-title] Health & social care in the community
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Soc Care Community
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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59. Zheng S, Zhang BL, Zhang RZ, Yang JL, Zou SM, Xue LY, Luo W, Yuan YL, Lü N: [Differences between clinical response and pathologic response of breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy]. Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi; 2010 Nov;39(11):734-8
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  • [Title] [Differences between clinical response and pathologic response of breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy].
  • OBJECTIVE: to investigate the pathologic basis of the difference between clinical response and pathologic response of breast carcinoma after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: two hundred and nine cases of breast cancer with neoadjuvant therapy were analyzed and clinical data were collected from June, 2005 to December, 2007.
  • All patients had core needle biopsy taken before neoadjuvant chemotherapy and were operated within 4 weeks after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Clinical examination, X-ray of breast and/or B ultrasonography of primary breast focus were taken before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Clinical responses of breast primary focus were evaluated according to RECIST (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors) version 1.1.Pathologic responses of breast primary focus were evaluated according to Miller and Payne (MP) grading system.
  • (1) Clinical responses basing on clinical examination showed complete response, partial response, stable disease and progressive response, in 33, 124, 41 and 11 cases respectively. (2) Eighty-seven cases had X-ray of breast taken before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Clinical response basing on X-ray, showed complete response, partial response and stable disease in 8, 42 and 37 cases respectively. (3) Pathologic responses of breast primary focus were as MP1 (14 cases), MP2 (35 cases), MP3 (106 cases), MP4 (36 cases) and MP5 (18 cases). (4) The clinical response basing on clinical examination were related to the pathologic response (χ(2) = 33.668, P = 0.001); and the clinical response basing on X-ray of breast were also related to the pathologic response (χ(2) = 22.404, P = 0.004). (5) The pathologic basis of the difference between the pathologic response and the clinical response basing on X-ray of breast were: embolism of carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, intraductal carcinoma with ossifying-type calcification, nodular fibrosis and others.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / radiography. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / pathology. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / radiography. Neoadjuvant Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / pathology. Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / radiography. Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / pathology. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / radiography. Carcinoma, Lobular / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Lobular / pathology. Carcinoma, Lobular / radiography. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Remission Induction

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  • (PMID = 21215162.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5807
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua bing li xue za zhi = Chinese journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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60. Gangjee A, Kurup S, Namjoshi O: Dihydrofolate reductase as a target for chemotherapy in parasites. Curr Pharm Des; 2007;13(6):609-39
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Dihydrofolate reductase as a target for chemotherapy in parasites.
  • The importance of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) in parasitic chemotherapy arises from its function in DNA biosynthesis and cell replication.
  • DHFR catalyzes the reduction of dihydrofolate (DHF) to tetrahydrofolate (THF), an essential cofactor in the biosynthesis of thymidylate monophosphate (dTMP).
  • Unfortunately, the side effects associated with sulfa drugs in this combination often result in cessation of therapy.
  • However, the current combination therapy suffers from high cost, in addition, several mutations have been reported in the active site of parasitic DHFR rendering the infections refractive to known DHFR inhibitors.
  • Thus the structural requirements for DHFR inhibition are of critical importance in the design of antifolates for parasitic chemotherapy.
  • This review discusses the synthesis and structural requirements for selective DHFR inhibition and their relevance to parasitic chemotherapy, since 1995.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiparasitic Agents / administration & dosage. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Folic Acid Antagonists / administration & dosage. Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase / genetics. Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17346178.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4286
  • [Journal-full-title] Current pharmaceutical design
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Pharm. Des.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiparasitic Agents; 0 / Folic Acid Antagonists; EC 1.5.1.3 / Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase
  • [Number-of-references] 194
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61. Thomas C, Hadaschik BA, Thüroff JW, Wiesner C: [Patients with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Second-line chemotherapy with mitoxantrone plus prednisone]. Urologe A; 2009 Sep;48(9):1070-4
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  • [Title] [Patients with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Second-line chemotherapy with mitoxantrone plus prednisone].
  • [Transliterated title] Docetaxel-refraktäre Patienten mit metastasiertem hormonrefraktären Prostatakarzinom. Mitoxantron plus Prednison als Zweitlinienchemotherapie.
  • BACKGROUND: To date there has been no accepted standard for second-line chemotherapy in docetaxel-refractory patients with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer (mHRPC).
  • Therefore, we evaluated our experience with mitoxantrone plus prednisone (MP) in this setting.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients with docetaxel-refractory mHRPC were treated with MP.
  • The parameters under investigation were prostate-specific antigen (PSA) remission, biochemical progression-free survival, and pain reduction under chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Partial PSA remission was seen in two patients, "stable disease" in three patients, and progression in five patients receiving MP.
  • Four of seven patients experienced pain reduction with MP.
  • Patients with a decline of PSA under docetaxel and MP had a progression-free survival of 11.5 months (median).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Presently, we see the indication for MP as being second-line chemotherapy in docetaxel-refractory patients with mHRPC who cannot be included in phase II/III studies.
  • Progression-free survival was prolonged, and the side effects of MP were comparatively low.
  • [MeSH-major] Mitoxantrone / administration & dosage. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / secondary. Taxoids / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Hormone Replacement Therapy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Failure. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19513599.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-0563
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Urologe. Ausg. A
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urologe A
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; BZ114NVM5P / Mitoxantrone
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62. Gobbi PG, Corbella F, Valentino F, Bergonzi M, Sangalli C, Perfetti V, Corazza GR: Complete long-term response to radiotherapy of gastric early-stage marginal zone lymphoma resistant to both anti-Helicobacter pylori antibiotics and chemotherapy. Ann Oncol; 2009 Mar;20(3):465-8
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  • [Title] Complete long-term response to radiotherapy of gastric early-stage marginal zone lymphoma resistant to both anti-Helicobacter pylori antibiotics and chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: The optimal approach to patients with gastric lymphoma of extranodal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) that resist to anti-Helicobacter pylori (HP) eradication therapy is still to be defined.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 1997 to December 2004, we observed 24 patients affected with newly diagnosed early-stage and HP-positive gastric lymphoma of the MALT type.
  • Five of them resisted to oral anti-HP antibiotic regimens and to subsequent one (two patients) or two (three patients) chemotherapy regimens.
  • They were admitted to local radiation therapy with a total dose of 30 Gy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Radiotherapy proved to be effective and safe for early-stage HP-positive gastric extranodal lymphoma of MALT type that is resistant to anti-HP eradication antibiotics and to following chemotherapy.
  • Radiotherapy might be suggested as principal salvage therapy after resistance to HP eradication, instead of chemotherapy.


63. Bladé J, San Miguel JF, Fontanillas M, Esteve J, Maldonado J, Alcalá A, Brunet S, García-Conde J, Besalduch J, Moro MJ, Fernández-Calvo J, Conde E, Font L, Gardella S, Carnero M, Carbonell F, Martí JM, Hernández-Martín J, Ortega F, Besses C, Ribera JM, Trujillo J, Escudero ML, Rozman C, Estapé J, Montserrat E: Increased conventional chemotherapy does not improve survival in multiple myeloma: long-term results of two PETHEMA trials including 914 patients. Hematol J; 2001;2(4):272-8
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  • [Title] Increased conventional chemotherapy does not improve survival in multiple myeloma: long-term results of two PETHEMA trials including 914 patients.
  • BACKGROUND: Melphalan and prednisone (MP) has been the standard treatment for multiple myeloma (MM) for the last 30 years.
  • Combination chemotherapy at conventional doses has not shown a significant prolongation of survival when compared to MP.
  • There are few data comparing conventional chemotherapy at standard doses with conventional treatment at higher doses.
  • METHODS: From 1 January, 1985 to 31 December, 1989, 487 patients were randomized between MP (melphalan 9 mg/m(2) p.o. and prednisone 60 mg/m(2) days 1-4) and alternating VCMP (vincristine 1 mg i.v. on day 1, cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m(2) i.v. on day 1, melphalan 6 mg/m(2) p.o. on days 1-4, and prednisone 60 mg/m(2) on days 1-4) and VBAP (vincristine 1 mg i.v. on day 1, BCNU and doxorubicin 30 mg/m(2) i.v. each on day 1, and prednisone 60 mg/m(2) on days 1-4).
  • RESULTS: Increasing dose intensity produced a significantly higher partial response rate (31% vs 45% vs 51% for MP, VCMP/VBAP 'SD', and VCMP/VBAP 'HD', respectively; P < 0.01).
  • However, a significantly early death rate was observed in the HD arm (7.7, 7.5 and 12.1% for MP, VCMP/VBAP 'SD', and VCMP/VBAP 'HD', respectively; P = 0.05).
  • Median duration of response (20 vs 18 vs 19 months for MP, VCMP/VBAP 'SD', and VCMP/VBAP 'HD', respectively; P = NS) and median survival (25 vs 31 vs 29 months for MP, VCMP/VBAP 'SD', and VCMP/VBAP 'HD', respectively; P = NS) were similar in the three groups.
  • MP produced a higher degree of thrombocytopenia than combination chemotherapy at standard (P = 0.002) or high dose (P = 0.01), this leading to a significantly higher dose reduction in the MP arm (P < 0.001 and P = 0.003 for VCMP/VBAP 'SD' and VCMP/VBAP 'HD', respectively).
  • This highlights the limited role of conventional chemotherapy in MM and the need for further trials, aimed at determining the impact of new treatment approaches such as high-dose therapy/autotransplantation.

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  • (PMID = 11920260.001).
  • [ISSN] 1466-4860
  • [Journal-full-title] The hematology journal : the official journal of the European Haematology Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol. J.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan; U68WG3173Y / Carmustine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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64. Sauerbrei A, Meier C, Meerbach A, Schiel M, Helbig B, Wutzler P: In vitro activity of cycloSal-nucleoside monophosphates and polyhydroxycarboxylates against orthopoxviruses. Antiviral Res; 2005 Sep;67(3):147-54
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ACYCLOVIR .

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  • [Title] In vitro activity of cycloSal-nucleoside monophosphates and polyhydroxycarboxylates against orthopoxviruses.
  • Because variola virus might be used as a pathogen in biological attacks, there is an urgent need to provide effective antiviral drugs for the treatment of orthopoxvirus infections.
  • Thus, the aim of the present study was to test the antiviral activity of 3 pro-nucleotides of the acyclic nucleoside analogues aciclovir (ACV), 3 of penciclovir (PCV) and 38 of the cyclic nucleoside analogue brivudin (BVDU), on the basis of cycloSaligenyl-nucleoside monophosphate approach against vaccinia virus and cowpox virus in vitro.
  • As result, three cycloSal-monophosphate derivatives of ACV proved to be potent inhibitors of both vaccinia virus and cowpox virus replication in vitro.
  • Among the tested monophosphate derivatives of cycloSal-PCV and cycloSal-BVDU, selected substances showed a promising antiviral activity against vaccinia virus and cowpox virus.
  • In conclusion, by the delivery of nucleoside monophosphates from neutral, membrane-permeable prodrugs on the basis of the cycloSaligenyl-nucleotide concept, different ACV, PCV and BVDU derivatives can act as potent and selective inhibitors of orthopoxvirus replication.
  • However, most of the cycloSal-monophosphate derivatives of BVDU had a higher cytotoxicity than their parent nucleosides.
  • [MeSH-major] Acyclovir / analogs & derivatives. Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Bromodeoxyuridine / analogs & derivatives. Organophosphates / pharmacology. Orthopoxvirus / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cercopithecus aethiops. Cowpox virus / drug effects. Microbial Sensitivity Tests. Tetrazolium Salts / metabolism. Vaccinia virus / drug effects. Vero Cells. Viral Plaque Assay. Virus Replication / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 16076502.001).
  • [ISSN] 0166-3542
  • [Journal-full-title] Antiviral research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antiviral Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Organophosphates; 0 / Tetrazolium Salts; 117038-70-7 / 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-((phenylamino)carbonyl)-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide; G34N38R2N1 / Bromodeoxyuridine; X4HES1O11F / Acyclovir
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65. Beatty SJ, Mehta BH, Rodis JL: Decreased warfarin effect after initiation of high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets. Ann Pharmacother; 2005 Apr;39(4):744-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Decreased warfarin effect after initiation of high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets.
  • OBJECTIVE: To report 2 cases of decreased international normalized ratio (INR) after initiation of a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet.
  • After initiation of a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet, the patient required a 22.2% increase (from 45 to 57.5 mg/wk) in warfarin dose.
  • Her INR remained in the therapeutic range on this dose for 8 weeks.
  • When the patient stopped the high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet, a decrease back to the original warfarin dose was required to return to a therapeutic INR. Case 2.
  • Initiation of a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet resulted in a 30% increase (from 26.25 to 37.5 mg/wk) in warfarin dose.
  • His warfarin dose was reduced to the original dose after he stopped the high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet.
  • DISCUSSION: The Naranjo probability scale indicated a possible adverse effect between warfarin and high-protein diets.
  • High-protein diets have been shown to increase serum albumin levels.
  • The increase of albumin occurs rapidly after initiation of a high-protein diet and appears to promptly affect anticoagulation therapy with warfarin.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These cases indicate a significant interaction between high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets and warfarin therapy.
  • Patients receiving warfarin therapy should be educated on and monitored for the potential interaction that occurs with warfarin therapy and high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets.
  • [MeSH-major] Dietary Carbohydrates / administration & dosage. Dietary Proteins / administration & dosage. Food-Drug Interactions / physiology. Warfarin / administration & dosage

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  • [CommentIn] Ann Pharmacother. 2005 Jul-Aug;39(7-8):1371-2; author reply 1372 [15928257.001]
  • (PMID = 15755790.001).
  • [ISSN] 1060-0280
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dietary Carbohydrates; 0 / Dietary Proteins; 5Q7ZVV76EI / Warfarin
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66. Iwanowicz EJ, Watterson SH, Liu C, Gu HH, Mitt T, Leftheris K, Barrish JC, Fleener CA, Rouleau K, Sherbina NZ, Hollenbaugh DL: Novel guanidine-based inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. Bioorg Med Chem Lett; 2002 Oct 21;12(20):2931-4
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  • [Title] Novel guanidine-based inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase.
  • A series of novel guanidine-based small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was explored.
  • IMPDH catalyzes the rate determining step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis and is a target for anticancer, immunosuppressive and antiviral therapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antiviral Agents / chemical synthesis. Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Crystallography, X-Ray. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. Indicators and Reagents. Structure-Activity Relationship

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  • (PMID = 12270177.001).
  • [ISSN] 0960-894X
  • [Journal-full-title] Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Indicators and Reagents; EC 1.1.1.205 / IMP Dehydrogenase; JU58VJ6Y3B / Guanidine
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67. Kishida M, Suzuki I, Kabayama H, Koshibu T, Izawa M, Takeshita Y, Kurita F, Okada M, Shinomiya N, Aoki T: Mouthpiece versus facemask for delivery of nebulized salbutamol in exacerbated childhood asthma. J Asthma; 2002 Jun;39(4):337-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mouthpiece versus facemask for delivery of nebulized salbutamol in exacerbated childhood asthma.
  • We compared the bronchodilator response to salbutamol (albuterol) delivered by a compressed air nebulizer through a mouthpiece and via a facemask in 18 asthmatic children, to determine the most appropriate delivery method.
  • Patients using a mouthpiece had significantly better mean percent increases in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) and in forced vital capacity (FVC) than those using a facemask 30 min after inhalation (FEV1, 56.4 +/- 32.6% vs. 28.9 +/- 19.1%, FVC: 34.4 +/- 26.4% vs. 7.5 +/- 14.9%, respectively).
  • Nebulized therapy plays an important role in the management of bronchial asthma in children and should be delivered by a mouthpiece whenever possible in cases of exacerbated asthma.
  • [MeSH-major] Albuterol / administration & dosage. Asthma / drug therapy. Bronchodilator Agents / administration & dosage. Masks
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Inhalation. Adolescent. Child. Equipment Design. Female. Forced Expiratory Volume. Humans. Male. Nebulizers and Vaporizers. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12095184.001).
  • [ISSN] 0277-0903
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Asthma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bronchodilator Agents; QF8SVZ843E / Albuterol
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68. Groves KE: An introduction to the Micrel Micropump MP Daily portable syringe driver. Int J Palliat Nurs; 2003 Nov;9(11):468-73
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An introduction to the Micrel Micropump MP Daily portable syringe driver.
  • In this article the author describes the Micrel Micropump MP Daily (MP Daily) portable syringe driver.
  • The MP Daily syringe driver addresses some of these issues while remaining small, lightweight and inexpensive, with a long battery life and fitting into the pocket of a shirt of pyjama jacket.
  • Although confusion remains a problem, and the ideal has not yet been reached, the MP Daily goes some considerable way towards reducing risks and opportunities for human error.
  • [MeSH-major] Infusion Pumps. Infusions, Parenteral / instrumentation. Pain / drug therapy. Palliative Care / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Equipment Design. Equipment Failure. Humans. Neoplasms / complications. Patient Selection. Subcutaneous Tissue

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  • (PMID = 14676723.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-6321
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of palliative nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Palliat Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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69. Johnson S: Low-dose, sublingual AZT-monophosphate therapy for HIV+ patients? Med Hypotheses; 2001 Mar;56(3):409-10
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  • [Title] Low-dose, sublingual AZT-monophosphate therapy for HIV+ patients?
  • Furthermore, AZT must be converted first to monophosphate and then to diphosphate and finally to triphosphate by the same enzyme: thymidine kinase (TK).
  • Therefore, large doses of AZT overwhelm TK, causing massive production of monophosphate and reducing the production of di and triphosphate.
  • On the other hand, sublingual administration of 1 mg AZT monophosphate every 8 hours (since the intracellular half life of AZT triphosphate is 3 hours) would be desirable, resulting in more damage to the virus and less harm to the patient.
  • Finally, the small dose of monophosphate ensures that most of the AZT be converted to triphosphate, greatly increasing the efficiency and reducing the likelihood of the virus developing resistance due to reverse transcriptase binding to the similar but non inhibiting mono and diphosphate.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-HIV Agents / therapeutic use. HIV Infections / drug therapy. HIV Seropositivity / drug therapy. Thymine Nucleotides / therapeutic use. Zidovudine / analogs & derivatives. Zidovudine / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Sublingual. Dideoxynucleotides. HIV / drug effects. HIV / physiology. Humans. Models, Biological. Thymidine Kinase / antagonists & inhibitors. Virus Replication / drug effects

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.
  • (PMID = 11359372.001).
  • [ISSN] 0306-9877
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical hypotheses
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Hypotheses
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-HIV Agents; 0 / Dideoxynucleotides; 0 / Thymine Nucleotides; 29706-85-2 / 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine 5'phosphate; 4B9XT59T7S / Zidovudine; EC 2.7.1.21 / Thymidine Kinase
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70. Saze Z, Terashima M, Otani S, Soeta N, Kashimura S, Osuka F, Odashima Y, Saito T, Hoshino Y, Kogure M, Hashimoto Y, Watanabe K, Gotoh M: [A case of advanced gastric cancer responding remarkably to neo-adjuvant combination chemotherapy using CPT-11 plus S-1]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2007 Sep;34(9):1473-6
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  • [Title] [A case of advanced gastric cancer responding remarkably to neo-adjuvant combination chemotherapy using CPT-11 plus S-1].
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer has not yet been established.
  • We report a patient with advanced gastric cancer responding remarkably to neo-adjuvant combination chemotherapy consisting of CPT-11 and S-1.
  • The patient was a 69-year-old woman diagnosed with large type 3 advanced gastric cancer with esophageal invasion and having No.3 lymph node metastasis (cT3, cN1, cM0, cStage IIIA), treated with 2 courses of CPT-11 plus S-1 as neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Computed tomography after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy showed improvement of gastric wall thickness and reduction of lymph node metastasis.
  • Histological diagnosis was pT2 (MP), pN1, pStage II, and estimation of the histological change by chemotherapy was Grade 2.
  • Combination chemotherapy consisting of CPT-11 plus S-1 can be performed safely as a neo-adjuvant treatment, and may be an effective treatment modality for advanced gastric cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Camptothecin / administration & dosage. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Drug Combinations. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Oxonic Acid / administration & dosage. Tegafur / administration & dosage. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 17876149.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; 7673326042 / irinotecan; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
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71. Chew NY, Reddel HK, Bosnic-Anticevich SZ, Chan HK: Effect of mouthpiece washing on aerosol performance of CFC-free Ventolin. J Asthma; 2004 Oct;41(7):721-7
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  • [Title] Effect of mouthpiece washing on aerosol performance of CFC-free Ventolin.
  • The prescribing information for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-free salbutamol metered-dose inhalers carries a strongly-worded instruction to wash the mouthpiece weekly, but patients rarely carry this out.
  • This study investigated the effect of washing/not washing the mouthpiece on CFC-free Ventolin aerosol performance.
  • Twelve CFC-free Ventolin inhalers were actuated two puffs four times/day, and assessed by unit dose sampler and cascade impactor on Days 1, 7, 8, 14, 15, 21, and 22 ("throughlife," i.e., over the entire content of the inhaler).
  • The mouthpieces of six inhalers were washed after the last actuation on Days 7, 14, and 21.
  • This study shows a progressive through-life reduction in fine particle mass from CFC-free Ventolin inhalers, which is prevented by weekly mouthpiece washing.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Inhalation. Aerosols / therapeutic use. Analysis of Variance. Asthma / drug therapy. Biological Availability. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Male. Risk Assessment. Sensitivity and Specificity. Statistics, Nonparametric

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  • (PMID = 15584631.001).
  • [ISSN] 0277-0903
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Asthma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aerosols; 0 / Anti-Asthmatic Agents; QF8SVZ843E / Albuterol
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72. Shindo T, Yumoto Y, Yoshida M, Okuda T: [Nonsecretory primary plasma cell leukemia successfully treated with VAD and MP therapy]. Rinsho Ketsueki; 2002 Feb;43(2):107-11
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  • [Title] [Nonsecretory primary plasma cell leukemia successfully treated with VAD and MP therapy].
  • No M-protein was detectable in serum or urine by immunoelectrophoresis and immunofixation, but cytoplasmic M-protein (IgG-kappa) was detected by enzyme antibody staining.
  • First, the patient was given modified VAD therapy (vincristine, doxorubicin, and prednisolone) and complete remission was obtained.
  • Then MP therapy (melphalan and prednisolone) was instituted, and remission has since been maintained for 11 months.
  • Our experience with this exceedingly rare case suggests the superiority of combination chemotherapy as an induction therapy and the effectiveness of MP therapy as maintenance therapy for this disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Plasma Cell / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Melphalan / administration & dosage. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 11925872.001).
  • [ISSN] 0485-1439
  • [Journal-full-title] [Rinshō ketsueki] The Japanese journal of clinical hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rinsho Ketsueki
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; AP protocol 2; VAD1 regimen
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73. Shimono C, Tanaka A, Fujita A, Ishimoto M, Oura S, Yamaue H, Sato M: [Comparison of port needle with safety device between Huber Plus (HP) and Poly PERF Safe (PPS)]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 May;37(5):947-51
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  • [Title] [Comparison of port needle with safety device between Huber Plus (HP) and Poly PERF Safe (PPS)].
  • An embedded port is frequently used for outpatients with advanced cancer in central venous chemotherapy or hepatic arterial chemoinfusion.
  • The port needle with a safety device in an ambulatory treatment center is indispensable for medical employees and patient plus family to reduce the risk of a needle puncture accident and to prevent iatrogenic infection.
  • The port needle with safety system has been already introduced in our chemotherapy center.
  • There are two types of port needle with safety device; Huber Plus (HP, Medicon Co., Ltd.) and POLY PERF Safe (PPS, Pyolax Device, Co., Ltd.).
  • The comparison of the feasibility between HP and PPS was conducted by both medical employees and patients plus family using an inquiry score method.
  • HP was highly regarded for its stability plus fixation and PPS for its usefulness in puncture and extraction of the needle.
  • PPS was found to be preferable to HP based on the overall evaluation.

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  • (PMID = 20495336.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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74. Chen L, Petrelli R, Gao G, Wilson DJ, McLean GT, Jayaram HN, Sham YY, Pankiewicz KW: Dual inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and histone deacetylase based on a cinnamic hydroxamic acid core structure. Bioorg Med Chem; 2010 Aug 15;18(16):5950-64
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  • [Title] Dual inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and histone deacetylase based on a cinnamic hydroxamic acid core structure.
  • Small molecules that act on multiple biological targets have been proposed to combat the drug resistance commonly observed for cancer chemotherapy.
  • By combining the structural features of known inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogense (IMPDH) and histone deacetylase (HDAC), dual inhibitors of IMPDH and HDAC based on the scaffold of cinnamic hydroxamic acid (CHA) have been designed, synthesized, and evaluated in biological assays.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / chemistry. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors / chemistry. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors / pharmacology. IMP Dehydrogenase / antagonists & inhibitors. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Cinnamates / chemical synthesis. Cinnamates / chemistry. Cinnamates / pharmacology. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Histone Deacetylases / metabolism. Humans. Hydroxamic Acids / chemical synthesis. Hydroxamic Acids / chemistry. Hydroxamic Acids / pharmacology. Models, Molecular

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20650640.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-3391
  • [Journal-full-title] Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bioorg. Med. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cinnamates; 0 / Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors; 0 / Hydroxamic Acids; EC 1.1.1.205 / IMP Dehydrogenase; EC 3.5.1.98 / Histone Deacetylases; U14A832J8D / cinnamic acid
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75. Jacobs AM, Tomczak R: Evaluation of Bensal HP for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Adv Skin Wound Care; 2008 Oct;21(10):461-5
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  • [Title] Evaluation of Bensal HP for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.
  • BACKGROUND: The extract of oak bark (QRB7) has been used for years as a topical medication with success.
  • QRB7 is the proprietary oak bark extract in Bensal HP.
  • It is indicated as an external treatment for the inflammation and irritation associated with many common forms of dermatitis, including certain eczematoid conditions.
  • These conditions include complications associated with pyodermas, and in the treatment of insect bites, burns, and fungal infections.
  • OBJECTIVE: To quantitatively measure the difference in diabetic ulcer size reduction when using Bensal HP versus silver sulfadiazine cream (SSC) for topical treatment as an adjunct to conventional treatment.
  • METHODS: Forty diabetic patients with noncellulitic plantar Wagner grade 1 or 2 ulcers and a minimal ankle brachial index of 0.75 were randomly assigned to either the Bensal HP (QRB7) treatment group or SSC control group for 6 weeks of treatment.
  • In addition to either Bensal HP or SSC, all wounds were cultured and treated with debridement at time 0, 2, 4, and 6 weeks and with off-loading.
  • RESULTS: The combined wound diameter of the Bensal HP group decreased 72.5% compared to 54.7% for the SSC group.
  • There was a statistical significance between the decreases in wound sizes after 6 weeks of treatment (P = .016).
  • The Cohen effect size for the Bensal HP group was 2.06 compared with 1.03 for the SSC group.
  • CONCLUSION: In this tightly controlled 6-week study in which no patients were lost to follow-up, Bensal HP seems to be an effective treatment for properly treated diabetic ulcers, outperforming an identical control group whose only difference was SSC as a medication.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents / administration & dosage. Diabetic Foot / drug therapy. Phytotherapy. Plant Extracts / administration & dosage. Quercus. Silver Sulfadiazine / administration & dosage. Wound Healing / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Benzoic Acid / administration & dosage. Debridement. Drug Combinations. Humans. Plant Bark. Salicylic Acid / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 18836324.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-8654
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in skin & wound care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Skin Wound Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Plant Extracts; 8SKN0B0MIM / Benzoic Acid; O414PZ4LPZ / Salicylic Acid; W46JY43EJR / Silver Sulfadiazine
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76. Laughton SJ, Merchant TE, Sklar CA, Kun LE, Fouladi M, Broniscer A, Morris EB, Sanders RP, Krasin MJ, Shelso J, Xiong Z, Wallace D, Gajjar A: Endocrine outcomes for children with embryonal brain tumors after risk-adapted craniospinal and conformal primary-site irradiation and high-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell rescue on the SJMB-96 trial. J Clin Oncol; 2008 Mar 1;26(7):1112-8
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  • [Title] Endocrine outcomes for children with embryonal brain tumors after risk-adapted craniospinal and conformal primary-site irradiation and high-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell rescue on the SJMB-96 trial.
  • PURPOSE: To estimate the cumulative incidence of specific hormone deficiencies and the influence of hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis radiation dose in a cohort of children with embryonal brain tumors treated with risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation (CSI), conformal primary site irradiation, and high-dose chemotherapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Clinical data and HP axis radiation dosimetry data were obtained from 88 eligible children.
  • Radiation dosimetry to the HP axis was associated only with the development of TSH deficiency; the 4-year cumulative incidence was 44% +/- 19% and 11% +/- 8% (P = .014) for those receiving more or less than the median dose to the hypothalamus (>or= 42 v < 42 Gy), respectively.
  • The median dose of CSI for the average-risk (AR) patients was 23.4 and 39.6 Gy (36 to 40.5 Gy) for the high-risk patients.
  • The estimated mean decline in height Z-score after radiation therapy was greater in high-risk patients (-0.65 units/yr) when compared with AR patients (-0.54 units/yr; P = .039).
  • CONCLUSION: Pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors are at high risk for treatment-related hormone deficiencies.
  • GHD and primary hypothyroidism were diagnosed in a majority of subjects relatively soon after the completion of therapy.
  • Radiation dose to the hypothalamus in excess of 42 Gy was associated with an increase in the risk of developing TSH deficiency.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenocorticotropic Hormone / deficiency. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Human Growth Hormone / deficiency. Hypothyroidism / etiology. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / radiotherapy. Spinal Cord / radiation effects. Thyrotropin / deficiency
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Cohort Studies. Cranial Irradiation. Female. Hematopoietic Stem Cells. Humans. Male. Pituitary Gland / drug effects. Pituitary Gland / radiation effects. Prospective Studies. Risk Factors


77. Requena A, Landeras JL, Martínez-Navarro L, Calatayud C, Sánchez F, Maldonado V, Muñoz M, Fernández M, González A, López S, López R, Pacheco A, Calderón G, Martínez V: Could the addition of hp-hMG and GnRH antagonists modulate the response in IVF-ICSI cycles? Hum Fertil (Camb); 2010 Mar;13(1):41-9
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  • [Title] Could the addition of hp-hMG and GnRH antagonists modulate the response in IVF-ICSI cycles?
  • METHODS: Open, quasi-experimental, multicenter, prospective, parallel-controlled study compared 136 women undergoing in vitro fertilization--intracytoplasmic sperm injection after stimulation with highly purified human menopausal gonadotropin (hp-hMG) (n = 44), recombinant-follicle stimulating hormone (r-FSH) (n = 46), or a combination of both (r FSH + hp-hMG) (n = 46) following an antagonist protocol.
  • RESULTS: No differences were found in the ongoing pregnancy rates between groups [37.0% versus 29.5% (hp-hMG) and 23.9% (r-FSH); p = 0.688].
  • However, the ratio top-quality embryos/retrieved oocytes (TQE/RO) was higher in the combined therapy group (19.6%)--reaching significance versus the r-FSH group (6.5%) (p = 0.008), but not versus hp-hMG (12.3%) (p = 0.137).
  • CONCLUSIONS: An improved TQE/RO ratio was obtained together with a greater percentage of frozen embryos in the patients that incorporated hp-hMG to their stimulation protocol.
  • Despite good results of adding hp-hMG, non statistical differences were found in terms of ongoing pregnancy rate.
  • [MeSH-major] Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Human / administration & dosage. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone / analogs & derivatives. Infertility, Female / drug therapy. Menotropins / administration & dosage. Ovulation Induction / methods. Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Analysis of Variance. Chi-Square Distribution. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Fertility Agents, Female / administration & dosage. Humans. Oocyte Retrieval. Patient Selection. Pregnancy. Pregnancy Rate. Prospective Studies. Regression Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20384441.001).
  • [ISSN] 1742-8149
  • [Journal-full-title] Human fertility (Cambridge, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum Fertil (Camb)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fertility Agents, Female; 0 / Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Human; 123246-29-7 / ganirelix; 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone; 61489-71-2 / Menotropins
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78. Dalbasti T, Oktar N, Cagli S, Ozdamar N: Local interstitial chemotherapy with sustained release bucladesine in de novo glioblastoma multiforme: a preliminary study. J Neurooncol; 2002 Jan;56(2):167-74
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  • [Title] Local interstitial chemotherapy with sustained release bucladesine in de novo glioblastoma multiforme: a preliminary study.
  • This clinical study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the sustained release form of dibutryl adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (dB-cAMP, bucladesine) placed in the tumor resection cavity at the time of recurrence of the de novo glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients.
  • Four different therapy protocols were used: First group of 10 patients had tumor resection only.
  • Second group assessed had only systemic chemotherapy as six i.v. infusions of fotémustine after tumor resection.
  • A biodegradable polymer, poly-DL-lactide-co-glycolide with molecular weight of 80000, was used as carrier matrix for the drug with an approximately 4-5 months of release time.
  • Maximal doses of 20 mg of bucladesine with a mean dose of 15.5 mg were implanted.
  • No bone marrow suppression occurred and there were no wound infections as far as the local bucladesine-loaded polymer therapy is concerned.
  • In this randomized prospective trial of local interstitial chemotherapy with long acting bcl-SR did show a statistically significant delay of recurrence on the treatment of GBM patients.
  • Best treatment results obtained from the local bcl-SR + systemic fotémustine treated group in which survival rate estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method was 70% in de novo GBM at 12 months.
  • [MeSH-major] Bucladesine / administration & dosage. Bucladesine / therapeutic use. Glioblastoma / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow / drug effects. Delayed-Action Preparations. Drug Implants / administration & dosage. Drug Implants / adverse effects. Drug Implants / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Nitrosourea Compounds / therapeutic use. Organophosphorus Compounds / therapeutic use. Prospective Studies. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Surgical Wound Infection. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11995818.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0 / Drug Implants; 0 / Nitrosourea Compounds; 0 / Organophosphorus Compounds; 63X7MBT2LQ / Bucladesine; GQ7JL9P5I2 / fotemustine
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79. Mukherjee SD, Swystun LL, Mackman N, Wang JG, Pond G, Levine MN, Liaw PC: Impact of chemotherapy on thrombin generation and on the protein C pathway in breast cancer patients. Pathophysiol Haemost Thromb; 2010;37(2-4):88-97
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  • [Title] Impact of chemotherapy on thrombin generation and on the protein C pathway in breast cancer patients.
  • Although thromboembolism is a problematic complication of chemotherapy, the pathogenic mechanisms by which chemotherapeutic agents exert prothrombotic effects in vivo are unclear.The objective of this study was to examine the effects of adjuvant chemotherapy on thrombin generation, the protein C anticoagulant pathway, and microparticle tissue factor (MP TF) activity in 26 breast cancer patients (stages I to III).
  • Plasma samples were collected on day 1 (baseline), day 2, and day 8 for the first 2 cycles of chemotherapy.
  • Levels of thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complexes, MP TF activity, and components of the protein C anticoagulant pathway, including protein C, activated protein C (APC), soluble thrombomodulin (sTM), and soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR), were measured.
  • Compared to prechemotherapy baseline levels, plasma TAT, protein C, and APC were significantly different following the administration of chemotherapy (p < 0.01 for each).
  • Plasma protein C levels were lower in cycle 2, day 8, whereas plasma APC levels were lower in cycle 2, day 1, and cycle 2, day 8.
  • No significant changes were found in plasma sEPCR, sTM, or MP TF activity.
  • This study suggests that adjuvant chemotherapy in women with breast cancer increases thrombin generation and impairs the endothelium-based protein C anticoagulant pathway.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Breast Neoplasms / blood. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protein C / metabolism. Thrombin / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antigens, CD / blood. Antithrombin III. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / adverse effects. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / adverse effects. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Epirubicin / adverse effects. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / adverse effects. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Peptide Hydrolases / blood. Receptors, Cell Surface / blood. Thrombomodulin / blood. Thromboplastin / metabolism. Thrombosis / blood. Thrombosis / chemically induced. Time Factors

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 21430357.001).
  • [ISSN] 1424-8840
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathophysiology of haemostasis and thrombosis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathophysiol. Haemost. Thromb.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / / MOP-CTP79846
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / PROCR protein, human; 0 / Protein C; 0 / Receptors, Cell Surface; 0 / Thrombomodulin; 0 / antithrombin III-protease complex; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9000-94-6 / Antithrombin III; 9035-58-9 / Thromboplastin; EC 3.4.- / Peptide Hydrolases; EC 3.4.21.5 / Thrombin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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80. Rosenberg JE, Weinberg VK, Kelly WK, Michaelson D, Hussain MH, Wilding G, Gross M, Hutcheon D, Small EJ: Activity of second-line chemotherapy in docetaxel-refractory hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients : randomized phase 2 study of ixabepilone or mitoxantrone and prednisone. Cancer; 2007 Aug 1;110(3):556-63
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Activity of second-line chemotherapy in docetaxel-refractory hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients : randomized phase 2 study of ixabepilone or mitoxantrone and prednisone.
  • BACKGROUND: This randomized, noncomparative, multicenter, clinical trial evaluated ixabepilone or mitoxantrone/prednisone (MP) as second-line chemotherapy for taxane-refractory, hormone-refractory, prostate cancer (HRPC).
  • METHODS: Patients with HRPC that progressed during or within 60 days of cessation of taxane chemotherapy were randomly selected with equal probability to ixabepilone 35 mg/m(2) intravenously every 3 weeks, or mitoxantrone 14 mg/m(2) intravenously every 3 weeks and prednisone 5 mg orally twice daily.
  • Treatment continued until progression or toxicity; crossover was allowed.
  • Median survival from protocol entry was 10.4 months with ixabepilone and 9.8 months with MP.
  • Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) declines of >or=50% were observed in 17% of ixabepilone (95% CI, 7-32) and 20% of second-line MP patients (95% CI, 9-35).
  • Partial responses were observed in 1 of 24 ixabepilone and in 2 of 21 MP patients with evaluable measurable disease.
  • Median duration of second-line ixabepilone and MP treatment was 2.2 months and 2.3 months, respectively.
  • For third-line crossover treatment, PSA declines of >or=50% were observed in 3 of 27 ixabepilone-treated and 4 of 15 MP-treated patients.
  • Prior taxane response was associated with an increased likelihood of second-line ixabepilone or MP response.
  • The most common grade 3/4 toxicity associated with second-line treatment was neutropenia (54% of ixabepilone patients and 63% of MP patients).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Ixabepilone and MP had modest activity as second-line chemotherapy for docetaxel-refractory HRPC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cross-Over Studies. Epothilones / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mitoxantrone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Salvage Therapy. Survival Rate. Taxoids / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 17577218.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Epothilones; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; BZ114NVM5P / Mitoxantrone; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen; K27005NP0A / ixabepilone; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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81. Konturek PC, Konturek SJ, Cześnikiewicz M, Płonka M, Bielański W: Interaction of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) on gastric mucosa and risk of ulcerations. Med Sci Monit; 2002 Sep;8(9):RA197-209
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Interaction of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) on gastric mucosa and risk of ulcerations.
  • Hp and NSAID are the most common pathogens in the stomach, but their interaction on gastro-duodenal mucosa has been little studied.
  • Hp infection in humans does not interfere with NSAID-induced gastric ulcer healing by omeprazole, therefore, there is no rationale to eradicate the germ.
  • Hp infection induces COX-2 expression resulting in excessive biosynthesis of gastroprotective prostaglandin (PG), which should in turn counteract NSAID-induced gastropathy and contribute to healing of existing ulcers.
  • Some investigators claim that Hp infection acts synergistically with NSAID on ulcerogenesis and propose that Hp should be eradicated, particularly at the onset of long-term NSAID therapy.
  • Our studies in about 6500 dyspeptic patients undergoing upper endoscopy and 13C-urea breath test revealed that about 70% of these patients are Hp positive and 31% of these develop gastro-duodenal ulcers.
  • Of these ulcers, 66% were Hp positive and NSAID negative, 3%--NSAID positive and Hp negative, 8% were both Hp positive and NSAID positive, while 23% ulcers were Hp and NSAID negative.
  • An evidence was obtained for negative interaction between Hp infection and NSAID on risk of gastro-duodenal ulcers suggesting that Hp may attenuate the peptic ulcerogenesis.
  • Our results support the concept 1) the interaction between Hp infection and NSAID on gastro-duodenal ulcerations is antagonistic, 2) the Hp and NSAID are independent risk factors for peptic ulcerations in humans, 3) there is no need for the Hp eradication in NSAID-treated patients, and 4) the rate of ulcer complications (hemorrhage and perforation) remains constant despite the decrease in Hp and ulcer prevalence.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / metabolism. Gastric Mucosa / drug effects. Gastric Mucosa / microbiology. Helicobacter pylori / metabolism. Peptic Ulcer / diagnosis. Peptic Ulcer / microbiology

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  • (PMID = 12218957.001).
  • [ISSN] 1234-1010
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Sci. Monit.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
  • [Number-of-references] 57
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82. Ochiai T, Nishimura K, Noguchi H, Kitajima M, Tsuruoka Y, Takahashi Y, Tsukada A, Watanabe E, Nagaoka I, Futagawa S: Prognostic impact of orotate phosphoribosyl transferase activity in resectable colorectal cancers treated by 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. J Surg Oncol; 2006 Jul 1;94(1):45-50
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic impact of orotate phosphoribosyl transferase activity in resectable colorectal cancers treated by 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Phosphoribosylation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is an essential step which leads to tumor growth inhibition and orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) is the main enzyme that involves in this conversion of 5-FU to 5-fluorouridine monophosphate.
  • This retrospective study was aimed to evaluate the correlation between tumor OPRT activity and the clinical outcome in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients treated by oral 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: Surgical specimen was obtained from resectable 124 CRC patients who were subsequently treated by oral 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • OPRT activity in the extract of tumor tissue was enzymatically determined.
  • RESULTS: Patients were divided into two groups by determined cut-off value of intratumor OPRT (0.147 nmol/min/mg protein) (high group: n = 102, low group: n = 22).
  • Five-year DFS (P = 0.035) and OS (P = 0.020) were significantly better for high OPRT group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that an assay of tumor OPRT contributes to the determination of 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy outcome and application in clinical practice should be included in tumor analysis prior to 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colorectal Neoplasms / enzymology. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Orotate Phosphoribosyltransferase / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 16788943.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4790
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; EC 2.4.2.10 / Orotate Phosphoribosyltransferase; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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83. Fonina LA, Ovchinnikov MV, Gur'ianov SA, Sychev SV, Belevskaia RG, Treshchalina EM: [Synthesis and properties of the retro-analogue of myelopeptide MP-2]. Bioorg Khim; 2005 May-Jun;31(3):239-44

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Synthesis and properties of the retro-analogue of myelopeptide MP-2].
  • The bone marrow myelopeptide MP-2 (Leu-Val-Val-Tyr-Pro-Trp), exhibiting antitumor activity, and its retro-analogue (Trp-Pro-Tyr-Val-Val-Leu) were synthesized, and their properties were studied.
  • The in vitro and in vivo activities of retro-MP-2 were comparable with those of MP-2.
  • Both peptides equally restored the functional activity of T-lymphocytes inhibited by toxins released by HL-60 cells and inhibited by 70-82% the growth of various types of transplantable solid tumors: Ca-755 adenocarcinoma of the mammary gland, Lewis adenocarcinoma of the lung, and S180 sarcoma.
  • The positions and intensities of the Cotton effects in CD spectra of the MP-2 peptide and its retro-analogue in various solvents are almost indistinguishable.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adjuvants, Immunologic / chemical synthesis. Adjuvants, Immunologic / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Lewis Lung / drug therapy. Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental / drug therapy. Oligopeptides / chemical synthesis. Oligopeptides / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 16004381.001).
  • [ISSN] 0132-3423
  • [Journal-full-title] Bioorganicheskaia khimiia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bioorg. Khim.
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Oligopeptides; 137833-32-0 / myelopeptides
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84. Bobrzyński A, Beben P, Budzyński A, Bielański W, Plonka M, Konturek S: Incidence of complications of peptic ulcers in patients with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and/or NSAID use in the era of Hp eradication. Med Sci Monit; 2002 Aug;8(8):CR554-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence of complications of peptic ulcers in patients with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and/or NSAID use in the era of Hp eradication.
  • BACKGROUND: Hp and NSAID are considered as major pathogens in peptic ulcerations and their complications but little is known about the incidence of ulcers and their complications following wide-spread use of Hp eradication.
  • 1) to analyze incidence of ulcers and their complications, bleeding and perforations at time when the Hp eradication has been used in ulcer therapy, and 2) to assess the impact of Hp infection and NSAID use on the incidence of ulcers and complications.
  • The incidence of Hp in patients with complications assessed by UBT or CLO was 76.7%, while the incidence of Hp in 7920 patients ranged form 72.8% in 1996 to 53.8% in 2001.
  • The decline in the prevalence of peptic ulcer from about 44% to 8% occurred over the same time.
  • A slight increase in the number of ulcer resulting from NSAID use was observed so was the number of ulcers without Hp or NSAID (idiopathic).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Despite decreased Hp prevalence, the incidence of ulcers complications remained unchanged probably due to increased use of NSAID and the appearance of idiopathic ulcers.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / adverse effects. Helicobacter Infections / drug therapy. Peptic Ulcer / complications. Peptic Ulcer / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 12165741.001).
  • [ISSN] 1234-1010
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Sci. Monit.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
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85. Chiarelli LR, Molinaro M, Libetta C, Tinelli C, Cosmai L, Valentini G, Dal Canton A, Regazzi M: Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase variability in renal transplant patients on long-term mycophenolate mofetil therapy. Br J Clin Pharmacol; 2010 Jan;69(1):38-50
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase variability in renal transplant patients on long-term mycophenolate mofetil therapy.
  • WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: * Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is a potent, selective and reversible inhibitor of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo guanosine triphosphate biosynthesis.
  • * The large IMPDH interindividual variability could be responsible for the differences in therapeutic effects and side-effects observed with MPA.
  • * Induction of IMPDH activity has been observed in whole blood during immunosuppressive therapy.
  • WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS: * Our data were acquired in long-term mycophenolate mofetil-treated renal transplant recipients on different combinations of immunosuppressive agents (ciclosporin, tacrolimus, sirolimus) and with different treatment duration (up to 8.8 years post transplant).
  • AIMS: Long-term mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) therapy may induce inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), thus decreasing MMF immunosuppressive properties.
  • Pharmacodynamic monitoring was used to investigate whether biological activity is altered after long-term therapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Even though a correlation has been found between IMPDH activity and rejection, its efficacy as a predictive tool in long-term transplant outcomes may be affected by high interpatient variability; on the other hand, continuous monitoring of the IMPDH trend could make an effective prognostic parameter of rejection.
  • [MeSH-major] IMP Dehydrogenase / pharmacokinetics. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Kidney Transplantation. Mycophenolic Acid / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid. Female. Humans. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / drug effects. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / enzymology. Linear Models. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 20078611.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2125
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of clinical pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Clin Pharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 9242ECW6R0 / mycophenolate mofetil; EC 1.1.1.205 / IMP Dehydrogenase; HU9DX48N0T / Mycophenolic Acid
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2830596
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86. Agro K, Blackhouse G, Goeree R, Willan AR, Huang JQ, Hunt RH, O'Brien BJ: Cost effectiveness in Canada of a multidrug prepackaged regimen (Hp-PAC)+ for Helicobacter pylori eradication. Pharmacoeconomics; 2001;19(8):831-43
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cost effectiveness in Canada of a multidrug prepackaged regimen (Hp-PAC)+ for Helicobacter pylori eradication.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost effectiveness of a multidrug prepackaged regimen for Helicobacter pylori, the Hp-PAC (lansoprazole 30mg, clarithromycin 500 mg, amoxicillin 1 g, all twice daily), relative to alternative pharmacological strategies in the management of confirmed duodenal ulcer over a 1-year period from 2 perspectives: (i) a strict healthcare payer perspective (Ontario Ministry of Health) excluding the patient copayment; and (ii) a healthcare payer perspective including the patient copayment.
  • DESIGN: A decision-analytical model was developed to estimate expected per patient costs [1998 Canadian dollars ($ Can)], weeks without ulcer and symptomatic ulcer recurrences for the Hp-PAC compared with: proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-clarithromycin-amoxicillin (PPI-CA), PPI-clarithromycin-metronidazole (PPI-CM), PPI-amoxicillin-metronidazole (PPI-AM) and ranitidine-bismuthmetronidazole-tetracycline (RAN-BMT).
  • From a strict healthcare payer perspective, PPI-CM ($Can 209) yielded lower expected costs than PPI-CA ($Can 221) and slightly lower costs than Hp-PAC ($Can 211).
  • When the current Ontario, Canada, $Can 2 patient copayment was added to the dispensing fee, Hp-PAC yielded lower costs ($Can 214) than PPI-CM ($Can 216).
  • CONCLUSION: From a strict healthcare payer perspective, Hp-PAC is weakly dominated by PPI-CM with an incremental cost effectiveness (relative to RAN-BMT) of $Can 5.77 per ulcer week averted.
  • When the patient copayment is added to this perspective, Hp-PAC weakly dominates PPI-CM ($Can 5 per ulcer week averted).
  • Regardless of perspective, Hp-PAC and PPI-CM differed by only $Can 2 per patient over 1 year and the expected time without ulcer was 51.2 weeks for both.
  • More data on the clinical and statistical differences in H. pylori eradication with Hp-PAC and PPI-CM would be useful.
  • This analysis does not in clude the possible advantage of Hp-PAC in terms of compliance and antibacterial resistance.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / economics. Cost-Benefit Analysis. Decision Support Techniques. Helicobacter Infections / drug therapy. Helicobacter Infections / economics. Helicobacter pylori
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Ulcer Agents / economics. Anti-Ulcer Agents / therapeutic use. Canada. Drug Therapy, Combination. Economics, Pharmaceutical. Humans. Peptic Ulcer / drug therapy. Peptic Ulcer / economics

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  • (PMID = 11596835.001).
  • [ISSN] 1170-7690
  • [Journal-full-title] PharmacoEconomics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharmacoeconomics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Anti-Ulcer Agents
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87. Maurya SK, Gollapalli DR, Kirubakaran S, Zhang M, Johnson CR, Benjamin NN, Hedstrom L, Cuny GD: Triazole inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase. J Med Chem; 2009 Aug 13;52(15):4623-30
BindingDB. BindingDB .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Triazole inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.
  • Cryptosporidium parvum is an important human pathogen and potential bioterrorism agent.
  • This protozoan parasite cannot salvage guanine or guanosine and therefore relies on inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) for biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides and hence for survival.
  • The 1,2,3-triazole CpIMPDH inhibitors provide new tools for elucidating the role of IMPDH in C. parvum and may serve as potential therapeutics for treating cryptosporidiosis.

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  • (PMID = 19624136.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medicinal chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Med. Chem.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R21 NS067497; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U01AI075466; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U01 AI075466; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U01 AI075466-01; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI075466-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiprotozoal Agents; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Triazoles; EC 1.1.1.205 / IMP Dehydrogenase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS167141; NLM/ PMC2810100
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88. Su H, Gunter JH, de Vries M, Connor T, Wanyonyi S, Newell FS, Segal D, Molero JC, Reizes O, Prins JB, Hutley LJ, Walder K, Whitehead JP: Inhibition of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase reduces adipogenesis and diet-induced obesity. Biochem Biophys Res Commun; 2009 Aug 21;386(2):351-5
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Inhibition of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase reduces adipogenesis and diet-induced obesity.
  • We previously described a putative role for inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, in lipid accumulation.
  • Here we present data which demonstrate that IMPDH activity is required for differentiation of preadipocytes into mature, lipid-laden adipocytes and maintenance of adipose tissue mass.
  • Co-treatment with guanosine, a substrate in the salvage pathway of nucleotide biosynthesis, restored GTP levels and adipogenesis demonstrating the specificity of these effects.
  • Treatment of diet-induced obese mice with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), the prodrug of MPA, for 28 days did not affect food intake or lean body mass but reduced body fat content (by 36%, p=0.002) and adipocyte size (p=0.03) and number.
  • These data suggest that inhibition of IMPDH may represent a novel strategy to reduce adipose tissue mass.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipogenesis / drug effects. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. IMP Dehydrogenase / antagonists & inhibitors. Mycophenolic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Obesity / drug therapy. Weight Loss

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  • (PMID = 19523919.001).
  • [ISSN] 1090-2104
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical and biophysical research communications
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 12133JR80S / Guanosine; 9242ECW6R0 / mycophenolate mofetil; EC 1.1.1.205 / IMP Dehydrogenase; HU9DX48N0T / Mycophenolic Acid
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89. Liotard JF, Mehiri M, Di Giorgio A, Boggetto N, Reboud-Ravaux M, Aubertin AM, Condom R, Patino N: AZT and AZT-monophosphate prodrugs incorporating HIV-protease substrate fragment: synthesis and evaluation as specific drug delivery systems. Antivir Chem Chemother; 2006;17(4):193-213
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ZIDOVUDINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] AZT and AZT-monophosphate prodrugs incorporating HIV-protease substrate fragment: synthesis and evaluation as specific drug delivery systems.
  • With the view to deliver anti-HIV nucleoside and nucleoside-monophosphate (MP) analogues specifically into HIV-infected cells, we synthesized a series of ester and phosphoramidate peptide conjugates of zidovudine (AZT) and of AZT-MP, respectively, wherein the peptide sequences derive from a HIV-protease (PR) hydrolysable substrate.
  • Most of the phosphoramidate peptide conjugates of AZT-MP were rapidly degraded in a physiological buffer into several metabolites including AZT.
  • Their anti-HIV activity in TK+ CEM-SS and MT-4 cells was much lower than that of AZT, indicating that only low amounts of AZT or AZT-MP were released into cells during incubation.
  • Antiviral activities measured on TK- CEM cells for some phosphoramidates suggest that low amounts of AZT-MP could be released intracellularly.
  • However, this AZT-MP release was not initiated by a HIV-PR hydrolysis, as no evidence for peptide cleavage was obtained by HPLC analysis of one representative compound after incubation with HIV-PR.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Delivery Systems. HIV Infections / drug therapy. HIV Protease / chemistry. Prodrugs. Thymine Nucleotides / chemical synthesis. Thymine Nucleotides / therapeutic use. Zidovudine / analogs & derivatives. Zidovudine / chemical synthesis. Zidovudine / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Amides / chemical synthesis. Anti-HIV Agents / chemical synthesis. Anti-HIV Agents / therapeutic use. Cells, Cultured. Dideoxynucleotides. Drug Evaluation. Drug Stability. Esters / chemical synthesis. HIV-1 / drug effects. Humans. Inhibitory Concentration 50. Models, Biological. Phosphoric Acids / chemical synthesis. Protease Inhibitors / pharmacology. Thymidine Kinase / genetics

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  • (PMID = 17066898.001).
  • [ISSN] 0956-3202
  • [Journal-full-title] Antiviral chemistry & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antivir. Chem. Chemother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amides; 0 / Anti-HIV Agents; 0 / Dideoxynucleotides; 0 / Esters; 0 / Phosphoric Acids; 0 / Prodrugs; 0 / Protease Inhibitors; 0 / Thymine Nucleotides; 29706-85-2 / 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine 5'phosphate; 4B9XT59T7S / Zidovudine; 9Q189608GB / phosphoramidic acid; EC 2.7.1.21 / Thymidine Kinase; EC 3.4.23.- / HIV Protease
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90. Ratcliffe AJ: Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Curr Opin Drug Discov Devel; 2006 Sep;9(5):595-605
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Autoimmune Diseases.

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  • [Title] Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.
  • Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a key enzyme in the de novo biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides.
  • This review will highlight recent advances in the IMPDH field, with a focus on the discovery and development of non-nucleoside IMPDH inhibitors.
  • [MeSH-major] Autoimmune Diseases / drug therapy. Enzyme Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. IMP Dehydrogenase / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 17002220.001).
  • [ISSN] 1367-6733
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in drug discovery & development
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Drug Discov Devel
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; EC 1.1.1.205 / IMP Dehydrogenase
  • [Number-of-references] 57
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91. Fardon TC, Fardon EJ, Hodge MR, Lipworth BJ: Comparative cutoff points for adenosine monophosphate and methacholine challenge testing. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol; 2004 Oct;93(4):365-72
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ADENOSINE 5'-PHOSPHATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparative cutoff points for adenosine monophosphate and methacholine challenge testing.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of lower cutoff points for adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and methacholine (MCH) bronchial challenge tools to monitor response to treatment in chronic asthma.
  • Data were analyzed for correlation of single results and doubling dose shifts after anti-inflammatory treatment intervention.
  • Evaluating the doubling dose shift produced by the addition of anti-inflammatory treatment (inhaled corticosteroids or montelukast) produced the following Pearson correlation coefficients: MCH PD20 (provocation dose that causes a decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 20%) vs PD15, 0.80; MCH PD20 vs PD10, 0.65; AMP PC20 vs PC15, 0.96; and AMP PC20 vs PC10, 0.84 (P < .001 for all).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The 10% and 15% cutoff points strongly predict the 20% cutoff value for AMP and MCH, as do the doubling dose shifts after anti-inflammatory treatment.
  • The lower thresholds are suitable for monitoring response to therapy, and they expose patients to significantly less provocation agent.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenosine Monophosphate. Bronchial Provocation Tests / standards. Bronchoconstrictor Agents. Methacholine Chloride
  • [MeSH-minor] Acetates / administration & dosage. Acetates / therapeutic use. Administration, Inhalation. Adrenal Cortex Hormones / administration & dosage. Adrenal Cortex Hormones / therapeutic use. Anti-Asthmatic Agents / administration & dosage. Anti-Asthmatic Agents / therapeutic use. Asthma / drug therapy. Bronchial Hyperreactivity / drug therapy. Forced Expiratory Volume. Humans. Quinolines / administration & dosage. Quinolines / therapeutic use. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 15521373.001).
  • [ISSN] 1081-1206
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology : official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Allergy Asthma Immunol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Acetates; 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Anti-Asthmatic Agents; 0 / Bronchoconstrictor Agents; 0 / Quinolines; 0W5ETF9M2K / Methacholine Chloride; 415SHH325A / Adenosine Monophosphate; MHM278SD3E / montelukast
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92. Sauerbrei A, Meier C, Meerbach A, Wutzler P: Inhibitory efficacy of cyclosal-nucleoside monophosphates of aciclovir and brivudin on DNA synthesis of orthopoxvi ruses. Antivir Chem Chemother; 2006;17(1):25-31
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ACYCLOVIR .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Inhibitory efficacy of cyclosal-nucleoside monophosphates of aciclovir and brivudin on DNA synthesis of orthopoxvi ruses.
  • Previous studies have shown that cycloSaligenyl-monophosphate (cycloSal-MP) derivatives of aciclovir (ACV), penciclovir (PCV) and brivudin (BVDU) can act as inhibitors of vaccinia virus and cowpox virus replication in vitro.
  • Viral DNA was quantified in treated and non-treated virus-infected cells by semi-quantitative PCR on the basis of the haemagglutinin protein gene of orthopoxviruses.
  • The high inhibitory efficacy on both replication of viral DNA and infectious viral particles in cell cultures makes these compounds promising candidates for in vivo experiments.
  • [MeSH-major] Acyclovir / analogs & derivatives. Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Bromodeoxyuridine / analogs & derivatives. Orthopoxvirus / growth & development. Poxviridae Infections / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cercopithecus aethiops. DNA Replication / drug effects. DNA, Viral / chemistry. DNA, Viral / genetics. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Vero Cells. Virus Replication / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 16542003.001).
  • [ISSN] 0956-3202
  • [Journal-full-title] Antiviral chemistry & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antivir. Chem. Chemother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral; 2M3055079H / brivudine; G34N38R2N1 / Bromodeoxyuridine; X4HES1O11F / Acyclovir
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93. Takada J, Kenno S, Aoki T, Hamada H, Katsuki Y: [A case in which intra-arterial chemotherapy for simultaneous hepatic metastases markedly improved AFP-producing gastric cancer]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2009 Nov;36(12):2326-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. EPIRUBICIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [A case in which intra-arterial chemotherapy for simultaneous hepatic metastases markedly improved AFP-producing gastric cancer].
  • The prognosis of most hepatic and lymph node metastases in AFP-producing gastric cancer is poor, and despite the use of multimodal therapy, the average survival period is reported to be approximately one year.
  • Described here is one example in which intra-arterial chemotherapy for simultaneous hepatic metastases in AFP-producing gastric cancer achieved a marked improvement.
  • Distal gastrectomy was performed for Type II gastric cancer.
  • L, type 2, 5.5x2.4 cm, tub 2>por 1, pT2 (MP), int, INF b, ly2, v1, pN1, pPM (-), pDM (-), pH1: stage IV.
  • 5-FU+epirubicin+MMC (FEM)intra-arterial chemotherapy was started one month following surgery, but because CT showed multiple new hepatic lesions(S4, S5)four months following surgery, DSM therapy was performed with hepatic arterial injections of MMC 10 mg, DSM 300 mg.
  • Dynamic CT showed a reduction in size of the tumors in both S4 and S5, and at five months following surgery, hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy FP (CDDP 5 mg+5-FU 250 mg weekly) was started and performed 45 times in a 14-month period.
  • During therapy, CR was achieved for the hepatic metastases and tumor marker levels were also normal.
  • This suggests the possibility that intra-arterial chemotherapy is an effective treatment method for hepatic metastases in AFP-producing gastric cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology. alpha-Fetoproteins / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Gastrectomy. Hepatic Artery. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial. Mitomycin / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 20037411.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / alpha-Fetoproteins; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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94. Buzás GM, Illyés G, Székely E, Széles I: Six regimens for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) in duodenal ulcer patients: three consecutive trials (1995-1999). J Physiol Paris; 2001 Jan-Dec;95(1-6):437-41
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Six regimens for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) in duodenal ulcer patients: three consecutive trials (1995-1999).
  • AIM: to present our experience in eradicating Hp in three consecutive trials performed between 1995 and 1999.
  • Hp infection was confirmed by Giemsa stain and Rut.
  • CONCLUSION: Regimens using 2 x l PPI or RBC + 2 antibiotics for l week proved to be the most effective for Hp eradication in duodenal ulcer patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Duodenal Ulcer / microbiology. Helicobacter Infections / complications. Helicobacter Infections / drug therapy. Helicobacter pylori
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anti-Bacterial Agents / adverse effects. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Anti-Ulcer Agents / therapeutic use. Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Therapy, Combination. Duodenoscopy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Proton Pump Inhibitors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11595472.001).
  • [ISSN] 0928-4257
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of physiology, Paris
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Physiol. Paris
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Anti-Ulcer Agents; 0 / Proton Pump Inhibitors
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95. Lee DK, Gray RD, Wilson AM, Robb FM, Soutar PC, Lipworth BJ: Single and short-term dosing effects of levocetirizine on adenosine monophosphate bronchoprovocation in atopic asthma. Br J Clin Pharmacol; 2004 Jul;58(1):34-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Cetirizine .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Single and short-term dosing effects of levocetirizine on adenosine monophosphate bronchoprovocation in atopic asthma.
  • AIMS: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) acts indirectly via primed airway mast cells to induce bronchial hyper-responsiveness, which in turn correlates with eosinophilic asthmatic inflammation and atopic disease expression.
  • There was a 1-week washout period prior to each randomized treatment.
  • The provocative concentration of AMP producing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) was measured after each washout at baseline and at 4-6 h following the first and last doses of each randomized treatment.
  • RESULTS: Baseline mean +/- SEM values after washout prior to each randomized treatment comparing levocetirizine vs placebo were not significantly different for prechallenge FEV1 (% predicted) 83 +/- 4 vs 82 +/- 4, or AMP PC20 (mg ml(-1)) 45 +/- 24 vs 45 +/- 22, respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Asthma / drug therapy. Cetirizine / administration & dosage. Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenosine Monophosphate. Adult. Aged. Bronchial Hyperreactivity / drug therapy. Bronchial Provocation Tests. Cross-Over Studies. Double-Blind Method. Female. Forced Expiratory Volume / drug effects. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 15206990.001).
  • [ISSN] 0306-5251
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of clinical pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Clin Pharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating; 415SHH325A / Adenosine Monophosphate; YO7261ME24 / Cetirizine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1884543
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96. Braun-Sand SB, Peetz M: Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase as a target for antiviral, anticancer, antimicrobial and immunosuppressive therapeutics. Future Med Chem; 2010 Jan;2(1):81-92
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase as a target for antiviral, anticancer, antimicrobial and immunosuppressive therapeutics.
  • Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the de novo biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides.
  • In recent years it has become the target of multiple drugs in an attempt to cure a variety of diseases.
  • Possible therapeutic drugs range from antiviral and anticancer to immunosuppressive targets.
  • Microbial and parasitic IMPDH differ significantly from the human isoforms and targeting those isoforms could lead to effective treatments for many diseases.
  • Inhibiting IMPDH is an extremely promising therapy for a variety of disease states.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Humans. Immunosuppression. Molecular Structure. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / enzymology

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  • (PMID = 21426047.001).
  • [ISSN] 1756-8927
  • [Journal-full-title] Future medicinal chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Future Med Chem
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Infective Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Isoenzymes; EC 1.1.1.205 / IMP Dehydrogenase
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97. Tasaduq SA, Singh K, Sethi S, Sharma SC, Bedi KL, Singh J, Jaggi BS, Johri RK: Hepatocurative and antioxidant profile of HP-1, a polyherbal phytomedicine. Hum Exp Toxicol; 2003 Dec;22(12):639-45
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hepatocurative and antioxidant profile of HP-1, a polyherbal phytomedicine.
  • HP-1 a herbal formulation comprising of Phyllanthus niruri and extracts of Terminalia belerica, Terminalia chebula, Phyllanthus emblica and Tinospora cordifolia has been evaluated for hepatoprotective activity against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced toxicity.
  • Results show that HP-1 reversed the leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and prevented the depletion of glutathione (GSH) levels in a primary monolayer culture of rat hepatocytes (in vitro).
  • HP-1 attenuated the serum toxicity as manifested in elevated levels of transaminases (glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), and GPT) The antioxidative enzymes in liver (catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were restored to normal values after the oral administration of HP-1.
  • HP-1 suppressed the formation of the superoxide anion radical and reduced CCl4 mediated lipid peroxidation (LPO).
  • The present study showed that HP-1 is a potential hepatoprotective formulation with an additional attribute of being anti-peroxidative.
  • [MeSH-major] Antioxidants / therapeutic use. Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury / drug therapy. Phytotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Alanine Transaminase / physiology. Animals. Ascorbic Acid / administration & dosage. Ascorbic Acid / pharmacology. Carbon Tetrachloride / administration & dosage. Carbon Tetrachloride / adverse effects. Carbon Tetrachloride / antagonists & inhibitors. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cell Survival / physiology. Cells, Cultured. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Combinations. Formazans / metabolism. Glutathione / physiology. Hepatocytes / drug effects. Hepatocytes / enzymology. India. L-Lactate Dehydrogenase / physiology. Liver / drug effects. Liver / enzymology. Liver / pathology. Male. Phyllanthus. Plant Preparations / pharmacology. Plant Preparations / therapeutic use. Plants, Medicinal / chemistry. Plants, Medicinal / drug effects. Rats. Silymarin / administration & dosage. Silymarin / pharmacology. Terminalia. Tinospora. alpha-Tocopherol / administration & dosage. alpha-Tocopherol / pharmacology. beta Carotene / administration & dosage. beta Carotene / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 14992325.001).
  • [ISSN] 0960-3271
  • [Journal-full-title] Human & experimental toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum Exp Toxicol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Formazans; 0 / Plant Preparations; 0 / Silymarin; 01YAE03M7J / beta Carotene; CL2T97X0V0 / Carbon Tetrachloride; EC 1.1.1.27 / L-Lactate Dehydrogenase; EC 2.6.1.2 / Alanine Transaminase; GAN16C9B8O / Glutathione; H4N855PNZ1 / alpha-Tocopherol; PQ6CK8PD0R / Ascorbic Acid
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98. van den Berge M, Kerstjens HA, Meijer RJ, de Reus DM, Koëter GH, Kauffman HF, Postma DS: Corticosteroid-induced improvement in the PC20 of adenosine monophosphate is more closely associated with reduction in airway inflammation than improvement in the PC20 of methacholine. Am J Respir Crit Care Med; 2001 Oct 1;164(7):1127-32
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ADENOSINE 5'-PHOSPHATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Corticosteroid-induced improvement in the PC20 of adenosine monophosphate is more closely associated with reduction in airway inflammation than improvement in the PC20 of methacholine.
  • It has been suggested in cross-sectional studies that provocation with adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) more closely reflects the inflammatory process in asthma than does provocation with methacholine or histamine.
  • In 120 asthmatic patients, we measured PC20 methacholine and PC20 AMP as well as sputum induction and nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled air before and after 2 weeks of treatment with corticosteroids.
  • We conclude that PC20 AMP is more sensitive to changes in acute airway inflammation than is PC20 methacholine, further reinforcing the notion that PC20 AMP can be a useful tool for monitoring the effects of antiinflammatory therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenosine Monophosphate. Androstadienes / therapeutic use. Anti-Inflammatory Agents / therapeutic use. Asthma / drug therapy. Asthma / physiopathology. Forced Expiratory Volume / drug effects. Glucocorticoids / therapeutic use. Methacholine Chloride. Prednisone / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Fluticasone. Humans. Inflammation / drug therapy. Inflammation / physiopathology. Male. Multivariate Analysis

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  • [CommentIn] Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 May 1;165(9):1336; author reply 1336 [11991890.001]
  • [CommentIn] Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 Mar 1;165(5):730 [11874824.001]
  • (PMID = 11673197.001).
  • [ISSN] 1073-449X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androstadienes; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 0W5ETF9M2K / Methacholine Chloride; 415SHH325A / Adenosine Monophosphate; CUT2W21N7U / Fluticasone; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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99. Cavo M, Benni M, Ronconi S, Fiacchini M, Gozzetti A, Zamagni E, Cellini C, Tosi P, Baccarani M, Tura S, Writing Committee of the "Bologna 90" Clinical Trial: Melphalan-prednisone versus alternating combination VAD/MP or VND/MP as primary therapy for multiple myeloma: final analysis of a randomized clinical study. Haematologica; 2002 Sep;87(9):934-42
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NOVANTRONE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Melphalan-prednisone versus alternating combination VAD/MP or VND/MP as primary therapy for multiple myeloma: final analysis of a randomized clinical study.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In the absence of a cure for multiple myeloma (MM) with standard-dose therapy, any strategy that can be expected to increase tumor reduction and to extend survival duration is likely to be of clinical relevance.
  • The primary end-point of the present study was to investigate whether the alternating combination of vincristine-doxorubicin-dexamethasone (VAD) and melphalan-prednisone (MP) or vincristine-mitoxantrone-dexamethasone (VND) and MP could improve the clinical outcome of MM patients thus treated in comparison with those receiving MP alone.
  • DESIGN AND METHODS: Between November 1990 and April 1994, 527 previously untreated, stage I-III, MM patients from 29 Italian institutions were randomized to receive one of three remission induction chemotherapy regimens consisting of 8-monthly courses of either MP alone or alternating VAD/MP or VND/MP.
  • RESULTS: On an intent-to-treat basis, the objective response rates were 53% with MP (objective + minor: 67%), 47% with VAD/MP (objective + minor: 61%) and 49% with VND/MP (objective + minor: 61%).
  • Median survival duration was 36.5 months with MP, 29 months with VAD/MP and 32.5 months with VND/MP.
  • The difference among these groups was not statistically significant, even after stratifying patients into high-risk and low-risk subgroups, as assessed by a multifactor proportional hazard analysis.
  • In both younger and elderly patients, severe granulocytopenia and related infections were significantly more frequent with VND/MP compared to the remaining arms of treatment (p < 0.001 and p = 0.009, respectively).
  • Similarly, the frequency of WHO grade III-IV cardiovascular events was significantly higher for patients receiving anthracycline-containing regimens (VND/MP and VAD/MP) than for those treated with MP alone (p = 0.04).
  • INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: Alternating VAD/MP and VND/MP failed to improve the clinical outcome for MM patients, at the cost of increased toxicity and morbidity.
  • Resistance to standard-dose chemotherapy remains a significant obstacle to the treatment of MM.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Melphalan / therapeutic use. Mitoxantrone / therapeutic use. Multiple Myeloma / drug therapy. Prednisone / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Salvage Therapy. Survival Rate. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12217805.001).
  • [ISSN] 0390-6078
  • [Journal-full-title] Haematologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Haematologica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; BZ114NVM5P / Mitoxantrone; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; VAD combination
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100. Mellon M, Leflein J, Walton-Bowen K, Cruz-Rivera M, Fitzpatrick S, Smith JA: Comparable efficacy of administration with face mask or mouthpiece of nebulized budesonide inhalation suspension for infants and young children with persistent asthma. Am J Respir Crit Care Med; 2000 Aug;162(2 Pt 1):593-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Asthma in Children.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparable efficacy of administration with face mask or mouthpiece of nebulized budesonide inhalation suspension for infants and young children with persistent asthma.
  • The retrospective analysis presented here compares the efficacy of treatment with the suspension administered through a face mask or mouthpiece.
  • All patients receiving budesonide inhalation suspension via face mask or mouthpiece showed clinical improvements in nighttime and daytime asthma symptoms as compared with administration of a placebo.
  • In patients using mouthpieces, nighttime asthma symptoms improved significantly in the 0.25-mg twice-daily (p = 0.005) and 1.0-mg daily (p = 0.035) groups.
  • The use of breakthrough medication was reduced in patients receiving budesonide via face masks or mouthpieces relative to placebo, and treatment was well tolerated in all study groups.
  • This retrospective analysis suggests that nebulized budesonide inhalation suspension can be administered effectively by either face mask or mouthpiece to young children with persistent asthma.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents / administration & dosage. Asthma / drug therapy. Budesonide / administration & dosage. Masks
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Inhalation. Administration, Topical. Child. Double-Blind Method. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Glucocorticoids. Humans. Infant. Male. Nebulizers and Vaporizers. Retrospective Studies. Suspensions. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Apr;163(5):1277-8 [11316669.001]
  • (PMID = 10934092.001).
  • [ISSN] 1073-449X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 0 / Suspensions; 51333-22-3 / Budesonide
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