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Items 1 to 39 of about 39
1. Acar O, Akinci M, Uluocak N, Akbulut F, Kilicaslan I, Gokce O: Paratesticular metastasis of malignant melanoma: a case report. Kaohsiung J Med Sci; 2008 Jun;24(6):315-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Melanoma.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Paratesticular metastasis of malignant melanoma: a case report.
  • We report a case of multimetastatic malignant melanoma that was diagnosed after histopathologic examination of the excised paratesticular mass.
  • Our patient initially visited the neurosurgery clinic due to low back pain.
  • The histopathologic findings were consistent with malignant melanoma.
  • He was referred to the oncology department for adjuvant treatment.
  • The patient died during the third month of chemotherapy.
  • Our case was unique because the malignant melanoma was widely metastatic and involved primarily paratesticular tissues without any invasion of the testis and epididymis.
  • [MeSH-major] Genital Neoplasms, Male / pathology. Genital Neoplasms, Male / secondary. Melanoma / diagnosis. Melanoma / pathology. Scrotum / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Back Pain. Biopsy. Epididymis / pathology. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Testis / pathology. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 18635417.001).
  • [ISSN] 1607-551X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Kaohsiung journal of medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kaohsiung J. Med. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China (Republic : 1949- )
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2. Kakutani K, Doita M, Nishida K, Miyamoto H, Kurosaka M: Radiculopathy due to malignant melanoma in the sacrum with unknown primary site. Eur Spine J; 2008 Sep;17 Suppl 2:S271-4
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Melanoma.

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  • [Title] Radiculopathy due to malignant melanoma in the sacrum with unknown primary site.
  • Melanoma is an interesting tumor, showing the appearance of metastasis without any trace of its primary lesion.
  • To report a very rare case of malignant melanoma in the sacrum with unknown primary origin.
  • The authors present a case of a 52-year-old man who was admitted with increasing lower back, left buttock, and left lower extremity pain, and dysuria.
  • Plain radiograph, computed tomography scan, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a destructive lesion in the sacrum and left ilium, which infiltrated the spinal canal and sacroiliac joint.
  • The pathological diagnosis was malignant melanoma.
  • No obvious primary malignant melanoma was detected on the skin surface, on the oral or anal mucosa, or in the fundus oculi.
  • Following radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the severe buttock pain disappeared and the patient was able to walk without impediment.
  • However the patient died nine months after initial diagnosis.
  • Malignant melanoma in the sacrum with an unknown primary site, showing S1 radiculopathy is reported for the first time.
  • The melanoma could have been a metastatic tumor of the sacrum, although the primary site was not detected.
  • The incidence of primary melanoma is increasing faster than any other cancer.
  • Thus treatment of patients with spinal metastasis of melanoma is an important challenge for orthopedic surgeons.
  • [MeSH-major] Melanoma / secondary. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / pathology. Radiculopathy / etiology. Radiculopathy / pathology. Sacrum / pathology. Spinal Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Back Pain / etiology. Back Pain / pathology. Back Pain / physiopathology. Disease Progression. Drug Therapy. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Ilium / pathology. Ilium / radiography. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Polyradiculopathy / etiology. Polyradiculopathy / pathology. Polyradiculopathy / physiopathology. Radiotherapy. Sacroiliac Joint / pathology. Sacroiliac Joint / radiography. Spinal Canal / pathology. Spinal Canal / radiography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Failure. Urination Disorders / etiology. Urination Disorders / pathology. Urination Disorders / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 18075762.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0932
  • [Journal-full-title] European spine journal : official publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Spine J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2525896
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3. Sanchez-Perez L, Kottke T, Diaz RM, Ahmed A, Thompson J, Chong H, Melcher A, Holmen S, Daniels G, Vile RG: Potent selection of antigen loss variants of B16 melanoma following inflammatory killing of melanocytes in vivo. Cancer Res; 2005 Mar 1;65(5):2009-17
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

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  • [Title] Potent selection of antigen loss variants of B16 melanoma following inflammatory killing of melanocytes in vivo.
  • However, expression of other melanoma-associated antigens, such as gp100, was not affected.
  • Antigen loss could be reversed by long-term growth in culture away from immune-selective pressures or within 96 hours by treatment with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-Aza).
  • When transplanted back into syngeneic animals, variants were very poorly controlled by further vaccination.
  • However, a combination of vaccination with 5-Aza to reactivate antigen expression in tumors in situ generated highly significant improvements in therapy over treatment with vaccine or 5-Aza alone.
  • Therefore, combination therapy using vaccination and systemic treatment with 5-Aza or other demethylating agents may have significant therapeutic benefits for antitumor immunotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, Neoplasm / immunology. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. Immunotherapy, Adoptive. Melanocytes / drug effects. Melanoma, Experimental / immunology. Tumor Escape. Vaccines, DNA / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Azacitidine / pharmacology. Combined Modality Therapy. DNA Methylation / drug effects. Interferon-gamma / metabolism. Intramolecular Oxidoreductases / genetics. Intramolecular Oxidoreductases / immunology. Intramolecular Oxidoreductases / metabolism. Membrane Glycoproteins / genetics. Membrane Glycoproteins / immunology. Membrane Glycoproteins / metabolism. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Mice, Nude. Monophenol Monooxygenase / genetics. Monophenol Monooxygenase / immunology. Monophenol Monooxygenase / metabolism. Neoplasm Proteins / genetics. Neoplasm Proteins / immunology. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism. Perforin. Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins. Vaccination. gp100 Melanoma Antigen

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  • (PMID = 15753401.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50CA91956; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA94180
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins; 0 / Si protein, mouse; 0 / Vaccines, DNA; 0 / gp100 Melanoma Antigen; 126465-35-8 / Perforin; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma; EC 1.14.18.1 / Monophenol Monooxygenase; EC 5.3.- / Intramolecular Oxidoreductases; EC 5.3.3.12 / dopachrome isomerase; M801H13NRU / Azacitidine
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4. Lăzureanu C, Baderca F, Burlacu O, Nicodin A: Soft tissue epithelioid angiosarcoma. Rom J Morphol Embryol; 2010;51(4):787-92
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  • [Title] Soft tissue epithelioid angiosarcoma.
  • We present a case of 48-year-old male with a nine months history of right inferior thoracic (T10-T12) paravertebral mass, which became painful after a back trauma; dyspnea and hemoptysis were associated.
  • Fragments of 10 cm large tumor resection specimen (striated muscle, dense connective tissue, adipose tissue, lymph nodes and intercostals nerves) were routinely processed, further immunohistochemical investigations were needed, using Dako antibodies pan-CK clone MNF116, CD34, CD20, vimentin, synaptophysin, melanoma HMB45 clone, with LSAB 2Kits system and further CK AE1÷AE3, CK7, CK20, CEA, S-100 protein, CD31, von Willebrand factor, D2-40÷podoplanin, Ki-67 antigen, with EnVision system and DAB visualization in both systems.
  • The histological and immunohistochemical aspects were indicative for soft tissue epithelioid angiosarcoma, which was misdiagnosed on frozen and HE sections as a carcinoma, because of the cohesiveness and nesting properties of the malignant cells, together with the presence of lymph node metastases.
  • The proliferative activity of the malignant cells, highlighted by Ki-67 antibody, clone MIB 1 was high (30% of malignant cells were positive at HPF).
  • The patient was discharged with adjuvant therapy indication: radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemangiosarcoma / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnostic Errors. Epithelioid Cells / metabolism. Epithelioid Cells / pathology. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Thoracic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Thoracic Neoplasms / metabolism. Thoracic Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 21103644.001).
  • [ISSN] 1220-0522
  • [Journal-full-title] Romanian journal of morphology and embryology = Revue roumaine de morphologie et embryologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rom J Morphol Embryol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Romania
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5. Weiss JM, Back TC, Scarzello AJ, Subleski JJ, Hall VL, Stauffer JK, Chen X, Micic D, Alderson K, Murphy WJ, Wiltrout RH: Successful immunotherapy with IL-2/anti-CD40 induces the chemokine-mediated mitigation of an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 2009 Nov 17;106(46):19455-60
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  • Treatment of mice bearing orthotopic, metastatic tumors with anti-CD40 antibody resulted in only partial, transient anti-tumor effects whereas combined treatment with IL-2/anti-CD40, induced tumor regression.
  • Treatment of mice with IL-2/anti-CD40, but not anti-CD40 alone, also caused an IFN-gamma-dependent increase in the expression of multiple Th1 chemokines within the tumor microenvironment.
  • Interestingly, although IL-2/anti-CD40 treatment increased Tregs in the spleen, it also caused a coincident IFN-gamma-dependent reduction in CD4(+)/FoxP3(+) Tregs, myeloid-derived suppressor cells and Th2 chemokine expression specifically within the tumor microenvironment that was not observed after treatment with anti-CD40 alone.
  • These results suggest that the use of anti-CD40 in combination with IL-2 or IL-15 may hold substantially more promise for clinical cancer treatment than anti-CD40 alone.

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  • (PMID = 19892741.001).
  • [ISSN] 1091-6490
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA095572; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / ; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA-95572; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / N01CO12400; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CO / N01-CO-12400
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies; 0 / Antigens, CD40; 0 / Ccl9 protein, mouse; 0 / Ccr2 protein, mouse; 0 / Chemokine CCL5; 0 / Chemokine CXCL9; 0 / Chemokines; 0 / Chemokines, CC; 0 / Cxcl9 protein, mouse; 0 / IP10-Mig receptor; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins; 0 / Receptors, CCR2; 0 / Receptors, Cytokine; EC 3.5.3.1 / Arginase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2773732
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6. Babilas P, Schacht V, Liebsch G, Wolfbeis OS, Landthaler M, Szeimies RM, Abels C: Effects of light fractionation and different fluence rates on photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolaevulinic acid in vivo. Br J Cancer; 2003 May 6;88(9):1462-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effects of light fractionation and different fluence rates on photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolaevulinic acid in vivo.
  • To improve efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with intravenously administered 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) fractionating the light dose or reducing the light intensity may be a possibility.
  • Therefore, Syrian Golden hamsters were fitted with dorsal skinfold chambers containing an amelanotic melanoma (n=26).
  • Prior to and up to 24 h after PDT tissue, pO(2) was measured using luminescence lifetime imaging.
  • The efficacy was evaluated by measuring the tumour volume of amelanotic melanoma cells grown subcutaneously in the back of Syrian Golden hamsters (n=36).
  • No significant effect of fractionated irradiation was shown regarding the therapeutic efficacy 28 days after PDT.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminolevulinic Acid / therapeutic use. Light. Melanoma, Experimental / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cricetinae. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Mesocricetus. Oxygen Consumption / drug effects. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 12778078.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 88755TAZ87 / Aminolevulinic Acid
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2741044
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7. Aida K, Monia K, Ahlem S, Dominique HT, Becima F, Sylvie F, Ridha KM: Agminated Spitz nevi arising on a nevus spilus after chemotherapy. Pediatr Dermatol; 2010 Jul-Aug;27(4):411-3
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  • [Title] Agminated Spitz nevi arising on a nevus spilus after chemotherapy.
  • We report here a further case in a child that is original because it is induced by chemotherapy.
  • A 3-year-old boy presented 3 months after the onset of a chemotherapy for a vesico-prostatic rhabdomyosarcoma, multiple pigmented papulo-nodules located on the face, neck, chest wall, and the higher back.
  • Histological examination of three excised nodules led to the diagnosis of Spitz nevus.
  • Our patient may have a high risk for melanoma since he has many criteria predisposing to this risk.
  • Some of these criteria are related to NS but we should also take into account the chemotherapy induction and the high number of Spitz nevi.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Nevus, Epithelioid and Spindle Cell / chemically induced. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Rhabdomyosarcoma / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / chemically induced. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy


8. Valente M, Pozzi-Mucelli F, Ponte E: Venous thromboembolism and melanoma. Minerva Cardioangiol; 2001 Oct;49(5):327-33
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Skin Cancer.

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  • [Title] Venous thromboembolism and melanoma.
  • Furthermore, thrombosis may develop as a result of prolonged immobilization, surgery, chemotherapy or hormone therapy.
  • We present a case of a patient who underwent surgery for excision of a Clark level II melanoma on the back who developed pulmonary metastasis four years after the operation.
  • The metastasis manifested with very severe venous thromboembolism which, despite anticoagulant therapy and the placement of a vena caval filter, led to the patient's death from pulmonary embolism.
  • The case is uncommon, in terms of both the rarity with which venous thromboembolism is associated to melanoma, and the severity with which it manifested.
  • [MeSH-major] Melanoma / secondary. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Thromboembolism / etiology

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  • (PMID = 11533552.001).
  • [ISSN] 0026-4725
  • [Journal-full-title] Minerva cardioangiologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Minerva Cardioangiol
  • [Language] eng; ita
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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9. Requena L, de la Cruz A, Moreno C, Sangüeza O, Requena C: Animal type melanoma: a report of a case with balloon-cell change and sentinel lymph node metastasis. Am J Dermatopathol; 2001 Aug;23(4):341-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Animal type melanoma: a report of a case with balloon-cell change and sentinel lymph node metastasis.
  • Animal type melanoma is a rare histopathologic variant of melanoma characterized by sheets and nodules of heavily pigmented epithelioid melanocytes that involve the entire thickness of the dermis.
  • This human neoplasm mimics melanocytic neoplasms seen in gray horses and laboratory animals; thus, is termed animal type melanoma.
  • We report an example of animal type melanoma on the back of a 27-year-old man.
  • The lesion showed areas of melanoma in situ, which ruled out the possibility of metastatic melanoma.
  • A lymphoscintigraphy showed a sentinel lymph node in the right axilla and a subsequent axillary lymphadenectomy demonstrated that the architecture of the sentinel lymph node was effaced by metastatic melanoma.
  • The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy with inteferon alfa-2b and four months after this treatment the patient is alive and well, without evidence of recurrences or additional metastases.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymph Nodes / pathology. Melanoma. Skin Neoplasms
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Humans. Male. Melanoma, Experimental / pathology. Neoplasm Metastasis

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  • (PMID = 11481528.001).
  • [ISSN] 0193-1091
  • [Journal-full-title] The American Journal of dermatopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Dermatopathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. Liang KV, Sanderson SO, Nowakowski GS, Arora AS: Metastatic malignant melanoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Mayo Clin Proc; 2006 Apr;81(4):511-6
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  • [Title] Metastatic malignant melanoma of the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Malignant melanoma is one of the most common malignancies to metastasize to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.
  • Metastases to the GI tract can present at the time of primary diagnosis or decades later as the first sign of recurrence.
  • We report 2 cases of malignant melanoma metastatic to the GI tract, followed by a review of the literature.
  • The first case is a 72-year-old man who underwent resection of superficial spreading melanoma on his back 13 years previously who presented with dysphagia.
  • A biopsy specimen of a mucosal fold in a gastric fundus noted during endoscopy was taken and revealed metastatic malignant melanoma, which was resected 1 month later.
  • Three weeks later, the patient was found to have an ulcerated jejunal metastatic melanoma mass, which was also resected.
  • The second case is a 63-year-old man with an ocular melanoma involving the chorold of the left eye that had been diagnosed 4 years previously, which had been excised several times, who presented with anorexia, dizziness, and fatigue.
  • He underwent adjuvant radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surgical resection of the gastric melanoma metastasis.
  • In patients with a history of melanoma, a high index of suspicion for metastasis must be maintained if they present with seemingly unrelated symptoms.
  • Diagnosis requires careful inspection of the mucosa for metastatic lesions and biopsy with special immunohistochemical stains.
  • Management may include surgical resection, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, observation, or enrollment in clinical trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Choroid Neoplasms / pathology. Jejunal Neoplasms / secondary. Melanoma / secondary. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Stomach Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Fatal Outcome. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Intestinal Mucosa / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 16610571.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-6196
  • [Journal-full-title] Mayo Clinic proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mayo Clin. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. Hofmann MA, Sterry W, Trefzer U: Complex combination biochemotherapy regimen in advanced metastatic melanoma in a non-intensive care unit: toxicity or benefit? Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2007 Mar;37(3):224-9
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  • [Title] Complex combination biochemotherapy regimen in advanced metastatic melanoma in a non-intensive care unit: toxicity or benefit?
  • BACKGROUND: There is currently no chemotherapy or chemoimmunotherapy regimen that has shown impact on survival in patients with metastatic melanoma.
  • The treatment was performed on a regular dermatological ward.
  • The median progression free interval was 4 months (range 0-19) for all patients and the median survival time was 12 months (range 2-26).
  • From a safety and practical point of view, there was no draw-back on treating patients in a non-intensive care unit.
  • The median survival time is in the range of the one reported for monochemotherapy regimen.
  • CONCLUSION: This complex and highly toxic chemoimmunotherapeutic regimen should not be considered as standard therapy in patients with metastatic malignant melanoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Melanoma / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / toxicity. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / toxicity. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / toxicity. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / toxicity. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Dacarbazine / toxicity. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Interferon-alpha / administration & dosage. Interferon-alpha / toxicity. Interleukin-2 / administration & dosage. Interleukin-2 / toxicity. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Vindesine / administration & dosage. Vindesine / toxicity

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  • (PMID = 17472972.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-3621
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Interleukin-2; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; RSA8KO39WH / Vindesine
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12. Khan O, Middleton M: High-risk melanoma with nodal involvement in a young woman. Nat Clin Pract Oncol; 2006 Sep;3(9):517-21; quiz 522
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  • [Title] High-risk melanoma with nodal involvement in a young woman.
  • BACKGROUND: An 18-year-old female presented to her General Practitioner with a bleeding mole on her back.
  • Physical examination revealed a 1.5 cm 1.7 cm pigmented lesion on the left aspect of the patient's upper back.
  • DIAGNOSIS: Stage IIIB (T3bN2aM0) focally ulcerated, nodular malignant melanoma (Breslow depth 2.5 mm, Clark's level IV).
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Melanoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Recombinant Proteins. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 16955090.001).
  • [ISSN] 1743-4254
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature clinical practice. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Clin Pract Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 99210-65-8 / interferon alfa-2b
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13. Braumann C, Jacobi CA, Rogalla S, Menenakos C, Fuehrer K, Trefzer U, Hofmann M: The tumor suppressive reagent taurolidine inhibits growth of malignant melanoma--a mouse model. J Surg Res; 2007 Dec;143(2):372-8
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  • [Title] The tumor suppressive reagent taurolidine inhibits growth of malignant melanoma--a mouse model.
  • TRD has been shown to induce apoptosis of melanoma cells in vitro.
  • Therefore, the effects of TRD on disseminated melanoma were evaluated in a mice model.
  • METHODS: After general anesthesia, a midline laparotomy was performed and 1.5 million malignant melanoma cells (B78-D14) were applied in the spleen and 1 million cells at the back (C57BL/6).
  • RESULTS: The i.p. therapy caused a dose-dependent inhibition of total tumor growth (P = 0.003) and i.p. tumor growth (P = < 0.001), whereas subcutaneous (s.c.) tumor growth was not affected (P = 0.132) compared with the i.p. control group.
  • The i.v. therapy reduced the total tumor growth (P = 0.013) and the s.c. tumor growth (P = 0.016), whereas the i.p. tumor load was not reduced (P = 0.122) compared with the control group.
  • Both i.p. and i.v. therapy with 3% TRD significantly decreased the total number of metastatic lesions.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The i.p. and i.v. therapies reduce total tumor weight and number of metastatic lesions of disseminated malignant melanoma in a dose-dependent fashion in mice.
  • Our encouraging findings should be further confirmed in clinical studies examining the influence of TRD in patients with disseminated malignant melanoma for whom prognosis still remains dismal.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Melanoma / drug therapy. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / drug therapy. Taurine / analogs & derivatives. Thiadiazines / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Body Weight. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Injections, Intraperitoneal. Injections, Intravenous. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Neoplasm Transplantation. Subcutaneous Tissue / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17612567.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of surgical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Surg. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Thiadiazines; 1EQV5MLY3D / Taurine; 8OBZ1M4V3V / taurolidine
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14. Tarhini AA, Christensen S, Frankel P, Margolin K, Ruel C, Shipe-Spotloe J, DeMark M, Kirkwood JM: Phase II study of aflibercept (VEGF trap) in recurrent inoperable stage III or stage IV melanoma of cutaneous or ocular origin. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9028

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II study of aflibercept (VEGF trap) in recurrent inoperable stage III or stage IV melanoma of cutaneous or ocular origin.
  • METHODS: Phase II study of aflibercept in patients with inoperable stage III or IV melanoma who had received no prior chemotherapy or hormonal therapy.
  • All had AJCC stage IV melanoma (3M1a, 3M1b, 21M1c).
  • Nine patients had primary ocular melanoma, 16 cutaneous and 2 unknown primary site.
  • Grade 3/4 toxicities included cerebral ischemia (1 patient; 4%), confusion (1; 4%), thrombocytopenia (1; 4%), hypertension (7; 26%), hypotension (1; 4%), left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (1; 4%), fatigue (1; 4%), proteinuria (4; 15%), extraocular muscle paresis (1; 4%), renal failure (1; 4%), back pain (1; 4%), headache (1; 4%).
  • Eight (1 M1a, 1M1b, 6M1c; 4 ocular, 3 cutaneous, 1 unknown primary) of the first 21 patients had at least 4 months of PFS (10 out of 27; 2 additional patients with cutaneous melanoma had SD: 1M1a and 1M1c).
  • Four patients were taken off study prior to response evaluation for toxicity (3) or treatment refusal (1).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Aflibercept can be administered with acceptable toxicity, and exhibits promising antitumor efficacy against advanced melanoma.

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  • (PMID = 27962095.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Kogure K, Manabe S, Hama S, Tokumura A, Fukuzawa K: Potentiation of anti-cancer effect by intravenous administration of vesiculated alpha-tocopheryl hemisuccinate on mouse melanoma in vivo. Cancer Lett; 2003 Mar 20;192(1):19-24
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  • [Title] Potentiation of anti-cancer effect by intravenous administration of vesiculated alpha-tocopheryl hemisuccinate on mouse melanoma in vivo.
  • We examined the effect of alpha-tocopheryl hemisuccinate (TS) on the growth of mouse melanoma cells B16-F1 inoculated on the back of hairless mice by two administration procedures of TS, i.p. administration of TS dissolved with dimethyl sulfoxide (TS i.p.) and i.v. administration of TS vesicles (TS-vesicle i.v.).
  • [MeSH-major] Melanoma / drug therapy. Vitamin E / administration & dosage. Vitamin E / analogs & derivatives. Vitamin E / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Division / drug effects. Injections, Intraperitoneal. Injections, Intravenous. Male. Mice. Mice, Hairless. Neoplasm Transplantation. Survival Rate. Time Factors. Tocopherols. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 12637149.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-3835
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1406-18-4 / Vitamin E; 1406-66-2 / Tocopherols
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16. Lewis TJ: Toxicity and cytopathogenic properties toward human melanoma cells of activated cancer therapeutics in zebra fish. Integr Cancer Ther; 2010 Mar;9(1):84-92
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Toxicity and cytopathogenic properties toward human melanoma cells of activated cancer therapeutics in zebra fish.
  • There is an increasing body of data showing that activated cancer therapy--the synergistic effect of "preloaded" molecules and a tuned energy source to produce cytopathogenic moieties--is a promising new modality for cancer treatment.
  • The key activated therapies are photodynamic therapy (PDT), which involves the synergy between light and photosensitizer molecules, and ultrasound activated therapy (USAT; also referred to as sonodynamic therapy), which involves the synergy between ultrasound and sonosensitizer molecules.
  • PDT is a well-known activated therapy with roots dating back to 1900.
  • The sensitizers are derived from chlorophyll and are metal centered porphyrins known to specifically accumulate in hyperproliferating tissue.
  • In the cytotoxicity studies, melanoma cell line WM-266-4, derived from a metastatic site of a malignant melanoma, was tested against SF1 and SF2.
  • Both sensitizer systems showed marked efficacy in the destruction of the implanted melanoma cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis. Melanoma / pathology. Melanoma / therapy. Photochemotherapy. Ultrasonic Therapy. Zebrafish
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Combined Modality Therapy / adverse effects. Disease Models, Animal. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / adverse effects. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 20308086.001).
  • [ISSN] 1552-695X
  • [Journal-full-title] Integrative cancer therapies
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Integr Cancer Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents
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17. Katagiri Y, Hozumi Y, Kondo S: Knockdown of Skp2 by siRNA inhibits melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo. J Dermatol Sci; 2006 Jun;42(3):215-24
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Knockdown of Skp2 by siRNA inhibits melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo.
  • BACKGROUND: Low levels of p27Kip1 expression are associated with poor prognosis in various malignancies including malignant melanoma.
  • Recently, it has been reported that S phase kinase-interacting protein 2 (Skp2), the specific ubiquitin ligase subunit that targets p27Kip1 for degradation, was overexpressed and was inversely related to p27Kip1 levels in malignant melanoma with poor prognosis.
  • OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing of Skp2 can be employed in order to inhibit p27Kip1 down-regulation and suppress melanoma cell growth as a consequence in vitro and in vivo.
  • METHODS: We constructed a plasmid vector, which synthesizes siRNAs to determine the effects of decreasing the high constitutive levels of Skp2 protein in melanoma cells.
  • Western blot and real-time RT-PCR were performed to examine the decreases of Skp2 protein and mRNA in vitro.
  • Furthermore, melanoma cells were injected into the back of nude mice subcutaneously to examine the suppression of tumorigenicity targeting Skp2 gene silencing in vivo.
  • RESULTS: Skp2 protein was decreased and the p27Kip1 protein was accumulated in Skp2 siRNA transfected melanoma cells.
  • Skp2 siRNA inhibited the cell growth of melanoma cells in vitro.
  • CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that siRNA-mediated gene silencing of Skp2 can be a potent tool of cancer gene therapy for suppression of p27Kip1 degradation in malignant melanoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27 / drug effects. Melanoma / drug therapy. RNA, Small Interfering / therapeutic use. S-Phase Kinase-Associated Proteins / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Down-Regulation / drug effects. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Leupeptins. Melanoma, Experimental. Mice. Mice, Nude. RNA Interference

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  • (PMID = 16504485.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-1811
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of dermatological science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Dermatol. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Leupeptins; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 0 / S-Phase Kinase-Associated Proteins; 133407-82-6 / benzyloxycarbonylleucyl-leucyl-leucine aldehyde; 147604-94-2 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27
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18. Liu JK, Kan P, Schmidt MH: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as a sacral tumor. Report of two cases. Neurosurg Focus; 2003 Aug 15;15(2):E10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In the first case a 52-year-old man presented with progressive back pain, bilateral radicular pain, and saddle block anesthesia secondary to a lytic, expansile soft-tissue mass.
  • In the second case a 64-year-old man presented with left-sided radicular pain, paresthesias, and progressive weakness due to a lytic soft-tissue mass in the left sacral ala extending into the left L-5 and S-1 foramina.
  • In both cases, an open biopsy procedure was performed after nondiagnostic examination of needle biopsy samples.
  • In the first case the disease was classified as Stage IAE, and the patient subsequently underwent four cycles of cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisone (CHOP)- and rituximab-based chemotherapy followed by consolidation radiotherapy.
  • In the second case the disease was also classified as Stage IAE, and the patient underwent CHOP-based chemotherapy and consolidation radiotherapy.
  • Lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sacral tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Sacrum / pathology. Spinal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Biopsy. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Diagnosis, Differential. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Humans. Laminectomy. Low Back Pain / etiology. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Melanoma. Middle Aged. Neoplasm, Residual. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Reflex, Abnormal. Rituximab. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Urinary Retention / etiology. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 15350041.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgical focus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurg Focus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHOP protocol
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19. Reutter JC, Long EM, Morrell DS, Thomas NE, Groben PA: Eruptive post-chemotherapy in situ melanomas and dysplastic nevi. Pediatr Dermatol; 2007 Mar-Apr;24(2):135-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Eruptive post-chemotherapy in situ melanomas and dysplastic nevi.
  • A 22-year-old white man without a personal or family history of atypical nevi had received chemotherapy for pre-B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia at age 17 that included L-asparaginase, prednisone, methotrexate, mercaptopurine, daunorubicin, and cytoxan.
  • Two to three months after completing maintenance chemotherapy, the patient reports he developed many moles, which remained stable for approximately 2 years.
  • Upon examination, two dark, atypical appearing plaques with irregular borders and numerous pink papules of varying shapes and sizes were noted on his chest, back, and abdomen.
  • Histology of specimens of both types of lesions revealed three moderately atypical compound dysplastic melanocytic nevi and three in situ melanomas.
  • Malignant melanoma has been associated with chronic immunosuppression, and benign nevi have been reported to erupt after chemotherapy.
  • We report an occurrence of multiple eruptive dysplastic nevi and in situ melanomas appearing shortly after completion of chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Drug Eruptions / etiology. Dysplastic Nevus Syndrome / chemically induced. Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Melanoma / chemically induced. Skin Neoplasms / chemically induced

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  • (PMID = 17461808.001).
  • [ISSN] 0736-8046
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Dermatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
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20. Macary PA, Too CT, Dai X: Targeting tumours by adoptive transfer of immune cells. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol; 2006 May-Jun;33(5-6):569-74

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • 1. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the most widely used and well-established modalities for treating malignant diseases.
  • Surgery is used to excise solid tumours and radiotherapy/chemotherapy are used for the treatment of liquid tumours and for solid tumours where there is a risk of micrometastases.
  • A major drawback for both radiotherapy and chemotherapy is their lack of specificity for tumour cells.
  • Both these treatments can destroy normal bone marrow cells and result in severe side-effects.
  • 2. The impairment of haemapoiesis due to bone marrow destruction combined with the use of toxins in chemotherapy that inhibit the proliferation of immune cells leaves many patients immunocompromised.
  • This complicates the development of prophylactic (vaccine) strategies for tumours where patients are undergoing conventional therapy.
  • 3. An alternative approach is to expand and activate tumour-specific immune cells in vitro that can then be adoptively transferred back in large numbers.
  • This is defined as adoptive immunotherapy and has the advantage of potentially bypassing the immuno-inhibitory effects of conventional therapies.
  • 5. Many novel cell-based immunotherapeutic strategies developed in murine tumour models are now being applied in human clinical trials.
  • The malignancies targeted include melanoma, chronic myelogenous leukaemia and breast, ovarian, colon and kidney cancers.
  • In the present review, we discuss these novel cell-based strategies and the implications they have for the future treatment of human malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Immunotherapy, Adoptive. Lymphocyte Subsets / transplantation. Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating / transplantation. Neoplasms / therapy. T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic / transplantation

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  • (PMID = 16700896.001).
  • [ISSN] 0305-1870
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Exp. Pharmacol. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Number-of-references] 75
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21. Kefford R, Beith JM, Van Hazel GA, Millward M, Trotter JM, Wyld DK, Kusic R, Shreeniwas R, Morganti A, Ballmer A, Segal E, Nayler O, Clozel M: A phase II study of bosentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist, as monotherapy in patients with stage IV metastatic melanoma. Invest New Drugs; 2007 Jun;25(3):247-52
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  • [Title] A phase II study of bosentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist, as monotherapy in patients with stage IV metastatic melanoma.
  • There is no effective systemic therapy for disseminated metastatic melanoma.
  • Data suggest that endothelin may play a role in pathophysiology of melanoma and that the dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan may have anti-tumor activity.
  • This multicenter, open-label, single-arm, prospective, proof-of-concept study assessed the effects of bosentan monotherapy (500 mg oral tablets, bid) on tumor response in patients with stage IV metastatic melanoma.
  • Patients were treated until disease progression, death or serious adverse event leading to premature study drug discontinuation.
  • Among the 35 patients included in this study with stage IV metastatic melanoma, 21 (60%) were stage M1C, 10 (29%) stage M1B and 4 (11%) stage M1A (American Joint Committee on Cancer [AJCC] classification).
  • Nine patients (26%) had received prior therapy for stage IV melanoma.
  • The most frequent adverse events were typical for the underlying disease or known to be associated with bosentan: headache (43%), fatigue (34%), nausea (31%), back pain (23%) and abnormal hepatic function (23%).
  • Bosentan might have benefit in disease stabilization in certain patients with metastatic melanoma and deserves further investigation in combination with other anticancer drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Endothelin Receptor Antagonists. Melanoma / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sulfonamides / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Australia. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prospective Studies. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Receptors, Endothelin / genetics. Receptors, Endothelin / metabolism. Tablets. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17021960.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-6997
  • [Journal-full-title] Investigational new drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Invest New Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Endothelin Receptor Antagonists; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Endothelin; 0 / Sulfonamides; 0 / Tablets; Q326023R30 / bosentan
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22. Vogt T, McClelland M, Jung B, Popova S, Bogenrieder T, Becker B, Rumpler G, Landthaler M, Stolz W: Progression and NSAID-induced apoptosis in malignant melanomas are independent of cyclooxygenase II. Melanoma Res; 2001 Dec;11(6):587-99
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  • [Title] Progression and NSAID-induced apoptosis in malignant melanomas are independent of cyclooxygenase II.
  • We investigated the significance of Cox-II in the progression of malignant melanomas (MMs).
  • Using immunohistology we determined that Cox-II is not expressed in 70 benign and malignant melanocytic tumours.
  • Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting of MM cell lines and MM tissues confirmed the lack of Cox-II expression in MM.
  • However, in vitro the Cox-inhibiting non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac sulphide (SIS) was significantly more effective in inducing apoptosis than sulindac sulphone (SOS), a derivative with a negligible effect on Cox (P < 0.01).
  • Furthermore, add-back experiments with high doses of the prostaglandins PGE2 and PGF2beta, major Cox-II products, did not abrogate this effect.
  • Nevertheless, Cox-II inhibitors are still candidates for therapy, though they act via an unknown mechanism.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / pharmacology. Apoptosis / drug effects. Isoenzymes / metabolism. Melanoma / pathology. Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases / metabolism. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Sulindac / analogs & derivatives. Sulindac / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 11725205.001).
  • [ISSN] 0960-8931
  • [Journal-full-title] Melanoma research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Melanoma Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 184SNS8VUH / Sulindac; 63231-63-0 / RNA; 6UVA8S2DEY / sulindac sulfide; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 1.14.99.1 / PTGS2 protein, human; EC 1.14.99.1 / Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases; K619IIG2R9 / sulindac sulfone
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23. Diebold Y, Calonge M: Applications of nanoparticles in ophthalmology. Prog Retin Eye Res; 2010 Nov;29(6):596-609
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Nanocarriers, such as nanoparticles, have the capacity to deliver ocular drugs to specific target sites and hold promise to revolutionize the therapy of many eye diseases.
  • One of the most important handicaps of the eye as a target organ for drugs is the presence of several barriers that impede direct and systemic drug access to the specific site of action.
  • Topical application is the preferred route for most drugs, even when the target tissues are at the back part of the eye where intraocular injections are currently the most common route of administration.
  • Direct administration using any of these two routes faces many problems related to drug bioavailability, including side effects and repeated uncomfortable treatments to achieve therapeutic drug levels.
  • In this regard, the advantages of using nanoparticles include improved topical passage of large, poorly water-soluble molecules such as glucocorticoid drugs or cyclosporine for immune-related, vision-threatening diseases.
  • Other large and unstable molecules, such as nucleic acids, delivered using nanoparticles offer promising results for gene transfer therapy in severe retinal diseases.
  • Also, nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery increases the contact time of the administered drug with its target tissue, such as in the case of brimonidine, one of the standard treatments for glaucoma, or corticosteroids used to treat autoimmune uveitis, a severe intraocular inflammatory process.
  • In addition, nanocarriers permit the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin to reach inner eye structures using the transmucosal route.
  • Finally, nanoparticles allow the possibility of targeted delivery to reach specific types of cancer, such as melanoma, leaving normal cells untouched.
  • This review summarizes experimental results from our group and others since the beginnings of nanocarrier technology to deliver drugs to different locations in the eye.
  • Also, it explores the future possibilities of nanoparticles not only as drug delivery systems but also as aides for diagnostic purposes.
  • [MeSH-major] Nanoparticles / therapeutic use. Ophthalmology. Retinal Diseases / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Humans

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20826225.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-1635
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in retinal and eye research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Retin Eye Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
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24. Feun L, You M, Wu CJ, Kuo MT, Wangpaichitr M, Spector S, Savaraj N: Arginine deprivation as a targeted therapy for cancer. Curr Pharm Des; 2008;14(11):1049-57
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Arginine deprivation as a targeted therapy for cancer.
  • Tumors which usually do not express ASS include melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, some mesotheliomas and some renal cell cancers.
  • Citrulline can be recycled back to arginine in normal cells which express ASS, whereas ASS(-) tumor cells cannot.
  • A pegylated form of ADI (ADI-PEG20) has been formulated and has shown in vitro and in vivo activity against melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma.
  • ADI-PEG20 induces apoptosis in melanoma cell lines.
  • However, arginine deprivation can also induce ASS expression in certain melanoma cell lines which can lead to in vitro drug resistance.
  • Phase I and II clinical trials with ADI-PEG20 have been conducted in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, and antitumor activity has been demonstrated in both cancers.

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  • (PMID = 18473854.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4286
  • [Journal-full-title] Current pharmaceutical design
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Pharm. Des.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109578-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA109578; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA109578-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109578; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA109578-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA109578-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109578-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109578-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; 94ZLA3W45F / Arginine; EC 3.- / Hydrolases; EC 3.5.3.6 / ADI PEG20; EC 6.3.4.5 / Argininosuccinate Synthase
  • [Number-of-references] 75
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS287629; NLM/ PMC3096551
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25. Alessi SS, Sanches JA, Oliveira WR, Messina MC, Pimentel ER, Festa Neto C: Treatment of cutaneous tumors with topical 5% imiquimod cream. Clinics (Sao Paulo); 2009;64(10):961-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of cutaneous tumors with topical 5% imiquimod cream.
  • INTRODUCTION: There are various approaches to the treatment of cutaneous tumors; one of them is treatment with imiquimod, a synthetic toll-like receptor agonist with a low molecular weight that offers a topical, noninvasive, and non-surgical therapeutic option.
  • The main objective of our study was to provide data on 89 patients who used a 5% imiquimod cream for the treatment of cutaneous tumors at the Cutaneous Oncology Group of the Dermatology Department of Hospital das Clinicas from 2003 to 2008.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Here, we present our experience in the treatment of 123 cutaneous tumors of various types, including basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), Bowen's disease, erythroplasia of Queyrat, Paget's disease, and trichoepithelioma, with 5% imiquimod cream from 2003 to 2008 in the Cutaneous Oncology Group of the Dermatology Department of Hospital das Clinicas.
  • Patients were divided into two separate groups according to their diagnosis and comorbidities; these comorbidities included epidermodysplasia verruciformis, xeroderma pigmentosum, albinism, basal cell nevus syndrome, Brooke-Spiegler syndrome, HIV, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, B-cell lymphoma, and kidney transplantation.
  • Treatment duration, response to imiquimod, follow-up, recurrence, and local and systemic reactions associated with use of the drug were analyzed.
  • Tumors were located mainly on the face, back, trunk, and legs.
  • Aggressive BCC and superficial and nodular BCC did not present a good response to treatment.
  • We demonstrate that patients with no response to imiquimod, even when they demonstrated no local reaction, can undergo another cycle of six weeks of imiquimod treatment and show a complete response.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our experience confirms imiquimod as an effective treatment option for several types of cutaneous tumors, especially in patients without the cutaneous comorbidities cited above and with low-risk tumors.
  • Imiquimod has a relatively low cost compared to other therapeutic options and can be delivered via ambulatory care to patients with surgery contraindications, and its side effects are tolerable.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / administration & dosage. Aminoquinolines / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19841702.001).
  • [ISSN] 1980-5322
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinics (São Paulo, Brazil)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clinics (Sao Paulo)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Aminoquinolines; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 99011-02-6 / imiquimod
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2763070
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Basal cell carcinoma / Imiquimod / Immunomodulator / Immunotherapy / Non-melanoma skin cancer
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26. Novak JF, Trnka F: Proenzyme therapy of cancer. Anticancer Res; 2005 Mar-Apr;25(2A):1157-77
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Proenzyme therapy of cancer.
  • However, out of many promising serine and metalloproteinase inhibitors, none are included in cancer treatment regimens at present.
  • The current search for active antiproteolytic compounds is in contrast to the classical approach developed by John Beard, who suggested treating advanced cancer by fresh pancreatic extracts whose antitumor activity was based on their proteolytic potential.
  • The treatment of cultured tumor cells with TR and CH at nanomolar [corrected] concentrations, comparable to those achieved in the blood of the patients, causes complete arrest of the directional movement of metastatic cells.
  • Conversely, the same treatment of normal cells results in enhanced motility and an accelerated closure of the gap created in cell monolayers.
  • Further, treatment of cells with serine proteases results in the formation of cellular 3-dimensional structures such as lamellae, cell streams and aggregates.
  • In some cell types, the aggregates are compacted via cadherin-based cell-cell communication systems and form compact spheroids.
  • Protease-treated tumor cells contain a disrupted actin cytoskeleton and exhibit a loss of front-to-back polarity.
  • The precursor nature of the active enzymes may offer protection against numerous serpins present in the tissues and blood.
  • We believe that this selectivity of activation is responsible for the antitumor/antimetastatic effect of proenzyme therapy and low toxicity to normal cells or tumor host.
  • These findings support the conclusion that proteolysis is the active mechanism of the proenzyme treatment.
  • Future studies will focus on the molecular mechanisms of the proenzyme therapy including the identification of molecular target(s) on the tumor cells.
  • In conclusion, we have discovered that proenzyme therapy, mandated first by John Beard nearly one hundred years ago, shows remarkable selective effects that result in growth inhibition of tumor cells with metastatic potential.
  • [MeSH-major] Amylases / pharmacology. Chymotrypsin / pharmacology. Chymotrypsinogen / pharmacology. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Trypsin / pharmacology. Trypsinogen / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Actin Cytoskeleton / drug effects. Actin Cytoskeleton / enzymology. Adherens Junctions / drug effects. Adherens Junctions / enzymology. Angiostatins / blood. Animals. Cattle. Cell Count. Cell Growth Processes / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Movement / drug effects. Dogs. Endostatins / blood. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Melanoma, Experimental / drug therapy. Melanoma, Experimental / enzymology. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Rats. Spheroids, Cellular. Tight Junctions / drug effects. Tight Junctions / enzymology

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  • [ErratumIn] Anticancer Res. 2005 May-Jun;25(3c):2599
  • (PMID = 15868959.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Endostatins; 86090-08-6 / Angiostatins; 9002-08-8 / Trypsinogen; 9035-75-0 / Chymotrypsinogen; EC 3.2.1.- / Amylases; EC 3.4.21.1 / Chymotrypsin; EC 3.4.21.4 / Trypsin
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27. Ueda Y, Yamagishi T, Ikeya H, Hirayama N, Itokawa T, Aozuka Y, Samata K, Nakaike S, Tanaka M, Ono M, Saiki I: VGA1155, a novel binding antagonist of VEGF, inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Anticancer Res; 2004 Sep-Oct;24(5A):3009-17
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  • Since vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in tumor angiogenesis, it is reasonable to expect that antagonizing VEGF binding to its receptor may be effective in cancer therapy.
  • VGA1155 also inhibited VEGF-induced tube formation of HUVEC in vitro and tumor angiogenesis toward B16-BL6 melanoma after orthotopic implantation into the skin of the back.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Benzoates / pharmacology. Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Melanoma, Experimental / blood supply. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 15517909.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Benzoates; 0 / VGA1155; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; VC2W18DGKR / Thymidine
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28. Gourley C, Monaghan H, Beattie G, Court S, Love C, Gabra H: Intra-uterine death resulting from placental metastases in adenocarcinoma of unknown primary. Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol); 2002 Jun;14(3):213-6
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  • A thirty-five year old woman presented with bilateral neck, chest wall and back masses.
  • The lymph node and cutaneous metastases progressed rapidly so it was decided to initiate systemic chemotherapy with a view to delivery at 28 weeks gestation by Caesarean section.
  • Shortly after the second 3-weekly cycle of cisplatinum chemotherapy the patient suffered severe lower back and hip pain with MRI scan showing multiple bony metastases in the pelvic girdle.
  • With the exception of melanoma this has rarely been reported in solid adult malignancy.

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  • (PMID = 12109824.001).
  • [ISSN] 0936-6555
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain))
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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29. Strik H, Prömmel P: [Neoplastic meningitis. Diagnosis and individualised therapy]. Nervenarzt; 2010 Feb;81(2):229-41; quiz 242
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  • [Title] [Neoplastic meningitis. Diagnosis and individualised therapy].
  • [Transliterated title] Meningeosis neoplastica. Diagnostik und individualisierte Therapie.
  • It occurs in approximately 5-10% of malignant diseases, most often in breast cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, and B-cell lymphoma.
  • Symptoms of neoplastic meningitis include head or back pain, cranial nerve palsies, diffuse radicular symptoms, and psychiatric disturbances.
  • Positive CSF cytology requires optimal sampling and processing, and the treatment of neoplastic meningitis must be individualized.
  • The CSF dissemination can be treated with intrathecal chemotherapy with methotrexate or Ara-C.
  • Systemic chemotherapy is needed to control solid manifestations or, in the case of substances entering the CSF, to support intrathecal chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Meningeal Carcinomatosis / diagnosis. Meningeal Carcinomatosis / secondary. Meningitis, Aseptic / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cerebrospinal Fluid / cytology. Cranial Irradiation. Cytarabine / therapeutic use. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Injections, Spinal. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Meninges / pathology. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Neurologic Examination. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant

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  • (PMID = 20140544.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-0407
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Nervenarzt
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nervenarzt
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  • [Number-of-references] 53
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30. López Almaraz R, Villafruela Alvarez C, Rodríguez Luis J, Doménech Martínez E: [Neonatal neoplasms: a single-centre experience]. An Pediatr (Barc); 2006 Dec;65(6):529-35

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Transliterated title] Neoplasias neonatales: experiencia de un centro.
  • INTRODUCTION: Malignant tumors are uncommon in the neonatal period and benign tumors may have malignant potential.
  • OBJECTIVES: To describe the neoplasms diagnosed and treated in newborns (</= 28 days of life) in the Hospital Universitario de Canarias and their association with congenital abnormalities and to evaluate prenatal diagnosis of these tumors.
  • The variables analyzed were the percentage of neonatal neoplasms among the total number of cancer cases in children aged less than 14 years, their incidence among all the newborns in our hospital, sex, year of diagnosis, age at clinical diagnosis, the presence or absence of prenatal diagnosis, type of tumor (histologic diagnosis), association with syndromes or other congenital anomalies, treatment, and long-term outcome.
  • Males accounted for 43.8 % and females for 56.2 %, with a mean age at diagnosis of 5.5 days (range 1-28 days).
  • Five neonates (31.2 %) had a prenatal diagnosis, 60 % of which were made in the last 7 years of the study period.
  • Histologic diagnoses were neuroblastoma (n = 5; 31.2 %), teratoma/ germ cell tumor (n = 4; 25 %), soft tissue sarcoma (one fibrosarcoma of the thigh and two hemangiopericytoma of the back and heart; 18.8 %), and one case each of mesoblastic nephroma, cerebral tumor (ependymoblastoma), melanoma (associated with giant congenital melanocytic nevi), and acute leukemia (associated with Down syndrome).
  • Treatment consisted of surgery alone (n = 10; 62.5 %) and surgery plus chemotherapy (n = 5; 31.2 %); one patient received no treatment.
  • In the last 7 years, the prenatal diagnosis of these entities has improved.
  • Most of the neoplasms responded to therapy, mainly surgery, and long-term outcome was favorable.

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  • [CommentIn] An Pediatr (Barc). 2007 Jul;67(1):85-6 [17663916.001]
  • (PMID = 17194321.001).
  • [ISSN] 1695-4033
  • [Journal-full-title] Anales de pediatría (Barcelona, Spain : 2003)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] An Pediatr (Barc)
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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31. Iglesias-Bartolomé R, Crespo PM, Gomez GA, Daniotti JL: The antibody to GD3 ganglioside, R24, is rapidly endocytosed and recycled to the plasma membrane via the endocytic recycling compartment. Inhibitory effect of brefeldin A and monensin. FEBS J; 2006 Apr;273(8):1744-58
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  • In addition, antibodies to tumor-associated gangliosides are being used as therapeutic agents.
  • In this study, we characterized in both GD3 ganglioside-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 and SK-Mel 28 melanoma cells the intracellular trafficking and subcellular localization of the mouse monoclonal antibody to GD3, R24.
  • Taken together, our results indicate that the GD3-R24 complex is endocytosed in GD3-expressing cells, accumulates in the recycling endosome, and is transported back to the plasma membrane via a route that involves clathrin-coated vesicles.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blotting, Western. CHO Cells / drug effects. CHO Cells / metabolism. Clathrin-Coated Vesicles / metabolism. Cricetinae. Dynamin II / metabolism. Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel. Humans. Melanoma / drug therapy. Melanoma / metabolism. Microscopy, Confocal. Protein Transport. Subcellular Fractions

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  • (PMID = 16623710.001).
  • [ISSN] 1742-464X
  • [Journal-full-title] The FEBS journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] FEBS J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Gangliosides; 20350-15-6 / Brefeldin A; 62010-37-1 / ganglioside, GD3; 906O0YJ6ZP / Monensin; EC 3.6.5.5 / Dynamin II
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32. Strik H, Prömmel P: Diagnosis and individualized therapy of neoplastic meningitis. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther; 2010 Jul;10(7):1137-48
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYTARABINE .

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  • [Title] Diagnosis and individualized therapy of neoplastic meningitis.
  • It occurs in approximately 5-10% of malignant diseases, most often in breast cancer, lung cancer, melanoma or B-cell lymphoma.
  • Symptoms of neoplastic meningitis are head or back pain, cranial nerve palsies, diffuse radicular symptoms or psychiatric disturbances.
  • Treatment must be individually shaped: the CSF dissemination may be treated with intrathecal chemotherapy with methotrexate or cytarabinoside (Ara-C).
  • Systemic chemotherapy is needed to control solid manifestations or, in the case of substances entering the CSF, to support intrathecal chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacokinetics. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cerebrospinal Fluid / cytology. Combined Modality Therapy. Cranial Irradiation. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Cytarabine / therapeutic use. Diagnostic Imaging. Female. Humans. Injections, Spinal. Liposomes. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Nervous System Diseases / etiology

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  • (PMID = 20645702.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8328
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of anticancer therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Liposomes; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine
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33. Jeong WC, Kim KJ, Ju HW, Back HK, Kim HK, Im SY, Lee HK: Cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 metabolites play a critical role in pulmonary tumor metastasis in mice. Anticancer Res; 2010 Sep;30(9):3421-7
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  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Tumor metastases were detected by lung colonization and angiogenesis was assayed as growth of blood vessels from subcutaneous tissue into an implanted matrigel of basement membrane.
  • RESULTS: In this study, the effects of inhibitors of cPLA2, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 on pulmonary metastasis formation by B16F10 melanoma cells were investigated.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cyclooxygenase 2 / metabolism. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Female. Lipoxygenase Inhibitors. Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors. Melanoma, Experimental / secondary. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Neovascularization, Pathologic / enzymology. Neovascularization, Pathologic / pathology. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 20944117.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Lipoxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 3.1.1.4 / Phospholipases A2, Cytosolic
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34. Molina-Garrido MJ, Mora A, Andrada E, Guillén-Ponce C, Cánovas V, Guirado-Risueño M, Pastor E, Molina MA, Molina MJ, Martín Hidalgo A, Carrato A: Multiple bone lesions resembling a metastatic origin. An unexpected diagnosis. Clin Transl Oncol; 2008 Apr;10(4):241-5
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  • [Title] Multiple bone lesions resembling a metastatic origin. An unexpected diagnosis.
  • Lytic and blastic lesions have been associated to malignant tumours, such as solid cancer (breast cancer, renal cancer, prostate cancer, malignant melanoma or thyroid tumours).
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Mastocytosis, Systemic / diagnosis. Mastocytosis, Systemic / physiopathology. Osteolysis / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Anemia / complications. Back Pain / etiology. Bone Density Conservation Agents / therapeutic use. Diagnosis, Differential. Diphosphonates / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Hypertension / complications. Imidazoles / therapeutic use. Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Osteoporosis / complications. Osteoporosis / drug therapy. Radionuclide Imaging

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  • [Cites] J Clin Rheumatol. 2005 Apr;11(2):105-8 [16357712.001]
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  • (PMID = 18411200.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-048X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bone Density Conservation Agents; 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Imidazoles; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 6XC1PAD3KF / zoledronic acid
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35. Roman CD, Choy H, Nanney L, Riordan C, Parman K, Johnson D, Beauchamp RD: Vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis inhibition and postoperative wound healing in rats. J Surg Res; 2002 Jun 1;105(1):43-7
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  • SU5416 has been shown to inhibit VEGF-dependent mitogenesis of human endothelial cells and to decrease the growth of xenografts of melanoma, lung carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, and gliomas.
  • The effect of pre- or perioperative use of this drug on angiogenesis and wound healing in the postoperative setting has not been shown.
  • This represents an important step forward in the use of this and similar drugs in the perioperative setting of treatment for multiple types of cancers.
  • The use of an inhibitor of VEGF receptors such as SU5416 is distinct and it is likely complementary to other agents in the treatment of such cancers.
  • We then performed a right pulmonary lobectomy and 6-mm full-thickness punch biopsies of the back.
  • Tissue perfusion measured via laser Doppler on Postoperative Day 2 was 1.65, 1.22, and 1.14 perfusion units (P < 0.0004) for control, 8 mg/kg, and 12 mg/kg groups, respectively.
  • RESULTS: We successfully treated a murine model with functional doses of the anti-VEGF drug SU5416 so as to achieve decreased vascularity and blood flow in postoperative wounds.
  • There was no effect on gross wound healing or infection in either control or treatment groups.
  • Also, no drug-related impairment of histologic healing or decrease in wound tensile strength was demonstrated at either 6 or 14 days.
  • CONCLUSION: Preoperative therapy with functional dosing of SU5416 does not appear to have any major effect on postoperative morbidity or mortality in rats.
  • We additionally conclude that preoperative therapy with SU5416 should be investigated further with careful attention to wound integrity.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Endothelial Growth Factors / metabolism. Indoles / pharmacology. Lymphokines / metabolism. Neovascularization, Physiologic / drug effects. Pyrroles / pharmacology. Wound Healing / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Endothelium / blood supply. Lung Neoplasms / surgery. Male. Models, Animal. Pneumonectomy. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Regional Blood Flow / drug effects. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).
  • (PMID = 12069500.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of surgical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Surg. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA69457
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Endothelial Growth Factors; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Lymphokines; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors; 71IA9S35AJ / Semaxinib
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36. Stewart AK, Bland KI, McGinnis LS Jr, Morrow M, Eyre HJ: Clinical highlights from the National Cancer Data Base, 2000. CA Cancer J Clin; 2000 May-Jun;50(3):171-83

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The NCDB collects oncology patient demographic information, diagnostic and treatment information, and outcomes data from a broad spectrum of hospital-based cancer registries throughout the US, ranging from large research and teaching facilities to small community hospitals.
  • Through this unique network, data are aggregated and reported back to participating hospitals to allow individual facilities to evaluate local patient care practices and outcomes.
  • Included among these are articles on breast cancer, gastric carcinoma, head and neck cancers, leukemia, liver carcinoma, lung cancer, parathyroid tumors, prostate carcinoma, small bowel adenocarcinoma, testicular malignancies, and vulvar melanoma.
  • The NCDB has accrued more than 6.4 million cancer cases for this time period.
  • Sufficient numbers of rare cancers are reported to the NCDB to permit some types of clinical evaluation not possible using other data sources.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma / epidemiology. Female. Head and Neck Neoplasms / epidemiology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Humans. Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell / drug therapy. Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell / epidemiology. Liver Neoplasms / epidemiology. Liver Neoplasms / therapy. Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology. Lung Neoplasms / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Parathyroid Neoplasms / epidemiology. Parathyroid Neoplasms / therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / epidemiology. Survival Rate. Testicular Neoplasms / epidemiology. Testicular Neoplasms / therapy. United States / epidemiology. Vulvar Neoplasms / epidemiology. Vulvar Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 10901740.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-9235
  • [Journal-full-title] CA: a cancer journal for clinicians
  • [ISO-abbreviation] CA Cancer J Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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37. Sjogren MH: Thymalfasin: an immune system enhancer for the treatment of liver disease. J Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2004 Dec;19(12):S69-72
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  • [Title] Thymalfasin: an immune system enhancer for the treatment of liver disease.
  • It has been evaluated for its immunomodulatory activities and related therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic hepatitis B and C, AIDS, primary immunodeficiency diseases, depressed response to vaccination and cancer.
  • Thymalfasin is responsible for reconstitution of immune function when thymic tissue is given back to thymectomized animals.
  • In addition, thymalfasin has been shown to have efficacy in multiple experimental models of immune dysfunction, mainly, infectious diseases such as hepatitis (woodchuck) and influenza (mouse), and cancer such as melanoma (mouse) and colorectal carcinoma (rat) where thymalfasin has shown antitumor effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / therapeutic use. Liver Diseases / drug therapy. Thymosin / analogs & derivatives. Thymosin / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Virus Diseases / drug therapy


38. Sjogren MH: Thymalfasin: an immune system enhancer for the treatment of liver disease. J Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2004 Dec;19 Suppl 6:S69-72
SciCrunch. DrugBank: Data: Chemical .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Thymalfasin: an immune system enhancer for the treatment of liver disease.
  • It has been evaluated for its immunomodulatory activities and related therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic hepatitis B and C, AIDS, primary immunodeficiency diseases, depressed response to vaccination and cancer.
  • Thymalfasin is responsible for reconstitution of immune function when thymic tissue is given back to thymectomized animals.
  • In addition, thymalfasin has been shown to have efficacy in multiple experimental models of immune dysfunction, mainly, infectious diseases such as hepatitis (woodchuck) and influenza (mouse), and cancer such as melanoma (mouse) and colorectal carcinoma (rat) where thymalfasin has shown antitumor effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Liver Diseases / drug therapy. Thymosin / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Cytokines / metabolism. Histocompatibility Antigens Class I / metabolism. Humans. Lymphocytes / drug effects. Lymphopoiesis / drug effects. Molecular Sequence Data. Virus Replication / drug effects

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.
  • (PMID = 15546253.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-1746
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Histocompatibility Antigens Class I; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 0 / thymalfasin; 61512-21-8 / Thymosin
  • [Number-of-references] 13
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39. Holmfred A: Failed intrathecal analgesia following severe, terminal cancer pain. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand; 2004 Jul;48(6):796
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. KETAMINE .

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  • [MeSH-major] Analgesics / therapeutic use. Back Pain / drug therapy. Melanoma / physiopathology. Skin Neoplasms / physiopathology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Amines / therapeutic use. Anesthetics, Local / administration & dosage. Anesthetics, Local / therapeutic use. Bupivacaine / administration & dosage. Bupivacaine / therapeutic use. Catheterization / methods. Clonidine / administration & dosage. Clonidine / therapeutic use. Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Ketamine / administration & dosage. Ketamine / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Morphine / administration & dosage. Morphine / therapeutic use. Severity of Illness Index. Terminal Care / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Failure. gamma-Aminobutyric Acid / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15248302.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-5172
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Anaesthesiol Scand
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amines; 0 / Analgesics; 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 0 / Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids; 56-12-2 / gamma-Aminobutyric Acid; 690G0D6V8H / Ketamine; 6CW7F3G59X / gabapentin; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine; MN3L5RMN02 / Clonidine; Y8335394RO / Bupivacaine
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