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1. Stewart AK, Vescio R, Schiller G, Ballester O, Noga S, Rugo H, Freytes C, Stadtmauer E, Tarantolo S, Sahebi F, Stiff P, Meharchard J, Schlossman R, Brown R, Tully H, Benyunes M, Jacobs C, Berenson R, White M, DiPersio J, Anderson KC, Berenson J: Purging of autologous peripheral-blood stem cells using CD34 selection does not improve overall or progression-free survival after high-dose chemotherapy for multiple myeloma: results of a multicenter randomized controlled trial. J Clin Oncol; 2001 Sep 01;19(17):3771-9
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  • [Title] Purging of autologous peripheral-blood stem cells using CD34 selection does not improve overall or progression-free survival after high-dose chemotherapy for multiple myeloma: results of a multicenter randomized controlled trial.
  • PURPOSE: Although high-dose chemotherapy supported by autologous peripheral-blood progenitor-cell (PBPC) transplantation improves response rates and survival for patients with multiple myeloma, all patients eventually develop progressive disease after transplantation.
  • It has been hypothesized that depletion of malignant plasma cells from autografts may improve outcome by reducing infused cells contributing to relapse.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A randomized phase III study using the CEPRATE SC System (Cellpro, Bothell, WA) to enrich CD34(+) autograft cells and passively purge malignant plasma cells was completed in 190 myeloma patients randomized to receive an autograft of CD34-selected or unselected PBPCs.
  • Median time to count recovery, number of transfusions, transplantation-related mortality, and days in hospital were equivalent between the two transplantation arms.
  • Median overall survival in the selected arm was reached at 50 months and is not reached at this time in the unselected arm (P =.78).
  • Median disease-free survival was 100 versus 104 weeks (P =.82), with 67% of patients in the selected arm and 66% of patients in the unselected arm relapsing.
  • CONCLUSION: This phase III trial demonstrates that although CD34 selection significantly reduces myeloma cell contamination in PBPC collections, no improvement in disease-free or overall survival was achieved.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD34 / analysis. Bone Marrow Purging / methods. Multiple Myeloma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating / immunology. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Proportional Hazards Models. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11533101.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD34; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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2. Gérard J, Berdin B, Portier G, Godon A, Tessier-Marteau A, Geneviève F, Zandecki M: [Bone marrow necrosis in two patients with neoplastic disorders]. Ann Biol Clin (Paris); 2007 Nov-Dec;65(6):636-42
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  • [Transliterated title] Nécrose médullaire chez deux patients atteints de maladies cancéreuses.
  • Bone marrow necrosis is defined by extensive necrosis of the myeloid tissue and bone marrow stroma.
  • Diagnosis is done on characteristic cytological pattern of the bone marrow aspiration and/or biopsy.
  • An haematological malignancy was suspected after observation of a few peripheral blood blast cells, but necrosis was found on the bone marrow aspiration and could not lead to further haematological diagnosis.
  • Within next days, the white blood cell count and the number of blasts increased, leading to the diagnosis of acute monoblastic leukaemia.
  • A chemotherapy was started but the patient died 20 days after admission.
  • The second patient, aged 28, has been hospitalized for severe bleeding a few days after the diagnosis of a metastatic gastric tumour.
  • According to literature, bone marrow necrosis is in most instances secondary to either an haematological malignancy (60%) or to a solid tumour (30%), but only at times observed with a non-malignant disorder.
  • Bone pain, fever, cytopenias and elevated serum lactic dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase are frequently reported, but are mostly non specific of the diagnosis in these malignant conditions.
  • Examination of the bone marrow leads to the diagnosis: cells are pycnotic, scarcely recognizable in a background of amorphous extracellular eosinophilic proteinaceous material, and histology shows disappearance of fat spaces with preservation of the bone tissue.
  • Tissue hypoxemia due to microcirculation failure may be the main mechanism leading to the necrosis, whatever the related disorder.
  • Supportive care together with specific therapy of the causal disease must be started promptly.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy. Humans. Male. Necrosis. Neoplasm Metastasis

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  • (PMID = 18039608.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-3898
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales de biologie clinique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Biol. Clin. (Paris)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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3. Oue T, Kubota A, Okuyama H, Kawahara H, Inoue M, Yagi K, Kawa K: Megatherapy with hematopoietic stem cell rescue as a preoperative treatment in unresectable pediatric malignancies. J Pediatr Surg; 2003 Jan;38(1):130-3; discussion 130-3
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  • [Title] Megatherapy with hematopoietic stem cell rescue as a preoperative treatment in unresectable pediatric malignancies.
  • BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: To improve the quality of life and prognosis of the patients with advanced pediatric malignant tumors, the authors have used megatherapy (MT) with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) before surgery.
  • To elucidate the impact of preoperative MT on the treatments of pediatric advanced malignancies, the authors reviewed the timing of surgery, preoperative condition, postoperative recovery, and outcome.
  • METHODS: Between 1991 and 2001, 24 children with malignant tumors received MT with SCT before surgery, and 19 tumors were resected after SCT.
  • RESULTS: The mean duration of white blood cell (WBC) recovery (>1,000/mm3) and platelet recovery (>50,000/mm3) after SCT was 17.1 and 42.5 days, respectively.
  • At 7 months to 7 years after diagnosis, 9 patients are alive without disease, one with disease, 6 have died of recurrent tumor, and 2 have died of chemotherapy-associated complications.
  • In the treatment of advanced pediatric malignancies, especially in the case of unresectable tumor, preoperative MT with SCT should be considered.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / therapy. Preoperative Care / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Infant. Male

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 12592635.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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4. Shi YK, He XH, Han XH, Yang JL, Liu P, Zhang CG, Ai B: [Mobilization of autologous peripheral blood stem cells with etoposide and recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor in malignant tumor patients]. Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi; 2004 Jun;26(6):360-3
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  • [Title] [Mobilization of autologous peripheral blood stem cells with etoposide and recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor in malignant tumor patients].
  • OBJECTIVE: To observe the combined effect of etoposide (Vp-16) and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on mobilization of autologous peripheral blood stem cells (APBSC) in malignant tumor patients and find out the suitable dose of Vp-16.
  • In group B, Vp-16 1500 mg/m(2) was injected intravenously in six divided doses for 3 hours every 12 hours on day 1, 2 and 3. rhG-CSF was given as a single daily injection subcutaneously at the dose of 300 microg.body(-1).day(-1) from the day of the nadir of white blood cell (WBC) to the day before the end of APBCS harvest.
  • RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the time of nadir, nadir of WBC, absolute neutrophil count (ANC), the beginning time and continuous time of rhG-CSF given, the beginning time and continuous time of APBSC harvest.
  • When the blood volume, flow rate and continuous time of apheresis were similar in each apheresis in the two groups, the number of APBSC in each harvest and total number of APBSC were also not significantly different between the two groups.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacology. Etoposide / pharmacology. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / pharmacology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / drug effects. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Hodgkin Disease / therapy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Recombinant Proteins

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  • (PMID = 15312348.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-3766
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua zhong liu za zhi [Chinese journal of oncology]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide
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5. Abdallah E, Hajji Z, Mellal Z, Belmekki M, Bencherifa F, Berraho A: [Macular serous detachment revealing acute lymphoblastic leukemia]. J Fr Ophtalmol; 2005 Jan;28(1):39-44
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  • BACKGROUND: Leukemias are a group of malignant diseases caused by immature hematopoietic cells proliferating in the blood marrow.
  • The investigations showed the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Steroids and chemotherapy led to complete remission with normal visual acuity during a follow-up of 29 months.
  • The intraretinal hemorrhage may contain a white component that usually is a white dot in the center of the hemorrhage, but other clinical features are described.
  • Serous detachment of the neuroepithelium is seldom reported, and can be the first symptom of the disease.
  • Ocular location is estimated to be an equivalent of central nervous system involvement, and subsequently requires adequate treatment (steroids, chemotherapy and radiotherapy of the central nervous system).
  • CONCLUSION: Ocular manifestations of leukemia are frequent but rarely reveal the disease.
  • However, the diagnosis of leukemia should be considered in case of pigmentary epithelium involvement.
  • [MeSH-major] Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis. Retinal Detachment / etiology

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  • (PMID = 15767897.001).
  • [ISSN] 0181-5512
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal français d'ophtalmologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Fr Ophtalmol
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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6. Seftel MD, Bruyere H, Copland M, Hogge DE, Horsman DE, Nantel SH, Shepherd JD, Lavoie JC, Le A, Sutherland HJ, Toze CL, Nevill TJ: Fulminant tumour lysis syndrome in acute myelogenous leukaemia with inv(16)(p13;q22). Eur J Haematol; 2002 Oct;69(4):193-9
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  • Tumour lysis syndrome (TLS) is caused by rapid breakdown of malignant cells resulting in electrolyte disturbances and acute renal failure.
  • Between November 1997 and July 2001, 114 consecutive adult AML patients aged <60 yr received induction chemotherapy consisting of cytosine arabinoside 1.5 g m(-2) q 12 h x 12 doses and daunorubicin 45 mg m(-2) d(-1) x 3 doses.
  • During induction chemotherapy (CT), seven patients (6.1%, 95% CI 2.5-12.2) developed fulminant TLS, resulting in acute renal failure; five of these seven patients had inversion of chromosome 16 [inv(16)(p13;q22)], and one patient had a biological equivalent [t(16,16)(p13;q22)].
  • Four of the TLS patients underwent leukapheresis for a presenting white blood cell (WBC) count > 100 x 10(9) L(-1) prior to commencing chemotherapy, and six patients subsequently required haemodialysis for a median of 2 (range 1-8) wk.
  • One patient relapsed at 12 months and again developed TLS on re-induction.
  • In univariate analysis, TLS patients were more likely to have an elevated presentation and pre-chemotherapy WBC counts, elevated serum creatinine, and uric acid levels at presentation, as well as an inv(16).
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Chromosome Inversion. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 16. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / drug therapy. Tumor Lysis Syndrome / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Cytarabine / adverse effects. Daunorubicin / administration & dosage. Daunorubicin / adverse effects. Female. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 12431237.001).
  • [ISSN] 0902-4441
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; ZS7284E0ZP / Daunorubicin
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7. Tang S, Huang D, Wang J, Wei X, Ran C, Peng Y, Lu S, Zhang J: Application of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in children with malignant tumor. Chin Med J (Engl); 2001 Oct;114(10):1098-101
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  • [Title] Application of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in children with malignant tumor.
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate if low dose total body irradiation (TBI, 6.0-9.0 Gy) combined with intensified chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation results in better survival in children with refractory leukemia or solid tumors.
  • METHODS: Twenty-one children with malignant tumors were included in this study.
  • Underlying disease included high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, CR1 in 3 children and CR2 in 5 children), acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML, 9 children), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma stage IV (2 children), and neuroblastoma stage IV (2 children).
  • The peripheral hematopoietic stem cells were collected six to eleven months after complete response, mobilized with high dose chemotherapy alone or combined with GM-CSF or G-CSF.
  • The conditioning regimen consisted of chemotherapy with two to three combinations of the following drugs: cyclophosphamide, arabinosylcytosine, McNU, etopside, and ldarubicin on the basis of TBI (6.0-9.0 Gy).
  • Peripheral white blood cell count decreased to 0 in all patients at day +4.8 +/- 2.9, and platelet count decreased to less than 20 x 10(9)/L at day +9.0 +/- 2.6.
  • Recovery of white blood cell (WBC) to 10 x 10(9)/L, absolute neutrophil count to 0.5 x 10(9)/L, platelet count to 20 x 10(9)/L occurred on 21 +/- 12, 26 +/- 13, and 27 +/- 10 days, respectively.
  • CONCLUSION: Our preliminary data suggest that myeloablative therapy with low dose TBI (6.0-9.0 Gy) combined with intensified chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation might be associated with favorable results in children with refractory leukemia or solid tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms / therapy. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

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  • (PMID = 11677775.001).
  • [ISSN] 0366-6999
  • [Journal-full-title] Chinese medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chin. Med. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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8. Smaaland R, Sothern RB, Laerum OD, Abrahamsen JF: Rhythms in human bone marrow and blood cells. Chronobiol Int; 2002 Jan;19(1):101-27
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  • [Title] Rhythms in human bone marrow and blood cells.
  • On an average, the percentage of total BM cells in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis phase was 188% greater at midday than at midnight (circadian rhythm: p = 0.018; acrophase or peak time of 13: 16h).
  • Patients with malignant disease (n = 15) and a normal cortisol circadian rhythm showed higher fractions of BM cells in S-phase at midday.
  • Thus, the temporal synchrony in cell cycling renders BM cells more sensitive at specific times to hematopoietic growth factors and cell cycle-specific cytotoxic drugs.
  • Moreover, proper timing of BM harvesting may improve progenitor cell yield.
  • When using marker rhythms in the blood to allow for individualized timing of BM procedures, the times of low values in white blood corpuscles, neutrophils, and lymphocytes and high values in cortisol were predictive of the times of highest BM erythroid, myeloid, and total S-phase numbers occurring in the following 12 h.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Cells / cytology. Bone Marrow Cells / cytology. Circadian Rhythm / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / toxicity. Bone Marrow / drug effects. Bone Marrow / metabolism. Cell Cycle. Cell Differentiation. Chronotherapy. Colony-Forming Units Assay. DNA / biosynthesis. Erythropoiesis / physiology. Glutathione / metabolism. Hematopoiesis / drug effects. Hematopoiesis / physiology. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / cytology. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / drug effects. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / metabolism. Humans. Male. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / metabolism. Neoplasms / pathology. Seasons

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  • (PMID = 11962670.001).
  • [ISSN] 0742-0528
  • [Journal-full-title] Chronobiology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chronobiol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 9007-49-2 / DNA; GAN16C9B8O / Glutathione
  • [Number-of-references] 88
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9. Kennedy B, Hillmen P: Immunological effects and safe administration of alemtuzumab (MabCampath) in advanced B-cLL. Med Oncol; 2002;19 Suppl:S49-55
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  • Alemtuzumab (MabCampath) can purge both B- and T-cells in a variety of clinical situations, as seen in the treatment of autoimmune disorders and of lymphoid malignancies such as B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL).
  • One of the characteristics of advanced B-CLL is an increased susceptibility to infection, which may improve in patients whose disease responds to alemtuzumab, particularly when immune reconstitution by non-malignant stem cells is successful.
  • However, at initiation of treatment, patients with advanced disease are likely to have poor immune function, and need careful management during and after treatment.
  • Here, we present results showing the nature of immune reconstitution after alemtuzumab and the ways in which alemtuzumab may affect white cell counts during and after treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Neoplasm / therapeutic use. Communicable Diseases / complications. Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / immunology. Humans. Multiple Sclerosis / drug therapy. Multiple Sclerosis / immunology

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  • (PMID = 12180492.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-0560
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical oncology (Northwood, London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antibodies, Neoplasm; 3A189DH42V / alemtuzumab
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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10. Motegi S, Nishizaki Y, Muramatsu C, Nakamura H, Kobayashi F, Shiozawa H, Kamochi J, Itakura M, Shibuya M, Ogawa T, Matsuzaki S: Hemophagocytic syndrome in ileum-origin B-cell lymphoma. J Gastroenterol; 2003;38(10):995-9
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  • [Title] Hemophagocytic syndrome in ileum-origin B-cell lymphoma.
  • A 56 year-old-man was admitted due to upper abdominal tumor and was diagnosed as having stage IVb diffuse B-cell malignant lymphoma that originally developed in the terminal ileum.
  • The first and the second administrations of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, 750 mg/m(2); adriamycin, 50 mg/m(2); vincristine, 1.4 mg/m(2); and prednisolone, 100 mg/day) therapy were effective; however, the third course of therapy was postponed because of an episode of massive hematochezia.
  • Bone marrow smear showed the proliferation of reactive histiocytic cells which phagocytized red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
  • B-cell lymphoma-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (B-LAHS) was diagnosed.
  • (1) LAHS occurred in an ileum-origin B-cell lymphoma, and (2) LAHS developed during an interval after chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Histiocytosis, Non-Langerhans-Cell / diagnosis. Ileal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Lymphoma, B-Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Colonoscopy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Epstein-Barr Virus Infections / diagnosis. Epstein-Barr Virus Infections / virology. Herpesvirus 4, Human. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Failure. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 14614609.001).
  • [ISSN] 0944-1174
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHOP protocol
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11. Mori M, Niitsu N, Takagi T, Tomiyama J, Matsue T, Nakagawa Y, Okamoto R: Reduced-dose chop therapy for elderly patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Leuk Lymphoma; 2001 Apr;41(3-4):359-66
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  • [Title] Reduced-dose chop therapy for elderly patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • While CHOP therapy is effective for malignant lymphoma, the optimum schedule for elderly patients remains controversial.
  • The present study investigated the usefulness of reduced-dose CHOP therapy for elderly patients.
  • Previously untreated patients aged 65 years or older with intermediate to high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were given up to 6 courses of reduced-dose CHOP therapy at 3-week intervals.
  • Filgrastim was administered when the white blood cell count fell below 2,000/microL.
  • Fifty-seven patients were evaluable and the scheduled therapy was completed in 37.
  • In conclusion, it seems that in the elderly patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, response to reduced-dose ((5/6) dose) CHOP therapy is comparable to that for standard CHOP in younger adults, mainly because of improved dose-intensity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / toxicity. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Actuarial Analysis. Age Factors. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / toxicity. Disease-Free Survival. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / toxicity. Female. Humans. Male. Pilot Projects. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / toxicity. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / toxicity

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  • (PMID = 11378549.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHOP protocol
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12. Schaich M, Illmer T, Seitz G, Mohr B, Schäkel U, Beck JF, Ehninger G: The prognostic value of Bcl-XL gene expression for remission induction is influenced by cytogenetics in adult acute myeloid leukemia. Haematologica; 2001 May;86(5):470-7
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  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There is growing evidence that altered expression of genes belonging to the BcL-2 family of apoptosis regulators might influence chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in malignant cells and therefore could confer multidrug resistance.
  • So far expression studies of apoptosis-regulating genes on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mainly focused on Bcl-2 itself and most of them have not included other factors involved in drug resistance or apoptosis as parameters determining response to chemotherapy, disease progression and survival.
  • DESIGN AND METHODS: We therefore examined Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bax gene expression in 235 adult patients with de novo or secondary myeloid leukemia.
  • RESULTS: Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL positive patients had a much lower white blood cell count than negative patients (p<0.001 and p=0.003, respectively).
  • Remarkably Bax was significantly less frequently expressed in de novo AML patients with high risk cytogenetics (p=0.007).
  • However, in the multivariate analysis regarding the group of de novo AML patients < or =60 years with intermediate risk cytogenetics, Bcl-XL expression was found to be an independent negative prognostic factor for response to induction therapy (p=0.04).
  • In contrast, no prognostic impact of Bcl-XL expression on treatment response was seen within the group of patients with high risk cytogenetic findings.
  • Neither Bcl-2 nor Bax nor Bcl-XL expression had a significant influence on overall or disease-free survival.
  • INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that the prognostic value of Bcl-XL gene expression for treatment response in AML patients < or =60 years is dependent on cytogenetics.
  • [MeSH-major] Leukemia, Myeloid / diagnosis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Aged. Biomarkers. Cytogenetic Analysis. Gene Expression. Humans. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Remission Induction. bcl-2-Associated X Protein. bcl-X Protein

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  • (PMID = 11410409.001).
  • [ISSN] 0390-6078
  • [Journal-full-title] Haematologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Haematologica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / BAX protein, human; 0 / BCL2L1 protein, human; 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / bcl-2-Associated X Protein; 0 / bcl-X Protein
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13. Karayannopoulou M, Kaldrymidou E, Constantinidis TC, Dessiris A: Adjuvant post-operative chemotherapy in bitches with mammary cancer. J Vet Med A Physiol Pathol Clin Med; 2001 Mar;48(2):85-96
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  • [Title] Adjuvant post-operative chemotherapy in bitches with mammary cancer.
  • The survival time in a group of eight bitches with malignant mammary tumours given adjuvant post-operative chemotherapy was compared with survival in another group of eight bitches with mammary cancer which were treated by surgical excision alone.
  • The same surgical procedure was used in both groups.
  • All bitches had stage III disease according to the World Health Organization clinical staging system.
  • Chemotherapy was started one week post-surgery.
  • Selected haematological parameters (packed cell volume, white blood cell count, platelet count and differential white blood cell count) and serum biochemical parameters (alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine) were measured before and during chemotherapy.
  • Survival analysis indicated that the chemotherapeutic regimen had a positive influence on the disease-free interval and the survival time of the eight bitches (P < 0.05).
  • Although leucocyte numbers were significantly decreased (P < 0.001) during chemotherapy, the mean leucocyte counts remained within normal limits.
  • Packed cell volume and alkaline phosphatase increased significantly (P < 0.05) but within normal limits.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / veterinary. Carcinosarcoma / veterinary. Dog Diseases / drug therapy. Mammary Neoplasms, Animal / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / veterinary. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Dogs. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Postoperative Period. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 11315572.001).
  • [ISSN] 0931-184X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of veterinary medicine. A, Physiology, pathology, clinical medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Vet Med A Physiol Pathol Clin Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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14. Fabi A, Metro G, Vidiri A, Lanzetta G, Carosi M, Telera S, Maschio M, Russillo M, Sperduti I, Carapella CM, Cognetti F, Pace A: Low-dose fotemustine for recurrent malignant glioma: a multicenter phase II study. J Neurooncol; 2010 Nov;100(2):209-15
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  • [Title] Low-dose fotemustine for recurrent malignant glioma: a multicenter phase II study.
  • Fotemustine at the conventional dose of 100 mg/m(2) is an active treatment for recurrent malignant gliomas (RMGs).
  • However, it is associated with a relevant incidence of severe myelotoxicity, which is not justified in the palliative setting of this disease.
  • Forty patients with RMGs pretreated with ≤2 lines of chemotherapy were enrolled.
  • Thirty-one patients (77.5%) had tissue available for analysis of the O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter which was found to be methylated in 14 cases (45%).
  • Overall, 8 partial responses (20%) and 13 disease stabilizations (32.5%) were observed for a disease-control rate of 52.5%.
  • Grades 3 and 4 platelet and white blood cell toxicity occurred in ≤10% of patients, and no patients discontinued treatment because of toxicity.
  • No significant difference was observed for disease control rate between methylated and unmethylated patients, although a trend toward improved progression-free survival was reported for methylated patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Glioma / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Nitrosourea Compounds / administration & dosage. Organophosphorus Compounds / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. DNA Methylation / genetics. DNA Modification Methylases / genetics. DNA Repair Enzymes / genetics. Disease-Free Survival. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. Promoter Regions, Genetic / genetics. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / genetics

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  • (PMID = 20352471.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7373
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Nitrosourea Compounds; 0 / Organophosphorus Compounds; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; EC 2.1.1.- / DNA Modification Methylases; EC 2.1.1.63 / MGMT protein, human; EC 6.5.1.- / DNA Repair Enzymes; GQ7JL9P5I2 / fotemustine
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15. Brück P, Mousset S, Bühme A, Hoelzer D, Atta J: Nonsecretory primary plasma cell leukemia with good response to thalidomide-based treatment. Int J Hematol; 2007 Jul;86(1):66-8
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  • [Title] Nonsecretory primary plasma cell leukemia with good response to thalidomide-based treatment.
  • Primary plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare hematologic disorder with distinct features.
  • The criterion for the diagnosis of PCL is based on the finding of malignant plasma cells in the peripheral blood (more than 2 x 10(9)/L or more than 20% of white blood cells).
  • Examination of blood smears led to the diagnosis of PCL, which was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy.
  • Due to the patient's impaired general condition, intensive chemotherapy could not be administered.
  • After an oral induction chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide and high dose dexamethasone followed by one cycle of high-dose dexamethasone and thalidomide no evidence of the disease in the peripheral blood was detectable.
  • Consequently, the patient was put on a thalidomide maintenance therapy.
  • Six months after first diagnosis, the patient was found to have bone marrow and peripheral blood relapse with anemia and neutropenia in the clinical context of acute on chronic renal failure.
  • After a limited response to further chemotherapy, the patient died 14 months after the first diagnosis while on dexamethasone maintenance.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Plasma Cell / drug therapy. Thalidomide / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local

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  • (PMID = 17675269.001).
  • [ISSN] 0925-5710
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 4Z8R6ORS6L / Thalidomide
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16. Magagnoli M, Sarina B, Balzarotti M, Castagna L, Timofeeva I, Nozza A, Bertuzzi A, Siracusano L, Sinnone M, Santoro A: Mobilizing potential of ifosfamide/vinorelbine-based chemotherapy in pretreated malignant lymphoma. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2001 Nov;28(10):923-7
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  • [Title] Mobilizing potential of ifosfamide/vinorelbine-based chemotherapy in pretreated malignant lymphoma.
  • The mobilizing potential and therapeutic activity of ifosfamide/vinorelbine-containing regimens with G-CSF support were explored in patients with pretreated malignant lymphomas.
  • Ten patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) received ifosfamide and vinorelbine, and 17 with Hodgkin's disease (HD) received ifosfamide, vinorelbine and gemcitabine (IGEV regimen), as induction chemotherapy before high-dose chemotherapy (HDT) with peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support.
  • Most of the patients had been heavily pretreated with various chemotherapy regimens +/- radiotherapy.
  • The target yield was > or =3 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg of body weight in order to support the subsequent myeloablative chemotherapy.
  • The optimal PBSC harvest occurred on days 11 and 12, with no difference in CD34+ cell mobilization kinetics between the ifos- famide/vinorelbine and IGEV regimens.
  • The median total CD34+ cell/microl, CFU-GM and white blood cells (WBC) for all individual collections was 81.5/microl, 10 x 10(4)/kg, and 17 900/microl, respectively.
  • Hematological side-effects were acceptable and no treatment-related hospitalizations or toxic deaths occurred.
  • Fifteen patients have so far received high-dose therapy and PBSC reinfusion with rapid engraftment.
  • These results confirm that ifosfamide and vinorelbine-based chemotherapy regimen with G-CSF support can be successfully and safely used to mobilize PBSCs.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacokinetics. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization / methods. Ifosfamide / pharmacokinetics. Lymphoma / drug therapy. Vinblastine / analogs & derivatives. Vinblastine / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antigens, CD34 / analysis. Female. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. Humans. Leukapheresis / methods. Leukapheresis / standards. Leukocyte Count. Male. Middle Aged. Therapeutic Equivalency. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11753545.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD34; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; Q6C979R91Y / vinorelbine; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
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17. Andreopoulou E, Ross PJ, O'Brien ME, Ford HE, Priest K, Eisen T, Norton A, Ashley S, Smith IE: The palliative benefits of MVP (mitomycin C, vinblastine and cisplatin) chemotherapy in patients with malignant mesothelioma. Ann Oncol; 2004 Sep;15(9):1406-12
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  • [Title] The palliative benefits of MVP (mitomycin C, vinblastine and cisplatin) chemotherapy in patients with malignant mesothelioma.
  • BACKGROUND: With the rising incidence of malignant mesothelioma (MM), it is important to optimise treatment to control symptoms, maintain quality of life and, if possible, prolong life.
  • We have analysed prospectively collected data to evaluate a frequently used palliative chemotherapy regimen.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between October 1986 and May 2002 all patients with inoperable pleural mesothelioma were considered for treatment with MVP (mitomycin C 8 mg/m2 every 6 weeks, vinblastine 6 mg/m2 every 3 weeks and cisplatin 50 mg/m2 every 3 weeks) chemotherapy.
  • Symptoms were assessed by physician assessment at baseline and after each cycle of chemotherapy.
  • The response rate was 15.3%, with 68.6% having stable disease.
  • Poor prognostic factors in univariate analysis included poor PS, weight loss, mixed or sarcomatoid histology, low haemoglobin and high white blood cell count.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Palliation of symptoms in MM is achievable with current cisplatin-based treatments.

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  • (PMID = 15319247.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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18. Health Quality Ontario: Extracorporeal photophoresis: an evidence-based analysis. Ont Health Technol Assess Ser; 2006;6(6):1-82
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  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of extracorporeal photophoresis (ECP) for the treatment of refractory erythrodermic cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) and refractory chronic graft versus host disease (cGvHD).
  • BACKGROUND: CUTANEOUS T CELL LYMPHOMA: Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a general name for a group of skin affecting disorders caused by malignant white blood cells (T lymphocytes).
  • Cutaneous T cell lymphoma is relatively uncommon and represents slightly more than 2% of all lymphomas in the United States.
  • The relative frequency and disease-specific 5-year survival of 1,905 primary cutaneous lymphomas classified according to the World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (WHO-EORTC) classification (Appendix 1).
  • Mycosis fungoides had a frequency of 44% and a disease specific 5-year survival of 88%.
  • Sezary syndrome had a frequency of 3% and a disease specific 5-year survival of 24%.
  • Cutaneous T cell lymphoma has an annual incidence of approximately 0.4 per 100,000 and it mainly occurs in the 5(th) to 6(th) decade of life, with a male/female ratio of 2:1.
  • Mycosis fungoides is an indolent lymphoma with patients often having several years of eczematous or dermatitic skin lesions before the diagnosis is finally established.
  • Early in the disease biopsies are often difficult to interpret and the diagnosis may only become apparent by observing the patient over time.
  • Approximately 10% of MF patients will experience progressive disease involving lymph nodes, peripheral blood, bone marrow and visceral organs.
  • A particular syndrome in these patients involves erythroderma (intense and usually widespread reddening of the skin from dilation of blood vessels, often preceding or associated with exfoliation), and circulating tumour cells.
  • CHRONIC GRAFT VERSUS HOST DISEASE: Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a treatment used for a variety of malignant and nonmalignant disease of the bone marrow and immune system.
  • The procedure is often associated with serious immunological complications, particularly graft versus host disease (GvHD).
  • Approximately 50% of patients with cGvHD have limited disease and a good prognosis.
  • Of the patients with extensive disease, approximately 60% will respond to treatment and eventually be able to discontinue immunosuppressive therapy.
  • The remaining patients will develop opportunistic infection, or require prolonged treatment with immunosuppressive agents.
  • Risk factors include older age of patient or donor, higher degree of histoincompatibility, unrelated versus related donor, use of hematopoietic cells obtained from the blood rather than the marrow, and previous acute GvHD.
  • Bhushan and Collins estimated that the incidence of severe cGvHD has probably increased in recent years because of the use of more unrelated transplants, donor leukocyte infusions, nonmyeloablative transplants and stem cells obtained from the blood rather than the marrow.
  • The most commonly involved tissues are the skin, liver, mouth, and eyes.
  • Patients with limited disease have localized skin involvement, evidence of liver dysfunction, or both, whereas those with more involvement of the skin or involvement of other organs have extensive disease.
  • TREATMENT:   CUTANEOUS T CELL LYMPHOMA: The optimal management of MF is undetermined because of its low prevalence, and its highly variable natural history, with frequent spontaneous remissions and exacerbations and often prolonged survival.
  • Nonaggressive approaches to therapy are usually warranted with treatment aimed at improving symptoms and physical appearance while limiting toxicity.
  • Given that multiple skin sites are usually involved, the initial treatment choices are usually topical or intralesional corticosteroids or phototherapy using psoralen (a compound found in plants which make the skin temporarily sensitive to ultraviolet A) (PUVA).
  • PUVA is not curative and its influence on disease progression remains uncertain.
  • "Second line" therapy for early stage disease is often topical chemotherapy, radiotherapy or total skin electron beam radiation (TSEB).
  • Treatment of advanced stage (IIB-IV) MF usually consists of topical or systemic therapy in refractory or rapidly progressive SS.
  • Bone marrow transplantation and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation have been used to treat many malignant hematologic disorders (e.g., leukemias) that are refractory to conventional treatment.
  • Reports on the use of these procedures for the treatment of CTCL are limited and mostly consist of case reports or small case series.
  • CHRONIC GRAFT VERSUS HOST DISEASE: Patients who develop cGvHD require reinstitution of immunosuppressive medication (if already discontinued) or an increase in dosage and possibly addition of other agents.
  • The current literature regarding cGvHD therapy is less than optimal and many recommendations about therapy are based on common practices that await definitive testing.
  • Patients with disease that is extensive by definition but is indolent in clinical appearance may respond to prednisone.
  • However, patients with more aggressive disease are treated with higher doses of corticosteroids and/or cyclosporine.
  • Numerous salvage therapies have been considered in patients with refractory cGvHD, including ECP.
  • Due to uncertainty around salvage therapies, Bhushan and Collins suggested that ideally, patients with refractory cGvHD should be entered into clinical trials.
  • Two Ontario expert consultants jointly estimated that there may be approximately 30 new erythrodermic treatment resistant CTCL patients and 30 new treatment resistant cGvHD patients per year who are unresponsive to other forms of therapy and may be candidates for ECP.
  • Extracorporeal photopheresis is a procedure that was initially developed as a treatment for CTCL, particularly SS.
  • Whole blood is removed from patients followed by pheresis.
  • Lymphocytes are separated by centrifugation to create a concentrated layer of white blood cells.
  • The lymphocyte layer is treated with methoxsalen (a drug that sensitizes the lymphocytes to light) and exposed to UVA, following which the lymphocytes are returned to the patient.
  • Red blood cells and plasma are returned to the patient between each cycle.
  • Photosensitization is achieved by administering methoxsalen to the patient orally 2 hours before the procedure, or by injecting methoxsalen directly ino the leucocyte rich fraction.
  • The latter approach avoids potential side effects such as nausea, and provides a more consistent drug level within the machine.
  • In general, from the time the intravenous line is inserted until the white blood cells are returned to the patient takes approximately 2.5-3.5 hours.
  • For CTCL, the treatment schedule is generally 2 consecutive days every 4 weeks for a median of 6 months.
  • For cGvHD, an expert in the field estimated that the treatment schedule would be 3 times a week for the 1(st) month, then 2 consecutive days every 2 weeks after that (i.e., 4 treatments a month) for a median of 6 to 9 months.
  • REGULATORY STATUS: The UVAR XTS Photopheresis System is licensed by Health Canada as a Class 3 medical device (license # 7703) for the "palliative treatment of skin manifestations of CTCL."
  • It is not licensed for the treatment of cGvHD.

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  • (PMID = 23074497.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ontario health technology assessment series
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ont Health Technol Assess Ser
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3379535
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19. Koppikar P, Abdel-Wahab O, Hedvat C, Marubayashi S, Patel J, Goel A, Kucine N, Gardner JR, Combs AP, Vaddi K, Haley PJ, Burn TC, Rupar M, Bromberg JF, Heaney ML, de Stanchina E, Fridman JS, Levine RL: Efficacy of the JAK2 inhibitor INCB16562 in a murine model of MPLW515L-induced thrombocytosis and myelofibrosis. Blood; 2010 Apr 8;115(14):2919-27
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  • The discovery of JAK2 and MPL mutations in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) provided important insight into the genetic basis of these disorders and led to the development of JAK2 kinase inhibitors for MPN therapy.
  • INCB16562 inhibited proliferation and signaling in cell lines transformed by JAK2 and MPL mutations.
  • Compared with vehicle treatment, INCB16562 treatment improved survival, normalized white blood cell counts and platelet counts, and markedly reduced extramedullary hematopoeisis and bone marrow fibrosis.
  • These data suggest JAK2 inhibitor therapy may be of value in the treatment of JAK2V617F-negative MPNs.
  • However, we did not observe a decrease in the size of the malignant clone in the bone marrow of treated mice at the end of therapy, which suggests that JAK2 inhibitor therapy, by itself, was not curative in this MPN model.

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  • (PMID = 20154217.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0020
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / Howard Hughes Medical Institute / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mpl protein, mouse; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Receptors, Thrombopoietin; 0 / STAT3 Transcription Factor; 0 / STAT5 Transcription Factor; 0 / Stat3 protein, mouse; EC 2.7.10.2 / Jak2 protein, mouse; EC 2.7.10.2 / Janus Kinase 2
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2854434
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20. Deeg HJ, Blazar BR, Bolwell BJ, Long GD, Schuening F, Cunningham J, Rifkin RM, Abhyankar S, Briggs AD, Burt R, Lipani J, Roskos LK, White JM, Havrilla N, Schwab G, Heslop HE: Treatment of steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease with anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody ABX-CBL. Blood; 2001 Oct 1;98(7):2052-8
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  • [Title] Treatment of steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease with anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody ABX-CBL.
  • ABX-CBL, an immunoglobulin M murine monoclonal antibody, recognizes CD147 and initiates cell killing through complement-mediated lysis.
  • In a dose-finding trial, 27 patients with steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) received ABX-CBL at 0.01 (presumed no effect dose), 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 mg/kg per day, and an additional 32 patients were given ABX-CBL at 0.2 or 0.15 mg/kg per day.
  • All patients had undergone allogeneic transplantation for malignant or nonmalignant disorders and received GVHD prophylaxis, generally with methotrexate- and cyclosporine-containing regimens.
  • At 6 months after the initiation of ABX-CBL therapy, 26 (44%) patients were surviving.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antigens, CD. Antigens, Neoplasm. Antigens, Surface. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Avian Proteins. Blood Proteins. Graft vs Host Disease / drug therapy. Membrane Glycoproteins / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adolescent. Adult. Antigens, CD147. Child. Child, Preschool. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Resistance. Half-Life. Humans. Infant. Lymphocyte Subsets. Middle Aged. Steroids / therapeutic use. Survival Analysis. Therapeutic Equivalency

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  • (PMID = 11567989.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA18029; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA87948; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL36444
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Antigens, Surface; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Avian Proteins; 0 / BSG protein, human; 0 / Blood Proteins; 0 / Bsg protein, Gallus gallus; 0 / Bsg protein, rat; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Steroids; 136894-56-9 / Antigens, CD147
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21. Wada H, Sase T, Yamaguchi M: Hypercoagulant states in malignant lymphoma. Exp Oncol; 2005 Sep;27(3):179-85
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  • [Title] Hypercoagulant states in malignant lymphoma.
  • The incidence of severe complications, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in malignant lymphoma, differs between clinical stages and histological types of the disease, but they occur frequently in stage IV or natural killer (NK) cell lymphoma.
  • Patients with stage IV or NK cell lymphoma exhibit abnormal thrombotic and hemostatic states.
  • One of the mechanisms in DIC might involve elevated cytokine expression by lymphoma cells stimulating the expression of tissue factor (TF) in blood cells or surrounding tissue.
  • During chemotherapy for lymphoma, the white blood cell count was significantly reduced at days 1 and 3, but significantly increased at days 7 and 9.
  • At day 7 of chemotherapy, leukocyte TF mRNA levels were significantly increased.
  • Plasma concentrations of granulocyte elastase derived-XDP (GEXDP) levels correlated with D-dimer levels, suggesting that almost all elevated D-dimer is GE-XDP.
  • Analysis of patients with DIC or ARDS revealed that TF mRNA correlated with D-dimer, and GE-XDP correlated with leukocyte count, CRP and D-dimer, suggesting that inflammatory changes due to thrombosis may cause the activation of leukocytes during chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 16244577.001).
  • [ISSN] 1812-9269
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Ukraine
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein; 9035-58-9 / Thromboplastin; EC 3.4.21.37 / Leukocyte Elastase
  • [Number-of-references] 47
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