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1. Qiu W, Tong GX, Manolidis S, Close LG, Assaad AM, Su GH: Novel mutant-enriched sequencing identified high frequency of PIK3CA mutations in pharyngeal cancer. Int J Cancer; 2008 Mar 1;122(5):1189-94
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  • [Title] Novel mutant-enriched sequencing identified high frequency of PIK3CA mutations in pharyngeal cancer.
  • We previously reported 4 PIK3CA mutations in 38 head and neck cancer samples, 3 of which were identified in 6 pharyngeal cancer samples.
  • To determine the mutation frequency of PIK3CA in pharyngeal cancer, we studied 24 additional cases of pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in this study.
  • Using both direct genomic DNA sequencing and novel mutant-enriched sequencing methods developed specifically for the 3 hot-spot mutations (H1047R, E545K and E452K) of PIK3CA, we detected 5 mutations of PIK3CA in the 24 pharyngeal cancers (20.8%).
  • We showed that the mutant-enriched sequencing method for the H1047R hot-spot mutation can identify the mutation in a mixed population of mutant and wild-type DNA sequences at 1:360 ratios.
  • These novel mutant-enriched sequencing methods allow the detection of the PIK3CA hot-spot mutations in clinical specimens which often contain limited tumor tissues (i.e., biopsy specimens).
  • The data further support that oncogenic PIK3CA may play a critical role in pharyngeal carcinogenesis, and the mutant-enriched sequencing methods for PIK3CA are sensitive and reliable ways to detect PIK3CA mutations in clinical samples.
  • Because PIK3CA and its pathway are potential targets for chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and frequent somatic mutation of PIK3CA has been identified in many human cancer types (e.g., breast cancer, colorectal cancer), the abilities to detect PIK3CA mutations with enhanced sensitivities have great potential impacts on target therapies for many cancer types.

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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  • (PMID = 17990317.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0215
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA095434-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109525-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K01 CA095434-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA095434-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA109525-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA109525-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109525; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109525-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K01 CA095434; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA095434; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K01 CA095434-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA Primers; EC 2.7.1.- / Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; EC 2.7.1.137 / PIK3CA protein, human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS150987; NLM/ PMC2792983
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2. Chung MK, Jeong HS, Park SG, Jang JY, Son YI, Choi JY, Hyun SH, Park K, Ahn MJ, Ahn YC, Kim HJ, Ko YH, Baek CH: Metabolic tumor volume of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography predicts short-term outcome to radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in pharyngeal cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 2009 Sep 15;15(18):5861-8
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  • [Title] Metabolic tumor volume of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography predicts short-term outcome to radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in pharyngeal cancer.
  • PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate whether metabolic tumor volume (MTV) measured from [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) predicts short-term outcome to radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy and disease-free survival (DFS) in patients with pharyngeal cancers.
  • Short-term outcome was assessed using the treatment response evaluation by the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and recurrence events during follow-up (complete response/no recurrence or residual disease/recurrence).
  • A cutoff of 40 mL for the MTV was the best discriminative value for predicting treatment response.
  • By univariate analyses, patients with MTV > 40 mL showed a significantly lower number of complete response/no recurrence than did patients with MTV < or =40 mL [68.2% versus 87.8%; hazard ratio (HR), 3.34; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.09-10.08; P = 0.03], as is the same in tumor-node-metastasis stage (87.5% for I-II versus 90% for III versus 63.8% for IV; P = 0.02).
  • The standardized uptake value for the primary tumor did not show any correlation with treatment outcome or DFS.
  • CONCLUSION: MTV has a potential value in predicting short-term outcome and DFS in patients with pharyngeal cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Positron-Emission Tomography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Predictive Value of Tests. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Burden. Young Adult

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  • [CommentIn] Clin Cancer Res. 2010 Mar 15;16(6):1968; author reply 1968-9 [20215538.001]
  • (PMID = 19737951.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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3. Ogino I, Tsukuda M, Inoue T, Mikami Y, Itazawa T, Matsuda H, Koike I, Horiuchi C, Omura M, Taguchi T: Prognostic value of retropharyngeal node involvement in CT-based lymph node-positive pharyngeal cancer following radiotherapy. Anticancer Res; 2007 May-Jun;27(3B):1663-8
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  • [Title] Prognostic value of retropharyngeal node involvement in CT-based lymph node-positive pharyngeal cancer following radiotherapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 175 CT-based lymph node-positive patients with carcinoma of the head and neck were managed with definitive radiation therapy.
  • RPN involvement was identified only in pharyngeal cancer.
  • Fifty-two patients received induction chemotherapy and 58 received concurrent chemoradiotherapy.
  • Concurrent chemotherapy and RPN involvement significantly affected DFS on multivariate analysis in all pharyngeal cancer patients and non-nasopharyngeal cancer (NNP) patients.
  • RPN involvement, level IV involvement and concurrent chemotherapy also significantly affected locoregional control.
  • CONCLUSION: Our study confirmed a poor outcome was associated with RPN involvement in patients with CT-based node-positive pharyngeal cancer and NNP patients definitively treated by radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymph Nodes / radiography. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiography. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 17595793.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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4. Basić-Jukić N, Bubić-Filipi L, Prgomet D, Djanić Hadzibegović A, Bilić M, Kovac L, Kastelan Z, Pasini J, Mokos I, Basić-Koretić M, Kes P: Head and neck malignancies in Croatian renal transplant recipients. Bosn J Basic Med Sci; 2010 Apr;10 Suppl 1:S37-9
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  • Renal transplantation is associated with increased incidence of cancer.
  • We reviewed a large series of renal transplant recipients to determine the incidence and outcome of patients with malignant changes located at the head and neck.
  • Demographic data, localization and disease outcome were evaluated in patients who developed cancer.
  • Twenty one patients (1.7%) developed 27 head and neck malignancies.
  • The average time from transplantation to development of cancer was 56.8 months.
  • Of cutaneous malignancies, 88.9% were basal cell carcinoma; one patient had Merkell-cell carcinoma and one patient developed squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Six cases of basocellular skin cancer were recorded in one fair-skin patient.
  • Noncutaneous malignancies involved the oral cavity (2 cases of Kaposi's sarcoma and one pharyngeal cancer) and the thyroid gland in 3 patients each.
  • Two patients had post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder occurring at the head and neck.
  • One patient had brain tumor.
  • Radical surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy were necessary in 33.3% of patients.
  • None of the patients died from cancer.
  • An increased incidence of cancer occurring in the head and neck was recorded.
  • Careful skin examination and oral examination is mandatory for discovering cancer before dissemination.
  • Sirolimus is safe alternative to calcineurin-based immunosuppression in patients who developed head and neck malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / complications. Head and Neck Neoplasms / etiology. Kidney Transplantation / methods. Renal Insufficiency / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Brain Neoplasms / complications. Croatia. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunosuppression. Lymphoproliferative Disorders / etiology. Mouth Neoplasms / complications. Skin Neoplasms / complications. Thyroid Neoplasms / complications. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20433429.001).
  • [ISSN] 1840-4812
  • [Journal-full-title] Bosnian journal of basic medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bosn J Basic Med Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Bosnia and Herzegovina
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5. Barasch A, Epstein JB, Foong WC, Clayman L: Intralesional chemotherapy for head and neck carcinoma: a review of the literature. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod; 2004 Mar;97(3):307-11
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  • [Title] Intralesional chemotherapy for head and neck carcinoma: a review of the literature.
  • In the last decade chemotherapy has gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of oral and pharyngeal cancer.
  • Current standard treatment for advanced lesions consists of concomitant radiation and chemotherapy.
  • This approach has provided marginal improvement of prognosis for Stage III-IV disease.
  • Recent studies have explored the idea that locally delivered cytotoxic drugs could further improve prognosis in this patient population.
  • We review this literature with the objective of popularizing these data and suggesting future directions for treatment and clinical research for head and neck cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial. Injections, Intralesional. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 15024351.001).
  • [ISSN] 1079-2104
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 35
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6. Shah JP, Gil Z: Current concepts in management of oral cancer--surgery. Oral Oncol; 2009 Apr-May;45(4-5):394-401
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  • [Title] Current concepts in management of oral cancer--surgery.
  • Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with a high prevalence in South Asia.
  • Tobacco and alcohol consumption remain the most dominant etiologic factors, however HPV has been recently implicated in oral cancer.
  • Surgery is the most well established mode of initial definitive treatment for a majority of oral cancers.
  • The factors that affect choice of treatment are related to the tumor and the patient.
  • The radial forearm free flap provides excellent soft tissue and lining for soft tissue defects in the oral cavity.
  • Over the course of the past thirty years there has been improvement in the overall survival of patients with oral carcinoma largely due to the improved understanding of the biology of local progression, early identification and treatment of metastatic lymph nodes in the neck, and employment of adjuvant post-operative radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy.
  • The role of surgery in primary squamous cell carcinomas in other sites in the head and neck has evolved with integration of multidisciplinary treatment approaches employing chemotherapy and radiotherapy either sequentially or concurrently.
  • Thus, larynx preservation with concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become the standard of care for locally advanced carcinomas of the larynx or pharynx requiring total laryngectomy.
  • On the other hand, for early staged tumors of the larynx and pharynx, transoral laser microsurgery has become an effective means of local control of these lesions.
  • Advances in skull base surgery have significantly improved the survivorship of patients with malignant tumors of the paranasal sinuses approaching or involving the skull base.
  • Similarly, the role of the surgeon is essential throughout the life history of a patient with a malignant neoplasm in the head and neck area, from initial diagnosis through definitive treatment, post-treatment surveillance, management of complications, rehabilitation of the sequelae of treatment, and finally for palliation of symptoms.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Protocols. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Combined Modality Therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / surgery. Humans. Patient Selection. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures. Skin Neoplasms / surgery. Skull Base Neoplasms / surgery. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery. Surgical Flaps. Treatment Outcome


7. Klaassen I, Braakhuis BJ: Anticancer activity and mechanism of action of retinoids in oral and pharyngeal cancer. Oral Oncol; 2002 Sep;38(6):532-42
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  • [Title] Anticancer activity and mechanism of action of retinoids in oral and pharyngeal cancer.
  • Epidemiological studies indicate that a low intake of vitamin A is associated with an increased risk of squamous cancer.
  • In vitro studies on cancer cells show that exposure to retinoids results in the inhibition of growth, by blocking the cell cycle or by inducing apoptosis.
  • With respect to the clinical efficacy of retinoids some positive effects have been observed in early stage oral and oropharyngeal cancer.
  • Administration of retinoids has been shown to elicit responses in leukoplakia, a premalignant lesion of the oral mucosa that frequently develops into invasive cancer.
  • Furthermore, it has been possible with a retinoid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, to delay or inhibit the development of second primary tumors in patients who have been curatively treated for a first primary tumor in the oral cavity or oropharynx.
  • Because of the short duration of the response, the intrinsic resistance to retinoids and the toxic side effects, the treatment with this class of compounds has not become a standard therapy.
  • This knowledge can be used to develop novel tumor-selective strategies.
  • This review gives an update on the role of retinoids in oral and oropharyngeal cancer and their precursor lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Mouth Neoplasms / prevention & control. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / prevention & control. Retinoids / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Leukoplakia, Oral / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 12167430.001).
  • [ISSN] 1368-8375
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Retinoids
  • [Number-of-references] 107
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8. Akins PT, Kerber CW, Pakbaz RS: Stenting of vertebral artery origin atherosclerosis in high-risk patients: bare or coated? A single-center consecutive case series. J Invasive Cardiol; 2008 Jan;20(1):14-20
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  • After treatment, all patients were monitored with ultrasound and angiography and were aggressively managed for vascular disease risk factors.
  • Drug-eluting stents (tacrolimus) were used in the last 5 cases.
  • Three of the 7 patients treated with uncoated stents developed restenosis.
  • One patient developed asymptomatic occlusion of her bare-metal stent.
  • One patient died from pharyngeal cancer at 8 months, and 1 from lung cancer at 17 months.
  • Placement of drug-eluting stents appears to reduce in-stent restenosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Atherosclerosis / therapy. Catheterization / methods. Coated Materials, Biocompatible. Stents. Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Angiography / methods. Brain Ischemia / prevention & control. Cohort Studies. Drug-Eluting Stents. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Monitoring, Physiologic. Prospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Secondary Prevention. Sensitivity and Specificity. Treatment Outcome. Ultrasonography, Doppler. Vascular Patency. Vertebral Artery / physiopathology. Vertebral Artery / radiography

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  • (PMID = 18174613.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-2501
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of invasive cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Invasive Cardiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Coated Materials, Biocompatible
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9. Kohno N: The role of chemotherapy for advanced oro and hypopharyngeal cancer. Auris Nasus Larynx; 2004 Jun;31(2):113-8
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  • [Title] The role of chemotherapy for advanced oro and hypopharyngeal cancer.
  • Although important progress continuous to be made in the treatment of oro and hypopharyngeal cancer, the 5-year survival rate for all this disease has remained at less than 30% for the past 30 years.
  • In the early 1980s, chemotherapy was introduced with high expectation of reducing in the incidence of distant metastases and increasing the possibility of local control.
  • This article explores the use of chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pharyngeal cancer.
  • Thus, the efficacy of chemotherapy are reviewed and treatment options for advanced pharyngeal cancer are made.
  • In these cases, the possibility of instituting adjuvant chemotherapy with an active treatment regimen may be taken into account depending on the condition of the patient and the tumor.
  • Patients with surgically resectable tumors are given 1-2 cycles of induction chemotherapy.
  • Cases who respond to the induction chemotherapy are subsequently given concurrent chemoradiotherapy.
  • The cases who do not respond to the induction chemotherapy are treated with radical surgery.
  • Patients with unresectable carcinoma are given concurrent chemoradiotherapy because local treatment should be performed in such patients as early as possible.
  • In principle, concurrent regimens should be supplemented with adjuvant chemotherapy in all cases.
  • This is particularly required for those with advanced N-stage patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15121218.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-8146
  • [Journal-full-title] Auris, nasus, larynx
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Auris Nasus Larynx
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Number-of-references] 35
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10. Kohno N, Kitahara S: [Role of Chemotherapy in head and neck cancer]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2001 Apr;28(4):448-53
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  • [Title] [Role of Chemotherapy in head and neck cancer].
  • For head and neck cancer, a recent meta-analysis of published randomized trial results showed that concurrent chemoradiotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy may increase absolute survival by 12.1%, 6.5%, and 3.7%, respectively.
  • Initial response rates to first line chemotherapy are high, but this responsiveness does not appear to translate into a survival benefit.
  • Thus, chemotherapy can be indicated as the standard therapy for a very limited range of advanced head and neck cancers.
  • With the aim of prolonging survival, N stage advanced nasopharyngeal cancer is a good candidate for neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Among a large number of randomized trials of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, organ function preservation studies showed the possibility of laryngeal preservation for locally resectable T2 and T3 laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer.
  • Concurrent chemoradiotherapy may be indicated for advanced T stage head and neck cancers, especially those with locally unresectable lesions.
  • For N stage advanced pharyngeal cancer patients, adjuvant chemotherapy with applied after the standard therapy has a role in the treatment.
  • With palliative treatment in advanced and/or recurrent disease, there is less benefit from chemotherapy and indications for chemotherapy should be selected for individual patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Palliative Care. Quality of Life. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 11329777.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Number-of-references] 11
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11. Kohno N, Ikari T, Kawaida M, Tanaka K, Kawaura M, Kano S, Nakamizo M: Survival results of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2000 Jun;30(6):253-8
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  • [Title] Survival results of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
  • BACKGROUND: We carried out an open, randomized multi-center clinical trial for advanced head and neck cancer between April 1991 and December 1992.
  • METHODS: Thirty-two patients with previously untreated stage III and IV resectable squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and pharynx were entered into the study.
  • Of the remaining 24 patients, 13 were given neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and 11 underwent surgery alone.
  • CONCLUSIONS: NAC does not appear to play a role in the treatment of cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx with our PEM regimen.
  • However, the degree of toxicity was limited in our trial and therefore attempts to increase the dosage and/or revise the administration schedule for cancer of the pharynx and T1 to T3 tumor disease appear warranted.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mitomycin / administration & dosage. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 10939428.001).
  • [ISSN] 0368-2811
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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12. Kowalczuk A, Wiecek A, Franek E, Kokot F: [Plasma concentration of leptin, neuropeptide Y and tumor necrosis factor alpha in patients with cancers, before and after radio- and chemotherapy]. Pol Arch Med Wewn; 2001 Aug;106(2):657-68
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  • [Title] [Plasma concentration of leptin, neuropeptide Y and tumor necrosis factor alpha in patients with cancers, before and after radio- and chemotherapy].
  • In patients with cancers progressive reduction of body mass is frequently recent.
  • Pathogenesis of cachexia in patients with cancer is multifactorial.
  • Such factors as cytokines, peptides relieved by tumor mass and different forms of treatment as radio or chemotherapy may play a major role in the pathogenesis of cachexia in patients with cancer.
  • The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between body fat and lean mass and plasma leptin, NPY and TNF concentrations in patients with cancer of oral cavity and pharynx, cancer of larynx and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NIL).
  • 30 patients (10 with cancer of oral cavity and pharynx, 10 with cancer of larynx and 10 with non-Hodgkin lymphoma) were enrolled into this study.
  • Mean age of all cancer patients was 50 +/- 2.9 years (from 18 to 76 years).
  • The control group consisted of 29 healthy subjects with a means age 48 +/- 3.5 years (from 18 to 75 years), properly chosen according to the body weight, BMI, gender and age as above mentioned groups of patients with cancer.
  • In control and study groups body fat and not-fat mass was assessed before and after treatment using the bioelectrical impedance method.
  • Before oncological therapy patients with cancer did not differ from healthy subject with regard to body weight and body mass index.
  • After treatment significant: decrease of body weight, body fat mass and BMI was observed.
  • Serum leptin, NPY and TNF concentrations were analysed in healthy subjects and patients with cancer before and after treatment.
  • Before oncological treatment significantly lower serum leptin concentration in comparison to leptinaemia in control group was found.
  • In contrast to serum leptin, NPY serum concentration was similar in patients with cancer and in control subjects.
  • Serum concentration of TNF was significantly higher in patients with cancer in comparison to subjects of control group.
  • After oncological treatment, serum leptin and NPY concentration did not change significantly.
  • In contrast, serum TNF concentration decreased significantly after oncological therapy.
  • From the results obtained in this study we can conclude, that in patients with cancer secretion of leptin is decreased in relation to body fat mass.
  • However, contribution of this hormone to pathogenesis of cancer induced anorexia seems not to proven.
  • After this oncological treatment the relationship between serum leptin concentration and body mass is no longer significant.
  • [MeSH-major] Cachexia / blood. Head and Neck Neoplasms / blood. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Leptin / blood. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / blood. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Neuropeptide Y / blood. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Body Mass Index. Case-Control Studies. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant

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  • (PMID = 11926139.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Polskie Archiwum Medycyny Wewnetrznej
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pol. Arch. Med. Wewn.
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Leptin; 0 / Neuropeptide Y; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
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13. Li LB, Luo RC, Liao WJ, Zhang MJ, Luo YL, Miao JX: Clinical study of Photofrin photodynamic therapy for the treatment of relapse nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther; 2006 Dec;3(4):266-71
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  • [Title] Clinical study of Photofrin photodynamic therapy for the treatment of relapse nasopharyngeal carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical response and adverse effects of Photofrin photodynamic therapy (PDT) in patients with relapse nasal pharyngeal cancer.
  • METHODS: Thirty patients with relapse nasal pharyngeal cancer were randomly divided into PDT group and chemotherapy group.
  • Two days after PDT the necrotic tissues were removed and newly identified sites were subject to another round of light irradiation.
  • In chemotherapy group, the routine cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (DDP/5-FU) remedy was used.
  • RESULTS: The local response and nasal cavity obstruction remission rate in PDT group were better than that in chemotherapy group.
  • CONCLUSION: This pilot study suggests that Photofrin PDT is effective and safe in treatment of advanced nasal pharyngeal cancer and management of nasal obstruction.

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  • (PMID = 25046991.001).
  • [ISSN] 1572-1000
  • [Journal-full-title] Photodiagnosis and photodynamic therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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14. Arnold DJ, Goodwin WJ, Weed DT, Civantos FJ: Treatment of recurrent and advanced stage squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Semin Radiat Oncol; 2004 Apr;14(2):190-5
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  • [Title] Treatment of recurrent and advanced stage squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
  • Despite advances in our ability to safely treat patients with recurrent cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract, outcomes for retreatment are generally poor and the first chance to cure these patients remains the best chance.
  • Thorough knowledge of the outlook and options for patients with recurrent disease is also of significance in choosing therapy for patients with newly diagnosed disease.
  • This is especially true for newly diagnosed patients making the choice between surgery and nonsurgical ("organ-sparing") options, who need to know the outlook for salvage surgery, should they recur after radiation with or without concomitant chemotherapy.
  • Unfortunately, the results of surgical salvage are generally poor for patients with advanced stage recurrence and for those who recur after treatment of advanced disease.
  • Surgical salvage is most effective for patients with recurrent laryngeal cancer, least effective for recurrent cancer of the pharynx, and is intermediate for recurrence in the oral cavity.
  • Patients choosing nonsurgical treatment for newly diagnosed cancer of the pharynx cannot rely on salvage surgery in the event of recurrence.
  • Reirraditation for patients who have failed initial treatment that included radiation therapy has been used at a number of institutions with some success.
  • Experience using reirradiation with or without concomitant chemotherapy continues to evolve.
  • Palliative chemotherapy is an option for most patients, but response rates are generally poor and of short duration, after failure of initial treatment that includes radiation therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Retreatment / methods. Salvage Therapy / methods

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  • (PMID = 15095264.001).
  • [ISSN] 1053-4296
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in radiation oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Radiat Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 15
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15. Magné N, Pivot X, Bensadoun RJ, Guardiola E, Poissonnet G, Dassonville O, Francoual M, Formento JL, Demard F, Schneider M, Milano G: The relationship of epidermal growth factor receptor levels to the prognosis of unresectable pharyngeal cancer patients treated by chemo-radiotherapy. Eur J Cancer; 2001 Nov;37(17):2169-77
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  • [Title] The relationship of epidermal growth factor receptor levels to the prognosis of unresectable pharyngeal cancer patients treated by chemo-radiotherapy.
  • The aim of this study was to analyse prognostic factors for time to treatment failure (TTF) and overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable cancer of the pharynx.
  • A twice daily (b.i.d.) radiotherapy with concomitant cisplatin-5-fluorouracil chemotherapy was administered to 77 consecutive patients (68 males, 9 females; median age: 56 years).
  • The studied factors were: age, gender, tumour differentiation, tumour volume, initial hemoglobin level, karnofsky index (KI), primary tumour location, T, N, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) level in the tumour (fmol/mg protein).
  • In order to select subgroups with different outcomes, a stratification of patients was performed based on the EGFR value: patients with tumour EGFR levels <35 fmol/mg protein, between 35 and 275 fmol/mg protein and >275 fmol/mg protein had 95%, 51% and 16% 3 year OS rates, respectively (log rank test; P=0.0001).
  • Interestingly, for patients exhibiting a complete response (CR) after concomitant b.i.d. chemo-radiotherapy, patients with EGFR levels <35 fmol/mg protein were all alive at 3 years; in contrast, there was only 70 and 13% 3 year survival rates for patients with EGFR tumour levels between 35 and 275 fmol/mg protein and above 275 fmol/mg protein, respectively.
  • EGFR determination appears to be a powerful prognostic parameter in unresectable pharyngeal cancer patients treated by concomitant chemo-radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / metabolism. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Logistic Models. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism. Prognosis. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11677103.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
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16. Banga R, Ramsden J, Cox G: Recurrent squamous cell carcinoma in the neopharynx treated successfully with topical 5-fluorouracil. J Laryngol Otol; 2005 May;119(5):403-4
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  • We present the first reported case of a squamous cell carcinoma recurrence on a reconstructed flap in the pharynx treated successfully with topical chemotherapy.
  • The patient, treated for a pharyngeal cancer with resection and reconstruction with a free radial forearm flap, and post-operative radiotherapy, developed a tumour on the flap more than two years after surgery.
  • This was treated with 5-fluorouracil paste placed in the pharynx, with resolution of the tumour.
  • The patient was alive and well more than 28 months after this treatment, with no sign of disease recurrence.
  • Topical chemotherapy for treatment of oral cancer is well described for early disease, but we show that it may be a useful treatment in recurrent disease in selected patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Aged. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15949109.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-2151
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of laryngology and otology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Laryngol Otol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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17. Abouzeid WM, Mokhtar SA, Mahdy NH, El Kwsky FS: Quality of life of patients with oral and pharyngeal malignancies. J Egypt Public Health Assoc; 2009;84(3-4):299-329

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  • [Title] Quality of life of patients with oral and pharyngeal malignancies.
  • The target population was cases of oral and pharyngeal cancer in Alexandria and El Behira regions.
  • Data about quality of life (QoL) were collected through interviewing 171 subjects using the Arabic version of "Functional Living Interview Questionnaire for Cancer" (FLIC).
  • Stage categories showed significant indirect correlation with QoL scores.
  • The best QoL according to total or psychological mean scores was recorded for pharyngeal-otherwise (pharyngeal of a mysterious origin) or lip cases, while the worst were for the floor of the mouth.
  • According to treatment; surgery showed the best QoL, while chemotherapy showed the worst.
  • All those treatment complications showed significant associations with dichotomous leveling of QoL.
  • Logistic regression showed that stage, late surgical complications, and response to treatment were the most important predictors of QoL.

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  • (PMID = 19889358.001).
  • [ISSN] 0013-2446
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of the Egyptian Public Health Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Egypt Public Health Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
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18. Büntzel J, Glatzel M, Kuttner K, Weinaug R, Fröhlich D: Amifostine in simultaneous radiochemotherapy of advanced head and neck cancer. Semin Radiat Oncol; 2002 Jan;12(1 Suppl 1):4-13
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  • [Title] Amifostine in simultaneous radiochemotherapy of advanced head and neck cancer.
  • The authors discuss the results of 3 studies of their group reflecting the possible role of amifostine in simultaneous radiochemotherapy (RCT) of advanced head and neck cancer.
  • A control group (n = 14) received simultaneous RCT of the head and neck region with an irradiation dose of 60 Gy and 2 cycles of carboplatin (700 mg/m(2) cumulative dose).
  • Twenty-five patients received the same basic therapy and an additional 500-mg dose of amifostine before each chemotherapy.
  • In a controlled intensification trial (1997 through 1999), the authors included 76 consecutive patients (69 men, 7 women) with pharyngeal cancer (oropharynx, n = 33; hypopharynx, n = 43).
  • All patients received a conventional radiotherapy (2-Gy single dose, daily fractionation) up to doses of 60 Gy and an additional 10 Gy as a boost in the tumor-infiltrated region.
  • If the tumor volume was less than 20 cm(3), we observed an increased 1-year overall survival rate (91% v 71%) and time to progression (17 months v 10 months).
  • If the tumor volume was greater than 20 cm(3), we observed comparable treatment results in both groups (1-year survival rate, 60% v 61%; time to progression, 13 months v 12 months).
  • All patients were treated by surgery or radio(chemo)therapy because of an advanced head and neck cancer.
  • A total of 218 of 531 patients received the antineoplastic therapy without cytoprotection.
  • Amifostine could be integrated in simultaneous radiochemotherapy of advanced head and neck cancer patients.
  • Selective cytoprotection could decrease the main acute toxicities (mucositis, xerostomia, dysphagia) as well as late side effects (xerostomia, loss of taste, fibrosis) of this form of combined treatment.
  • The enhanced therapeutic index may be changed into a prognostic benefit for selected patients with unresectable tumors, if the volume is smaller than 20 cm(3).
  • [MeSH-major] Amifostine / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiation-Protective Agents / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carboplatin / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Edema / etiology. Esophageal Stenosis / etiology. Female. Fibrosis. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiation Injuries / pathology. Radiotherapy Dosage. Taste Disorders / etiology. Xerostomia / etiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 11917277.001).
  • [ISSN] 1053-4296
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in radiation oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Radiat Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiation-Protective Agents; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; M487QF2F4V / Amifostine
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19. Bjordal K, Ahlner-Elmqvist M, Hammerlid E, Boysen M, Evensen JF, Biörklund A, Jannert M, Westin T, Kaasa S: A prospective study of quality of life in head and neck cancer patients. Part II: Longitudinal data. Laryngoscope; 2001 Aug;111(8):1440-52
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  • [Title] A prospective study of quality of life in head and neck cancer patients. Part II: Longitudinal data.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients with head and neck cancer during and after treatment with radiotherapy, surgery, and chemotherapy.
  • Health-related quality of life was assessed at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months after start of treatment by means of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Core Quality of Life Questionnaire and the EORTC head and neck cancer-specific questionnaire.
  • Three hundred fifty-seven patients with cancer in the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, nose, sinuses, and salivary glands and neck node metastases from unknown primaries filled in the questionnaires at baseline.
  • The general trend was that HRQL deteriorated significantly during treatment, followed by a slow recovery until the 12-month follow-up with few exceptions (senses, dry mouth, and sexuality).
  • The patients with pharyngeal cancer in general reported worse HRQL compared with the other groups and did not reach pretreatment values in several domains.
  • Stage was also an important factor for HRQL in patients with head and neck cancer.
  • CONCLUSION: Detailed knowledge about the differences between groups and changes over time may aid us in the communication with patients and in the design of intervention studies focusing on improvement of the support and rehabilitation of patients with head and neck cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Laryngeal Neoplasms. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Mouth Neoplasms. Pharyngeal Neoplasms. Prospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 11568582.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-852X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Naim R, Chang RC, Schultz J, Hormann K: Chemopreventive alteration of the cell-cell adhesion in head and neck squamous cell cancer. Oncol Rep; 2006 Aug;16(2):273-7
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  • [Title] Chemopreventive alteration of the cell-cell adhesion in head and neck squamous cell cancer.
  • Approximately 310,000 new cases of oral and pharynx cancer account for a major cause of neoplasm related morbidity and mortality world-wide.
  • The vast majority of head and neck cancer is squamous cell carcinoma.
  • The major adhesion-proteins involved in the development and maintenance of all solid tissue are the Cadherins.
  • Downregulation of Cadherins and catenins is frequently observed in many types of human cancer.
  • Sulindac sulfone is one of the new therapeutic apoptotic agents that show promise in the treatment of cancer.
  • In this study, we incubated sulindac sulfone with a head and neck cancer cell line and investigated the outcome of E-Cadherin.
  • Sulindac sulfone resulted in an increase of E-Cadherin content in the head and neck squamous cell cancer cell line after 48 h of incubation; however, the reactivity was restricted to the adherent junctions.
  • ELISA also depicted significant rising levels of E-Cadherin.
  • However, in epithelial cancer cells, the Cadherin-catenin complex serves as a target for the chemopreventive agent, sulindac sulfone.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cadherins / metabolism. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Cell Adhesion. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sulindac / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] 3',5'-Cyclic-GMP Phosphodiesterases / antagonists & inhibitors. Apoptosis. Cyclic GMP / analysis. Cyclic GMP / metabolism. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Protein Kinase C / analysis. Protein Kinase C / metabolism. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Up-Regulation. beta Catenin / analysis. beta Catenin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16820902.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cadherins; 0 / beta Catenin; 184SNS8VUH / Sulindac; EC 2.7.11.13 / Protein Kinase C; EC 3.1.4.35 / 3',5'-Cyclic-GMP Phosphodiesterases; H2D2X058MU / Cyclic GMP; K619IIG2R9 / sulindac sulfone
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21. Oh WS, Roumanas E, Beumer J 3rd: Maxillofacial restoration after head and neck tumor therapy. Compend Contin Educ Dent; 2007 Feb;28(2):70-6; quiz 77, 101
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  • [Title] Maxillofacial restoration after head and neck tumor therapy.
  • Oral and pharyngeal cancers are among the leading cancer sites.
  • Surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or combination therapies are common treatment modalities.
  • Radiotherapy and chemotherapy cause significant morbidity and long-term irreversible sequelae in the oral cavity.
  • This article reviews current treatment modalities of tumor therapy, their consequences, and the restoration of maxillofacial defects.
  • [MeSH-minor] Cranial Irradiation / adverse effects. Dental Implants. Humans. Hyperbaric Oxygenation. Osteoradionecrosis / etiology. Osteoradionecrosis / therapy. Palatal Obturators. Surgical Flaps

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  • (PMID = 17319178.001).
  • [ISSN] 1548-8578
  • [Journal-full-title] Compendium of continuing education in dentistry (Jamesburg, N.J. : 1995)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Compend Contin Educ Dent
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dental Implants
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22. Cianni R, Urigo C, Notarianni E, Saltarelli A, D'Agostini A, Iozzino M, Dornbusch T, Cortesi E: Radioembolisation using yttrium 90 (Y-90) in patients affected by unresectable hepatic metastases. Radiol Med; 2010 Jun;115(4):619-33
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  • PURPOSE: This study was done to evaluate the effectiveness of radioembolisation of liver metastases with yttrium 90 (Y-90) in patients with no response to chemotherapy.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: From February 2005 to January 2008, we treated 110 patients affected by liver metastatic disease from colorectal, breast, gastric, pancreatic, pulmonary, oesophageal and pharyngeal cancers and from cholangiocarcinoma and melanoma.
  • In 90 cases, we obtained a decrease in specific tumour marker level.
  • The technical success rate was 96%, and technical effectiveness estimated at 3 months after treatment was 83.6%.
  • [MeSH-major] Embolization, Therapeutic / methods. Liver Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Yttrium Radioisotopes / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20091135.001).
  • [ISSN] 1826-6983
  • [Journal-full-title] La Radiologia medica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiol Med
  • [Language] eng; ita
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Yttrium Radioisotopes
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23. Ord RA, Blanchaert RH Jr: Current management of oral cancer. A multidisciplinary approach. J Am Dent Assoc; 2001 Nov;132 Suppl:19S-23S
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Current management of oral cancer. A multidisciplinary approach.
  • BACKGROUND: Recent basic science discoveries have contributed to our understanding of the etiology of oral cancer and allowed us to consider innovative approaches to therapy.
  • METHODS: The authors evaluated and summarized current approaches to the management of oral cancer, emphasizing the multidisciplinary team approach to coordinate surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy.
  • Current concepts in management, including complications of therapy, are described.
  • RESULTS: State-of-the-art surgical techniques can spare patients with oral cancer from much of the morbidity and complications common in the past.
  • The refinement of treatment strategies reduces complications and improves efficacy.
  • Many exciting new clinical trials in the areas of gene therapy and immunomodulation are showing promise.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Management of oral cancer has undergone radical change in the past 10 years and continues to evolve rapidly.
  • Discoveries in molecular biology, diagnosis, surgery, radiation therapy and medical oncology have altered many traditional concepts and practices.
  • CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: General dental practitioners need to understand current treatment modalities for oral and pharyngeal cancers to determine to whom they should refer patients for the most appropriate treatment, and to make recommendations regarding complications associated with these cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Mouth Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adjuvants, Immunologic / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Comprehensive Dental Care. Genetic Therapy. Humans. Immunotherapy. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Patient Care Team. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] J Am Dent Assoc. 2002 Apr;133(4):410, 412; author reply 412 [11991452.001]
  • (PMID = 11803648.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-8177
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Dental Association (1939)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Dent Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic
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24. Paludetti G, Almadori G, Bussu F, Galli J, Cadoni G, Maurizi M: Hypofolatemia as a risk factor for head and neck cancer. Adv Otorhinolaryngol; 2005;62:12-24
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hypofolatemia as a risk factor for head and neck cancer.
  • Head and neck cancer (HNSCC) includes squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx.
  • HNSCCs represent about 3% of all malignant tumors in the USA.
  • The standard therapeutic approach, focused on surgery, irradiation and chemotherapy, alone or in combination, has been in part modified in the last 30 years, but the overall survival of HNSCC patients has not substantially improved.
  • Nevertheless, we know that metabolic alterations, often aspecific, are frequently associated with cancer.
  • These may be secondary or may precede tumor development and favorite progression.
  • Homocysteine levels in cancer patients are probably largely affected by the HNSCC phenotype.
  • An accumulation of homocysteine might reveal a genetic defect which is theoretically a target for pharmacological therapy, for example by antifolic drugs.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Biopsy, Needle. Case-Control Studies. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Italy / epidemiology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / epidemiology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Laryngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Mouth Neoplasms / epidemiology. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Mouth Neoplasms / therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Reference Values. Risk Factors. Sensitivity and Specificity. Smoking / adverse effects. Smoking / epidemiology. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 15608414.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-3071
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in oto-rhino-laryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Otorhinolaryngol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0LVT1QZ0BA / Homocysteine; EC 3.4.17.21 / Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II
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25. Vargas H, Mouzakes J, Purdy SS, Cohn AS, Parnes SM: Follicular dendritic cell tumor: an aggressive head and neck tumor. Am J Otolaryngol; 2002 Mar-Apr;23(2):93-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Follicular dendritic cell tumor: an aggressive head and neck tumor.
  • OBJECTIVE: To characterize the clinicopathologic features of head and neck follicular dendritic cell (FDC) tumor and report the experience of this entity at our institution.
  • RESULTS: Thirty four cases of FDC tumor of the head and neck cases have been published.
  • Twenty five occurred in the cervical lymph nodes, 4 in the tonsils, 2 in the palate, 1 in the pharynx, 1 in the parapharyngeal region, and 1 in the thyroid gland.
  • Patients were treated with surgery (17), surgery and chemotherapy (8), and surgery and radiation (9).
  • After the primary treatment, 12 patients had no evidence of disease, whereas 5 were incurable.
  • Of these 13 patients who suffered recurrences, 4 had no evidence of disease after secondary treatment, 6 were alive with disease, and one was lost to follow up.
  • CONCLUSION: FDC tumor is a rare malignant neoplasm that can present in the head and neck region in both lymph nodes and extranodal sites.
  • Surgery has been the mainstay of treatment and should include diligent control of surgical margins.
  • The role of adjuvant therapy remains controversial.
  • We believe that FDC tumor should be viewed and treated as a moderately aggressive head and neck tumor.
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy, Needle. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Middle Aged. Parotid Neoplasms / diagnosis. Parotid Neoplasms / pathology. Parotid Neoplasms / surgery. Severity of Illness Index. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.)
  • (PMID = 11893977.001).
  • [ISSN] 0196-0709
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of otolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Otolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 11
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