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1. Schuetze SM, Patel S: Should patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma receive adjuvant chemotherapy? Oncologist; 2009 Oct;14(10):1003-12
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Should patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma receive adjuvant chemotherapy?
  • Soft tissue sarcoma is a malignant connective tissue tumor that may arise anywhere in the body and from diverse mesenchymal elements.
  • The majority of patients with soft tissue sarcoma present with potentially life-threatening disease, and complete resection to obtain specimen margins free of tumor and radiation offer the best chance for local disease control.
  • The risk of relapse and death from disease rises with increasing tumor stage, grade, and size.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy has been studied as a means to decrease the risk for disease recurrence in patients with localized soft tissue sarcoma at diagnosis, but the majority of trials reported on have been hampered by patient heterogeneity, low patient accrual, and short follow-up.
  • Meta-analysis and reviews of institutional large series, in efforts to overcome some of the limitations, suggest that doxorubicin with ifosfamide reduces the risk for sarcoma recurrence and death in selected patients with high-grade, large, and chemotherapy-sensitive sarcoma subtypes to a clinically meaningful degree.
  • In multiple analyses, patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma treated with chemotherapy have a >10% absolute lower risk for disease recurrence and longer disease-specific survival than patients treated without chemotherapy.
  • In the absence of conclusive results from an adequately powered, randomized, controlled clinical trial, the available data support the use of chemotherapy in the management of high-risk, localized, soft tissue sarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Sarcoma / mortality. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / drug therapy. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Anthracyclines / administration & dosage. Anthracyclines / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Ifosfamide / therapeutic use. Meta-Analysis as Topic. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Staging. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 19808770.001).
  • [ISSN] 1549-490X
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anthracyclines; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
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2. Lăzureanu C, Baderca F, Burlacu O, Nicodin A: Soft tissue epithelioid angiosarcoma. Rom J Morphol Embryol; 2010;51(4):787-92
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  • [Title] Soft tissue epithelioid angiosarcoma.
  • The preoperative native and with contrast substance CT revealed a tumor mass extended from the right paravertebral muscles to the diaphragmatic right pillar muscle, invading the postero-basal pleura and the posterior arches of the right XIth and 12th ribs with osteolysis.
  • Fragments of 10 cm large tumor resection specimen (striated muscle, dense connective tissue, adipose tissue, lymph nodes and intercostals nerves) were routinely processed, further immunohistochemical investigations were needed, using Dako antibodies pan-CK clone MNF116, CD34, CD20, vimentin, synaptophysin, melanoma HMB45 clone, with LSAB 2Kits system and further CK AE1÷AE3, CK7, CK20, CEA, S-100 protein, CD31, von Willebrand factor, D2-40÷podoplanin, Ki-67 antigen, with EnVision system and DAB visualization in both systems.
  • The histological and immunohistochemical aspects were indicative for soft tissue epithelioid angiosarcoma, which was misdiagnosed on frozen and HE sections as a carcinoma, because of the cohesiveness and nesting properties of the malignant cells, together with the presence of lymph node metastases.
  • The proliferative activity of the malignant cells, highlighted by Ki-67 antibody, clone MIB 1 was high (30% of malignant cells were positive at HPF).
  • The patient was discharged with adjuvant therapy indication: radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • The tumor locally recurred 12 months afterwards, but the patient is still alive 22 months after surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemangiosarcoma / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnostic Errors. Epithelioid Cells / metabolism. Epithelioid Cells / pathology. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Thoracic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Thoracic Neoplasms / metabolism. Thoracic Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 21103644.001).
  • [ISSN] 1220-0522
  • [Journal-full-title] Romanian journal of morphology and embryology = Revue roumaine de morphologie et embryologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rom J Morphol Embryol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Romania
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3. Hamm CA, Stevens JW, Xie H, Vanin EF, Morcuende JA, Abdulkawy H, Seftor EA, Sredni ST, Bischof JM, Wang D, Malchenko S, Bonaldo Mde F, Casavant TL, Hendrix MJ, Soares MB: Microenvironment alters epigenetic and gene expression profiles in Swarm rat chondrosarcoma tumors. BMC Cancer; 2010;10:471
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  • BACKGROUND: Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage tumors that do not respond to traditional chemotherapy or radiation.
  • Previous studies with this model revealed that tumor microenvironment could significantly influence chondrosarcoma malignancy.
  • Our analyses revealed that SRC tumors were hypomethylated compared to control tissue, and that tumors at each transplantation site had a unique expression profile.
  • CONCLUSION: This report describes the first global molecular characterization of the SRC model, and it demonstrates that the tumor microenvironment can induce epigenetic alterations and changes in gene expression in the SRC tumors.
  • We documented changes in gene expression that accompany changes in tumor phenotype, and these gene expression changes provide insight into the pathways that may play a role in the development and progression of chondrosarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Chondrosarcoma / genetics. Epigenesis, Genetic. Gene Expression Profiling. Lung Neoplasms / etiology. Tibia / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blotting, Western. Cartilage / metabolism. Cartilage / pathology. Connective Tissue Growth Factor / genetics. Connective Tissue Growth Factor / metabolism. DNA Methylation. Genes, fos / physiology. Humans. Injections, Subcutaneous. Male. Mice. Mice, Nude. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Phenotype. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Thymosin / genetics. Thymosin / metabolism. Tumor Cells, Cultured / transplantation

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  • (PMID = 20809981.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Ctgf protein, rat; 139568-91-5 / Connective Tissue Growth Factor; 61512-21-8 / Thymosin; 77591-33-4 / thymosin beta(4)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2944175
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4. Tejwani A, Kobayashi W, Chen YL, Rosenberg AE, Yoon S, Raskin KA, Rosenthal DI, Nielsen GP, Hornicek FJ, Delaney TF: Management of acral myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma. Cancer; 2010 Dec 15;116(24):5733-9
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  • BACKGROUND: Acral myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma (AMFS) is a rare, low-grade sarcoma that commonly affects the distal extremities.
  • From the published cases, therapy for AMFS to date has been comprised of excision or amputation, with limited use of radiotherapy (RT) or chemotherapy.
  • Treatment records and data from follow-up visits of patients were reviewed.
  • The average total dose was 56.4 Gray (Gy).
  • He was free of disease 23 months after his last treatment.
  • Of the 14 patients undergoing preoperative RT, complete pathologic necrosis or no tumor was noted in 1 of the patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Data were consistent with local control of distal extremity sarcomas with resection and RT, suggesting that limb-sparing surgery with this treatment combination is an appropriate option in the limb-sparing control of patients with AMFS, even those with positive surgical margins.
  • [MeSH-major] Extremities. Histiocytoma, Malignant Fibrous / radiotherapy. Histiocytoma, Malignant Fibrous / surgery. Sarcoma / radiotherapy. Sarcoma / surgery

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 20737559.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Wengerkievicz AC, Corá AP, de Almeida LP, Duarte NJ, Siqueira SA, Antonangelo L: Neoplastic ascites in osteosarcoma: a case report. Acta Cytol; 2010 Sep-Oct;54(5 Suppl):845-8
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  • BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor of connective tissue whose tumor cells produce bone tissue.
  • It can be classified as osteoblastic, chondroblastic, or fibroblastic, according to the predominant histologic type of cells.
  • We present a case of osteosarcoma with peritoneal dissemination that developed neoplastic ascites.
  • Computed tomography showed blastic lesions in the L3 vertebral body.
  • After only one session of chemotherapy, the patient presented a marked clinical worsening with extensive metastatic dissemination and occurrence of voluminous ascites.
  • The cytologic examination of the ascitic fluid demonstrated frequent poorly differentiated tumor cells.
  • The patient died a little more than 2 months after the diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Ascites / pathology. Osteosarcoma / pathology. Spinal Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 21053553.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-5547
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta cytologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Cytol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Naka T, Sugamura K, Hylander BL, Widmer MB, Rustum YM, Repasky EA: Effects of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic agents on patients' colon tumors grown in SCID mice. Cancer Res; 2002 Oct 15;62(20):5800-6
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  • [Title] Effects of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic agents on patients' colon tumors grown in SCID mice.
  • Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been reported to induce apoptosis in a variety of malignant cell lines, but it shows little or no toxicity in most normal cells.
  • We examined the response of three human colon tumors to TRAIL alone and in combination with chemotherapy, using SCID mice engrafted with intact patient surgical specimens.
  • These tumors, taken from fresh surgical specimens, contained the heterogeneous tumor cell population characteristic of patient tumors and showed differential sensitivity to TRAIL alone.
  • We also investigated the effect of TRAIL in combination with chemotherapy, using one tumor that showed moderate sensitivity to TRAIL alone.
  • Combining TRAIL with either 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or CPT-11 (irinotecan hydrochloride) produced a greatly enhanced antitumor effect over that of either agent alone, with 50% of the animals achieving complete tumor regression with a combination of TRAIL and CPT-11.
  • By histological analysis, tumors treated with TRAIL plus either 5-FU or CPT-11 were seen to consist mainly of connective tissue and fibrotic areas with only a few scattered tumor cells encapsulated in the connective tissue.
  • Several markers were assessed to investigate the basis for the observed therapeutic effect, and significant induction of apoptosis was observed in tumors treated with curative combinations.
  • Cytoplasmic and cell surface expression of the TRAIL receptors DR4 and DR5 was observed in this patient's tumor by immunohistochemistry.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Membrane Glycoproteins / pharmacology. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins. Drug Synergism. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Mice. Mice, SCID. Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / biosynthesis. TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 12384541.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA 16056
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; 0 / TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / TNFRSF10A protein, human; 0 / TNFRSF10B protein, human; 0 / TNFSF10 protein, human; 0 / Tnfrsf10b protein, mouse; 0 / Tnfsf10 protein, mouse; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 7673326042 / irinotecan; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
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7. Susa M, Choy E, Liu X, Schwab J, Hornicek FJ, Mankin H, Duan Z: Cyclin G-associated kinase is necessary for osteosarcoma cell proliferation and receptor trafficking. Mol Cancer Ther; 2010 Dec;9(12):3342-50
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  • Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumor among the children.
  • The advent of neoadjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved the prognosis of patients with osteosarcoma in the 1980s, but it has since plateaued in the past decades.
  • Recently, one of the most researched areas in sarcoma treatment is tyrosine kinases.
  • The level of GAK expression and its correlation to prognosis was analyzed in osteosarcoma tissue microarray.
  • We observed that GAK was overexpressed in both osteosarcoma cell lines and tissue samples when compared with human osteoblasts.
  • GAK knockdown by siRNA decreased cell proliferation in both drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant osteosarcoma cell lines.
  • Immunohistochemistry of osteosarcoma tissue microarray revealed that overexpression of GAK was associated with poor prognosis.
  • These findings may lead to the development of new therapeutic options for osteosarcoma.
  • [MeSH-minor] Blotting, Western. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation. Cell Survival. Gene Knockdown Techniques. Humans. Lentivirus / genetics. Protein Transport. RNA, Small Interfering / metabolism. Reproducibility of Results. Survival Analysis

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  • [Copyright] ©2010 AACR.
  • (PMID = 20881269.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-8514
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA119617
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 0 / Receptors, Cell Surface; EC 2.7.11.1 / GAK protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
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8. Hohenberger P, Wysocki WM: Neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced soft tissue sarcoma of the limbs: which treatment to choose? Oncologist; 2008 Feb;13(2):175-86
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  • [Title] Neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced soft tissue sarcoma of the limbs: which treatment to choose?
  • Soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) form a heterogeneous group of malignant neoplasms arising in the mesenchymal connective tissues.
  • Initially, treatment of STS relied solely on excision.
  • In the 1970s, Enneking et al. developed the concept of compartmental resection to reduce the local failure rate.
  • Later, Rosenberg et al. demonstrated, in a randomized study, that there was no difference in local tumor control and disease-free survival (DFS) in patients treated with amputation versus limb-saving surgery followed by 50-70 Gy external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT).
  • These patients are threatened with amputation for complete tumor removal.
  • High-dose preoperative EBRT for high-grade STS was developed, and its combination with intra-arterial or i.v. chemotherapy was reported to be effective.
  • Recently, systemic chemotherapy combined with deep wave hyperthermia was shown to result in a longer DFS time in a large, randomized, phase III study.
  • Treatment concepts differ significantly among centers and are influenced more by availability of technical equipment than by data.
  • [MeSH-major] Extremities / pathology. Limb Salvage. Neoadjuvant Therapy / methods. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion / methods. Fever. Humans. Mesoderm / pathology. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Recombinant Proteins. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 18305063.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-7159
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
  • [Number-of-references] 83
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9. Mankin HJ, Casas-Ganem J, Kim JI, Gebhardt MC, Hornicek FJ, Zeegen EN: Leiomyosarcoma of somatic soft tissues. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2004 Apr;(421):225-31
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  • [Title] Leiomyosarcoma of somatic soft tissues.
  • Leiomyosarcoma is a rare, aggressively malignant connective tissue tumor of mature adults, which arises from smooth muscle.
  • It occurs most frequently in the uterus, bowel, vascular tissues, and less commonly in somatic soft tissue or bone.
  • The tumor when it arises in soft tissue has distinctive histologic features which somewhat resemble malignant fibrous histiocytoma (otherwise known as myxofibrosarcoma).
  • Factors that increase the death rate include size of the tumor, Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Stage of disease, and to a lesser extent particularly in the lower extremities, anatomic site.
  • Radiation and chemotherapy had little direct effect on the outcome but patients treated with surgery and adjunctive agents seemed to live longer than their cohorts treated with surgery alone.
  • [MeSH-major] Leiomyosarcoma / mortality. Leiomyosarcoma / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / mortality. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 15123952.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. Taeger G, Ruchholtz S, Schütte J, Nast-Kolb D: [Diagnostics and treatment strategies for soft tissue sarcomas]. Unfallchirurg; 2004 Jul;107(7):601-15; quiz 616-7
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  • [Title] [Diagnostics and treatment strategies for soft tissue sarcomas].
  • Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) represent a rare entity of all malignant tumors (1%).
  • Thus, an in-depth understanding of multidisciplinary treatment strategies may not be sufficiently present at all operative units.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the procedure of choice in diagnosing STS.
  • Management of STS should employ multimodal treatment concepts (Oncology, Radiotherapy, Surgical Oncology).
  • The decision on whether radiotherapy, chemotherapy or another option is indicated should be taken by an interdisciplinary tumor board, which also determines the sequence of treatment in relation to resection.
  • To obtain sufficient information from histopathologic examination of the resected tumor, a clear and distinct definition of critical margins and topography by the surgeon is essential.
  • Following these concepts, optimal local tumor control associated with resections preserving function and limbs is achieved without impairment of overall prognosis.
  • Tumor resection alone, without previous evaluation and where appropriate adopting multimodal treatment strategies, no longer meets modern standards.
  • After primary treatment is complete, patients have to be enrolled in a standardized follow-up program.
  • [MeSH-major] Extremities / surgery. Sarcoma / surgery. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Connective Tissue / pathology. Diagnostic Imaging. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Patient Care Team. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant

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  • (PMID = 15252710.001).
  • [ISSN] 0177-5537
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Unfallchirurg
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Unfallchirurg
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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11. Sanders KW, Fowler MR, Milner J, Stucker FJ, Nathan CO: Aggressive fibromatosis of the parapharyngeal space: two cases and treatment recommendations. Ear Nose Throat J; 2004 Apr;83(4):262, 264, 266 passim
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  • [Title] Aggressive fibromatosis of the parapharyngeal space: two cases and treatment recommendations.
  • Aggressive fibromatosis is an uncommon tumor that is locally aggressive but not malignant.
  • Therefore, its classification falls between the benign and malignant neoplasms of soft-tissue origin.
  • The treatment of choice is wide surgical excision, which is often difficult.
  • Nonsurgical treatment includes radiation and chemotherapy, both of which are usually reserved for recurrences.
  • We describe two cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the parapharyngeal space, and we review the available treatment options.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibromatosis, Aggressive / diagnosis. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / therapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Pharynx / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Connective Tissue / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male. Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures. Recurrence


12. Onder AM, Teomete U, Argani P, Toledano S, Zilleruelo G, Rodriguez MM: PRCC-TFE3 renal cell carcinoma in a boy with a history of contralateral mesoblastic nephroma. Pediatr Nephrol; 2006 Oct;21(10):1471-5
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  • However, most of the studies published to date emphasize the association between Wilms tumor and the WT-1 gene.
  • A limited biopsy revealed densely hyalinized connective tissue that was initially interpreted to be a hyalinized contralateral mesoblastic nephroma.
  • The child received chemotherapy, but the mass continued to grow.
  • The tumor showed nuclear labeling for TFE3 protein by immunohistochemistry, supporting the above diagnosis.
  • He has been on hemodialysis, is tumor free, and has not been receiving chemotherapy for 24 months.
  • This is the first report of a RCC as a second malignant neoplasm in a child treated for a congenital mesoblastic nephroma.
  • [MeSH-major] Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors / genetics. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Cell Cycle Proteins / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Neoplasm Proteins / genetics. Neoplasms, Second Primary / genetics. Nephroma, Mesoblastic / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16807766.001).
  • [ISSN] 0931-041X
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, Germany)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Nephrol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors; 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / PRCC protein, human; 0 / TFE3 protein, human
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13. Mankin HJ, Gunnoe J, Farid Y, Hornicek FJ, Gebhardt MC: Long-term effects of connective tissue cancer treatment. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2004 Sep;(426):74-86
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term effects of connective tissue cancer treatment.
  • In 1999, we began a study to assess the long-term effect of connective tissue cancer treatment on clinical, social, and psychologic aspects of the lives of surviving patients.
  • A specially designed computer program generated an 85-item questionnaire, which was sent to more than 2000 patients with malignant bone and soft tissue neoplasms.
  • Although there are many possible uses for these data, we chose to do a study comparing the lifestyle and physical and sociologic problems for 144 patients treated with chemotherapy and surgery for high-grade osteosarcoma against a control population consisting of 61 patients treated surgically for benign giant cell tumors of bone.
  • The data show a remarkable degree of compensation on the part of the patients with the malignant tumors in terms of some problems but some significant differences particularly in physical status and functional limitations.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / therapy. Osteosarcoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Activities of Daily Living. Adolescent. Adult. Analgesics / therapeutic use. Body Weight. Disability Evaluation. Employment. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Health Status. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Quality of Life

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  • (PMID = 15346055.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics
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14. Guerrero MA, Ballard BR, Grau AM: Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: review of the literature and case report of stromal overgrowth. Surg Oncol; 2003 Jul;12(1):27-37
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  • [Title] Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: review of the literature and case report of stromal overgrowth.
  • The term "sarcoma" was initially used because of its fleshy appearance, a more modern term is Phyllodes tumor (PT).
  • The behavior of PT constitutes a spectrum from benign and locally recurrent to malignant and metastatic.
  • In a general surgical series, 6.2% of the tumors were malignant.
  • The microscopic appearance of PT is that of epithelial elements and connective tissue stroma.
  • The metastatic spread of malignant PT is mainly hematogenous to lung, with infrequent lymphatic involvement.
  • Wide local excision with 2 cm margins is the treatment of choice.
  • In 20% of both benign and malignant cases, PT will locally recur.
  • There is no proven benefit of radiation or chemotherapy, although radiotherapy may be useful in selected cases.
  • We present a case of a sarcomatous overgrowth in a malignant phyllodes tumor involving multiple histologic types.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Phyllodes Tumor / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12689668.001).
  • [ISSN] 0960-7404
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Number-of-references] 56
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15. Confavreux C, Lurkin A, Mitton N, Blondet R, Saba C, Ranchère D, Sunyach MP, Thiesse P, Biron P, Blay JY, Ray-Coquard I: Sarcomas and malignant phyllodes tumours of the breast--a retrospective study. Eur J Cancer; 2006 Nov;42(16):2715-21
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  • [Title] Sarcomas and malignant phyllodes tumours of the breast--a retrospective study.
  • BACKGROUND: Although most breast cancers are adenocarcinomas of the mammary gland, primary breast sarcomas may also arise from mammary gland mesenchymal tissue.
  • Phyllodes tumours represent a specific subset of these breast soft tissue tumours.
  • They are composed of a connective tissue stroma and epithelial elements.
  • Pathological presentation ranges from grade I to malignant phyllodes tumours (grade III) where the stromal component clearly exhibits a sarcoma pattern.
  • No survival difference was found between malignant phyllodes (grade III) and other primary breast sarcomas (angiosarcomas excluded).
  • The first goal of treatment is to achieve negative margins (R0).
  • We propose to treat the patients according to the clinical practice guidelines in use for soft tissue sarcomas and address them to a reference centre for sarcoma.
  • Treating rare tumours in the same place should permit us to standardise pathological data and to include patients into multicentric radiotherapy or chemotherapy protocols to improve overall survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms. Phyllodes Tumor. Sarcoma
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 17023158.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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16. Dim DC, Cooley LD, Miranda RN: Clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses: a review. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2007 Jan;131(1):152-6
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  • Clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses, also referred to as malignant melanoma of soft parts, is a rare malignancy derived from neural crest cells.
  • It usually presents in the distal lower extremities of young adults, frequently attached to tendons or aponeuroses.
  • It behaves like a high-grade soft tissue sarcoma and is associated with poor overall survival.
  • Grossly, the tumor is usually circumscribed with a histologic pattern of uniform polygonal to fusiform cells with clear to pale eosinophilic cytoplasm divided into variably sized clusters by fibrous septa.
  • Poor prognostic indicators include a tumor size equal to or more than 5 cm, presence of metastasis, and necrosis.
  • The mainstay of treatment is wide excision of the tumor.
  • The use of sentinel lymph node biopsy may become an important procedure in detecting occult regional metastasis and guiding the extent of surgery.
  • The beneficial effects of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy have not been fully evaluated.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Connective Tissue. Sarcoma, Clear Cell
  • [MeSH-minor] Activating Transcription Factor 1. Antigens, Neoplasm. Calmodulin-Binding Proteins / genetics. DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Melanoma-Specific Antigens. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism. Nuclear Proteins / genetics. Prognosis. RNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. S100 Proteins / metabolism. Tendons / pathology. Transcription Factors. Translocation, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 17227118.001).
  • [ISSN] 1543-2165
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ATF1 protein, human; 0 / Activating Transcription Factor 1; 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Calmodulin-Binding Proteins; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / EWSR1 protein, human; 0 / Melanoma-Specific Antigens; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / RNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / S100 Proteins; 0 / Transcription Factors; 0 / regulatory factor X transcription factors
  • [Number-of-references] 31
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17. Lasalvia-Prisco E, Cucchi S, Vázquez J, Lasalvia-Galante E, Golomar W, Gordon W: Antitumoral effect of a vaccination procedure with an autologous hemoderivative. Cancer Biol Ther; 2003 Mar-Apr;2(2):155-60
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  • [Title] Antitumoral effect of a vaccination procedure with an autologous hemoderivative.
  • This paper describes the development of a procedure previously reported by us that is used to obtain an autologous hemoderivative with antitumoral properties.
  • The procedure has been tested in a phase I-II, randomized, controlled clinical trial of 28 cancer patients with different primary malignancies in metastatic and chemotherapy-resistant stages.
  • The histology of the lesions that responded to this treatment was consistent with the characteristic histology observed in malignant lesions treated with a similar antitumoral hemoderivative: proliferation of stromal connective tissue, T-lymphocyte infiltration, and a reduction in the amount of tumor cells and blood vessels.
  • We concluded that vaccination had elicited an immune response because a delayed-type hypersensitivity test made with the autologous hemoderivative produced a significantly more intense response in the responding treated patients.
  • We propose that an immune mechanism acting on tumor cells and/or the regulatory system for stromal growth explains the histological results observed.
  • The use of blood to obtain the immunogen allows vaccination to be repeated, so this method could avoid tumor escape responses due to mutations in the antigen library of the tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, Neoplasm / immunology. Autoantigens / immunology. Cancer Vaccines / immunology. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / genetics. Neoplasms / therapy. Stromal Cells / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Humans. Hypersensitivity, Delayed / etiology. Immunotherapy. Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating / immunology. Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis / prevention & control. Neoplasm Metastasis / therapy. Transplantation, Autologous. Vaccination / methods

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  • [CommentIn] Cancer Biol Ther. 2003 Mar-Apr;2(2):161-3 [12750555.001]
  • (PMID = 12750554.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-4047
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer biology & therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Biol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Autoantigens; 0 / Cancer Vaccines; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
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18. Dobra K, Hjerpe A: Targeted therapy--possible new therapeutic option for malignant mesothelioma? Connect Tissue Res; 2008;49(3):270-2
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  • [Title] Targeted therapy--possible new therapeutic option for malignant mesothelioma?
  • Malignant Mesothelioma presents with a characteristic heterogeneous growth pattern.
  • Response to treatment is often only partial, which may be related to tumor cell heterogeneity.
  • Characterization of these differences has made it possible to identify novel drug targets which are effective for both phenotypes.
  • [MeSH-minor] Boronic Acids / metabolism. Boronic Acids / pharmacology. Boronic Acids / therapeutic use. Bortezomib. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Humans. Oligosaccharides / metabolism. Oligosaccharides / pharmacology. Oligosaccharides / therapeutic use. Pyrazines / metabolism. Pyrazines / pharmacology. Pyrazines / therapeutic use. Sodium Selenite / metabolism. Sodium Selenite / pharmacology. Sodium Selenite / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 18661358.001).
  • [ISSN] 1607-8438
  • [Journal-full-title] Connective tissue research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Connect. Tissue Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Oligosaccharides; 0 / Proteoglycans; 0 / Pyrazines; 52500-60-4 / Thioredoxins; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib; EC 3.4.25.1 / Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex; HIW548RQ3W / Sodium Selenite
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19. Demetri GD: Identification and treatment of chemoresistant inoperable or metastatic GIST: experience with the selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (STI571). Eur J Cancer; 2002 Sep;38 Suppl 5:S52-9
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  • [Title] Identification and treatment of chemoresistant inoperable or metastatic GIST: experience with the selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (STI571).
  • Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract.
  • The concept of GIST and the definition of GIST pathology have evolved greatly over the past 5 years.
  • Historically, malignant GIST has been highly refractory to conventional cytotoxic therapy.
  • Signal transduction inhibition as cancer therapy was first tested successfully with imatinib mesylate (formerly known as STI571), a selective small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, with the initial target being blockade of Bcr-Abl, the oncogene with tyrosine kinase activity responsible for the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).
  • The first GIST patient to receive imatinib exhibited dramatic benefit despite far-advanced metastatic disease that was previously refractory to all chemotherapy.
  • The results from these studies have established imatinib as an effective new therapeutic alternative for the majority of patients with advanced GIST, a solid tumor for which no prior chemotherapy has ever shown antitumor efficacy.
  • This work provides proof of concept to the hypothesis that selective inhibition of aberrant signal transduction can provide important anticancer activity, if the proper signaling pathways are identified and blocked.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Connective Tissue / drug therapy. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Stromal Cells
  • [MeSH-minor] Benzamides. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Neoplasm Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases. Tomography, Emission-Computed

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  • (PMID = 12528773.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
  • [Number-of-references] 28
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20. Dehn H, Høgdall EV, Johansen JS, Jørgensen M, Price PA, Engelholm SA, Høgdall CK: Plasma YKL-40, as a prognostic tumor marker in recurrent ovarian cancer. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand; 2003 Mar;82(3):287-93
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  • [Title] Plasma YKL-40, as a prognostic tumor marker in recurrent ovarian cancer.
  • The function of YKL-40 in cancer diseases is unknown, but it is a growth factor of connective tissue cells and probably has a role in inflammation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix, a process also involved in metastatic malignant diseases.
  • METHODS: YKL-40 was determined by ELISA in plasma samples from 73 patients with relapse of ovarian cancer shortly before start of second-line chemotherapy.
  • > 130 micro g/L or > 160 micro g/L) at the time of relapse had significantly shorter survival than patients with normal levels (respectively p = 0.007 and p = 0.004).
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Glycoproteins / blood. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / blood. Ovarian Neoplasms / blood

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  • (PMID = 12694127.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6349
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adipokines; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CA-125 Antigen; 0 / CHI3L1 protein, human; 0 / Glycoproteins; 0 / Lectins
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21. BaniHani MN, Al Manasra AR: Spontaneous regression in alveolar soft part sarcoma: case report and literature review. World J Surg Oncol; 2009;7:53
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  • [Title] Spontaneous regression in alveolar soft part sarcoma: case report and literature review.
  • BACKGROUND: Sarcomas are a type of malignant tumors that arise from connective tissue.
  • They are most of the time found in extremities CASE PRESENTATION: We are presenting a case of adult male patient, who was found to have huge abdominal mass and multiple gastric and duodenal polyps.
  • Pathological diagnosis for all lesions was Alveolar soft part sarcoma.
  • No chemotherapy or radiotherapy was given.
  • CONCLUSION: ASPS is a rare type of sarcomas that affect primarily the lower limbs.
  • This tumor does rarely metastasize to the gastrointestinal tract.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Regression, Spontaneous. Sarcoma, Alveolar Soft Part / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 19515237.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-7819
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2703639
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22. Thompson CB, Shepard HM, O'Connor PM, Kadhim S, Jiang P, Osgood RJ, Bookbinder LH, Li X, Sugarman BJ, Connor RJ, Nadjsombati S, Frost GI: Enzymatic depletion of tumor hyaluronan induces antitumor responses in preclinical animal models. Mol Cancer Ther; 2010 Nov;9(11):3052-64
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  • [Title] Enzymatic depletion of tumor hyaluronan induces antitumor responses in preclinical animal models.
  • Megadalton complexes of HA with proteoglycans create a hydrated connective tissue matrix, which may play an important role in tumor stroma formation.
  • Through its colloid osmotic effects, HA complexes contribute to tumor interstitial fluid pressure, limiting the effect of therapeutic molecules on malignant cells.
  • The therapeutic potential of enzymatic remodeling of the tumor microenvironment through HA depletion was initially investigated using a recombinant human HA-degrading enzyme, rHuPH20, which removed HA-dependent tumor cell extracellular matrices in vitro.
  • However, rHuPH20 showed a short serum half-life (t(1/2) < 3 minutes), making depletion of tumor HA in vivo impractical.
  • Pegylation improved serum half-life (t(1/2) = 10.3 hours), making it feasible to probe the effects of sustained HA depletion on tumor physiology.
  • In high-HA prostate PC3 tumors, i.v. administration of PEGPH20 depleted tumor HA, decreased tumor interstitial fluid pressure by 84%, decreased water content by 7%, decompressed tumor vessels, and increased tumor vascular area >3-fold.
  • Following repeat PEGPH20 administration, tumor growth was significantly inhibited (tumor growth inhibition, 70%).
  • The ability of PEGPH20 to enhance chemotherapy efficacy is likely due to increased drug perfusion combined with other tumor structural changes.
  • These results support enzymatic remodeling of the tumor stroma with PEGPH20 to treat tumors characterized by the accumulation of HA.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cell Adhesion Molecules / metabolism. Cell Adhesion Molecules / pharmacology. Hyaluronic Acid / metabolism. Hyaluronoglucosaminidase / metabolism. Hyaluronoglucosaminidase / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. CHO Cells. Cricetinae. Cricetulus. Drug Synergism. Humans. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred ICR. Mice, Nude. Polyethylene Glycols / administration & dosage. Polyethylene Glycols / pharmacokinetics. Polyethylene Glycols / pharmacology. Rats. Recombinant Proteins / administration & dosage. Recombinant Proteins / metabolism. Recombinant Proteins / pharmacokinetics. Recombinant Proteins / pharmacology. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Up-Regulation / genetics. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • [Copyright] ©2010 AACR.
  • (PMID = 20978165.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-8514
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; 9004-61-9 / Hyaluronic Acid; EC 3.2.1.35 / Hyaluronoglucosaminidase; EC 3.2.1.35 / hyaluronidase PH-20
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23. Lemke AJ, Senfft von Pilsach MI, Lübbe A, Bergemann C, Riess H, Felix R: MRI after magnetic drug targeting in patients with advanced solid malignant tumors. Eur Radiol; 2004 Nov;14(11):1949-55
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  • [Title] MRI after magnetic drug targeting in patients with advanced solid malignant tumors.
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to detect magnetic particle uptake into advanced solid malignant tumors and to document the extension of these tumors, carried out in the context of magnetic drug targeting.
  • In a prospective phase I trial, 11 patients were examined with MRI before and after magnetic drug targeting.
  • The sequence protocol included T1-WI and T2-WI in several planes, followed by quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the signal intensities and tumor extensions.
  • In nine patients, a signal decrease was observed in the early follow-up (2-7 days after therapy) on the T2-weighted images; two patients did not show a signal change.
  • In late follow-up (4-6 weeks after therapy), signal within nine tumors reached their initially normal level on both T1-WI and T2-WI; two tumors showed a slight signal decrease on T2-WI and a slight signal increase on T1-WI.
  • Within the surveillance period, tumor remission in 3 out of 11 patients was observed, and in 5 patients tumor growth had stopped.
  • The remaining three patients showed significant tumor growth.
  • MRI is a suitable method to detect magnetite particles, deposited at the tumor site via magnetic drug targeting.
  • MRI is therefore eligible to control the success of MDT and to assess the tumor size after the end of therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Neoplasms, Connective and Soft Tissue / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Contrast Media / administration & dosage. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Epirubicin / therapeutic use. Female. Ferrosoferric Oxide. Humans. Iron. Magnetics. Male. Middle Aged. Oxides. Prospective Studies. Reproducibility of Results

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  • (PMID = 15300401.001).
  • [ISSN] 0938-7994
  • [Journal-full-title] European radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Contrast Media; 0 / Oxides; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; E1UOL152H7 / Iron; XM0M87F357 / Ferrosoferric Oxide
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24. Brassens S, Chevalier JM, Leblainvaux M: [A strange case of phlebitis]. Ann Cardiol Angeiol (Paris); 2003 Dec;52(6):375-8

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • This sarcoma developed from the smooth muscle of a leg vessel, probably a vein.
  • Leiomyosarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor of specialized connective tissue, with a strong potential for local proliferation and metastatic spread.
  • The diagnosis suggested by imaging techniques (in particular MRI) is first and foremost immunohistochemical.
  • The treatment is surgical when possible, associated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy as appropriate.
  • The prognosis is especially poor when the diagnosis is made at the metastatic stage.
  • [MeSH-major] Leiomyosarcoma / diagnosis. Popliteal Vein / pathology. Thrombophlebitis / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Knee / blood supply. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male

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  • (PMID = 14752921.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-3928
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales de cardiologie et d'angéiologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Cardiol Angeiol (Paris)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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25. Van den Abbeele AD, Badawi RD: Use of positron emission tomography in oncology and its potential role to assess response to imatinib mesylate therapy in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Eur J Cancer; 2002 Sep;38 Suppl 5:S60-5
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  • [Title] Use of positron emission tomography in oncology and its potential role to assess response to imatinib mesylate therapy in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs).
  • The reliability of established anatomical imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is compromised in following response to certain types of treatment if metabolic improvement occurs before morphologic change is apparent.
  • Thus, traditional imaging techniques cannot discriminate early tumor response because they are based on purely visual structural assessments.
  • Recently, the use of positron emission tomography (PET), most commonly employing the radiotracer 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), has been shown to improve the assessment of tumor behavior by highlighting early functional changes in tumor glucose metabolism that appear to correlate closely with metabolic tumor response to imatinib mesylate.
  • Like CT and MRI, PET can identify an abnormal mass; its improvement over these techniques lies in its ability to differentiate active tumor from necrosing tissue, malignant from benign tissue, and recurrent tumor from scar tissue.
  • Understanding and using this tool should improve our ability to accurately follow response in GIST patients treated with imatinib mesylate, and permit this new therapeutic approach to be used optimally with accurate follow-up assessments and informed therapeutic decision-making.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Neoplasms, Connective Tissue / radionuclide imaging. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Stromal Cells. Tomography, Emission-Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Benzamides. Drug Monitoring / methods. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Radiopharmaceuticals. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12528774.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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26. Siewert E, Tietze L, Maintz C, Geier A, Dietrich CG, Matern S, Gartung C: [Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a broad clinical spectrum from incidental -discovery to acute gastrointestinal bleeding]. Z Gastroenterol; 2004 Mar;42(3):233-42
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  • Clinically asymptomatic tumor growth also occurs as demonstrated by the second case of a 44-year-old -woman with an incidental finding of GIST during surgery of the esophagus.
  • The cases are used to discuss the consequences for therapy and prognosis resulting from the heterogeneity of this tumor entity; the relevant immunohistochemical markers used to distinguish between various tumor subtypes of gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors (GIMT) are listed.
  • The third case of a 40-year-old patient with a malignant GIST recurrence after surgery and exhibiting secondary resistance after one year of successful therapy with the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib (Gleevec), antagonizing pathogenetically relevant constitutive c-KIT activation, illustrates the potential and limitations of the only effective drug treatment for advanced GIST.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Pain / etiology. Cardia. Esophageal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage / etiology. Neoplasms, Connective Tissue / diagnosis. Stomach Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzamides. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Diagnosis, Differential. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Esophagectomy. Female. Gastrectomy. Gastric Mucosa / pathology. Gastroscopy. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Incidental Findings. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Polyps / diagnosis. Polyps / drug therapy. Polyps / pathology. Polyps / surgery. Prognosis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit / analysis. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Shock, Hemorrhagic / etiology. Stromal Cells / pathology. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome


27. Mikula M, Proell V, Fischer AN, Mikulits W: Activated hepatic stellate cells induce tumor progression of neoplastic hepatocytes in a TGF-beta dependent fashion. J Cell Physiol; 2006 Nov;209(2):560-7
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  • [Title] Activated hepatic stellate cells induce tumor progression of neoplastic hepatocytes in a TGF-beta dependent fashion.
  • The development of hepatocellular carcinomas from malignant hepatocytes is frequently associated with intra- and peritumoral accumulation of connective tissue arising from activated hepatic stellate cells.
  • By employing cellular transplantation we show that the interaction of neoplastic MIM-R hepatocytes with the tumor microenvironment, containing either activated hepatic stellate cells (M1-4HSCs) or myofibroblasts derived thereof (M-HTs), induces progression in malignancy.
  • Cotransplantation of MIM-R hepatocytes with M-HTs yielded strongest MIM-R generated tumor formation accompanied by nuclear localization of Smad2/3 as well as of beta-catenin.
  • Genetic interference with TGF-beta signaling by gain of antagonistic Smad7 in MIM-R hepatocytes diminished epithelial dedifferentiation and tumor progression upon interaction with M1-4HSCs or M-HTs.
  • These results indicate that intervention with TGF-beta signaling is highly promising in liver cancer therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Hepatocytes / drug effects. Hepatocytes / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / pathology. Transforming Growth Factor beta / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Adhesion / drug effects. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. Cell Transplantation. Disease Progression. Fibroblasts / drug effects. Fibrosis. Humans. Mice. Models, Biological. Paracrine Communication / drug effects. Rats. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Smad2 Protein / metabolism. Smad3 Protein / metabolism. Smad7 Protein / metabolism. beta Catenin / metabolism

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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  • (PMID = 16883581.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9541
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cellular physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cell. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Austria / Austrian Science Fund FWF / / F 2801; Austria / Austrian Science Fund FWF / / F 2806
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Smad2 Protein; 0 / Smad3 Protein; 0 / Smad7 Protein; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta; 0 / beta Catenin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2900580; NLM/ UKMS31283
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28. Adjei AA, Rowinsky EK: Novel anticancer agents in clinical development. Cancer Biol Ther; 2003 Jul-Aug;2(4 Suppl 1):S5-15
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • There are currently more than 100 agents officially approved for the treatment of cancer world-wide.
  • Most therapeutic agents have been developed empirically by testing large numbers of chemicals on rapidly growing transplantable rodent tumors, and more recently, human tumor xenografts.
  • This approach has predominantly identified DNA-active drugs, which have limited efficacy and considerable toxicity.
  • In recent years, advances in the understanding of molecular genetics and tumor biology have elucidated the molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of cancers and resulted in the discovery of a variety of novel molecular targets for therapeutic intervention.
  • These targets can be conceptualized as supportive vessels, connective tissues, and signaling elements.
  • Agents directed against these targets are those that interfere with signal transduction pathways, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis (signals), malignant angiogenesis (vessels) and the tumor stroma (connective tissue).
  • As anti-cancer therapeutics with distinct targeting capabilities against malignant cells become available for clinical evaluations, prioritization of these therapies for efficient allotment of clinical trial resources, identification of patients whose malignancies most likely express the molecular constituents resembling the true target, and derivation of relevant endpoints for both screening and assessment of clinical relevance will be critical to their ultimate development and success.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Drug Design. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protein Kinases
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis. DNA / metabolism. Disease Progression. Endothelial Cells / metabolism. Humans. Neoplasm Transplantation. Neovascularization, Pathologic. Oligonucleotides, Antisense / pharmacology. Protein Kinase C / metabolism. Protein Kinase Inhibitors. Protein Structure, Tertiary. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism. Signal Transduction. TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases. ras Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 14508076.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-4047
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer biology & therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Biol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Oligonucleotides, Antisense; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 9007-49-2 / DNA; EC 2.7.- / Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.1.1 / MTOR protein, human; EC 2.7.1.1 / TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 2.7.11.13 / Protein Kinase C; EC 3.6.5.2 / ras Proteins
  • [Number-of-references] 156
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29. Siddiqi S, Mills J, Matushansky I: Epigenetic remodeling of chromatin architecture: exploring tumor differentiation therapies in mesenchymal stem cells and sarcomas. Curr Stem Cell Res Ther; 2010 Mar;5(1):63-73
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  • [Title] Epigenetic remodeling of chromatin architecture: exploring tumor differentiation therapies in mesenchymal stem cells and sarcomas.
  • Sarcomas are the mesenchymal-derived malignant tumors of connective tissues (e.g., fat, bone, and cartilage) presumed to arise from aberrant development or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs).
  • Appropriate control of stem cell maintenance versus differentiation allows for normal connective tissue development.
  • This review will focus on the importance of epigenetic chromatin remodeling in the context of mesenchymal stem cells, sarcoma tumorigenesis and differentiation therapy.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Soft Tissue Sarcoma.
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  • (PMID = 19807660.001).
  • [ISSN] 2212-3946
  • [Journal-full-title] Current stem cell research & therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Stem Cell Res Ther
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K08 CA132986; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K08 CA132986-01A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1K08 CA132968-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United Arab Emirates
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors; 5688UTC01R / Tretinoin
  • [Number-of-references] 153
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS173280; NLM/ PMC2842459
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30. Zhuge Y, Liu ZJ, Velazquez OC: Adult stem cel diferentiation and trafficking and their implications in disease. Adv Exp Med Biol; 2010;695:169-83
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Stem Cells.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Stem cells are unspecialized precursor cells that mainly reside in the bone marrow and have important roles in the establishment of embryonic tissue.
  • They also have critical functions during adulthood, where they replenish short-lived mature effector cells and regeneration of injured tissue.
  • In order to maintain a pool of stem cells that support the production of blood cells, stromal elements and connective tissue, stem cells must be able to constantly replenish their own number.
  • Some similar trafficking mechanisms are shared by leukocytes, adult and fetal stem cells, as well as cancer stem cells.(1,2) Achieving proper trafficking of stem cells will allow increased efficiency of targeted cell therapy and drug delivery.(2) In addition, understanding similarities and differences in homing and migration of malignant cancer stem cells will also clarify molecular events of tumor progression and metastasis.(2) This chapter focuses on the differentiation, trafficking and homing of the major types of adult bone marrow stem cells: hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and the term"stem cell" will refer to "adult stem cells" unless otherwise specified.

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  • (PMID = 21222206.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-2598
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in experimental medicine and biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Chvapil M, Kielar F, Liska F, Silhankova A, Brendel K: Synthesis and evaluation of long-acting D-penicillamine derivatives. Connect Tissue Res; 2005;46(4-5):242-50
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. (D)-PENICILLAMINE .

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  • This study extends the use of two lathyrogens, ss-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) and D-penicillamine (DPA) from daily systemic or local-topical administration to long-time acting agents.
  • This was achieved by converting the hydrophilic drugs into lipophilic derivatives.
  • During neutralization in vitro or in vivo by tissue fluid, an oily substance is formed that elutes from a hydrogel polymer at a much slower rate than hydroplilic DPA itself.
  • Both agents injected into the breast adenocarcinoma in Fisher rats significantly inhibited tumor growth without any signs of local or systemic toxicity.
  • We conclude that these lipophilic lathyrogens with prolonged effectiveness are suitable in the treatment of pathologies, consisting of excessively cross-linked or deposited collagen (fibrotic adhesions, strictures, stenosis, and scar contractures) and in the treatment of single, solitary tumors, malignant and benign.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminopropionitrile / analysis. Aminopropionitrile / chemical synthesis. Cicatrix, Hypertrophic / drug therapy. Connective Tissue Diseases / drug therapy. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Penicillamine / analogs & derivatives. Penicillamine / chemical synthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Alcohols / chemistry. Animals. Collagen / drug effects. Collagen / metabolism. Constriction, Pathologic / drug therapy. Constriction, Pathologic / metabolism. Constriction, Pathologic / physiopathology. Esterification. Female. Hexanols / chemistry. Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental / drug therapy. Molecular Structure. Rats. Rats, Inbred F344. Tissue Adhesions / drug therapy. Tissue Adhesions / metabolism. Tissue Adhesions / physiopathology. Treatment Outcome. Urethral Stricture / drug therapy. Urethral Stricture / metabolism. Urethral Stricture / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 16546828.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8207
  • [Journal-full-title] Connective tissue research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Connect. Tissue Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Alcohols; 0 / Hexanols; 151-18-8 / Aminopropionitrile; 9007-34-5 / Collagen; GNN1DV99GX / Penicillamine
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32. Tsuruta D, Kobayashi H, Imanishi H, Sugawara K, Ishii M, Jones JC: Laminin-332-integrin interaction: a target for cancer therapy? Curr Med Chem; 2008;15(20):1968-75
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  • [Title] Laminin-332-integrin interaction: a target for cancer therapy?
  • For many years, extracellular matrix (ECM) was considered to function as a tissue support and filler.
  • We focus in this review on a laminin isoform, laminin-332 (formerly termed laminin-5), a major component of the basement membrane (BM) of skin and other epithelial tissues.
  • Mutations in either laminin-332 or integrin alpha6beta4 result in junctional epidermolysis bullosa, a blistering skin disease, while targeting of laminin-332 by autoantibodies in cicatricial pemphigoid leads to dysadhesion of epithelial cells from their underlying connective tissue.
  • Abnormal expression of laminin-332 and its integrin receptors is also a hallmark of certain tumor types and is believed to promote invasion of colon, breast and skin cancer cells.
  • Moreover, there is emerging evidence that laminin-332 and its protease degradation products are not only found at the leading front of several tumors but also likely induce and/or promote tumor cell migration.
  • Finally, we discuss strategies for the development of laminin-332-based antagonists for the treatment of malignant tumors.

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  • (PMID = 18691052.001).
  • [ISSN] 0929-8673
  • [Journal-full-title] Current medicinal chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Med. Chem.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR054184-18; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR054184; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR054184-20; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR054184-18
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / Integrins; 0 / kalinin; EC 2.7.- / Protein Kinases; EC 3.4.- / Metalloproteases
  • [Number-of-references] 133
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS251751; NLM/ PMC2992754
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33. Livant DL: Targeting invasion induction as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. Curr Cancer Drug Targets; 2005 Nov;5(7):489-503
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeting invasion induction as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer.
  • The spread of cancer cells from the primary tumor to a distant site involves many of the invasive processes normally required for wound healing, including migration through the local connective tissue, invasion of the vasculature, extravasation, invasion of the connective tissue at a distant site, and angiogenesis.
  • Thus, the abilities of tumor cells to invade the host, and to induce endothelial cell invasion and neovascularization, are central to malignant progression.
  • The plasminogen activator system, which plays a direct role in stimulating alpha5beta1 integrin fibronectin receptor-mediated invasion during wound healing, is also very important in tumor cell invasion and metastasis, as well as in angiogenesis.
  • Therefore, the alpha5beta1 receptor and the plasminogen activator system may be promising targets for directed anticancer therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Therapy / methods. Neoplasm Invasiveness / prevention & control. Neoplasm Metastasis / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 16305346.001).
  • [ISSN] 1568-0096
  • [Journal-full-title] Current cancer drug targets
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Cancer Drug Targets
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Integrin alpha5beta1; EC 3.4.21.- / Plasminogen Activators
  • [Number-of-references] 249
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