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6. Klafter R, Arbiser JL: Regulation of angiogenesis and tumorigenesis by signal transduction cascades: lessons from benign and malignant endothelial tumors. J Investig Dermatol Symp Proc; 2000 Dec;5(1):79-82
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  • [Title] Regulation of angiogenesis and tumorigenesis by signal transduction cascades: lessons from benign and malignant endothelial tumors.
  • Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are implicated in the regulation of the angiogenic switch.
  • Much of the data accumulated to date uses NIH 3T3 cells, which are deficient in the tumor suppressor gene p16, as models for these studies.
  • We have used a novel system, derived by sequential introduction of a temperature-sensitive SV40 large T antigen and oncogenic H-ras, to study the angiogenic switch.
  • The data from all of these studies suggest that there is synergy between inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene and activation of the phosphoinositol-3-kinase pathway (PI-3-K), as well as synergy between inactivation of the p16 tumor suppressor gene and activation of the MAP kinase pathway.
  • These findings suggest that there are predictable behaviors of tumors that may be assessed by the status of p53 or p16 in a biopsy, and that these predictable changes in signal transduction may be useful both prognostically and in the design of rationally based drug therapy of benign and malignant tumors.

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  • (PMID = 11147680.001).
  • [ISSN] 1087-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of investigative dermatology. Symposium proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Investig. Dermatol. Symp. Proc.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / KO8AR02096
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 53
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7. Greenson JK: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors and other mesenchymal lesions of the gut. Mod Pathol; 2003 Apr;16(4):366-75
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  • Along with this understanding comes an exciting new drug therapy (Gleevec) that for the first time offers real hope to patients with malignant stromal tumors.
  • Between 10 and 30% of GISTs are malignant.
  • Although the most important tool needed to diagnose a GIST is still a hematoxylin and eosin-stained section, a confirmatory CD117 stain is recommended (and may be required for drug therapy).
  • True smooth muscle tumors, inflammatory fibroid polyps, fibromatoses, schwannomas, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, and solitary fibrous tumors all enter into the differential diagnosis of GISTs.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Mesoderm / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzamides. Diagnosis, Differential. Imatinib Mesylate. Immunohistochemistry. Molecular Biology. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Prognosis. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 12692202.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-3952
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate
  • [Number-of-references] 55
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8. Um JH, Kang CD, Bae JH, Shin GG, Kim DW, Kim DW, Chung BS, Kim SH: Association of DNA-dependent protein kinase with hypoxia inducible factor-1 and its implication in resistance to anticancer drugs in hypoxic tumor cells. Exp Mol Med; 2004 Jun 30;36(3):233-42
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  • [Title] Association of DNA-dependent protein kinase with hypoxia inducible factor-1 and its implication in resistance to anticancer drugs in hypoxic tumor cells.
  • Tumor hypoxia contributes to the progression of a malignant phenotype and resistance to ionizing radiation and anticancer drug therapy.
  • Many of these effects in hypoxic tumor cells are mediated by expression of specific set of genes whose relation to therapy resistance is poorly understood.
  • Under hypoxic condition, the expression and activity of DNA- PK were markedly induced with a concurrent increase in HIF-1alpha expression.
  • Thus, the correlated regulation of DNA-PK with HIF-1 could contribute to therapy resistance in hypoxic tumor cells, and it provides new evidence for developing therapeutic strategies enhancing the efficacy of cancer therapy in hypoxic tumor cells.
  • [MeSH-major] DNA-Binding Proteins / metabolism. DNA-Binding Proteins / physiology. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / physiology. Neoplasms / metabolism. Nuclear Proteins / metabolism. Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / physiology. Transcription Factors / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies / immunology. Cell Hypoxia. Cell Line, Tumor. DNA Helicases / immunology. DNA Helicases / metabolism. DNA-Activated Protein Kinase. Deferoxamine / pharmacology. Humans. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit. Immunoprecipitation. Phosphorylation. Up-Regulation

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  • (PMID = 15272235.001).
  • [ISSN] 1226-3613
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental & molecular medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Mol. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / HIF1A protein, human; 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1; 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / Transcription Factors; 0 / XRCC5 protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / DNA-Activated Protein Kinase; EC 2.7.11.1 / PRKDC protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; EC 3.6.4.- / DNA Helicases; J06Y7MXW4D / Deferoxamine
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9. Hauschild A, Volkenandt M, Garbe C: [Adjuvant drug therapy of malignant melanoma. Current knowledge and multi-center studies in German-speaking countries]. Dtsch Med Wochenschr; 2000 Oct 20;125(42):1272-8
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  • [Title] [Adjuvant drug therapy of malignant melanoma. Current knowledge and multi-center studies in German-speaking countries].
  • [Transliterated title] Adjuvante medikamentöse Therapie des malignen Melanoms. Aktueller Wissensstand und derzeitige Multicenterstudien in den deutschsprachigen Ländern.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Melanoma / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Europe. Humans. Multicenter Studies as Topic. Neoplasm Staging. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11098240.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-0472
  • [Journal-full-title] Deutsche medizinische Wochenschrift (1946)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dtsch. Med. Wochenschr.
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 33
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10. Ulrich-Pur H, Jech B, Scheithauer W, Kornek GV, Huber H: [Drug therapy of colorectal carcinoma]. Wien Klin Wochenschr; 2002 Jun 14;114(10-11):368-76
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  • [Title] [Drug therapy of colorectal carcinoma].
  • [Transliterated title] Die medikamentöse Therapie des kolorektalen Karzinoms.
  • Colorectal cancer represents one of the most common malignant diseases worldwide.
  • Because of the expanding understanding of the biology of this disease entity, and the development/availability of a number novel antitumor agents, therapeutic options have considerably improved within the past few years.
  • As for new drug development, therapeutic advances comprise the oral fluoropyrimidine prodrugs, specific thymidilate synthase inhibitors, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, and signal transduction inhibitors such as the anti-EGF-receptor monoclonal antibody Cetuximab.
  • Compared to the area of conventional 5-fluorouracil therapy, much higher objective response rates and major improvements in overall survival can be achieved today, even in the case of disseminated disease.
  • The aim of this review article is to provide the reader with an overview of presently available treatment options in the palliative, neoadjuvant and postoperative adjuvant setting in colon and rectal cancer, respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12708089.001).
  • [ISSN] 0043-5325
  • [Journal-full-title] Wiener klinische Wochenschrift
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Wien. Klin. Wochenschr.
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 63
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11. Terént A: [Drug therapy after stroke should be evidence-based. Organizational, economic and ethical decisions direct the choice of treatment]. Lakartidningen; 2003 Nov 20;100(47):3860-4, 3866
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  • [Title] [Drug therapy after stroke should be evidence-based. Organizational, economic and ethical decisions direct the choice of treatment].
  • [Transliterated title] Medikamentell terapi efter slaganfall bör vara evidensbaserad. Organisatoriska, ekonomiska och etiska avgöranden styr valet av behandling.
  • Five types of drug therapy can be considered after stroke: antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation with heparin or warfarin, blood-pressure-lowering therapy with ACE-inhibitors and diuretics, and finally cholesterol-lowering with statins.
  • Aspirin therapy is the best-documented treatment to avoid another stroke, both in the acute and the long-term perspective.
  • Warfarin treatment is fairly well documented for stroke patients with atrial fibrillation.
  • Heparin therapy increases the risk for serious haemorrhage.
  • Blood-pressure-lowering with a combined ACE-inhibitor and diuretic regimen has been shown to reduce the recurrence rate in younger patients with hemorrhagic as well as ischemic stroke.
  • Statin therapy could be offered to younger stroke patients with a history of coronary heart disease.
  • The increased occurrence of malignant diseases during statin therapy in elderly patients in one study deserves further investigations.
  • [MeSH-major] Stroke / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Anticoagulants / therapeutic use. Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Diuretics / therapeutic use. Evidence-Based Medicine. Heparin / therapeutic use. Humans. Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Warfarin / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 14719239.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-7205
  • [Journal-full-title] Läkartidningen
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lakartidningen
  • [Language] swe
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Sweden
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Anticoagulants; 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; 0 / Diuretics; 0 / Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors; 5Q7ZVV76EI / Warfarin; 9005-49-6 / Heparin
  • [Number-of-references] 22
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12. Schott M, Scherbaum WA, Feldkamp J: [Drug therapy of endocrine neoplasms. Part II: Malignant gastrinomas, insulinomas, glucagonomas, carcinoids and other tumors]. Med Klin (Munich); 2000 Feb 15;95(2):81-4
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  • [Title] [Drug therapy of endocrine neoplasms. Part II: Malignant gastrinomas, insulinomas, glucagonomas, carcinoids and other tumors].
  • [Transliterated title] Medikamentöse Therapie endokriner Karzinome. Teil II: Maligne Gastrinome, Insulinome, Glukagonome, Karzinoide und andere Tumoren.
  • TREATMENT: Because of the rarity and missing prospective studies as well as radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance of these tumors, generally accepted conventional therapy guidelines for these endocrine carcinomas do not exist.
  • Surgery and radionucleotide treatment should be considered as first line therapy.
  • Chemotherapy is usually not effective.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Carcinoid Tumor / drug therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Gastrinoma / drug therapy. Glucagonoma / drug therapy. Humans. Insulinoma / drug therapy. Octreotide / therapeutic use. Somatostatin / analogs & derivatives

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  • (PMID = 10714123.001).
  • [ISSN] 0723-5003
  • [Journal-full-title] Medizinische Klinik (Munich, Germany : 1983)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Klin. (Munich)
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 51110-01-1 / Somatostatin; RWM8CCW8GP / Octreotide
  • [Number-of-references] 49
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13. Blash JL: Systemic Candida infections in patients with leukemia: an overview of drug therapy. Clin J Oncol Nurs; 2002 Nov-Dec;6(6):323-31
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  • [Title] Systemic Candida infections in patients with leukemia: an overview of drug therapy.
  • Systemic fungal infections are becoming increasingly common in patients with hematologic malignancies receiving antineoplastic therapy.
  • The presence of acute myeloid or acute lymphoid leukemia, plus the use of chemotherapy to totally ablate malignant bone marrow cells, puts patients in a protracted neutropenic state.
  • During this profound and prolonged neutropenic phase, patients receive antibiotic therapy for suspected or identified bacterial infections.
  • However, when fever or other signs of infection continue despite antibiotic therapy, patients frequently need to be treated for suspected or identified systemic fungal infections.
  • These infections may occur in patients receiving either standard antileukemia therapy or research protocol therapy involving new drugs, new drug combinations, higher doses, or newer schedules of established drugs.
  • After antifungal therapy is initiated, it may be continued postdischarge in outpatient or homecare settings.
  • Therefore, becoming knowledgeable about antifungal therapy is important for all oncology nurses regardless of practice setting.
  • [MeSH-major] Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Candidiasis / drug therapy. Leukemia / immunology. Opportunistic Infections / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Immunocompromised Host. Male. Microbial Sensitivity Tests. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 12434463.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-1095
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical journal of oncology nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin J Oncol Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 28
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4. Kulkarni SK, Naidu PS: Pathophysiology and drug therapy of tardive dyskinesia: current concepts and future perspectives. Drugs Today (Barc); 2003 Jan;39(1):19-49
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  • [Title] Pathophysiology and drug therapy of tardive dyskinesia: current concepts and future perspectives.
  • Nearly 1% of the world population suffers from schizophrenia, and neuroleptics are the major class of drugs used to treat this disorder.
  • Neuroleptics are associated with wide variety of extrapyramidal side effects, such as akathesia, dystonia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, Parkinson-ism and tardive dyskinesia.
  • Despite the awareness that neuroleptics could cause extrapyramidal side effects, these drugs remain the most effective means of treating schizophrenia and Tourette's syndrome, as well as for the management of behavioral disorders in developmentally disabled individuals.
  • Recently, the role of oxidative stress and structural abnormality in the pathophysiology of tardive dyskinesia has gained much impetus.
  • Induction of free radicals by neuroleptic drugs leading to the oxidative stress and resultant structural abnormality could be the key factor in the pathogenesis of tardive dyskinesia.
  • This hypothesis has been supported by numerous reports that chronic neuroleptic treatment increases free radical production and causes structural damage.
  • [MeSH-major] Antipsychotic Agents / adverse effects. Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced / drug therapy. Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Clinical Trials as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Humans. Schizophrenia / drug therapy. Schizophrenia / genetics. Schizophrenia / metabolism

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  • [Copyright] (c) Prous Science 2003. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 12669107.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-3993
  • [Journal-full-title] Drugs of today (Barcelona, Spain : 1998)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drugs Today
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antipsychotic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 226
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15. Stewart AB, Lwaleed BA, Douglas DA, Birch BR: Current drug therapy for prostate cancer: an overview. Curr Med Chem Anticancer Agents; 2005 Nov;5(6):603-12
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  • [Title] Current drug therapy for prostate cancer: an overview.
  • Prostate cancer is the most common cancer amongst men in the USA and the second most common malignant cause of male death worldwide after lung cancer.
  • The life time risk of having microscopic evidence of prostate cancer for a 50 year old man is 42%.
  • This review, discusses current medical therapeutic options for prostate cancer including traditional treatments using luteinising hormone releasing analogues (LHRH), anti-androgens and estrogen treatments, and the use of novel drugs directed against molecular targets considered important in oncogenesis and metastasis.
  • Prostate cancer chemoprevention using 5alpha-reductase inhibitors and the role of gene therapy are also considered.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Diphosphonates / therapeutic use. Endothelin A Receptor Antagonists. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Genetic Therapy. Humans. Immunotherapy. Male. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Prognosis. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 16305482.001).
  • [ISSN] 1568-0118
  • [Journal-full-title] Current medicinal chemistry. Anti-cancer agents
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Med Chem Anticancer Agents
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Endothelin A Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
  • [Number-of-references] 138
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16. Bonhorst D: [The patient at risk of sudden death:value of drug therapy]. Rev Port Cardiol; 2000 Feb;19(2):233-9
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  • [Title] [The patient at risk of sudden death:value of drug therapy].
  • The evaluation of antiarrhythmic therapy should be based on its effects on total mortality assessed by controlled trials.
  • The author reviews the large trials on antiarrhythmic drugs, during the past ten years, and concludes with the current importance of such therapy.
  • Trials have been conducted in three kinds of high-risk populations: patients with malignant ventricular arrhythmias, survivors of myocardial infarction and patients with congestive heart failure.
  • The results have been disappointing, showing either an increase in mortality with antiarrhythmic drugs (class I, d-sotalol) or a neutral effect (amiodarone).
  • Trials conducted in patients with malignant arrhythmias have shown that the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was superior to the best available antiarrhythmic therapy.
  • In other high-risk populations, the only drugs that consistently reduced mortality were betablockers, which might have other mechanisms of action besides the antiarrhythmic effect.
  • We may conclude from these large trials that study endpoints must be correctly chosen in order to assess the real value of an antiarrhythmic drug.
  • The study population must have a high risk of sudden death and be within an appropriate time window of maximal risk.
  • Antiarrhythmic trials must proceed, learning the lessons from the old studies, trying to test new drugs or new therapeutic strategies, better selecting study populations and new risk markers superior to those currently available.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / therapeutic use. Death, Sudden, Cardiac / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Humans. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 10763353.001).
  • [ISSN] 0870-2551
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista portuguesa de cardiologia : orgão oficial da Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia = Portuguese journal of cardiology : an official journal of the Portuguese Society of Cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Port Cardiol
  • [Language] por
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] PORTUGAL
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 22
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17. O'Brien MM, Donaldson SS, Whittemore AS, Link MP: Second malignant neoplasms among survivors of pediatric Hodgkin disease treated with low-dose radiation (15-25.5 Gy) and chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10003

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  • [Title] Second malignant neoplasms among survivors of pediatric Hodgkin disease treated with low-dose radiation (15-25.5 Gy) and chemotherapy.
  • : 10003 Background: Second malignant neoplasms (SMN) are a known complication of Hodgkin disease (HD) treatment.
  • We report the occurrence of SMN among pediatric HD survivors treated at Stanford with chemotherapy and low-dose radiation from 1970 to 1990.
  • METHODS: Patients received 6 cycles of MOPP (mechlorethamine, vincristine, prednisone, procarbazine) with 15-25.5 Gy radiation ± 10 Gy boost or 3 MOPP and 3 ABVD cycles (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) with 15 Gy radiation ± 10 Gy boost.
  • Multivariate analysis was performed with Cox proportional hazards regression using chronological age as the time scale.
  • Four patients developed secondary leukemia.
  • Fifteen patients developed 17 secondary solid tumors (5 thyroid carcinomas, 6 breast carcinomas, 4 sarcomas, 1 bladder paraganglioma, 1 melanoma) at a median of 15.4 years.
  • All solid tumors except the melanoma occurred within or at the margin of radiation fields, ranging in dose from 15-26.5 Gy.
  • Cumulative incidence of any SMN is 17% (95%CI 10.5-26.7) at 20 years following HD diagnosis.
  • In univariate analysis, older age at HD diagnosis (>11 years) and female gender were associated with SMN (p<0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of SMN in pediatric HD survivors is elevated following treatment with chemotherapy and low-dose radiation.

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  • (PMID = 27962547.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Shlevkov NB, Bakalov SA, Pasha SP, Sergakova LM, Nesterenko LIu, Sergienko VB: [Prediction of results of antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients with malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias, based on the prognostic value of left ventricular contractility parameters]. Kardiologiia; 2007;47(7):41-50

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Prediction of results of antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients with malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias, based on the prognostic value of left ventricular contractility parameters].
  • In 44 patients (3 women and 41 men, mean age 54 +/- 11 years) with malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias (MVT) we assessed dependence of results of testing of antiarrhythmic drugs and efficacy of their long term use for prevention of recurrences of MVT on topography of derangement of local left ventricular (LV) contractility.
  • Testing of antiarrhythmic drugs was performed under control of repetitive intracardiac electrophysiological studies.
  • According to ROC-analysis most precise markers of positive results of drug testing were values of local ejection fraction (EF) in apical LV segment (10th segment on RNV) above 55%.
  • Signs predisposing to absence of MVT recurrences during long term use of antiarrhythmic drugs were lack of mitral regurgitation (above I degree) according to echocardiography data, values of local EF in segment of lateral LV wall (4th segment on RNV) exceeding 42%, or value of LV end diastolic volume less than 365 ml according to RNV data.
  • Parameters of local LV contractility are most precise markers of results of the use of antiarrhythmic drugs in patients with MVT, their diagnostic value is hair than that of global LVEF.
  • Efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs at electrophysiologic testing and long term follow-up are associated with different parameters of local LV contractility.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / therapeutic use. Myocardial Contraction / drug effects. Tachycardia, Ventricular / drug therapy. Tachycardia, Ventricular / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Echocardiography. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis. ROC Curve. Radionuclide Ventriculography. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Ventricular Dysfunction, Left / physiopathology. Ventricular Function, Left

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  • (PMID = 18260894.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-9040
  • [Journal-full-title] Kardiologiia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kardiologiia
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents
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19. Kusljugić Z, Divković K, Braković F, Smajić E, Buksa M, Praso M, Boskailo H: [Arrhythmia and left ventricle remodeling in acute myocardial infarct: recommendations for drug therapy]. Med Arh; 2004;58(2 Suppl 1):5-7
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  • [Title] [Arrhythmia and left ventricle remodeling in acute myocardial infarct: recommendations for drug therapy].
  • Our study had for the aim to examine relationship between postinfarction left ventricle dilatation and appearance of arrhythhmias, and to show drug effects on remodelling.
  • Patients who developed progressive left ventricle dilatation had higher mortality then patients without changes of left ventricle volume, and mortality is due of sudden cardiac death.
  • Drugs who had preventive effects or reverse remodelling can help in prevention of malignant arrhythhmias and sudden cardiac death.
  • The combined therapy with ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers and aldosterone antagonists is showed as the most-effective in prevention of remodelling, appearaance of arrhythhmias and sudden cardiac death.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / administration & dosage. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Arrhythmias, Cardiac / prevention & control. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists / administration & dosage. Myocardial Infarction / complications. Ventricular Remodeling / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Death, Sudden, Cardiac / prevention & control. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular / etiology. Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 15202297.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Medicinski arhiv
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Arh
  • [Language] bos
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists
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20. Berger CL, Edelson R: The life cycle of cutaneous T cell lymphoma reveals opportunities for targeted drug therapy. Curr Cancer Drug Targets; 2004 Nov;4(7):609-19
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  • [Title] The life cycle of cutaneous T cell lymphoma reveals opportunities for targeted drug therapy.
  • The diverse clinical presentations of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) have been unified by immunologic characterization of the malignant T cells as an expansion of clonal, CD4+ inducer T cells with affinity for epidermal association with Langerhans cells (LC), an immature member of the dendritic cell (DC) family.
  • Growth of the CTCL cells requires direct contact with the DC and both cell types survive in the presence of supportive cytokines for 3 months.
  • Separation of the CTCL cells and the DC, or DC maturation truncates the synergy between the two cell populations and results in rapid death of both cell types.
  • The immature DC are aggressively phagocytic and can engulf apoptotic CTCL cells that have exhausted their proliferative potential and present peptides derived from the apoptotic material in class II MHC molecules to the T cell receptor (TCR) of the CD4+ CTCL cell.
  • Understanding the CTCL cell life cycle unveils a variety of potential targets that can be exploited for therapeutic intervention.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15578918.001).
  • [ISSN] 1568-0096
  • [Journal-full-title] Current cancer drug targets
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Cancer Drug Targets
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 91
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26. Keller G, Schally AV, Nagy A, Baker B, Halmos G, Engel JB: Effective therapy of experimental human malignant melanomas with a targeted cytotoxic somatostatin analogue without induction of multi-drug resistance proteins. Int J Oncol; 2006 Jun;28(6):1507-13
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  • [Title] Effective therapy of experimental human malignant melanomas with a targeted cytotoxic somatostatin analogue without induction of multi-drug resistance proteins.
  • Malignant melanomas are characterized by a high intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy.
  • Multiple drug resistance (MDR) can be mediated by transport proteins such as MDR-1, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) or lung resistance protein (LRP).
  • We evaluated the expression of somatostatin receptors on human malignant melanoma tumor lines MRI-H255 and MRI-H187 and examined the effects of the targeted analogue AN-238 and its cytotoxic radical AN-201 on growth of these tumors in nude mice.
  • We also studied the effects of AN-238 and AN-201 on the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1 and LRP by real-time PCR.
  • Targeted therapy with AN-238 did not produce an induction of mRNA of MDR-1, MRP-1 or LRP.
  • Our findings show that targeted chemotherapy with cytotoxic somatostatin analogue AN-238 inhibits the growth of malignant melanomas.
  • AN-238 could provide a novel treatment approach for advanced malignant melanomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Melanoma / drug therapy. Octreotide / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Animals. Base Sequence. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival / drug effects. DNA Primers. Drug Resistance, Multiple. Humans. Kinetics. Mice. Mice, Nude. P-Glycoprotein / drug effects. P-Glycoprotein / genetics. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Transplantation, Heterologous

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  • (PMID = 16685451.001).
  • [ISSN] 1019-6439
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / P-Glycoprotein; 99660-13-6 / RC 121; RWM8CCW8GP / Octreotide
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27. Grubisić-Cabo F, Vrdoljak E: Drug-induced hepatitis in a patient with malignant melanoma treated with interferon alfa 2b adjuvantly who had been administered gemfibrozil in therapy. Med Oncol; 2006;23(1):121-4
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  • [Title] Drug-induced hepatitis in a patient with malignant melanoma treated with interferon alfa 2b adjuvantly who had been administered gemfibrozil in therapy.
  • A well-known side effect of chemotherapy, covering a wide range of drugs, is drug-induced hepatitis.
  • We are reporting on a 61-yr-old female patient whose malignant melanoma had been surgically removed, and on whom adjuvant therapy with interferon alfa 2b was initiated.
  • After the patient was started on interferon alfa therapy, continuously increasing values of triglyceride were measured.
  • Therefore, 3 mo after the introduction of adjuvant therapy, gemfibrozil was prescribed at a dose of 600 mg per day.
  • Within a few days after the patient had been taking this combined therapy, the clinical and laboratory values of drug-induced hepatitis developed.
  • Soon after discontinuance of treatment by both drugs, the signs and symptoms of hepatitis disappeared.
  • Adjuvant interferon therapy was not continued afterward owing to the patient's wish.
  • We do not know if the hepatitis was the side effect to gemfibrozil alone, or the side effect was a result of an interaction between the two drugs.
  • Our intention in this article is to point out that prescription of any drugs, especially new ones, should be balanced and carefully monitored because of possible side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury / etiology. Gemfibrozil / adverse effects. Hypolipidemic Agents / adverse effects. Interferon-alpha / adverse effects. Melanoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Interactions. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Recombinant Proteins

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  • [Cites] Tumori. 1992 Oct 31;78(5):353-5 [1494811.001]
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  • (PMID = 16645237.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-0560
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical oncology (Northwood, London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Hypolipidemic Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 43K1W2T1M6 / interferon alfa-2b; Q8X02027X3 / Gemfibrozil
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28. Russell CS, Lang C, McCambridge M, Calhoun B: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol; 2001 Nov;98(5 Pt 2):906-8
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  • [Title] Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in pregnancy.
  • BACKGROUND: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome can be a serious neurologic complication of drug therapy during pregnancy.
  • After being given haldol for agitation, she developed fever, increasing agitation, rigidity, tachycardia, and tremors; she was diagnosed as having neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
  • CONCLUSION: Despite the common use of antipsychotic medications, neuroleptic malignant syndrome is seen infrequently during pregnancy.
  • The diagnosis can be difficult to make, but if suspected, it can be treated successfully.
  • [MeSH-major] Antipsychotic Agents / adverse effects. Haloperidol / adverse effects. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome. Pregnancy Complications / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Pneumonia, Viral / psychology. Pregnancy. Pregnancy Complications, Infectious / psychology. Psychomotor Agitation / drug therapy


29. Oborotova NA: [Results of creating domestic medicinal forms of antineoplastic agents at the N. N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences]. Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk; 2001;(9):19-24
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  • Since there is a rise in morbidity and mortality rates due to malignant neoplasms, their drug therapy along with radiation and surgical methods remains a burning problem of modern medicine.
  • Empirical and rational approaches to searching for new drugs have given rise to cancer agents that are widely used in clinical practice today.
  • By taking into account the chemical and biological features of experimentally chosen active cytostatics, emphasis should be laid on the particular importance of development of effective dosage forms of antitumor substances by conducting chemical analytical, pharmacological engineering, biopharmaceutical, and pharmacokinetic studies.
  • The purpose of the present paper is to assess the retrospective and present status of studies to design dosage forms of cancer drugs in our and foreign countries, and to pool the results of the author's own studies in designing dosage forms of antitumor substances from classes of chloroethylamines, nitrosoalkyl ureas, complex metal compounds, anthracene diones, antibiotics of plant origin, etc.

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  • (PMID = 11676248.001).
  • [ISSN] 0869-6047
  • [Journal-full-title] Vestnik Rossiiskoi akademii meditsinskikh nauk
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vestn. Akad. Med. Nauk SSSR
  • [Language] RUS
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Dosage Forms
  • [Number-of-references] 20
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30. Mizuno Y, Takubo H, Mizuta E, Kuno S: Malignant syndrome in Parkinson's disease: concept and review of the literature. Parkinsonism Relat Disord; 2003 Apr;9 Suppl 1:S3-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant syndrome in Parkinson's disease: concept and review of the literature.
  • We reviewed literature on malignant syndrome occurring in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during the course of drug therapy.
  • The clinical features were essentially similar to those of neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
  • The immediate triggering event was, most often, discontinuation or reduction of anti-parkinsonian drugs, particularly of levodopa.
  • But no anti-parkinsonian drug was the exception to the induction of malignant syndrome.
  • Early treatment with intravenous fluid infusion and external body cooling are essential for good recovery.
  • It has been claimed that they are effective; however, randomized controlled studies are needed to explicitly prove the efficacy of these drugs in malignant syndrome associated with PD.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiparkinson Agents / adverse effects. Levodopa / adverse effects. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome / etiology. Parkinson Disease / drug therapy

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  • [CommentIn] Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2003 Dec;10(2):115-6 [14644003.001]
  • (PMID = 12735909.001).
  • [ISSN] 1353-8020
  • [Journal-full-title] Parkinsonism & related disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Parkinsonism Relat. Disord.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiparkinson Agents; 46627O600J / Levodopa
  • [Number-of-references] 56
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31. Wakabayashi T, Hatano N, Kajita Y, Yoshida T, Mizuno M, Taniguchi K, Ohno T, Nagasaka T, Yoshida J: Initial and maintenance combination treatment with interferon-beta, MCNU (Ranimustine), and radiotherapy for patients with previously untreated malignant glioma. J Neurooncol; 2000 Aug;49(1):57-62
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  • [Title] Initial and maintenance combination treatment with interferon-beta, MCNU (Ranimustine), and radiotherapy for patients with previously untreated malignant glioma.
  • Combined treatment with interferon-beta, MCNU (Ranimustine), and radiotherapy was assessed in patients with malignant glioma who had not received previous cytotoxic drug therapy.
  • Forty-three patients up to 75 years old with histopathologically confirmed malignant glioma were studied.
  • Of the 43 patients who completed initial therapy, 19 were given sequential maintenance therapy.
  • Survival time was much longer with than without maintenance therapy.
  • We concluded that this combination therapy had a pronounced effect on untreated malignant glioma, particularly in patients whose initial therapy was followed up with maintenance therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Interferon-beta / administration & dosage. Male. Middle Aged. Nitrosourea Compounds / administration & dosage. Survival Analysis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11131987.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Nitrosourea Compounds; 77238-31-4 / Interferon-beta; RYH2T97J77 / ranimustine
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32. González E, Andrés A, Polanco N, Hernández A, Morales E, Hernandez E, Huerta A, Ortuño T, Gutiérrez Martínez E, Praga M, Morales JM: Everolimus represents an advance in immunosuppression for patients who have developed cancer after renal transplantation. Transplant Proc; 2009 Jul-Aug;41(6):2332-3
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  • [Title] Everolimus represents an advance in immunosuppression for patients who have developed cancer after renal transplantation.
  • The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the proliferation signal inhibitor immunosuppressant drugs everolimus among patients who develop neoplasms after renal transplantation.
  • Treatment was initiated with everolimus with or without CNIs.
  • There was a low percentage of patients with relapse of their tumor.
  • One patient had a relapse of bladder cancer with tumor progression at 3 years; another patient with melanoma developed lymph node invasion.
  • The results suggested that tumor relapse was low.
  • The results suggested that immunosuppression with everolimus combined with low doses of CNIs or in single-drug therapy is safe immunosuppression for patients who develop posttransplant malignant diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Kidney Transplantation / immunology. Neoplasms / complications. Postoperative Complications. Sirolimus / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Creatinine / blood. Cyclosporine / therapeutic use. Everolimus. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mycophenolic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Mycophenolic Acid / therapeutic use. Proteinuria. Recurrence. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Tacrolimus / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 19715911.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2623
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; 9242ECW6R0 / mycophenolate mofetil; 9HW64Q8G6G / Everolimus; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine; HU9DX48N0T / Mycophenolic Acid; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus; WM0HAQ4WNM / Tacrolimus
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33. Faber TS, Zehender M: [Antiarrhythmic therapy in patients with heart failure]. Ther Umsch; 2000 May;57(5):324-32
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  • [Title] [Antiarrhythmic therapy in patients with heart failure].
  • [Transliterated title] Therapie kardialer Arrhythmien bei Herzinsuffizienz.
  • Two therapeutic strategies are currently available for therapy and prevention of malignant ventricular arrhythmias and subsequent sudden arrhythmic death: antiarrhythmic drug therapy and implantable defibrillators.
  • Betablockers exert a favorable antiarrhythmic action without increasing proarrhythmia, thus betablockers may serve as a basic medication in patients at risk for sudden death.
  • However, the general use of antiarrhythmic drug therapy for symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias is not recommended, as these drugs have been shown to increase mortality in patients with severe congestive heart failure due to proarrhythmic or negative inotropic effects (e.g. class Ia antiarrhythmics).
  • Even class III antiarrhythmic drugs such as amiodarone, which has been studied sufficiently in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, is not effective enough for significant reduction of cardiac mortality in patients with symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias and depressed ventricular function (e.g.
  • Dofetilide has also not been shown to prolong life significantly by suppressing malignant ventricular arrhythmias (DIAMOND-Study).
  • In patients with symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias or aborted sudden death, ICD therapy has been proven to be superior to antiarrhythmic drug therapy in cardiac mortality reduction as a secondary prevention strategy (e.g.
  • For primary prevention of sudden arrhythmic death in high risk patients, 2 studies (MADIT, MUSST) have already demonstrated favorable results, decreasing mortality by ICD therapy in selected patient populations with partly-reduced ventricular function and unsustained but inducible ventricular tachycardias.
  • From available data, antiarrhythmic drug therapy in high risk patients is not justified on a routine basis, whereas ICD therapy as a secondary and perhaps primary prevention strategy will significantly reduce cardiac mortality in patients with severe heart failure.
  • Sotalol, a class III antiarrhythmic agent, has recently been shown to reduce ICD-shock delivery which indicates that concomitant drug therapy in patients with an ICD device already implanted may be beneficial in terms of reducing ICD discharges due to ventricular and supraventricular tachycardias.
  • In patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure, restitution of sinus rhythm is the primary therapeutic goal which can be safely achieved by amiodarone and dofetilide (DIAMOND).
  • In the latter, continuous monitoring of the patient is mandatory because of increased risk of torsade de pointes arrhythmias during the first days of drug administration.
  • In patients with chronic atrial fibrillation rate control and anticoagulation with warfarin is the primary therapeutic option, which can be achieved with either drug treatment (Digoxin, betablockers, amiodarone) or by His bundle ablation with subsequent pacemaker insertion.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / therapeutic use. Amiodarone / therapeutic use. Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / therapeutic use. Arrhythmias, Cardiac / therapy. Cardiac Pacing, Artificial. Heart Failure / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Pacemaker, Artificial

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  • (PMID = 10859993.001).
  • [ISSN] 0040-5930
  • [Journal-full-title] Therapeutische Umschau. Revue thérapeutique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ther Umsch
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] SWITZERLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents; N3RQ532IUT / Amiodarone
  • [Number-of-references] 60
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34. Nilsson P, Werkö L: [Swedish research in hypertension]. Sven Med Tidskr; 2001;5(1):61-74
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  • In Sweden, research in hypertension has been on-going since the early 1920's when Eskil Kylin was the first to describe hypertension as part of a metabolic cardiovascular syndrome.
  • Later on several other researchers and clinicians have contributed to the development of medical understanding of hypertension and its treatment.
  • Bertil Hood was the one who started modern drug therapy for malignant hypertension in 1950 when hexamethonium was used, which was a life-saving drug but with many serious adverse reactions.
  • Later on other drugs have been developed many of them first tested in smaller haemodynamic studies before used in clinical trials.
  • In spite of the fact that hypertensive patients constitute the largest patient group of all, with currently 700.000 treated patients in Sweden, it is still not well established which therapy and other interventions are the most beneficial and cost-effective for long-term treatment.

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  • (PMID = 11820245.001).
  • [ISSN] 1402-9871
  • [Journal-full-title] Svensk medicinhistorisk tidskrift
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sven Med Tidskr
  • [Language] swe
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Historical Article; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Sweden
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35. Liao HT, Chien CH, Chen CH, Wang HP, Huang DF: Recurrent autoimmune inner ear disease (AIED) and polyarteritis nodosa in a patient with large cell lung carcinoma. Clin Rheumatol; 2007 Jun;26(6):1008-10
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lung Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We report a 72-year-old male patient with polyarteritis nodosa treated continuously for 5 years with aggressive immunosuppressive drugs, including cyclophosphamide, who experienced three episodes of acute hearing loss during treatment.
  • During the period of treatment, three episodes of AIED occurred, and eventually, lung cancer developed.
  • From the time relationship and clinical manifestations of neuropathy and livedo reticularis, the first episode of hearing loss was more likely to be related to vasculitis itself, while the third episode may well have been associated with the development of lung cancer given the dramatic improvement in the clinical condition following treatment of the tumor by excision and cancer chemotherapy.
  • For those patients with autoimmune disease who are on long-term immunosuppressive drug therapy, active surveillance for a nascent malignant tumor should be exercised if AIED recurs or persists.


36. Hesketh JC, Herrera D, Zicha S, Nattel S: Novel targets for cardiac antiarrhythmic drug development. Curr Pharm Des; 2005;11(15):1959-74
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Arrhythmia.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Novel targets for cardiac antiarrhythmic drug development.
  • Cardiac arrhythmias remain a major source of morbidity and mortality in developed countries.
  • Antiarrhythmic drug therapy was traditionally the mainstay of cardiac arrhythmia treatment; however, drug therapy of cardiac arrhythmias has been plagued by incomplete efficacy and by potentially serious adverse reactions, of which the most worrisome has been a potential for malignant proarrhythmia and related effects to increase cardiac mortality.
  • This article reviews the principal arrhythmia mechanisms and their ionic determinants, and discusses potential innovative approaches to new antiarrhythmic drug development, including the consideration of novel ionic targets, potential biophysical approaches and non-channel components involved in composing the arrhythmic substrate.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / therapeutic use. Arrhythmias, Cardiac / drug therapy. Drug Design
  • [MeSH-minor] Action Potentials / drug effects. Action Potentials / physiology. Humans. Ion Channels / antagonists & inhibitors. Ion Channels / physiology. Technology, Pharmaceutical / methods. Technology, Pharmaceutical / trends

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  • (PMID = 15974970.001).
  • [ISSN] 1381-6128
  • [Journal-full-title] Current pharmaceutical design
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Pharm. Des.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents; 0 / Ion Channels
  • [Number-of-references] 211
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37. Cullen SN, Chapman RW: Review article: current management of primary sclerosing cholangitis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther; 2005 Apr 15;21(8):933-48
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Few large randomized controlled trials of drug therapy have been published.
  • Drug therapy is useful for alleviating symptoms.
  • Consensus is emerging on the issues of screening for the malignant complications of PSC and the indications for liver transplantation are becoming broader and encompassing the earliest stages of cholangiocarcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Cholangitis, Sclerosing / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cholagogues and Choleretics / therapeutic use. Cholestasis / etiology. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Endoscopy, Digestive System / methods. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / complications. Liver Cirrhosis / complications. Liver Failure / etiology. Liver Transplantation / methods. Stents. Ursodeoxycholic Acid / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15813829.001).
  • [ISSN] 0269-2813
  • [Journal-full-title] Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cholagogues and Choleretics; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 724L30Y2QR / Ursodeoxycholic Acid
  • [Number-of-references] 189
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38. Yettimis E, Trompetas V, Varsamidakis N, Courcoutsakis N, Polymeropoulos V, Kalokairinos E: Pathologic splenic rupture: an unusual presentation of pancreatic cancer. Pancreas; 2003 Oct;27(3):273-4
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pancreatic Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Pathologic splenic rupture is an uncommon finding associated with a long list of pathologic conditions including infectious diseases, hematologic diseases, metabolic disorders, drug therapy, primary and secondary benign or malignant splenic tumors, acute or chronic pancreatitis, collagen disorders, pregnancy, and others.
  • [MeSH-major] Pancreatic Neoplasms / complications. Pancreatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Splenic Rupture / etiology

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  • (PMID = 14508136.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-4828
  • [Journal-full-title] Pancreas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pancreas
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Kendi TK, Caglar S, Huvaj S, Bademci G, Kendi M, Alparslan S: Suprasellar germ cell tumor with subarachnoid seeding MRI and MR spectroscopy findings. Clin Imaging; 2004 Nov-Dec;28(6):404-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Suprasellar germ cell tumor with subarachnoid seeding MRI and MR spectroscopy findings.
  • Patient had a history of depression unresponsive to drug therapy and recently developed diabetes insipidus.
  • MR spectroscopy of the mass showed prominent lipid peak suggesting high malignant potential.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis. Germinoma / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon / methods

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  • (PMID = 15531139.001).
  • [ISSN] 0899-7071
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical imaging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. Zlatnik EIu, Kapkina NN, Zaderin VP, Zakora GI: [Immunocorrective effect of alternating magnetic field in the postoperative period in malignant bladder cancer]. Vopr Onkol; 2001;47(3):312-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Immunocorrective effect of alternating magnetic field in the postoperative period in malignant bladder cancer].
  • MF application was followed by higher T- and B-lymphocyte and CD4+, CD16+ cell levels as well as enhanced T-cell activity; no postoperative complications were registered and tumor relapse rates were relatively low.
  • The procedure may substitute drug therapy for immunocorrection and to avoid recurrence of bladder cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Lymphocyte Count. Male. Middle Aged. Receptors, IgG. T-Lymphocyte Subsets. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11544830.001).
  • [ISSN] 0507-3758
  • [Journal-full-title] Voprosy onkologii
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vopr Onkol
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Receptors, IgG
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41. Stewart-Amidei C: Managing symptoms and side effects during brain tumor illness. Expert Rev Neurother; 2005 Nov;5(6 Suppl):S71-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Managing symptoms and side effects during brain tumor illness.
  • Malignant brain tumors and the therapies used to treat them can present challenging problems.
  • Headache is the most common symptom during brain tumor illness.
  • Etiology determines the exact management approach, but pharmacologic and non pharmacologic measures may be used.
  • Seizures also commonly occur and are best managed with anti epileptic drug therapy.
  • Early discussion about end-of-life issues is necessary because the disease itself can impair decision-making ability.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / physiopathology. Brain Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Anticonvulsants / adverse effects. Cognition Disorders / etiology. Cognition Disorders / therapy. Dexamethasone / adverse effects. Expert Testimony. Headache / etiology. Headache / therapy. Humans. Seizures / etiology. Seizures / therapy

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  • [CommentIn] Expert Rev Neurother. 2005 Nov;5(6 Suppl):1-2 [16274264.001]
  • (PMID = 16274273.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8360
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of neurotherapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Neurother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticonvulsants; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone
  • [Number-of-references] 23
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42. Norden AD, Drappatz J, Ciampa AS, Doherty L, LaFrankie DC, Kesari S, Wen PY: Colon perforation during antiangiogenic therapy for malignant glioma. Neuro Oncol; 2009 Feb;11(1):92-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Colon perforation during antiangiogenic therapy for malignant glioma.
  • Antiangiogenic drugs have emerged as effective treatment options for patients with recurrent malignant gliomas (MGs).
  • Though this class of drugs is generally well tolerated, rare life-threatening complications, including thromboembolism, hemorrhage, and gastrointestinal (GI) perforation, are reported.
  • We describe six cases of GI perforation among 244 glioma patients (2.5%) during treatment with antiangiogenic agents in combination with chemotherapy and corticosteroids.
  • Because GI perforation is a life-threatening yet treatable complication, neurooncologists must have a low threshold to consider it in patients on antiangiogenic drug therapy who present with abdominal pain and other GI complaints.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / blood supply. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Glioma / blood supply. Glioma / drug therapy. Intestinal Perforation / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Humans. Middle Aged. Neovascularization, Pathologic. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18757774.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8517
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuro-oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
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43. Indap MA, Radhika S, Motiwale L, Rao KV: Inhibitory effect of cinnamoyl compounds against human malignant cell line. Indian J Exp Biol; 2006 Mar;44(3):216-20
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Inhibitory effect of cinnamoyl compounds against human malignant cell line.
  • The current study demonstrated synergy with combination of drug therapy, and suggested that combination of ferulic acid and cisplatin synergistically inhibited cellular proliferation.
  • Cytotoxic synergy was observed independent of the sequence of addition of two drugs to cultured cells.
  • These findings suggested that among the cinnamoyl compounds, CMN was most potent and FER appeared to be a better modulating agent on human malignant cell line.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / chemistry. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Curcuma / chemistry. Curcumin / chemistry. Curcumin / pharmacology. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Cisplatin / chemistry. Cisplatin / pharmacology. Cyclodextrins / chemistry. Cyclodextrins / pharmacology. Flavonoids / chemistry. Flavonoids / pharmacology. Humans. K562 Cells. Phenols / chemistry. Phenols / pharmacology. Polyphenols

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  • (PMID = 16538860.001).
  • [ISSN] 0019-5189
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of experimental biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J. Exp. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cyclodextrins; 0 / Flavonoids; 0 / Phenols; 0 / Polyphenols; IT942ZTH98 / Curcumin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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44. Alharbi A, Drummond D, Pinto A, Kirk V: Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis causing chronic stridor and delayed speech in an 18-month-old boy. Can Respir J; 2006 Oct;13(7):381-3
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Speech and Communication Disorders.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Human papilloma virus types 6 and 11 are important in the etiology of papillomas and are most probably transmitted from mother to child during birth.
  • Although spontaneous remission is frequent, pulmonary spread and/or malignant transformation resulting in death has been reported.
  • CO2 laser evaporation of papillomas and adjuvant drug therapy using lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha are the most common treatments.
  • However, several other treatments have been tried, with varying success.
  • [MeSH-minor] Bronchoscopy. Chronic Disease. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Infant. Laser Therapy. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Retreatment

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  • (PMID = 17036092.001).
  • [ISSN] 1198-2241
  • [Journal-full-title] Canadian respiratory journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can. Respir. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2683292
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45. Sawhney R, Abraham M, Ganjoo P, Tandon MS: Anesthetic considerations in a patient with severe aortic stenosis for craniotomy. J Neurosurg Anesthesiol; 2003 Apr;15(2):151-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We describe the anesthetic management of a patient with a malignant brain tumor who was found to have severe aortic stenosis during preanesthetic evaluation.
  • She underwent palliative balloon aortic valvuloplasty prior to surgery, and this combined with appropriate monitoring and drug therapy resulted in a satisfactory outcome.
  • Adverse intraoperative events like hypotension and left ventricular failure occurred; however, these events were transient and responded to treatment.

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  • (PMID = 12658002.001).
  • [ISSN] 0898-4921
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgical anesthesiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Neurosurg Anesthesiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Dalton WS, Hazlehurst L, Shain K, Landowski T, Alsina M: Targeting the bone marrow microenvironment in hematologic malignancies. Semin Hematol; 2004 Apr;41(2 Suppl 4):1-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Unicellular drug-resistant models have been critical in elucidating intrinsic drug-resistant mechanisms; however, these models do not consider resistance mechanisms that may be elicited by extrinsic influences such as the tumor microenvironment.
  • We propose that specific niches within the tumor microenvironment may provide a sanctuary for subpopulations of tumor cells to evade or circumvent drug-induced death and that this may represent a form of de novo drug resistance.
  • We have found that elements of the bone marrow microenvironment, including extracellular matrices and normal stromal elements, protect malignant cells, including leukemia and myeloma cells, from drug-induced cell death.
  • This extrinsic form of drug resistance may allow cells to survive initial drug treatment and thereby acquire a more complex, intrinsic drug-resistant phenotype.
  • Focusing on this form of de novo drug resistance may ultimately prevent the emergence of acquired drug resistance and enhance drug therapy for hematologic malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow / pathology. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Cell Communication / drug effects. Drug Delivery Systems. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Humans

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  • (PMID = 15190509.001).
  • [ISSN] 0037-1963
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 82533; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA77859
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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52. Ma KJ, Li N, Wang HT, Chu JM, Fang PH, Yao Y, Ma J, Hua W, Zhang S, Wang FZ, Li Z, Pu JL: Clinical study of 39 Chinese patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy. Chin Med J (Engl); 2009 May 20;122(10):1133-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of ARVD/C patients from China, particularly to define the features of electrocardiograph and treatment outcomes.
  • Seven patients had cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD) implanted plus drug therapy and 17 patients took antiarrhythmic drugs alone.
  • One patient died of ventricular fibrillation suddenly and one patient underwent heart transplantation for progressive biventricular heart failure during the drug therapy alone.
  • ICD provided life-saving protection by effectively terminating malignant arrhythmias, and the high recurrence of VT was the major problem of RFCA therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia / diagnosis. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / therapeutic use. Catheter Ablation. Defibrillators, Implantable. Electrocardiography. Female. Heart Transplantation. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19493458.001).
  • [ISSN] 0366-6999
  • [Journal-full-title] Chinese medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chin. Med. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents
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53. Soucek-Hadwiger B, Döller W: [Secondary malignant lymphedema]. Wien Med Wochenschr; 2006 May;156(9-10):309-13
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Secondary malignant lymphedema].
  • [Transliterated title] Das sekundäre maligne Lymphödem.
  • The diagnosis of a secondary malignant lymphoedema which is caused by tumor infiltration or tumor compression is a very important sign for an unknown primary, but also for a tumor relapse.
  • It is a big challenge, because it is often associated with a long story of woe, severe pain and a big reduction in mobility.
  • Only an early diagnosis and introduction of a tumor-specific therapy is able to prevent the progress of this disease.
  • As the secondary lymphedema is a chronic progressive disease, the early beginning of the "Complex physical Oedematherapy" is necessary, which consists of a combination of manual lymph drainage, compression by the use of bandages and special stockings for compression, physical training to improve mobility, dermatological care and drug therapy.
  • Therefore the therapeutic goal is to reach a stable disease without symptoms, which means reducing the lymphedema to "Stadium 0, latent stage".
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma, Ductal / surgery. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphedema / therapy. Mastectomy, Segmental. Palliative Care. Postoperative Complications / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Long-Term Care. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Neoplasm Staging


54. Li ZQ, Zhang M, Jin YZ, Zhang WW, Liu Y, Yuan L, Cui LJ, Liu XZ, Yu X, Hu TS: [Safety and efficacy of intracoronary transplantation of G-CSF mobilized autologous peripheral blood stem cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction]. Zhonghua Xin Xue Guan Bing Za Zhi; 2006 Feb;34(2):99-102
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  • METHODS: Patients with AMI were randomly assigned to receive intracoronary PBSCs transplantation following bone marrow cells mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (300-600 microg/day subcutaneously for 5 days) in addition to standard therapy (standard drug therapy and PCI, PBSCs transplantation group, n = 35) or standard therapy (standard drug therapy and PCI, n = 35).
  • One day after G-CSF treatment was finished the patient's mononuclear cells were harvested by Baxter CS 3000 blood cell separator in a volume of 57 ml and then transferred into the infarct related artery by occluding the over the wire balloon and infusing artery through balloon center lumen.
  • RESULTS: No severe side effects of G-CSF treatment could be observed.
  • Malignant arrhythmias were not observed either.
  • Left ventricular function was significantly improved 6 months after G-CSF mobilized autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation compared to baseline (global left ventricular function ejection fraction: 57.1 +/- 7.8 vs. 50.0 +/- 8.2%, P < 0.0001; WMSI: 1.101 +/- 0.118 vs. 1.219 +/- 0.190, P < 0.0001; left end-systolic volume: 52.6 +/- 20.3 vs. 63.8 +/- 23.9 ml, P = 0.01 and left end-diastolic volume: 119.2 +/- 30.3 vs. 134.2 +/- 36.7 ml, P = 0.07) while these parameters remained unchanged in the control group.
  • CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates that G-CSF mobilized autologous intracoronary PBSCs transplantation is a safe and feasible treatment for patients with AMI and global left ventricular function is improved and left ventricular remodeling attenuated at six-month follow-up.
  • [MeSH-major] Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization / methods. Myocardial Infarction / therapy. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16626571.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-3758
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua xin xue guan bing za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Xin Xue Guan Bing Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
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55. Oliver L, Olivier C, Marhuenda FB, Campone M, Vallette FM: Hypoxia and the malignant glioma microenvironment: regulation and implications for therapy. Curr Mol Pharmacol; 2009 Nov;2(3):263-84
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hypoxia and the malignant glioma microenvironment: regulation and implications for therapy.
  • Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) tumors are the most common type of brain tumors.
  • These tumors are in general very malignant and can be characterized as rapidly progressive astrocytomas.
  • These pathological features are thought to be due to tissue hypoxia.
  • The ability of tumor cells to maintain a balance between an adaptation to hypoxia and cell death is regulated by a family of transcription factors called hypoxia-inducing factors (HIF), which are essential for the regulation of the expression of a large number of hypoxia-responsive genes.
  • The hypothesis that tumor hypoxia would facilitate the likelihood of metastases, tumor recurrence, resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and the invasive potential; all of which culminate in a decrease in patient survival.
  • In this review we will summarize the role of hypoxia in GBM with regard to drug therapy and toxicity and attempt to describe the possible interactions between hypoxia and apoptosis.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Drug Therapy. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Glycolysis. Humans. Necrosis. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neovascularization, Pathologic. Radiotherapy. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 20021464.001).
  • [ISSN] 1874-4702
  • [Journal-full-title] Current molecular pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Mol Pharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United Arab Emirates
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1
  • [Number-of-references] 217
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56. Ferguson S, Lesniak MS: Convection enhanced drug delivery of novel therapeutic agents to malignant brain tumors. Curr Drug Deliv; 2007 Apr;4(2):169-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Convection enhanced drug delivery of novel therapeutic agents to malignant brain tumors.
  • In spite of conventional treatment modalities which include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, the survival rates for patients with malignant gliomas remain disappointing.
  • Successful treatment has been limited by difficulties in delivering therapeutic agents to the central nervous system (CNS).
  • Specifically, drug penetration of the blood brain barrier (BBB) poses a unique and challenging problem in glioma therapy.
  • This method was originally introduced and refined in the early 1990s by researchers at the National Institute of Health (NIH) and involves drug infusion under high pressure using intracranial catheters.
  • CED allows for delivery of high concentrations of therapeutic agents directly into brain tumors and surrounding parenchyma.
  • This method eludes the BBB and allows the use of regional drug therapy, while at the same time limiting systemic toxicity.
  • We also discuss future directions and the potential impact of this modality on the treatment of malignant gliomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Glioma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bacterial Toxins / administration & dosage. Blood-Brain Barrier / metabolism. Convection. Exotoxins / administration & dosage. Humans. Infusions, Intralesional. Interleukin-13 / administration & dosage. Interleukin-4 / administration & dosage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Radiopharmaceuticals / administration & dosage. Transferrin / administration & dosage. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17456036.001).
  • [ISSN] 1567-2018
  • [Journal-full-title] Current drug delivery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Drug Deliv
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United Arab Emirates
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Bacterial Toxins; 0 / Exotoxins; 0 / IL13-PE38QQR; 0 / Interleukin-13; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0 / Tf-CRM107; 0 / Transferrin; 0 / interleukin-4-Pseudomonas exotoxin; 207137-56-2 / Interleukin-4
  • [Number-of-references] 66
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57. Heffner JE: Diagnosis and management of malignant pleural effusions. Respirology; 2008 Jan;13(1):5-20

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Diagnosis and management of malignant pleural effusions.
  • Malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) complicate the clinical course of patients with a broad array of malignancies, which are most often due to lymphomas or carcinomas of the breast, lung, gastrointestinal tract or ovaries.
  • Patients may present with a MPE as the initial manifestation of a cancer or develop an effusion during the advanced phases of a known malignancy.
  • In either circumstance, the median survival after presentation with a MPE is 4 months.
  • Effusions may result from direct pleural invasion (MPE) or indirect effects (paraneoplastic effusions), such as impairment of fluid efflux from the pleural space by lymphatic obstruction or pleural effects of cancer radiation or drug therapy.
  • Because only 50% of patients with cancer who develop a pleural effusion during their clinical course have a MPE, careful evaluation of the effusion to establish its aetiology is required to direct therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Pleural Effusion, Malignant / diagnosis. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / therapy

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  • [CommentIn] Respirology. 2008 Sep;13(5):754; author reply 755 [18513239.001]
  • (PMID = 18197908.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-1843
  • [Journal-full-title] Respirology (Carlton, Vic.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Respirology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Number-of-references] 232
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58. Nowak AK, Byrne MJ, Millward MJ, Alvarez JM, Robinson BW: Current chemotherapeutic treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma. Expert Opin Pharmacother; 2004 Dec;5(12):2441-9
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  • [Title] Current chemotherapeutic treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma.
  • Malignant pleural mesothelioma is an aggressive malignancy which is almost always fatal; median survival is usually < 1 year.
  • Until recently, there has been no effective treatment which can improve symptoms and prolong survival.
  • This article reviews recent developments in the treatment of mesothelioma, particularly advances in drug therapy and the use of the current most active drug combination: pemetrexed and cisplatin.
  • Pemetrexed is a novel antifolate drug with multiple enzyme targets.
  • This combination has become the standard of care in mesothelioma treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Mesothelioma / drug therapy. Pleural Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Deoxycytidine / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy / trends. Folic Acid Antagonists / therapeutic use. Glutamates / therapeutic use. Guanine / analogs & derivatives. Guanine / therapeutic use. Humans. Pemetrexed

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  • (PMID = 15571462.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-7666
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Folic Acid Antagonists; 0 / Glutamates; 04Q9AIZ7NO / Pemetrexed; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 5Z93L87A1R / Guanine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  • [Number-of-references] 70
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59. Mekkawy AH, Morris DL, Pourgholami MH: Urokinase plasminogen activator system as a potential target for cancer therapy. Future Oncol; 2009 Nov;5(9):1487-99
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Urokinase plasminogen activator system as a potential target for cancer therapy.
  • Members of this system, including uPA and its receptor (uPAR), are overexpressed in several malignant tumors.
  • This system plays a major role in adhesion, migration, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells, thus making it an important target for anticancer drug therapy.
  • Several strategies, including the use of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, ribozymes, DNAzyme, RNAi, uPA inhibitors, soluble uPAR, catalytically inactive uPA fragments, synthetic peptides and synthetic hybrids are under study, as they interfere with the expression and/or activity of uPA or uPAR in tumor cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator / antagonists & inhibitors. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 19903074.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8301
  • [Journal-full-title] Future oncology (London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Future Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator; EC 3.4.21.73 / Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator
  • [Number-of-references] 111
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60. Rao RD, Uhm JH, Krishnan S, James CD: Genetic and signaling pathway alterations in glioblastoma: relevance to novel targeted therapies. Front Biosci; 2003 May 1;8:e270-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Genetic and signaling pathway alterations in glioblastoma: relevance to novel targeted therapies.
  • Glioblastomas multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults.
  • GBM patients have a dismal prognosis, with a median survival of less than 1 year.
  • Specific genetic defects have been identified that appear to be important for the development, as well as maintenance of the malignant characteristics that are associated with GBM.
  • However, even more exciting in this era of molecularly targeted therapy are the clues these gene alterations provide for identifying signaling mechanisms responsible for carcinogenesis, and for identifying potential therapeutic targets.
  • Cancer drug therapy is currently undergoing a major transition with an attempt to move from the use of cytotoxic drugs towards the use of tumor mechanism-based drugs.
  • Advances such as the decoding of the human genome, combinatorial chemistry, and gene expression profiling have led to an increase in the rate at which new drugs are being developed.
  • In this review, we will describe the most common genetic and signaling pathway alterations that have relevance to new drug development for the treatment of GBM.
  • [MeSH-major] Central Nervous System Neoplasms / drug therapy. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / genetics. Glioblastoma / drug therapy. Glioblastoma / genetics. Mutation. Signal Transduction / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Drug Design. Humans

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  • (PMID = 12700121.001).
  • [ISSN] 1093-9946
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front. Biosci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 123
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61. Grzybowska-Izydorczyk O, Góra-Tybor J, Robak T: [Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the therapy of chronic myeloid leukaemia]. Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online); 2006;60:490-7
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  • [Title] [Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the therapy of chronic myeloid leukaemia].
  • Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a malignant clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem cells resulting in increased myeloid and erythroid cells and platelets, and marked hyperplasia in the bone marrow.
  • Imatinib mesylate (Glivec), a specific small-molecule inhibitor of BCR-ABL, has become the standard drug therapy in all phases of the disease.
  • Considerable progress has recently been made in understanding the structural biology of ABL and the molecular basis for resistance, facilitating the discovery and development of second- generation drugs designed to combat mutant forms of BCR-ABL.
  • The first of these compounds to enter clinical development were dasatinib (BMS-354825) and AMN107 and, from phase I results, both of these promise a breakthrough in the treatment of imatinib-resistant CML.

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  • (PMID = 17013368.001).
  • [ISSN] 1732-2693
  • [Journal-full-title] Postepy higieny i medycyny doswiadczalnej (Online)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online)
  • [Language] POL
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.2 / Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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62. Takeuchi M, Tanizawa A, Mayumi M: Piperacillin plus aztreonam for treatment of neutropenic fever. Pediatr Int; 2003 Jun;45(3):307-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Piperacillin plus aztreonam for treatment of neutropenic fever.
  • However, aminoglycoside-related toxicity occasionally makes this regimen difficult to use as the first-line drug therapy.
  • METHODS: A total of 31 febrile episodes in 16 patients with malignant neoplasms were evaluted.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A combination of piperacillin and aztreonam provides an effective and non-toxic regimen for first-line therapy in febrile patients with neutropenia.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / administration & dosage. Aztreonam / administration & dosage. Bacterial Infections / drug therapy. Drug Therapy, Combination / therapeutic use. Fever / complications. Neoplasms / complications. Neutropenia / complications. Penicillins / administration & dosage. Piperacillin / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 12828586.001).
  • [ISSN] 1328-8067
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatrics international : official journal of the Japan Pediatric Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Penicillins; G2B4VE5GH8 / Aztreonam; X00B0D5O0E / Piperacillin
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63. Mendez MF, Lipton A: Emergent neuroleptic hypersensitivity as a herald of presenile dementia. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci; 2001;13(3):347-56
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  • The authors report 5 patients with psychotic mood disorders and long-standing antipsychotic drug therapy.
  • As they reached 50 to 60 years of age, they unexpectedly developed hypersensitivity to these medications, with rigidity, muteness, or the neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
  • Nearly coincident with this reaction, they developed progressive cognitive deficits consistent with frontotemporal dementia.
  • [MeSH-major] Alzheimer Disease / chemically induced. Antipsychotic Agents / adverse effects. Drug Hypersensitivity / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Dopamine / deficiency. Female. Frontal Lobe / pathology. Frontal Lobe / physiopathology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Mental Disorders / drug therapy. Middle Aged. Neurons / metabolism. Severity of Illness Index. Substantia Nigra / metabolism. Substantia Nigra / pathology. Temporal Lobe / pathology. Temporal Lobe / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 11514641.001).
  • [ISSN] 0895-0172
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antipsychotic Agents; VTD58H1Z2X / Dopamine
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64. Borgia G, Reynaud L, Cerini R, Ciampi R, Schioppa O, Dello Russo M, Gentile I, Piazza M: A case of paracoccidioidomycosis: experience with long-term therapy. Infection; 2000 Mar-Apr;28(2):119-20
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A case of paracoccidioidomycosis: experience with long-term therapy.
  • We describe long-term therapy for paracoccidioidomycosis occurring in a 61-year-old house-painter from Venezuela.
  • The diagnostic examinations made in South America had shown pulmonary granulomatous lesions and an osteolytic pattern of the left knee that had been considered suspect of malignant disease with an indication for limb amputation.
  • With the aid of fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) and culture examination we diagnosed an osteomyelitis by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and initiated therapy with itraconazole, 400 mg per day, reduced to 200 mg per day after 2 months.
  • At the end of 2 years of drug therapy, we observed complete regression of the pulmonary lesions and of the osteolytic area of the left knee.
  • We suggest that this pathology be considered in differential diagnosis of leprosy, tuberculosis, leishmaniasis, and systemic mycoses, even in non-endemic areas.
  • [MeSH-major] Antifungal Agents / administration & dosage. Itraconazole / administration & dosage. Osteomyelitis / drug therapy. Paracoccidioides / isolation & purification. Paracoccidioidomycosis / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy, Needle. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Knee Joint. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 10782401.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8126
  • [Journal-full-title] Infection
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Infection
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 304NUG5GF4 / Itraconazole
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65. Biecker E, Fischer HP, Strunk H, Sauerbruch T: Benign hepatic tumours. Z Gastroenterol; 2003 Feb;41(2):191-200
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Due to advances in imaging procedures like MRI, Cf-scan and ultrasound as well as progress in immunohistochemistry, the appropriate diagnosis is made ina high percentage of patients without laparotomy and resection.
  • Most important in clinical practice is the differential diagnosis of focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatocellular adenoma because of the risk of rupture and bleeding in the latter.
  • Cavernous haemangioma, the most common benign hepatic tumour, rarely needs treatment.
  • The diagnosis of nodular regenerative hyperplasia is often missed and patients present with secondary complications and signs of portal hypertension that necessitate treatment.
  • The main problem in angiomyolipoma is to distinguish it from malignant processes which do require treatment.
  • Because of its clinical presentation, inflammatory pseudotumour is also sometimes confused with a malignant tumour.
  • Therapeutic options are drug therapy or surgical resection.
  • [MeSH-major] Liver Diseases / diagnosis. Liver Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoma, Liver Cell / diagnosis. Adenoma, Liver Cell / pathology. Adult. Aged. Diagnostic Imaging. Focal Nodular Hyperplasia / diagnosis. Focal Nodular Hyperplasia / pathology. Granuloma, Plasma Cell / diagnosis. Granuloma, Plasma Cell / pathology. Hemangioendothelioma / diagnosis. Hemangioendothelioma / pathology. Hemangioma, Cavernous / diagnosis. Hemangioma, Cavernous / pathology. Humans. Infant. Liver / pathology. Liver Regeneration / physiology. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 12650132.001).
  • [ISSN] 0044-2771
  • [Journal-full-title] Zeitschrift für Gastroenterologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Z Gastroenterol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 138
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66. Helmbach H, Rossmann E, Kern MA, Schadendorf D: Drug-resistance in human melanoma. Int J Cancer; 2001 Sep 1;93(5):617-22
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Drug-resistance in human melanoma.
  • Advanced malignant melanoma has a poor prognosis since chemotherapy is mostly ineffective due in part to the intrinsic and/or extrinsic resistance of melanoma cells to systemic treatment with anti-neoplastic agents.
  • The relevance of well-analyzed drug-resistance mechanisms, e.g., intracellular/extracellular transport and induction of certain enzyme systems, is reviewed.
  • Most anti-cancer drugs kill susceptible cells through induction of apoptosis.
  • Therefore, it appears that differences in the apoptotic pathways which lead to apoptotic deficiency may account for the ability of some tumor cells to resist drug therapy.
  • Human melanomas, which are characteristically drug-resistant, are more likely to have altered apoptotic pathways and fewer pro-apoptotic molecules.
  • Tumor cells with these characteristics are seldom sensitive to drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis. DNA Repair / physiology. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / physiology. Melanoma / metabolism

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 11477569.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 65
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67. Alyea EP, DeAngelo DJ, Moldrem J, Pagel JM, Przepiorka D, Sadelin M, Young JW, Giralt S, Bishop M, Riddell S: NCI First International Workshop on The Biology, Prevention and Treatment of Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: report from the committee on prevention of relapse following allogeneic cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2010 Aug;16(8):1037-69
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  • [Title] NCI First International Workshop on The Biology, Prevention and Treatment of Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: report from the committee on prevention of relapse following allogeneic cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies.
  • Herein we review the limits of currently available transplant therapies and the innovative strategies being developed to overcome resistance to therapy or to fill therapeutic modalities not currently available.
  • These novel strategies include nonimmunologic therapies, such as targeted preparative regimens and posttransplant drug therapy, as well as immunologic interventions, including graft engineering, donor lymphocyte infusions, T cell engineering, vaccination, and dendritic cell-based approaches.
  • Several aspects of the biology of the malignant cells as well as the host have been identified that obviate success of even these newer strategies.
  • To maximize the potential for success, we recommend pursuing research to develop additional targeted therapies to be used in the preparative regimen or as maintenance posttransplant, better characterize the T cell and dendritic cells subsets involved in graft-versus-host disease and the graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect, identify strategies for timing immunologic or nonimmunologic therapies to eliminate the noncycling cancer stem cell, identify more targets for immunotherapies, develop new vaccines that will not be limited by HLA, and develop methods to identify populations at very high risk for relapse to accelerate clinical development and avoid toxicity in patients not at risk for relapse.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematologic Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease-Free Survival. Graft vs Host Disease / immunology. Graft vs Host Disease / therapy. Humans. Secondary Prevention. Transplantation Conditioning. Transplantation, Homologous

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  • (PMID = 20580849.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-6536
  • [Journal-full-title] Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA018029; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA018029-36
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS254495; NLM/ PMC3235046
  •  go-up   go-down


68. Rabasseda X: Marching against blood diseases: a report from the 51st Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (December 5-8, 2009 - New Orleans, Lousiana, USA). Drugs Today (Barc); 2010 Mar;46(3):195-230
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Blood Disorders.

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  • Lymphoma, leukemia, myeloma and many other malignant and nonmalignant blood diseases can have a severe impact on the sufferer's life expectancy, quality of life and functional abilities, and require treatment that in many cases is restricted to drug therapy.
  • Many other issues were discussed during last year's American Society of Hematology annual meeting, but important information was also reported and discussed on possibilities for modifying the life cycle of blood cells as a pharmacological strategy aimed at addressing the abnormalities that result in hematological disease for improving the resulting signs and symptoms.
  • New insight into such pharmacological approaches discussed during the meeting in New Orleans are summarized in the following report, which complements full detailed information contained in the original meeting abstracts available on the society's website.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Delivery Systems. Hematologic Diseases / drug therapy. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Blood Cells / drug effects. Blood Cells / metabolism. Humans

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20467593.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-3993
  • [Journal-full-title] Drugs of today (Barcelona, Spain : 1998)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drugs Today
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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69. Mentkevich GL, Dolgopolov IS, Popa AV, Boiarshinov VK, Ravshanova RS: [Blood stem cell transplantation in pediatric oncology]. Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk; 2001;(9):89-92
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  • Large-dose chemotherapy (LDCT) with auto- and allogenic transplantation of blood stem cells (BSC) in pediatric oncology remains so far the last hope for many patients.
  • At the same time many issues of the place and role of transplantation in pediatric oncology remains unclear.
  • Based on 240 sessions of cytopheresis, the author show that BSC can be sampled from severe pretreated patients despite the drug therapy regimen.
  • Consolidation as LDCT with BSC autotransplantation without cleansing the material from malignant cells is not a sufficient therapeutical measurement in disseminated neuroblastoma.

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  • (PMID = 11676265.001).
  • [ISSN] 0869-6047
  • [Journal-full-title] Vestnik Rossiiskoi akademii meditsinskikh nauk
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vestn. Akad. Med. Nauk SSSR
  • [Language] RUS
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Number-of-references] 11
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70. Murphy T, Hori S, Sewell J, Gnanapragasam VJ: Expression and functional role of negative signalling regulators in tumour development and progression. Int J Cancer; 2010 Dec 01;127(11):2491-9
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  • As such, there has been intense research into developing drugs that can inhibit or attenuate intracellular signalling.
  • A number of studies have now demonstrated significant alterations in expression of negative regulators in malignant tissue in different cancer types.
  • Here, we summarise the evidence for the functional expression of negative signalling regulators in tumour growth and progression and discuss their potential role as cancer biomarkers and targets for novel drug therapy.

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  • (PMID = 20607827.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0215
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G1001961; United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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71. Li QF, Ouyang GL, Liu QR, Hong SG: [Tachyplesin-induced differentiation of human hepatocarcinoma cell line SMMC-7721]. Ai Zheng; 2002 May;21(5):480-3
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  • BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: The study on antitumor activities of marine bioactive substances is an important field in exploiting marine bioactive substances and antitumor drugs.
  • And the induction of tumor cell differentiation is a new strategy for drug therapy of tumors.
  • CONCLUSION: Tachyplesin might effectively reverse the malignant morphology and ultrastructure, change the activity of enzyme and the levels of antigens associated with hepatocarcinoma cell, and induce the differentiation of the human hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells.
  • [MeSH-minor] Alkaline Phosphatase / drug effects. Alkaline Phosphatase / metabolism. Animals. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular. Cell Differentiation / drug effects. Horseshoe Crabs. Humans. Liver Neoplasms. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen / biosynthesis. Tumor Cells, Cultured. alpha-Fetoproteins / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 12452036.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ai Zheng
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Peptides, Cyclic; 0 / Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen; 0 / alpha-Fetoproteins; 118231-04-2 / tachyplesin peptide, Tachypleus tridentatus; EC 3.1.3.1 / Alkaline Phosphatase
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72. Daly BP, Brown RT: Scholarly literature review: management of neurocognitive late effects with stimulant medication. J Pediatr Psychol; 2007 Oct;32(9):1111-26
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Scholarly literature review: management of neurocognitive late effects with stimulant medication.
  • OBJECTIVE: To examine the extant literature on stimulant drug therapy for survivors of childhood cancer during the late-effects period.
  • METHODS: A review of literature is provided on the mechanism of and cognitive toxicities for children and adolescents treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and malignant brain tumors (BT) as well as the pharmacotherapy of stimulant medications, with a specific review of literature on the efficacy and safety of the stimulants for children with ALL and BT.
  • RESULTS: Only four studies were found that have examined the effects of stimulant medication on the cognitive toxicities of childhood survivors of cancer during the late-effects period and only two of these investigations were controlled clinical trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / psychology. Central Nervous System Stimulants / pharmacology. Central Nervous System Stimulants / therapeutic use. Cognition / drug effects. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / psychology

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  • (PMID = 17442692.001).
  • [ISSN] 0146-8693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric psychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pediatr Psychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Central Nervous System Stimulants
  • [Number-of-references] 150
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73. Workman P: New drug targets for genomic cancer therapy: successes, limitations, opportunities and future challenges. Curr Cancer Drug Targets; 2001 May;1(1):33-47
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  • [Title] New drug targets for genomic cancer therapy: successes, limitations, opportunities and future challenges.
  • Cancer drug therapy is undergoing a major transition from the previous pregenomic cytotoxic era to the new postgenomic era.
  • Future mechanism-based therapeutic agents will increasingly be designed to act on molecular targets that are causally involved in the malignant progression of human cancers.
  • Such agents are predicted to show greater therapeutic selectivity for cancer versus normal cells.
  • New cancer drug targets are identified and validated in various ways.
  • Other new technologies, particularly high throughput screening, combinatorial chemistry and gene expression microarrays, are increasing the speed and efficiency of drug development.
  • Examples of new molecular therapeutics showing promising activity in the clinic include Herceptin, Glivec and Iressa.
  • However, many challenges remain as we test the vision of individualised combinatorial genome-based therapy, using drugs targeted to every significant molecular abnormality in cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Design. Genome, Human. Neoplasms / genetics. Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cancer Vaccines / therapeutic use. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Forecasting. Gene Expression Profiling. Genetic Therapy / methods. Humans

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  • (PMID = 12188890.001).
  • [ISSN] 1568-0096
  • [Journal-full-title] Current cancer drug targets
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Cancer Drug Targets
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cancer Vaccines
  • [Number-of-references] 82
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74. Hsu CY: Does non-malignant hypertension cause renal insufficiency? Evidence-based perspective. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens; 2002 May;11(3):267-72
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Does non-malignant hypertension cause renal insufficiency? Evidence-based perspective.
  • While it is clear that malignant hypertension damages the kidneys, the question of whether non-malignant hypertension actually causes renal insufficiency remains controversial.
  • A recent meta-analysis of 10 randomized controlled trials of antihypertensive drug therapy showed that patients randomized to antihypertensive therapy (or more-intensive therapy) did not show a significant reduction in their risk of developing renal dysfunction (relative risk, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.21; P=0.77).
  • A review of the totality of the evidence shows that there is relatively weak support for the thesis that non-malignant hypertension itself is an important de-novo cause (initiator) of renal insufficiency (as opposed to being a promoter of existing renal disease, which is a well established fact).

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  • (PMID = 11981255.001).
  • [ISSN] 1062-4821
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in nephrology and hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Opin. Nephrol. Hypertens.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 36
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75. Bestetti RB, Cardinalli-Neto A: Sudden cardiac death in Chagas' heart disease in the contemporary era. Int J Cardiol; 2008 Dec 17;131(1):9-17
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  • Patients with inducible VT will be better treated with Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) than with amiodarone therapy.
  • For secondary prevention, we suggest that patients with malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias with hemodynamic instability receive ICD therapy.
  • For patients with life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and no hemodynamic instability, however, secondary prevention can be accomplished with ICD therapy or catheter ablation in those with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 30% or less, and with electrophysiologic testing-guided drug therapy or empiric treatment with amiodarone in those with a LVEF of 30% or high.
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 18692919.001).
  • [ISSN] 1874-1754
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Number-of-references] 63
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76. Finsterer J: [Mitochondrial myopathies]. Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr; 2009 Nov;77(11):631-8

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  • The course of mitochondrial myopathies is usually slowly progressive and only rarely rapidly progressive leading to restriction of mobility and requirement of a wheel chair or even muscular respiratory insufficiency.
  • The diagnosis is based on the history, clinical neurologic examination, blood chemical investigations, lactate stress test, electromyography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, muscle biopsy, biochemical investigations of the skeletal muscles, and genetic investigations.
  • Only symptomatic therapy is available and includes physiotherapy and orthopedic supportive devices, diet, symptomatic drug therapy (analgetics, cramp-releasing drugs, antioxidants, lactate-lowering drugs, alternative energy sources, co-factors), avoidance of mitochondrion-toxic drugs, surgery (correction of ptosis or orthopedic problems), and invasive or non-invasive mechanical ventilation.
  • General anesthesia needs to be performed in the same way as in patients with susceptibility for malignant hyperthermia.

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  • [Copyright] Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.
  • (PMID = 19890772.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-3522
  • [Journal-full-title] Fortschritte der Neurologie-Psychiatrie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Muscle Proteins; 9007-49-2 / DNA
  • [Number-of-references] 32
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77. Banerjee S: Cutaneous manifestations in renal failure patients: a case series. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol; 2007 Mar-Apr;73(2):106-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Cutaneous involvement in renal disease is due to a host of factors ranging from metabolic disturbances to immunosuppressive drugs.
  • Our first case had cutaneous cryptococcosis where skin lesions gave a clue to the diagnosis of altered sensorium and underlying meningitis.
  • The second case initially presented with florid warts and was treated successfully but later presented with an explosive recurrence of skin lesions due to malignant transformation.
  • The last case had cutaneous manifestations of drug therapy because of heparin infusion.
  • To conclude, cutaneous manifestations in patients with renal failure are varied and a high degree of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis and aggressive treatment to effectively combat mortality and morbidity.

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  • (PMID = 17456917.001).
  • [ISSN] 0973-3922
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of dermatology, venereology and leprology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
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78. Kerbel RS: Issues regarding improving the impact of antiangiogenic drugs for the treatment of breast cancer. Breast; 2009 Oct;18 Suppl 3:S41-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Issues regarding improving the impact of antiangiogenic drugs for the treatment of breast cancer.
  • One of the major recent clinical advances in cancer treatment is the use of antiangiogenic drugs such as bevacizumab, sorafenib, and sunitinib.
  • Bevacizumab, the monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody, has been approved for the first line treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) when combined with taxane.
  • However, the clinical benefits are modest; despite a doubling of response rates and significant prolongation of progression free survival times, no increase in overall survival is attained.
  • These include rapid development of acquired drug resistance due to the redundancy of proangiogenic growth factors, acceleration of tumor growth after antiangiogenic drug treatments are stopped, and increases in tumor cell malignant aggressiveness driven by mechanisms such as increased tumor hypoxia.
  • Some possible strategies to improve the benefits of antiangiogenic drug therapy are discussed such as prolonging the treatment beyond tumor progression, combination with other therapeutic modalities, e.g. long term ('maintenance') low-dose metronomic chemotherapy or additional targeted/biologic drugs, e.g. trastuzumab.

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  • (PMID = 19914541.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-3080
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA041233; Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Bridged Compounds; 0 / Taxoids; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 1605-68-1 / taxane; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab
  • [Number-of-references] 70
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS687527; NLM/ PMC4540343
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79. SHsirinov ZT, Salikhov IaS, Kurbanov FS: [Diagnosis and surgical treatment of gastric ulcers of proximal localization]. Khirurgiia (Mosk); 2004;(10):20-3

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  • [Title] [Diagnosis and surgical treatment of gastric ulcers of proximal localization].
  • Seventy-two patients had uncomplicated ulcers, complications were diagnosed in 135 including 34 (16,4%) cases of malignant transformation.
  • Successful surgical treatment of a proximal part of the stomach is based on timely complex diagnosis.
  • High rate of complications dictates that conservative treatment of these ulcers should be limited to 6 months - 1 year.
  • Indications for surgery must be also regarded when up-to-date drug therapy is ineffective during 2-3 months.
  • Proximal and distal resection of the stomach are the main methods in surgical treatment of patients with benign ulcers of the cardia and subcardia.
  • In malignant ulcer gastrectomy is recommended.
  • [MeSH-major] Gastrectomy / methods. Stomach Ulcer / diagnosis. Stomach Ulcer / surgery

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  • (PMID = 15477820.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-1207
  • [Journal-full-title] Khirurgiia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Khirurgiia (Mosk)
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia
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80. McFarland KL, Wetzstein GA: Chronic myeloid leukemia therapy: focus on second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cancer Control; 2009 Apr;16(2):132-40
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  • [Title] Chronic myeloid leukemia therapy: focus on second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.
  • RESULTS: Two second-generation TKIs, dasatinib and nilotinib, are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.
  • Both have shown significant clinical activity in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who are resistant or intolerant to imatinib or other therapies.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The TKIs are a superb example of an effective targeted approach for a malignant disease.
  • As more clinical data become available and additional novel agents are developed, specific therapy and dosing strategies for individuals with CML will depend on the status of their disease, the anticipated side effects, and concurrent drug therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Clinical Trials as Topic. Dasatinib. Humans. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Thiazoles / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 19337199.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-2359
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer control : journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Control
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 4-methyl-N-(3-(4-methylimidazol-1-yl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3-((4-pyridin-3-ylpyrimidin-2-yl)amino)benzamide; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrimidines; 0 / Thiazoles; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; RBZ1571X5H / Dasatinib
  • [Number-of-references] 55
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81. Magro CM, Crowson AN, Kovatich AJ, Burns F: Drug-induced reversible lymphoid dyscrasia: a clonal lymphomatoid dermatitis of memory and activated T cells. Hum Pathol; 2003 Feb;34(2):119-29
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  • [Title] Drug-induced reversible lymphoid dyscrasia: a clonal lymphomatoid dermatitis of memory and activated T cells.
  • Certain systemic conditions predispose patients to excessive lymphocyte responses to immune-perturbing drugs, which may progress to malignant lymphoma.
  • We encountered 15 cases of atypical cutaneous T-cell lymphoid hyperplasia in the setting of drug therapy.
  • The lymphoid infiltrates showed reproducible CD7 and/or CD62 K deletion in concert with T cell clonality and variable CD30 positivity-findings similar to those of CTCL-but the rashes resolved or improved substantially after drug modulation.
  • We propose the term "drug-induced reversible lymphoid dyscrasia" to describe this entity.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 12612879.001).
  • [ISSN] 0046-8177
  • [Journal-full-title] Human pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD
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82. Pandolfini C, Bonati M: European paediatric research and children's therapeutic needs. A trial review. Acta Paediatr; 2008 Sep;97(9):1232-7
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  • [Title] European paediatric research and children's therapeutic needs. A trial review.
  • AIM: To evaluate the current paediatric therapeutic research situation in Europe with respect to paediatric needs and drug therapies.
  • METHODS: Data from ongoing and published paediatric drug therapy trials from 2004 to 2007 were evaluated and compared to the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) priority list for studies on paediatric medicinal products.
  • Only four of 25 EMEA priority conditions were addressed, the most common were 'malignant diseases' (18.2% of trials) and 'asthma' (3.2%).
  • CONCLUSION: Paediatric research is being carried out in Europe, but this study found a general lack of overlap between therapeutic needs and research.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Biomedical Research. Child. Child, Preschool. Drug Therapy. European Union. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Infection / drug therapy. Needs Assessment. Parasitic Diseases / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 18489618.001).
  • [ISSN] 0803-5253
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Paediatr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Norway
  • [Number-of-references] 15
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83. Ford AM, Martínez-Ramírez A: Therapeutic opportunities and targets in childhood leukemia. Clin Transl Oncol; 2006 Aug;8(8):560-5
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  • [Title] Therapeutic opportunities and targets in childhood leukemia.
  • Childhood leukemia is a common pediatric cancer in the developed world, the disease is biologically diverse and there is much discussion as to its causal mechanisms.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common subtype and infants with ALL have a greatly increased risk of treatment failure.
  • There are molecular and biological properties of leukemic cells that determine treatment outcome; these can usually be attributed to distinct genetic abnormalities that alter the normal proliferative and survival signals of hematopoietic cells.
  • LSC seem to be surprisingly different from their normal counterparts and therefore are obvious new targets for drug therapy.
  • Therapeutic concepts using monoclonal antibodies have substantially improved response rates in patients with malignant lymphomas and are currently being evaluated in other types of cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Leukemia / genetics. Leukemia / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Humans. Immunization, Passive. Immunotherapy, Active. Infant. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / genetics. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy. Stem Cells

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  • (PMID = 16952844.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-048X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal
  • [Number-of-references] 41
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84. Haegelen C, Godey B, Riffaud L, Le Gall F, Le Page E, Morandi X: [Sinus cavernous syndrome caused by isolated aspergillosis of the sphenoid sinus]. Rev Neurol (Paris); 2003 Feb;159(2):209-11
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Aspergillosis.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Transliterated title] Syndrome du sinus caverneux par aspergillose isolée du sinus sphénoïdal.
  • We report the case of a 75-year-old diabetic woman with a long history of retroorbital pain before she developed a subacute cavernous sinus syndrome.
  • Neuroimaging including CT scan and MRI suggested a malignant tumor involving the sphenoid sinus but the diagnosis of aspergillosis was made intraoperatively and by histopathological examination.
  • Soon after surgical drainage of the sphenoid sinus and systemic anti-fungal drug therapy, both retroorbital pain and cavernous sinus syndrome had completely resolved.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diabetes Complications. Female. Fluorescent Antibody Technique. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Pain / etiology. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 12660576.001).
  • [ISSN] 0035-3787
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue neurologique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev. Neurol. (Paris)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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85. Thomas O, Extramiana F, Milliez P, Cauchemez B, Coumel P, Leenhardt A: [Indications for implantable automatic defibrillators: critical analysis]. Arch Mal Coeur Vaiss; 2003 May;96 Spec No 4:54-61
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators.

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  • The implantable automatic defibrillator (IAD), invented in 1980, has revolutionised the management of patients with malignant ventricular arrhythmias resistant to medical treatment or ablation procedures.
  • Then, the results of recent studies have validated prophylactic implantations of these devices in primary prevention in the post-infarction period (MADIT, MUSTT, MADIT II studies) and have demonstrated the superiority of IAD over antiarrhythmic drug therapy in terms of global survival in patients with severe ventricular arrhythmias (AVID, CIDS, CASH studies).
  • [MeSH-major] Arrhythmias, Cardiac / therapy. Defibrillators, Implantable / utilization. Patient Selection

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  • (PMID = 12852286.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-9683
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives des maladies du coeur et des vaisseaux
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Mal Coeur Vaiss
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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86. Bergler WF, Götte K: Current advances in the basic research and clinical management of juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2000;257(5):263-9
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  • Human papilloma viruses type 6 and 11 are important in the etiology of the papillomata and are most probably transmitted from mother to child during childbirth.
  • Although spontaneous remission is frequent, a rare fatal course because of pulmonary spread or malignant transformation has occurred.
  • CO2 laser evaporation of papillomas and adjuvant drug therapy using lymphoblastoid alpha-interferon are the most common treatment modalities at present.
  • However, several other treatment modalities have been tried with varying success.
  • Recent advances in basic research and different therapeutic approaches are reviewed.
  • [MeSH-major] Laryngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Papilloma / surgery. Papillomaviridae. Papillomavirus Infections / surgery. Tumor Virus Infections / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Laser Therapy

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  • (PMID = 10923940.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-4477
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon-alpha
  • [Number-of-references] 80
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87. Kubota M, Takayanagi N, Kurashima K, Miyahara Y, Hara K, Saito H, Tokunaga D, Ubukata M, Yanagisawa T, Sugita Y, Kawabata Y: [Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in a patient with hyper-IgE syndrome]. Nihon Kokyuki Gakkai Zasshi; 2007 May;45(5):394-8

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  • High-resolution computed tomography, performed upon hospitalization, demonstrated panlobular nodular darkening in left lung fields, and an expanding, blended, map-like darkening near the pleura.
  • Since a Grocott stain-positive cyst was confirmed histopathologically by transbronchial lung biopsy, the patient was given a diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.
  • Drug therapy was initiated with sulfamethoxaxole trimethoprim (Baktar), and on the 58th day, chest CT confirmed that the darkening observed at admission had virtually disappeared.
  • Underlying diseases, such as AIDS, malignant lymphoma and secondary immunodeficiency caused by immunosuppressive agents or adrenocorticosteroids, were excluded as the cause of P. carinii pneumonia based on clinical/laboratory findings.

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  • (PMID = 17554982.001).
  • [ISSN] 1343-3490
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Kokyūki Gakkai zasshi = the journal of the Japanese Respiratory Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nihon Kokyuki Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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88. Yu CQ, Hu BP, Zheng LY, Ding YM: [The analysis and discussion of clinical features and treatment of tumor like Sjögren's syndrome in 46 cases]. Shanghai Kou Qiang Yi Xue; 2001 Dec;10(4):302-4

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [The analysis and discussion of clinical features and treatment of tumor like Sjögren's syndrome in 46 cases].
  • OBJECTIVE: Manifestations and treatment of tumor-like Sjögren's syndrome(SS) is varying, it is difficulty to differentiate it from other diseases.
  • The purpose of this paper was to identify the peculiarity of the manifestations and treatment of tumor like SS.
  • METHODS: The data of 46 cases suffering from tumor like SS had been analyzed retrospectively and discussed with published articles about its clinical features and treatment.
  • The result of treatment showed recurrence site of operation group was out of primary region, recurrence rate was 20%.
  • Effective rate of drug group was about 81%,however, recurrence rate was up to 38%.
  • Malignant change occurred in three cases.
  • CONCLUSION: The local feature of tumor like SS is mass in salivary gland, general manifestations are accompanied in some patients.
  • It presents chronic benign process, malignant change may occur in a few patients.
  • Combined therapy should be taken reasonably, local with general, drug with operation.
  • The diagnosis should be identified before treatment, drug therapy is used at first, and operation is adopted after failure of drug treatment.

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  • (PMID = 14993956.001).
  • [ISSN] 1006-7248
  • [Journal-full-title] Shanghai kou qiang yi xue = Shanghai journal of stomatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Shanghai Kou Qiang Yi Xue
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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89. Barón-Esquivias G, Pedrote A, Cayuela A, Valle JI, Fernández JM, Arana E, Fernández M, Morales F, Burgos J, Martínez-Rubio A: Long-term outcome of patients with asystole induced by head-up tilt test. Eur Heart J; 2002 Mar;23(6):483-9
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

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  • Two different protocols (angles) of tilting (Westminster (60 degrees) n=1124; isoproterenol (80 degrees) n=198)) influenced the time to the syncopal episode (13 (6 X 5, 20 X 5) vs 2 (1, 6 X 5) min, P=0,0005) but not the duration of the asystole.
  • During this period, therapy for asystole featured three different stages: first patients were treated with pacemakers; later drug therapy (metoprolol and/or etilefrine) was recommended; lastly (from 1995), no specific treatment was given.
  • The Kaplan-Meier analysis in patients with and without asystole showed a mean time free of recurrence of 92 X 6 +/- 6 months vs 82 X 6 +/- 4 X 7 months (P=ns).
  • The previous number of syncopes had a significant relationship with recurrences (P=0 X 002), but not therapy.
  • (1) Asystole during head-up tilt test does not imply a malignant outcome and syncope recurrence is low;.
  • (2) pacemaker or drug therapy do not significantly influence outcome which correlates to the previous number of syncopal episodes but not to gender, age, asystole occurrence, asystole duration and timing to asystole during head-up tilt test;.
  • (3) tilting protocol (angle) might influence time to and incidence of asystole during head-up tilt test.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Arrest / diagnosis. Heart Arrest / physiopathology. Syncope / physiopathology. Tilt-Table Test / methods

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 The European Society of Cardiology.
  • [CommentIn] Eur Heart J. 2002 Dec;23(23):1886; author reply 1886-7 [12445538.001]
  • [CommentIn] Eur Heart J. 2002 Mar;23(6):433-7 [11863344.001]
  • (PMID = 11863351.001).
  • [ISSN] 0195-668X
  • [Journal-full-title] European heart journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Heart J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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90. Singh S, Srivastava SK, Bhardwaj A, Owen LB, Singh AP: CXCL12-CXCR4 signalling axis confers gemcitabine resistance to pancreatic cancer cells: a novel target for therapy. Br J Cancer; 2010 Nov 23;103(11):1671-9
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] CXCL12-CXCR4 signalling axis confers gemcitabine resistance to pancreatic cancer cells: a novel target for therapy.
  • BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer cells are highly resistant to drug therapy; however, underlying causes remain largely unknown.
  • We hypothesised that the activation of CXCL12-CXCR4 signalling confers drug resistance to pancreatic cancer cells by potentiating survival.
  • CXCR4 is overexpressed in precancerous/malignant pancreatic lesions and cancer stem cells, and implicated in its pathogenesis.
  • RESULTS: The pancreatic cancer cells treated with gemcitabine exhibited reduced cytotoxicity in the presence of CXCL12 as compared with the cells treated with drug alone.
  • AMD3100 arrested the CXCL12-induced pancreatic cancer cell growth and drug resistance.
  • CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a role of CXCL12-CXCR4 signalling axis in conferring drug resistance to pancreatic cancer cells and suggest that it could serve as a novel therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer therapy, alone and in combination with the cytotoxic drug.

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  • (PMID = 21045835.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R03 CA137513; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA137513
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / CXCL12 protein, human; 0 / CXCR4 protein, human; 0 / Chemokine CXCL12; 0 / Heterocyclic Compounds; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / Receptors, CXCR4; 0 / beta Catenin; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 155148-31-5 / JM 3100; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; EC 2.7.10.2 / Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.11.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt; EC 2.7.11.24 / Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2994230
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91. Reale C, Vernaglione E, Reale CA, Mancini A, Prologo M, Campisi C: Advantages of totally implanted port over impromptu short-term central venous catheter in oncological pain therapy. J Vasc Access; 2003 Apr-Jun;4(2):50-5

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Advantages of totally implanted port over impromptu short-term central venous catheter in oncological pain therapy.
  • Forty non-terminally ill patients affected by urinary malignant pathologies with visceral and bone metastases were enrolled in a prospective and randomised study at the Urology Department of 'La Sapienza' University in Rome, Italy.
  • Such data were used to adjust drug therapy.
  • In this study we hypothesized that a delayed central venous catheter implant, when the pain is at first considerably evident, can interfere negatively with drug treatment.
  • The visual analogue scale (VAS) and the brief pain inventory (BPI) were administered to the patients, and these showed good levels of analgesia in both groups and a greater comfort to the patients with the previously implanted port in comparison with a short-term central venous catheter.
  • In conclusion, PCA achieves a constant level of drugs and enables the patient to voluntary control the pain by means of supplemental boluses.

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  • (PMID = 17642060.001).
  • [ISSN] 1129-7298
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of vascular access
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Vasc Access
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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92. Brennan PA, Mackenzie N, Quintero M: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha in oral cancer. J Oral Pathol Med; 2005 Aug;34(7):385-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NITRIC OXIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • It contributes to local and systemic tumour progression as well as potentially compromising radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Although there are a few conflicting reports of its prognostic significance, over expression of HIF-1alpha seems to play an adverse role in the malignant progression of head and neck cancer by facilitating the adaptation of cells to hypoxia as well as contributing to the invasive properties and angiogenesis in these tumours.
  • The pharmacological manipulation of HIF-1alpha has marked effects on tumour growth, and it could prove to be an important target for drug therapy, both in oral cancer and in other hypoxia-dependent disease states.

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  • (PMID = 16011605.001).
  • [ISSN] 0904-2512
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oral pathology & medicine : official publication of the International Association of Oral Pathologists and the American Academy of Oral Pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Oral Pathol. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / HIF1A protein, human; 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit; 0 / Transcription Factors; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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93. Lake JR, David KM, Steffen BJ, Chu AH, Gordon RD, Wiesner RH: Addition of MMF to dual immunosuppression does not increase the risk of malignant short-term death after liver transplantation. Am J Transplant; 2005 Dec;5(12):2961-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL .

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  • [Title] Addition of MMF to dual immunosuppression does not increase the risk of malignant short-term death after liver transplantation.
  • To examine whether triple- (MMF+Tacro+CS) versus dual-drug therapy (Tacro+CS) is associated with an increased incidence of malignancy, or death due to malignancy, data from a large registry of liver transplant recipients were analyzed.
  • Data from adult primary liver recipients reported to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients between June 1, 1995, and April 30, 2004, and recorded at transplant on triple-drug (n = 9180) or dual-drug (n = 10 099) therapy were included.
  • Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed no significant differences in death due to malignancy 4 years post-transplantation between the treatment groups.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / administration & dosage. Graft Rejection / drug therapy. Immunosuppressive Agents / administration & dosage. Liver Transplantation / mortality. Mycophenolic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Tacrolimus / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / mortality. Registries / statistics & numerical data. Risk Factors. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 16303011.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-6135
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 9242ECW6R0 / mycophenolate mofetil; HU9DX48N0T / Mycophenolic Acid; WM0HAQ4WNM / Tacrolimus
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94. Yang J, Zhou GW, Chen X, Wei Y, Peng CH, Ning G, Li HW: [Diagnosis and treatment of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 related pancreatic endocrine tumors]. Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2009 Mar 1;47(5):329-32
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  • [Title] [Diagnosis and treatment of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 related pancreatic endocrine tumors].
  • OBJECTIVE: To summarize the experience on diagnosis and treatment of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1) related pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET).
  • Drug therapy, surgery and follow-up were applied on the patients.
  • RESULTS: There were 9 patients having insulinomas including 2 cases of multiple insulinomas and 1 case presenting an insulinoma, multiple nonfunctional PET and malignant duodenum gastrinoma with liver metastasis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Well recognizing PET and MEN-1, early diagnosing MEN-1 related PET, appropriately surgical intervention will prove patients' life quality and will help for prolonging patients' survival time.
  • [MeSH-major] Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 / diagnosis. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 / surgery. Pancreatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Pancreatic Neoplasms / surgery


95. Nilsson B, Bümming P, Meis-Kindblom JM, Odén A, Dortok A, Gustavsson B, Sablinska K, Kindblom LG: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: the incidence, prevalence, clinical course, and prognostication in the preimatinib mesylate era--a population-based study in western Sweden. Cancer; 2005 Feb 15;103(4):821-9
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  • BACKGROUND: Recent breakthroughs regarding gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and their pathogenesis have redefined diagnostic criteria and have led to the development of molecularly targeted drug therapy.
  • New treatment options mandate more accurate information regarding the incidence, prevalence, clinical behavior, and prognostic factors of GIST.
  • Forty-four percent of symptomatic, clinically detected GISTs were categorized as high risk (29%) or overtly malignant (15%), with tumor-related deaths occurring in 63% of patients and 83% of patients, respectively (estimated median survival, of 40 months and 16 months, respectively).
  • Tumor-related deaths occurred in only 2 of 170 of patients (1.2%) with very-low-risk, low-risk, or intermediate-risk tumors.
  • The prevalence of all GIST risk groups was 129 per million (31 per million for the high-risk group and the overtly malignant group).
  • Currently existing risk-group stratification systems based on tumor size and mitotic rate delineate GIST patients who have a poor prognosis.
  • Prognostication in patients with GIST can be refined using a proposed risk score based solely on tumor size and proliferative index.
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzamides. Digestive System Surgical Procedures. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Incidence. Ki-67 Antigen / metabolism. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Prevalence. Prognosis. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Survival Analysis. Sweden

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2005 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 15648083.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate
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96. Jovanović A, Jurković L, Zlata O, Gluhak I, Soldo D: [Care for terminal cancer patients at general practitioner office]. Acta Med Croatica; 2007 Feb;61(1):63-8
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  • Therapy and care provided for dying cancer patients by general practitioners at Dugave-Travno GP Office were investigated.
  • There were 79 associated diseases diagnosed in 44 patients, along 43 diseases related to malignant disease in 26 patients.
  • A total of 66 patients were using analgesic therapy, 37 patients continuously, and 48 patients for up to one year.
  • In 56 patients analgesic drugs were administered orally, in 25 parenterally, in 16 rectally, and in 21 patients transdermally.
  • Physicians prescribed opioid therapy in 55 patients: codeine in 2, tramadol in 46, pentazocine in 7, methadone in 5, Kapanol in 15 and fentanyl in 21 patients.
  • Sixty patients received adjuvant drug therapy.
  • Study results showed a high rate of associated diseases and diseases related to malignant disease in cancer patients.
  • Community health services should be improved, and the World Health Organization guidelines on palliative care, management of malignant pain in particular, should be more thoroughly followed.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms / therapy. Palliative Care. Physicians, Family. Terminal Care

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  • (PMID = 17593643.001).
  • [ISSN] 1330-0164
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta medica Croatica : c̆asopis Hravatske akademije medicinskih znanosti
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Med Croatica
  • [Language] hrv
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Croatia
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97. Desaknai S, Lumniczky K, Esik O, Hamada H, Safrany G: Local tumour irradiation enhances the anti-tumour effect of a double-suicide gene therapy system in a murine glioma model. J Gene Med; 2003 May;5(5):377-85
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  • [Title] Local tumour irradiation enhances the anti-tumour effect of a double-suicide gene therapy system in a murine glioma model.
  • BACKGROUND: Gliomas are invasive malignant tumours with poor prognosis.
  • Combination of gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy with existing treatment modalities might open new therapeutic potentials.
  • Subcutaneous or intracranial tumours were established in C57Bl mice by transplanting drug-sensitising gene containing Gl261 cells.
  • RESULTS: In vitro treatment of transduced Gl261 cells with both 5-FU and GC showed enhanced cytotoxic effect compared with single agents.
  • Combination of drug treatments with irradiation greatly increased cytotoxicity.
  • In subcutaneous and intracranial tumours double-agent treatment was more effective than a single drug.
  • Combination with local irradiation highly improved the anti-tumour effect (90-100% survival) even when only part of the tumour cells carried drug-sensitising genes (40-50% survival at 10% rate).
  • Treatment of established tumours with direct intra-tumour Adex-CAUPTK inoculations and intraperitoneal 5-FU, GC injections slowed down tumour progression that was further enhanced by local irradiation.
  • CONCLUSION: The combination of double-suicide gene therapy with local irradiation is a promising tool to eradicate small, residual tumours.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Combined Modality Therapy. Genetic Therapy / methods. Glioma / radiotherapy. Glioma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoviridae / genetics. Animals. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Cell Line. Cell Line, Tumor. Disease Progression. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Fluorouracil / pharmacology. Ganciclovir / pharmacology. Genetic Vectors / genetics. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Radiotherapy / methods. Time Factors

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • (PMID = 12731086.001).
  • [ISSN] 1099-498X
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of gene medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gene Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antiviral Agents; P9G3CKZ4P5 / Ganciclovir; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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98. Gouveris P, Lazaris AC, Papathomas TG, Nonni A, Kyriakou V, Delladetsima J, Patsouris ES, Tsavaris N: Topoisomerase I protein expression in primary colorectal cancer and recurrences after 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2007 Dec;133(12):1011-5
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  • [Title] Topoisomerase I protein expression in primary colorectal cancer and recurrences after 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • PURPOSE: Our aim was to investigate whether chemotherapy with 5-FU induces an alteration in the levels of topoisomerase I (topo I) in colorectal neoplastic tissues METHODS: Twenty-five colorectal cancer patients were included in our study; these had undergone surgical resection of the primary tumor, received post-operatively 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy and then suffered from recurrences.
  • In a standard three-step immunohistochemical procedure, a monoclonal antibody to topo I was applied in both specimens from each patient (one from the primary location and a second one from the recurrence).
  • RESULTS: Malignant cells from the recurrences displayed a statistical significant increase, concerning the levels of topoisomerase I, by comparison with the primary tumors (P=0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Topo I expression may be part of the malignant cells' phenotype in recurrent colorectal carcinomas, suggesting a potential role for Topo I in the acquisition of a metastatic phenotype.
  • The increase of topo I immunohistochemical status is likely to be attributed to 5-FU and given the fact that high levels of topo I correlate with sensitivity to camptothecin, advanced colorectal cancer patients seem to benefit from topo I targeted anticancer drug therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colorectal Neoplasms / enzymology. DNA Topoisomerases, Type I / metabolism. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Recurrence. Sex Factors

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  • (PMID = 17605046.001).
  • [ISSN] 0171-5216
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 5.99.1.2 / DNA Topoisomerases, Type I; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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99. Wong SF, Jakowatz JG, Taheri R: Management of hypertriglyceridemia in patients receiving interferon for malignant melanoma. Ann Pharmacother; 2004 Oct;38(10):1655-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of hypertriglyceridemia in patients receiving interferon for malignant melanoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To describe 3 cases of hypertriglyceridemia associated with the use of interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) for the treatment of malignant melanoma and propose a management plan for dyslipidemia associated with interferon therapy.
  • CASE SUMMARIES: Three case reports of hypertriglyceridemia with or without elevation of total cholesterol level associated with the use of adjuvant IFN-alpha for the treatment of malignant melanoma are described.
  • These patients received IFN-alpha-based adjuvant therapy with doses ranging from 5-20 million units/m(2) for 1-2 years' duration.
  • DISCUSSION: Based on our case reports and published data, hypertriglyceridemia is more frequently associated with longer duration of interferon therapy, although the time of onset is not clearly defined.
  • Lifestyle modifications should be encouraged in patients who develop dyslipidemia, and drug treatment should be considered.
  • If drug therapy is indicated, fibric acid derivatives should be considered as first-line therapy.
  • Even at lower doses, this class of drug seems to be effective in managing severe triglyceride elevations in these patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Hypertriglyceridemia is a rare but potentially severe adverse consequence of interferon therapy.
  • Patients with malignant melanoma who develop dyslipidemia while receiving interferon should be considered for antidyslipidemic management.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Hypertriglyceridemia / chemically induced. Hypolipidemic Agents / therapeutic use. Interferon-alpha / adverse effects. Melanoma / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15304625.001).
  • [ISSN] 1060-0280
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Hypolipidemic Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha
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100. Sussman SK, Kho SA, Cersosimo E, Heimann A: Coexistence of malignant struma ovarii and Graves' disease. Endocr Pract; 2002 Sep-Oct;8(5):378-80
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  • [Title] Coexistence of malignant struma ovarii and Graves' disease.
  • OBJECTIVE: To report an unusual case of hyperthyroidism from Graves' disease that was coexistent with malignant struma ovarii.
  • METHODS: We summarize the clinical history, physical findings, laboratory data, imaging studies, pathologic features, and treatment in a patient with recurrent hyperthyroidism and discuss the incidence of ovarian tumors of various histologic origins, including thyroid tissue (that is, struma ovarii).
  • RESULTS: Five years after diagnosis of Graves' disease and resolution of symptoms with 1 year of antithyroid drug therapy, a 53-year-old woman had recurrence of palpitations, tremors, and weight loss.
  • Total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy revealed a 7.5-cm cystic right ovary that contained a 1.0-cm struma ovarii with a 0.4-cm nodule of follicular variant papillary thyroid carcinoma within it.
  • CONCLUSION: The concomitant presence of Graves' disease complicates the management of struma ovarii and raises interesting questions about treatment and prognosis.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antithyroid Agents / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy. Methimazole / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Ovariectomy. Recurrence. Thyroxine / blood

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  • (PMID = 15251841.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-891X
  • [Journal-full-title] Endocrine practice : official journal of the American College of Endocrinology and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Endocr Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antithyroid Agents; 554Z48XN5E / Methimazole; Q51BO43MG4 / Thyroxine
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